Search results for 'speckled hen' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  91
    Bence Nanay (2009). How Speckled is the Hen? Analysis 69 (3):499-502.
    We can see a number of entities without seeing a determinate number of entities. For example, when we see the speckled hen, we do not see it as having a determinate number of speckles, although we do see it as having a lot of speckles. How is this possible? I suggest a contextualist answer that differs both from Michael Tye's and from Fred Dretske's.
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  2. Michael Tye (2009). A New Look at the Speckled Hen. Analysis 69 (2):258-263.
    We owe the problem of the speckled hen to Gilbert Ryle. It was suggested to A.J. Ayer by Ryle in connection with Ayer’s account of seeing. Suppose that you are standing before a speckled hen with your eyes trained on it. You are in good light and nothing is obstructing your view. You see the hen in a single glance. The hen has 47 speckles on its facing side, let us say, and the hen ap­ pears speckled (...)
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  3. Ted Poston (2007). Acquaintance and the Problem of the Speckled Hen. Philosophical Studies 132 (2):331 - 346.
    This paper responds to Ernest Sosa's recent criticism of Richard Fumerton's acquaintance theory. Sosa argues that Fumerton's account of non-inferential justification falls prey to the problem of the speckled hen. I argue that Sosa's criticisms are both illuminating and interesting but that Fumerton's theory can escape the problem of the speckled hen. More generally, the paper shows that an internalist account of non-inferential justification can survive the powerful objections of the Sellarsian dilemma and the problem of the (...) hen. (shrink)
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  4.  74
    Michael Pace (2010). Foundationally Justified Perceptual Beliefs and the Problem of the Speckled Hen. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 91 (3):401-441.
    Many epistemologists accept some version of the following foundationalist epistemic principle: if one has an experience as if p then one has prima facie justification that p. I argue that this principle faces a challenge that it inherits from classical foundationalism: the problem of the speckled hen. The crux of the problem is that some properties are presented in experience at a level of determinacy that outstrips our recognitional capacities. I argue for an amendment to the principle that adds (...)
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  5.  29
    Ralph Kennedy (1993). Professor Chisholm and the Problem of the Speckled Hen. Journal of Philosophical Research 18:143-147.
    The Problem of the Speckled Hen is a potential stumbling-block for any philosophical treatment of perceptual certainty. Roderick Chisholm argues in the third edition of his Theory of Knowledge that the Speckled Hen is not a problem for the account of the perceptually certain contained in that book. In this note, I argue that Chisholm’s defense of his account does not work.
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  6. Roderick Chisholm (1942). The Problem of the Speckled Hen. Mind 51 (204):368-373.
  7.  74
    Michael Tye (2010). Up Close with the Speckled Hen. Analysis 70 (2):283-286.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  8.  56
    Roderick Chisholm (1942). Discussions: The Problem of the Speckled Hen. Mind 51 (204):368-373.
  9.  15
    David Martel Johnson (1971). Another Perspective on the Speckled Hen. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 1 (December):235-244.
  10. Ted Poston (2007). Acquaintance and the Problem of the Speckled Hen. Philosophical Studies 132 (2):331-346.
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  11. M. Tye (2009). A New Look at the Speckled Hen. Analysis 69 (2):258-263.
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  12. Susanna Schellenberg (forthcoming). Phenomenal Evidence and Factive Evidence. Philosophical Studies:1-22.
    Perceptions guide our actions and provide us with evidence of the world around us. Illusions and hallucinations can mislead us: they may prompt as to act in ways that do not mesh with the world around us and they may lead us to form false beliefs about that world. The capacity view provides an account of evidence that does justice to these two facts. It shows in virtue of what illusions and hallucinations mislead us and prompt us to act. Moreover, (...)
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  13. Chris Tucker (2010). Why Open-Minded People Should Endorse Dogmatism. Philosophical Perspectives 24 (1):529-545.
    Open-minded people should endorse dogmatism because of its explanatory power. Dogmatism holds that, in the absence of defeaters, a seeming that P necessarily provides non-inferential justification for P. I show that dogmatism provides an intuitive explanation of four issues concerning non-inferential justification. It is particularly impressive that dogmatism can explain these issues because prominent epistemologists have argued that it can’t address at least two of them. Prominent epistemologists also object that dogmatism is absurdly permissive because it allows a (...)
