Search results for 'sterilization' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  12
    María Carranza (2007). The Therapeutic Exception: Abortion, Sterilization and Medical Necessity in Costa Rica. Developing World Bioethics 7 (2):55–63.
    ABSTRACTBased on the case of Rosa, a nine‐year‐old girl who was denied a therapeutic abortion, this article analyzes the role played by the social in medical practice. For that purpose, it compares the different application of two similar pieces of legislation in Costa Rica, where both the practice of abortion and sterilization are restricted to the protection of health and life by the Penal Code. As a concept subject to interpretation, a broad conception of medical necessity could enable an (...)
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  2. Ruth Macklin & Willard Gaylin (1981). Mental Retardation and Sterilization a Problem of Competency and Paternalism. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  3. Anna Stubblefield (2007). “Beyond the Pale”: Tainted Whiteness, Cognitive Disability, and Eugenic Sterilization. Hypatia 22 (2):162-181.
    : The aim of the eugenics movement in the United States during the first half of the twentieth century was to prevent the degeneration of the white race. A central tactic of the movement was the involuntary sterilization of people labeled as feebleminded. An analysis of the practice of eugenic sterilization provides insight into how the concepts of gender, race, class, and dis/ability are fundamentally intertwined. I argue that in the early twentieth century, the concept of feeblemindedness came (...)
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  4.  12
    Luke Kersten & Laura Davis, From Word to Practice: Eugenic Language in Sterilization Legislation in North America.
    Between 1905 and 1945, 31 states in the Untied States and 2 provinces in Canada enacted sterilization legislation. Over 70 statutes and amendments were enacted to guide, oversee and regulate sterilization practice, while over 24 distinct conditions were offered as grounds for sterilization. Although excellent legal, historical, and philosophical scholarship has investigated the motivations, causes and consequences of this legislation, little work has been done to explicitly systematic analyse the language used in sterilization legislation. This brief (...)
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  5.  14
    Tiziana Leone & Andrew Hinde (2005). Sterilization and Union Instability in Brazil. Journal of Biosocial Science 37 (4):459-469.
    Brazilian women rely on sterilization as the main source of birth control. Sterilization has been one of the causes of the steep decline in fertility in Brazil, at least since the second half of 1970. It is hypothesized that understanding couples’ relationships might be key to explaining this high rate of female sterilizations. Possible reasons for the higher level of fertility among women in unstable unions than among women in stable ones could be the less effective use of (...)
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  6.  3
    Iúri da Costa Leite, Neeru Gupta & Roberto Do Nascimento Rodrigues (2004). Female Sterilization in Latin America: Cross-National Perspectives. Journal of Biosocial Science 36 (6):683-698.
    Fertility levels have dropped substantially in Latin America in recent decades, fuelled by increased contraceptive use and notably a method mix skewed towards female sterilization. This study examined choice of female sterilization in four Latin American countries: Brazil, Colombia, the Dominican Republic and Peru. Data were drawn from national Demographic and Health Surveys conducted in 1995s reproductive histories to consider the effects of a number of sociodemographic and contextual determinants as they pertained to status at the moment of (...)
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  7.  28
    Torbjörn Tännsjö (2006). Non-Voluntary Sterilization. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (4):401 – 415.
    We cannot easily condemn in principle a policy where people are non-voluntarily sterilized with their informed consent (where they accept sterilization, if they do, in order to avoid punishment). There are conceivable circumstances where such a policy would be morally acceptable. One such conceivable circumstance is the one (incorrectly, as it were) believed by most decent advocates of eugenics in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century to exist: to wit, a situation where the human race as such is (...)
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  8.  4
    Guðrún V. Stefánsdóttir & Eygló Ebba Hreinsdóttir (2013). Sterilization, Intellectual Disability, and Some Ethical and Methodological Challenges: It Shouldn't Be a Secret. Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (3):302-308.
