Search results for 'standardized tests' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  8
    Cris Mayo (2005). Testing Resistance: Busno-Cratic Power, Standardized Tests, and Care of the Self. Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (3):357–363.
    I will argue in what follows, following the insights of James Marshall on busno‐cratic power, that resistance to this new power is already well underway, and that this resistance is potentially problematic and potentially transgressive 1 . The self is not only a chooser in busno‐cratic land, it is also re‐commodifying itself and in so doing, beginning to struggle at the limits of its commodified situation. I will argue that commodified selves, as much as they are constrained, are also potent (...)
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  2. C. J. Fazzaro (2006). Freedom of Speech, American Public Education, and Standardized Tests: A Critical Enquiry. Journal of Thought 41 (4):11.
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  3.  1
    Gail McKoon & Roger Ratcliff (2016). Adults with Poor Reading Skills: How Lexical Knowledge Interacts with Scores on Standardized Reading Comprehension Tests. Cognition 146:453-469.
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  4. Gilbert Plumer (2001). Phenomenological Argumentative Structure. Argumentation 15 (2):173-189.
    The nontechnical ability to identify or match argumentative structure seems to be an important reasoning skill. Instruments that have questions designed to measure this skill include major standardized tests for graduate school admission, for example, the United States-Canadian Law School Admission Test (LSAT), the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE), and the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT). Writers and reviewers of such tests need an appropriate foundation for developing such questions--they need a proper representation of phenomenological argumentative structure--for legitimacy, (...)
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  5. Gilbert Plumer (1999). Necessary Assumptions. Informal Logic 19 (1):41-61.
    In their book EVALUATING CRITICAL THINKING Stephen Norris and Robert Ennis say: “Although it is tempting to think that certain [unstated] assumptions are logically necessary for an argument or position, they are not. So do not ask for them.” Numerous writers of introductory logic texts as well as various highly visible standardized tests (e.g., the LSAT and GRE) presume that the Norris/Ennis view is wrong; the presumption is that many arguments have (unstated) necessary assumptions and that readers and (...)
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  6. Kenneth Olson & Gilbert Plumer (2002). What Constitutes a Formal Analogy? In Hans V. Hansen, Christopher W. Tindale, J. Anthony Blair, Ralph H. Johnson & Robert C. Pinto (eds.), Argumentation and its Applications [CD-ROM]. Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation 1-8.
    There is ample justification for having analogical material in standardized tests for graduate school admission, perhaps especially for law school. We think that formal-analogy questions should compare different scenarios whose structure is the same in terms of the number of objects and the formal properties of their relations. The paper deals with this narrower question of how legitimately to have formal analogy test items, and the broader question of what constitutes a formal analogy in general.
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  7. Massimo Pigliucci (2012). Testing My Own Morality. Philosophy Now 91 (Jul/Aug):41-41.
    Apparently, I’m a righteous son of a bitch, morally speaking. At least that’s the conclusion I would have to reach if I trusted the results of a morality test I took at the BBC website (bbc.co.uk/labuk/experiments/morality). The test was devised to collect data for a “new theory” that seeks to make sense of human morality in terms of a super-organism concept. Briefly, the idea is that “we, as individuals, behave as if we are part of a bigger ‘superorganism’ when we (...)
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  8. Gilbert Plumer & Kenneth Olson (2007). Reasoning From Conflicting Sources. In Hans V. Hansen, Christopher W. Tindale, J. Anthony Blair, Ralph H. Johnson & David M. Godden (eds.), Dissensus and the Search for Common Ground. Proceedings 2007 [CD-ROM]. Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation 1-9.
    One might ask of two or more texts—what can be inferred from them, taken together? If the texts happen to contradict each other in some respect, then the unadorned answer of standard logic is EVERYTHING. But it seems to be a given that we often successfully reason with inconsistent information from multiple sources. The purpose of this paper is to attempt to develop an adequate approach to accounting for this given.
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  9.  14
    James N. Butcher & Kenneth S. Pope (1993). Seven Issues in Conducting Forensic Assessments: Ethical Responsibilities in Light of New Standards and New Tests. Ethics and Behavior 3 (3 & 4):267 – 288.
    The publication of a new ethics code for the American Psychological Association (1992), new guidelines (Committee on Ethical Guidelines for Forensic Psychologists, 1991), and two new versions of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (the MMPI-2, Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989; and the MMPI-A, Butcher et al., 1992) provide an opportunity to review ethical aspects of forensic assessment. Seven major issues-appropriate graduate training, competence in the use of standardized tests, using tests that fit the task, using (...)