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  14. Declan Smithies (2012). Mentalism and Epistemic Transparency. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (4):723-741.
    Questions about the transparency of evidence are central to debates between factive and non-factive versions of mentalism about evidence. If all evidence is transparent, then factive mentalism is false, since no factive mental states are transparent. However, Timothy Williamson has argued that transparency is a myth and that no conditions are transparent except trivial ones. This paper responds by drawing a distinction between doxastic and epistemic notions of transparency. Williamson's argument may show that no conditions are doxastically transparent, but it (...)
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  15. Ned Block (2013). The Grain of Vision and the Grain of Attention. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):170-184.
    Often when there is no attention to an object, there is no conscious perception of it either, leading some to conclude that conscious perception is an attentional phenomenon. There is a well-known perceptual phenomenon—visuo-spatial crowding, in which objects are too closely packed for attention to single out one of them. This article argues that there is a variant of crowding—what I call ‘‘identity-crowding’’—in which one can consciously see a thing despite failure of attention to it. This conclusion, together with new (...)
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  16.  1
    Józef Hen, Natalia Janota & Benjamin Borek (2007). The Royal Constitution. Dialogue and Universalism 17 (5/6):43-52.
    Stanisław August Poniatowski (1732–1798) was the last king of Poland. He reigned from 1764 to 1795 and, during this time the first Polish constitution, the first in Europe, was established. These excerpts come from Hen’s book My Friend the King (Mój Przyjaciel Król). The book is narrated by the fictional Gaston Fabre, who is a close confidant of the King and is privy to all the turmoil and machinations at Court in months and years preceding the signing of the constitution.
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  17.  15
    Harmen Ghijsen (2015). Grounding Perceptual Dogmatism: What Are Perceptual Seemings? Southern Journal of Philosophy 53 (2):196-215.
    Perceptual Dogmatism holds that if it perceptually seems to S that p, then S has immediate prima facie justification for the belief that p. Various philosophers have made the notion of a perceptual seeming more precise by distinguishing perceptual seemings from both sensations and beliefs to accommodate a) the epistemic difference between perceptual judgments of novices and experts, and, b) the problem of the speckled hen. Using somewhat different terminology, perceptual seemings are supposed to be high-level percepts instead of (...)
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  18. John Bengson, Enrico Grube & Daniel Z. Korman (2011). A New Framework for Conceptualism. Noûs 45 (1):167 - 189.
    Conceptualism is the thesis that, for any perceptual experience E, (i) E has a Fregean proposition as its content and (ii) a subject of E must possess a concept for each item represented by E. We advance a framework within which conceptualism may be defended against its most serious objections (e.g., Richard Heck's argument from nonveridical experience). The framework is of independent interest for the philosophy of mind and epistemology given its implications for debates regarding transparency, relationalism and representationalism, demonstrative (...)
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  19.  7
    Józef Hen & Elżbieta Foeller (1980). On Montaigne — Somewhat Differently. Dialectics and Humanism 7 (1):93-104.
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  20.  3
    Yitzhak Hen (2003). Sarah Hamilton, The Practice of Penance, 900–1050. Woodbridge, Eng., and Rochester, N.Y.: Boydell and Brewer, for the Royal Historical Society, 2001. Pp. Xiii, 275; Black-and-White Frontispiece and Tables. $75. [REVIEW] Speculum 78 (2):511-512.
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  21.  3
    Yitzhak Hen (2010). Roger Collins, Die Fredegar-Chroniken.(Monumenta Germaniae Historica, Studien und Texte, 44.) Hannover: Hahnsche Buchhandlung, 2007. Pp. xv, 152.€ 20. [REVIEW] Speculum 85 (1):124-125.
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  22.  2
    Yitzhak Hen (1993). Clovis, Gregory of Tours, and Pro-Merovingian Propaganda. Revue Belge de Philologie Et D’Histoire 71 (2):271-276.
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  23.  2
    Yitzhak Hen (1999). A Mold Angenendt 's History of Medieval Religiosity. Revue Belge de Philologie Et D’Histoire 77 (2):473-479.
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  24.  1
    Yitzhak Hen (1998). Holy Land Pilgrims From Frankish Gaul. Revue Belge de Philologie Et D’Histoire 76 (2):291-306.
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  25.  1
    Hedva Braunstein-Bercovitz, Itay Hen & R. E. Lubow (2004). Brief Report. Cognition and Emotion 18 (8):1135-1144.
  26.  2
    R. Bogdan (ed.) (1985). Roderick M. Chisholm. Reidel.
    BIBLIOGRAPHY OF RODERICK M. CHISHOLM 1941 (a) 'Sextus Empiricus and Modern Empiricism', Philosophy of Science VIII, 371-384. 1942 (a) 'The Problem of the Speckled Hen', Mind u, 368-373. 1943 (a) Review of 'Lewin's Topological and Vector ...
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  27. Józef Hen (2001). A Night in Februrary, A Night in May. Dialogue and Universalism 11 (9-10):219-224.
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  28. Yitzhak Hen (2003). Robert Godding, Prêtres En Gaule Mérovingienne. Brussels: Société des Bollandistes, 2001. Paper. Pp. Lxviii, 559 Plus 1 Map; Tables. €110. [REVIEW] Speculum 78 (3):885-887.
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  29. J. Hen (1999). The Jester--The Great Man. Dialogue and Universalism 9:94-110.
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  30. Nir Madjar, Adi Nave & Shiran Hen (2013). Are Teachers' Psychological Control, Autonomy Support and Autonomy Suppression Associated with Students' Goals?☆. Educational Studies 39 (1):43-55.
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  31. Catherine Cornbleth & Dexter Waugh (1995). The Great Speckled Bird: Multicultural Politics and Education Policymaking. Routledge.
    This unique volume takes readers behind the scenes for an "insider/outsider" view of education policymaking in action. Two state-level case studies of social studies curriculum reform and textbook policy illustrate how curriculum decision making becomes an arena in which battles are fought over national values and priorities. Written by a New York education professor and a California journalist, the text offers a rare blend of academic and journalistic voices. The "great speckled bird" is the authors' counter-symbol to the bald (...)
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  32. Richard Fumerton (2005). Speckled Hens and Objects of Acquaintance. Philosophical Perspectives 19 (1):121–138.
  33.  17
    Christine Parker, Carly Brunswick & Jane Kotey (2013). The Happy Hen on Your Supermarket Shelf. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (2):165-186.
    This paper investigates what “free-range” eggs are available for sale in supermarkets in Australia, what “free-range” means on product labelling, and what alternative “free-range” offers to cage production. The paper concludes that most of the “free-range” eggs currently available in supermarkets do not address animal welfare, environmental sustainability, and public health concerns but, rather, seek to drive down consumer expectations of what these issues mean by balancing them against commercial interests. This suits both supermarkets and egg producers because it does (...)
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  34. Peter Markie (2009). Classical Foundationalism and Speckled Hens. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (1):190-206.
  35.  40
    Yehuda Halper (2013). Il_ Commento Medio _di Averroè Alla_ Metafisica _di Aristotele Nella Tradizione Ebraica: Edizione Delle Versioni Ebraiche Medievali di Zeraḥyah Ḥen E di Qalonymos Ben Qalonymos Con Introduzione Storica E Filologica_ (Averroes' _Middle Commentary_ on Aristotle's _Metaphysics in the Hebrew Tradition: Edition of the Medieval Hebrew Versions by Zeraḥyah Ḥen and Qalonymos Ben Qalonymos, Together with a Historical And. Philosophy East and West 63 (1):96-99.
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  36.  72
    Jeremy Fantl & Robert J. Howell (2003). Sensations, Swatches, and Speckled Hens. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 84 (4):371-383.
  37.  5
    Clotilde Calabi (2011). The Blurred Hen. In Anne Reboul (ed.), Philosophical Papers Dedicated to Kevin Mulligan.
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  38.  16
    Yehuda Halper (2013). Il Commento Medio di Averroè Alla Metafisica di Aristotele Nella Tradizione Ebraica: Edizione Delle Versioni Ebraiche Medievali di Zeraḥyah Ḥen E di Qalonymos Ben Qalonymos Con Introduzione Storica E Filologica (Averroes' Middle Commentary on Aristotle's Metaphysics in the Hebrew Tradition: Edition of the Medieval Hebrew Versions by Zeraḥyah Ḥen and Qalonymos Ben Qalonymos, Together with a Historical and Philological Introduction). Philosophy East and West 63 (1):96-99.