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  10.  17
    Glenn Fulcher & Fred Davidson (2008). Tests in Life and Learning: A Deathly Dialogue. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (3):407–417.
    This article is an imaginary Socratic dialogue between J. S. Mill and Michel Foucault, principally concerning educational assessment.
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  11. Michèle N. Schubiger, Florian L. Wüstholz, André Wunder & Judith M. Burkart (2015). High Emotional Reactivity Toward an Experimenter Affects Participation, but Not Performance, in Cognitive Tests with Common Marmosets. Animal Cognition 18 (3):701-712.
    When testing primates with cognitive tasks, it is usually not considered that subjects differ markedly in terms of emotional reactivity toward the experimenter, which potentially affects a subject’s cognitive performance. We addressed this issue in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus), a monkey species in which males tend to show stronger emotional reactivity in testing situations, whereas females have been reported to outperform males in cognitive tasks. In a two-phase experiment, we first quantified the emotional reactivity of 14 subjects toward four different (...)
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  12.  20
    Ann Dowker, Sheila Bala & Delyth Lloyd (2008). Linguistic Influences on Mathematical Development: How Important is the Transparency of the Counting System? Philosophical Psychology 21 (4):523 – 538.
    Wales uses languages with both regular (Welsh) and irregular (English) counting systems. Three groups of 6- and 8-year-old Welsh children with varying degrees of exposure to the Welsh language—those who spoke Welsh at both home and school; those who spoke Welsh only at home; and those who spoke only English—were given standardized tests of arithmetic and a test of understanding representations of two-digit numbers. Groups did not differ on the arithmetic tests, but both groups of Welsh speakers (...)
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  13.  6
    Tyson E. Lewis (2016). The Pedagogical Function of Art as Interpretation. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):57-71.
    Today, art and education have precarious statuses. Arts programs are being cut from the curriculum at an alarming rate. While the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 acknowledged the arts as a core academic subject, the arts were quickly eclipsed by the push toward quantifiable improvements on standardized tests. How should art educators respond to this urgent situation? While some might retreat back to an art-for-art’s-sake perspective, others find new justifications for the arts through the discourses of (...)
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  14. Lesley A. Jacobs (2003). Pursuing Equal Opportunities: The Theory and Practice of Egalitarian Justice. Cambridge University Press.
    Pursuing equality is an important challenge for any modern democratic society but this challenge faces two sets of difficulties: the theoretical question of what sort of equality to pursue and for whom; and the practical question concerning which legal and political institutions are the most appropriate vehicles for implementing egalitarian social policy and thus realizing egalitarian justice. This book offers original and innovative contributions to the debate about equality of opportunity. The first part of the book sets out a theory (...)
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  15.  16
    Peter Cramer (2016). Story Problems: Where Do the Agonists of the Dialogue Model of Argument Interact? Argumentation 30 (2):129-144.
    When discussing dialogue, argumentation researchers rarely draw the distinction between the story world and interactional world. While mediators often help to shape the interactions among agonists in the emerging flow of spoken discourse, writers of postulated dialogues narrate them, constructing a story world that depicts the agonists, depicts their utterances and their circumstances. In this paper, I ask where the agonists of the dialogue model of argument interact, and I show that they often interact in the story world of postulated (...)
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  16. Harry J. Gensler (2010). Introduction to Logic. Routledge.
    _Introduction to Logic_ combines likely the broadest scope of any logic textbook available with clear, concise writing and interesting examples and arguments. Its key features, all retained in the Second Edition, include: • simpler ways to test arguments than those available in competing textbooks, including the star test for syllogisms • a wide scope of materials, making it suitable for introductory logic courses or intermediate classes • engaging and easy-to-understand examples and arguments, drawn from everyday life as well as from (...)
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  17.  28
    Avigail Eisenberg (2006). Education and the Politics of Difference: Iris Young and the Politics of Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (1):7–23.
    Three key contributions of Iris Young to democratic political theory, and three challenges that have arisen in response to Young's theory, are examined here in relation to education. First, Young has argued that oppression and domination, not distributive inequality, ought to guide discussions about justice. Second, eliminating oppression requires establishing a politics that welcomes difference by dismantling and reforming structures, processes, concepts and categories that sustain difference‐blind, impartial, neutral, universal politics and policies. The infatuation with merit and standardized (...), both of which are central to measuring educational achievement, are chief amongst the targets in need of reform. Third, a politics of difference requires restructuring the division of labour and decision‐making so as to include disadvantaged social groups but allow them to contribute without foregoing their particularities. The challenges that have arisen in response to Young's theory are first, that difference is merely another way of getting at inequality of resources or opportunities, and if it is not, then, second, a politics of difference values difference for the sake of difference rather than for the sake of alleviating social disadvantage. Third, in theory and in practice a politics that focuses on difference putatively jeopardizes a politics whose aim is to improve the redistribution of resources. (shrink)
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  18.  19
    Judith Mulholland *, Paul Hansen & Eugene Kaminski (2004). Do Single-Gender Classrooms in Coeducational Settings Address Boys' Underachievement? An Australian Study. Educational Studies 30 (1):19-32.
    This paper reports a research project developed in partnership with the Principal and Leadership Team of an Australian secondary school. It monitored a school-based initiative designed to address the underachievement of male students. Students in Year 9 selected single-gender or coeducational classes in mathematics and English during the second half of a school year. Student scores in standardized tests and school-based assessment in these subjects were obtained before and after the establishment of the initiative. Results indicate no significant (...)
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  19.  69
    Rafe Esquith (2007). Teach Like Your Hair's on Fire: The Methods and Madness Inside Room 56. Viking.
    From one of America’s most celebrated educators, an inspiring guide to transforming every child’s education In a Los Angeles neighborhood plagued by guns, gangs, and drugs, there is an exceptional classroom known as Room 56. The fifth graders inside are first-generation immigrants who live in poverty and speak English as a second language. They also play Vivaldi, perform Shakespeare, score in the top 1 percent on standardized tests, and go on to attend Ivy League universities. Rafe Esquith is (...)
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  20.  10
    Jeanne Tunks (2001). The Effect of Training in Test Item Writing on Test Performance of Junior High Students. Educational Studies 27 (2):129-142.
    High stakes testing, a phenomena born out of intense accountability across the United States, produces instructional settings that marginalize both curriculum and instruction. Teachers and other school personnel have minimized instruction to drill and practice in an effort to raise standardized and criterion referenced test scores. This study presents an alternative to current practice that engages students in learning and increases their awareness of the internal aspects of standardized tests. The Test Item Construction Model guides students through (...)
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  21. Robert K. Fullinwider & Judith Lichtenberg (2004). Leveling the Playing Field: Justice, Politics, and College Admissions. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Leveling the Playing Field examines the admissions policies of contemporary American colleges and universities in light of the assumption that enhancing the educational opportunities of lower-income and minority students would make American society more just. The book evaluates controversies about such issues as the nature of merit, the missions of universities, affirmative action, the role of standardized tests, legacy preference, early decision, financial aid, the test-prep industry, and athletics.
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  22.  34
    Michele S. Moses & Michael J. Nanna (2007). The Testing Culture and the Persistence of High Stakes Testing Reforms. Education and Culture 23 (1):55-72.
    : The purposes of this critical analysis are to clarify why high stakes testing reforms have become so prevalent in the United States and to explain the connection between current federal and state emphases on standardized testing reforms and educational opportunities. The article outlines the policy context for high stakes examinations, as well as the ideas of testing and accountability as major tenets of current education reform and policy. In partial explanation of the widespread acceptance and use of (...) tests in the United States, we argue that there is a pervasive testing culture, in addition to other contributing factors such as administrative utility, profit motives, and political ideology. Finally, we offer a critique of high stakes testing reforms in light of concerns about equality of educational opportunity. (shrink)
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  23. Harry J. Gensler (2012). Introduction to Logic. Routledge.
    _Introduction to Logic_ combines likely the broadest scope of any logic textbook available with clear, concise writing and interesting examples and arguments. Its key features, all retained in the Second Edition, include: • simpler ways to test arguments than those available in competing textbooks, including the star test for syllogisms • a wide scope of materials, making it suitable for introductory logic courses or intermediate classes • engaging and easy-to-understand examples and arguments, drawn from everyday life as well as from (...)
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  24. Harry J. Gensler (2017). Introduction to Logic. Routledge.