    Mauro Zonta's long awaited work Il Commento medio di Averroè alla Metafisica di Aristotele nella tradizione ebraica is really three books in one: a historical and (...)philological account of the two medieval Hebrew translations of Averroes' Middle Commentary on Aristotle's Metaphysics and editions of both translations. The Arabic of Averroes' Middle Commentary on Aristotle's Metaphysics is not extant apart from a few fragments (see vol. 1, pp. 13-5). Nor is there a direct Latin translation of the Arabicindeed, Zonta states that there is no evidence of reliable citations of the work by any Latin authors (vol. 1, p. 18). Zonta's book, then, presents the only way of accessing Averroes' monumental work in its .. (shrink)
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  39.  13
    Michael C. Morris (2006). The Ethics and Politics of the Caged Layer Hen Debate in New Zealand. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (5):495-514.
    Changes in attitudes toward animal welfare, with a greater emphasis on the importance of allowing animals to express normal patterns of behavior has led to an examination of the practice of keeping hens in battery cages. There is widespread scientific consensus that the conditions of confinement and the barren nature of battery cages severely restrict hens’ behavioral repertoire, and are thus detrimental to their welfare. The New Zealand Animal Welfare Act 1999, stipulates that animals must have “the opportunity to display (...)
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  40.  2
    Jay F. Rosenberg (2004). (RTSH)," Red Triangles and Speckled Hens: Critical Notice of BonJour and Sosa on Epistemic Justification". International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (4):463 - 77.
  41.  8
    Heike Sefrin-Weis (2008). Colloquium 8: Pros Hen and the Foundations of Aristotelian Metaphysics. Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):261-300.
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  42. David J. Wolfson & Mariann Sullivan (2004). Foxes in the Hen House: Animals, Agribusiness, and the Law: A Modern American Fable. In Cass R. Sunstein & Martha Craven Nussbaum (eds.), Animal Rights: Current Debates and New Directions. Oxford University Press 205--206.
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  43.  16
    Peter J. Cataldo (1984). Plato, Aristotle, and Pros Hen Equivocity. Modern Schoolman 61 (4):237-247.
  44.  7
    David J. Wolfson & Mariann Sullivan (2004). Foxes in the Hen House. In Cass R. Sunstein & Martha Craven Nussbaum (eds.), Animal Rights: Current Debates and New Directions. Oxford University Press 205--228.
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  45.  9
    Martha Husain (1981). The Multiplicity in Unity of Being Qua Being in Aristotle's Pros Hen Equivocity. New Scholasticism 55 (2):208-218.
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  46. Massimo Piattelli-Palmarini (1990). Which Came First, the Egg-Problem or the Hen-Solution? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):84-86.
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  47.  3
    Gertrud Jaron Lewis (1993). Sabine B. Spitzlei, Erfahrungsraum Hen: Zur Mystik des Zisterzienserinnenklosters Helftaim 13. Jahrhundert.(Mystik in Geschichte und Gegenwart, Abt. 1, 9.) Stuttgart-Bad Cannstatt: Frommann-Holzboog, 1991. Pp. 201. DM 58. [REVIEW] Speculum 68 (4):1220-1222.
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  48.  6
    Stephen Benin (1999). A Hen Crowing Like a Cock: “Popular Religion” and Jewish Law. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 8 (2):261-281.
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  49.  6
    Simon Hornblower (1988). The Greek 'Third World' Hans-Joachim Gehrke: Jenseits von At Hen Und Sparta. Das Dritte Griechenland Und Seine Staatenwelt. Pp. 216. Munich: Beck, 1986. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 38 (01):87-89.
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  50.  2
    Mayke de Jong (1999). Yitzhak Hen, Culture and Religion in Merovingian Gaul, AD 481–751.(Cultures, Beliefs and Traditions: Medieval and Early Modern Peoples, 1.) Leiden, New York, and Cologne: EJ Brill, 1995. Pp. Xiv, 308; Tables. $80. [REVIEW] Speculum 74 (2):428-429.
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