    Introduction to Logic is clear and concise, uses interesting examples, and has easy-to-use proof methods. Its key features, retained in this Third Edition, include: simpler ways to test arguments, including an innovative proof method and the star test for syllogisms; a wide scope of materials, suiting it for introductory or intermediate courses; engaging examples, from philosophy and everyday life; useful for self-study and preparation for standardized tests, like the LSAT; a reasonable price ; and exercises that correspond to (...)
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  25. Lesley A. Jacobs (2012). Pursuing Equal Opportunities: The Theory and Practice of Egalitarian Justice. Cambridge University Press.
    Pursuing equality is an important challenge for any modern democratic society but this challenge faces two sets of difficulties: the theoretical question of what sort of equality to pursue and for whom; and the practical question concerning which legal and political institutions are the most appropriate vehicles for implementing egalitarian social policy and thus realizing egalitarian justice. This book offers original and innovative contributions to the debate about equality of opportunity. The first part of the book sets out a theory (...)
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  26. Lesley A. Jacobs (2003). Pursuing Equal Opportunities: The Theory and Practice of Egalitarian Justice. Cambridge University Press.
    Pursuing equality is an important challenge for any modern democratic society but this challenge faces two sets of difficulties: the theoretical question of what sort of equality to pursue and for whom; and the practical question concerning which legal and political institutions are the most appropriate vehicles for implementing egalitarian social policy and thus realizing egalitarian justice. This book offers original and innovative contributions to the debate about equality of opportunity. The first part of the book sets out a theory (...)
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  27. Judith Mulholland*, Paul Hansen & Eugene Kaminski (2004). Do Single-Gender Classrooms in Coeducational Settings Address Boys' Underachievement? An Australian Study. Educational Studies 30 (1):19-32.
    This paper reports a research project developed in partnership with the Principal and Leadership Team of an Australian secondary school. It monitored a school-based initiative designed to address the underachievement of male students. Students in Year 9 selected single-gender or coeducational classes in mathematics and English during the second half of a school year. Student scores in standardized tests and school-based assessment in these subjects were obtained before and after the establishment of the initiative. Results indicate no significant (...)
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  28.  1
    T. S. Poetter (2006). The Education of Sam Sanders. Hamilton Books.
    Set in 2029, The Education of Sam Sanders tells the story of an 8th grader searching for meaning in his school experiences. In a public school system beset by the finality and rigidity of standardized tests and curriculums, Sam Sanders, with the help of his teacher and mother, defies the system and creates something new: a curriculum that enlightens rather than categorizes students. In this hopeful yet frightening look at an educational future not too far from our own, (...)
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  29.  11
    Roger C. Schank (2004). Making Minds Less Well Educated Than Our Own. Lawrence Erlbaum.
    In the author's words: "This book is an honest attempt to understand what it means to be educated in today's world." His argument is this: No matter how important science and technology seem to industry or government or indeed to the daily life of people, as a society we believe that those educated in literature, history, and other humanities are in some way better informed, more knowing, and somehow more worthy of the descriptor "well educated." This 19th-century conception of the (...)
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  30. Naomi Zack (ed.) (2017). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Race. Oxford University Press Usa.
    The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Race provides up-to-date explanation and analyses by leading scholars of contemporary issues in African American philosophy and philosophy of race. These original essays encompass the major topics and approaches in this emerging philosophical subfield that supports demographic inclusion and diversity while at the same time strengthening the conceptual arsenal of social and political philosophy. Over the course of the volume's ten topic-based sections, ideas about race held by Locke, Hume, Kant, Hegel, and Nietzsche are (...)
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  31.  26
    Joseph S. Alper & Jon Beckwith (1998). Distinguishing Genetic From Nongenetic Medical Tests: Some Implications for Antidiscrimination Legislation. Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):141-150.
    Genetic discrimination is becoming an increasingly important problem in the United States. Information acquired from genetic tests has been used by insurance companies to reject applications for insurance policies and to refuse payment for the treatment of illnesses. Numerous states and the United States Congress have passed or are considering passage of laws that would forbid such use of genetic information by health insurance companies. Here we argue that much of this legislation is severely flawed because of the difficulty (...)
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  32.  43
    Peg Tittle (2010). Critical Thinking: An Appeal to Reason. Routledge.
    This book covers all the material typically addressed in first or second-year college courses in Critical Thinking: Chapter 1: Critical Thinking 1.1 What is critical thinking? 1.2 What is critical thinking not? Chapter 2: The Nature of Argument 2.1 Recognizing an Argument 2.2 Circular Arguments 2.3 Counterarguments 2.4 The Burden of Proof 2.5 Facts and Opinions 2.6 Deductive and Inductive Argument Chapter 3: The Structure of Argument 3.1 Convergent, Single 3.2 Convergent, Multiple 3.3 Divergent Chapter 4: Relevance 4.1 Relevance 4.2 (...)
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  33.  17
    Thomas J. Scheff & David S. Fearon Jr (2004). Cognition and Emotion? The Dead End in Self-Esteem Research. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 34 (1):73–90.
    This article suggests that studies of self-esteem using scales have reached a dead end, and suggest alternative directions. First we show how significance tests have obscured meager results. According to reviews, this huge body of research has yielded no substantial findings. Some sub-fields show consistent, but trivially small, effects; reviews of the entire field show none at all. Most important, the size of effects does not seem to be increasing. Three questions are raised: 1. Are new standards needed to (...)
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  34.  53
    Scott Forschler (2007). How to Make Ethical Universalization Tests Work. Journal of Value Inquiry 41 (1):31-43.
    Richard Hare described the "ethical fanatic" as an agent who appeared to be able to rationally universalize morally horrendous values by "fanatically" accepting the consequences of those values even if their universalization harmed the original agent. This challenges the project of basing ethics on universalization tests, as advocated by Hare, Immanuel Kant, and others. Hare later argued that fanatics are irrational by appealing to a "principle of prudence," but this violates his meta-principle of not basing fundamental ethical principles upon (...)
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  35.  25
    David F. Foster (2011). Worldwide Testing and Test Security Issues: Ethical Challenges and Solutions. Ethics and Behavior 20 (3):207-228.
    As psychology ethics begins to become more standardized and formalized globally (e.g., Gauthier, 2007) there are still educational, political, and psychological areas that require significant discussion. For example, test security has become a global issue, as psychological tests and even college entrance and graduate school admission tests have found their way online.
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  36.  21
    Maya Bar-Hillel, David Budescu & Yigal Attali (2005). Scoring and Keying Multiple Choice Tests: A Case Study in Irrationality. [REVIEW] Mind and Society 4 (1):3-12.
    We offer a case-study in irrationality, showing that even in a high stakes context, intelligent and well trained professionals may adopt dominated practices. In multiple-choice tests one cannot distinguish lucky guesses from answers based on knowledge. Test-makers have dealt with this problem by lowering the incentive to guess, through penalizing errors (called formula scoring), and by eliminating various cues for outperforming random guessing (e.g., a preponderance of correct answers in middle positions), through key balancing. These policies, though widespread and (...)
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  37.  5
    Cody S. Ding, Kim Song & Lloyd I. Richardson (2006). Do Mathematical Gender Differences Continue? A Longitudinal Study of Gender Difference and Excellence in Mathematics Performance in the U.S. Educational Studies 40 (3):279-295.
    A persistent belief in American culture is that males both outperform and have a higher inherent aptitude for mathematics than females. Using data from two school districts in two different states in the United States, this study used longitudinal multilevel modeling to examine whether overall performance on standardized as well as classroom tests reveals a gender difference in mathematics performance. The results suggest that both male and female students demonstrated the same growth trend in mathematics performance (as measured (...)
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  38.  12
    Paul Ghils (1992). Standardized Terminologies and Cultural Diversity. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 23 (1):33-44.
    In this paper we will discuss some epistemological aspects of lexical and terminological usage in the international arena, with special reference to the different rhetorics of the social and natural sciences. Sociolinguistic research confined to monolingual communities suggests that close-knit network structure is an important mechanism of language maintenance, in that speakers are able to form a cohesive group capable of resisting pressure, linguistic and social, from outside the group (MILROY, 1987). The concept of a linguistic norm in sociolinguistic theory (...)
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  39.  13
    John Wettersten (2007). Philosophical Anthropology Can Help Social Scientists Learn From Empirical Tests. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (3):295–318.
    Popper's theory of demarcation has set the standard of falsifiability for all sciences. But not all falsifiable theories are part of science and some tests of scientific theories are better than others. Popper's theory has led to the banning of metaphysical and/or philosophical anthropological theories from science. But Joseph Agassi has supplemented Popper's theory to explain how such theories are useful as research programs within science. This theory can also be used to explain how interesting tests may be (...)
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  40.  4
    Philip Tromovitch (2012). Statistical Reporting with Philip's Sextuple and Extended Sextuple: A Simple Method for Easy Communication of Findings. Journal of Research Practice 8 (1):Article - P2.
    The advance of science and human knowledge is impeded by misunderstandings of various statistics, insufficient reporting of findings, and the use of numerous standardized and non-standardized presentations of essentially identical information. Communication with journalists and the public is hindered by the failure to present statistics that are easy for non-scientists to interpret as well as by use of the word significant, which in scientific English does not carry the meaning of "important" or "large." This article promotes a new (...)
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  41.  2
    Abdul Karim Bangura (2011). African Mathematics: From Bones to Computers. Upa.
    This comprehensive text on African Mathematics addresses some of the problematic issues in the field, such as attitudes, curriculum development, educational change, academic achievement, standardized and other tests, performance factors, student characteristics, cross-cultural differences and studies, literacy, native speakers, social class and differences, equal education, teaching methods, and more.
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  42. Joselin Linder (2009). The Purity Test: Your Filth and Depravity Cheerfully Exposed by 2,000 Nosy Questions. St. Martin's Griffin.
    By the early 80s, kids were already trawling the message boards of the Internet for perverse kicks. Well before Star Ways Kid or "flash mobs," one of the first online fads was the "Purity Test," a series of questions to rate your moral purity, from the raunchy to the absurd.The tests would be printed out, brought to school, and pored over with friends in the back of the gym during recess. Then kids would modify the original with their own (...)
     
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  43.  94
    A. Bramon, R. Escribano & G. Garbarino (2006). Bell's Inequality Tests with Meson–Antimeson Pairs. Foundations of Physics 36 (4):563-584.
    Recent proposals to test Bell’s inequalities with entangled pairs of pseudoscalar mesons are reviewed. This includes pairs of neutral kaons or B-mesons and offers some hope to close both the locality and the detection loopholes. Specific difficulties, however, appear thus invalidating most of those proposals. The best option requires the use of kaon regeneration effects and could lead to a successful test if moderate K0 and k̄0 detection efficiencies are achieved.
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  44.  28
    Kevin Warwick, Huma Shah & James Moor (2013). Some Implications of a Sample of Practical Turing Tests. Minds and Machines 23 (2):163-177.
    A series of imitation games involving 3-participant (simultaneous comparison of two hidden entities) and 2-participant (direct interrogation of a hidden entity) were conducted at Bletchley Park on the 100th anniversary of Alan Turing’s birth: 23 June 2012. From the ongoing analysis of over 150 games involving (expert and non-expert, males and females, adults and child) judges, machines and hidden humans (foils for the machines), we present six particular conversations that took place between human judges and a hidden entity that produced (...)
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  45.  87
    Robert Alicki (2009). On von Neumann and Bell Theorems Applied to Quantumness Tests. Foundations of Physics 39 (4):352-360.
    The issues, raised in Żukowski (arXiv:0809.0115v1, 2008), concerning the relevance of the von Neumann theorem for the single-system’s quantumness test proposed in Alicki and Van Ryn (J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 41:062001, 2008) and performed for the case of single photon polarization in Brida et al. (Opt. Express 16:11750, 2008; arXiv:0811.3376, 2008) and the usefulness of Bell’s inequality for testing the idea of macroscopic quantum systems are discussed in some details. Finally, the proper quantum mechanical description of the experiment with (...)
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  46.  2
    Alan H. B. Wu (1998). Improving the Utilization of Clinical Laboratory Tests. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 4 (3):171-181.
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  47.  10
    D. J. Johnstone & D. V. Lindley (1995). Bayesian Inference Given Data?Significant At??: Tests of Point Hypotheses. Theory and Decision 38 (1):51-60.
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  48.  8
    F. S. Freeman (1931). The Factors of Speed and Power in Tests of Intelligence. Journal of Experimental Psychology 14 (1):83.
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  49.  8
    Silvia Salardi (2012). Determinism and Free Will in the Age of Genetics: Theoretical-Legal Concerns About Predictive Genetic Tests. Filozofija I Društvo 23 (4):57-70.
  50.  8
    K. Dunlap & A. Snyder (1920). Practice Effects in Intelligence Tests. Journal of Experimental Psychology 3 (5):396.
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