    This article discusses the experience of an Icelandic woman with intellectual disabilities who was sterilized and how she has dealt with it. It also reflects on some ethical and methodological issues that arise during inclusive life history research. The article is based on cooperation between two women, Eygló Ebba Hreinsdóttir, who was labelled with intellectual disabilities when she moved to an institution in Iceland in the 1970s, and the researcher Gu?rún V. Stefánsdóttir. Since 2003 we have worked closely together on (...)
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  9.  12
    D. M. Cowdin & J. F. Tuohey (1998). Sterilization, Catholic Health Care, and the Legitimate Autonomy of Culture. Christian Bioethics 4 (1):14-44.
    Disagreement over the legitimacy of direct sterilization continues within Catholic moral debate, with painful and at times confusing ramifications for Catholic healthcare systems. This paper argues that the medical profession should be construed as a key moral authority in this debate, on two grounds. First, the recent revival of neo-Aristotelianism in moral philosophy as applied to medical ethics has brought out the inherently moral dimensions of the history and current practice of medicine. Second, this recognition can be linked to (...)
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  10.  12
    G. P. Mckenny (1998). A Bad Disease, a Fatal Cure: Why Sterilization is Permissible and the Autonomy of Medicine is Not. Christian Bioethics 4 (1):100-109.
    The debate in this issue regarding the Roman Catholic condemnation of the morality of sterilization is puzzling for Protestants. As I will argue the puzzlement arises on two grounds. First, why would anyone object to direct sterilization for the cure or prevention of disease? Second, if one wanted to challenge such an objection on moral grounds why would one turn to medicine to do so? For Christian ethics there is nothing wrong in principle with direct sterilization when (...)
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  11.  2
    Ellen Keith (2011). Human Wreckage From Foreign Lands - A Study of Ethnic Victims of the Alberta Sterilization Act. Constellations 2 (2):81-89.
    On March 21 st , 1928, the Alberta government passed the Alberta Sexual Sterilization Act. Between 1928 and 1972, the Alberta Eugenics Board used the Act to sterilize an estimated 2,822 ‘mentally-defective’ Albertans. This paper examines the role that ethnicity played in the sterilization process, arguing that nativist attitudes influenced both the Canadian eugenics movement and the development of the Act.
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  12.  1
    Mala Ramanathan & U. S. Mishra (2000). Correlates of Female Sterilization Regret in the Southern States of India. Journal of Biosocial Science 32 (4):547-558.
    This study analyses factors associated with the incidence of sterilization regret in the four south Indian states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala and Tamil Nadu. Using data from the National Family Health Surveys, in all four states the incidence of regret was found to be less than 10% and the factors significantly associated with it were child loss experience and quality of services. Hence, there is a need to improve the quality of services, both in terms of counselling and (...)
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  13.  1
    E. Lodewijckx (2002). Voluntary Sterilization in Flanders. Journal of Biosocial Science 34 (1):29-50.
    From 1966 to 1990 there was a marked rise in the use of voluntary sterilization in Flanders, followed by a fall in women under the age of 40. In the last three decades a remarkable change has occurred in the choice between male and female sterilization. Compared with many other European countries, sterilization of men and women is widely practised in Flanders. In 1996 40% of 40- to 44-year-old women underwent voluntarily sterilization or had voluntarily sterilized (...)
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  14. Bernard J. Nottage, Marion H. Hall & Barbara E. Thompson (1977). Social and Medical Trends in Female Sterilization in Aberdeen, 1951–72. Journal of Biosocial Science 9 (4):487-500.
    This paper reports the social and medical characteristics of women resident in Aberdeen city who were sterilized in 195162 and 197152 women were offered sterilization, the majority being lower social class mothers with five or more children who were sterilized concurrently with abortion; the small number of upper social class women had one or two children and were sterilized for medical or obstetric reasons. By 196172, women themselves requested sterilization, the two–three child family was the norm, the proportion (...)
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  15.  8
    Cristina Richie (2013). Voluntary Sterilization for Childfree Women. Hastings Center Report 43 (6):36-44.
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  16.  5
    Susan Benedict & Jane M. Georges (2006). Nurses and the Sterilization Experiments of Auschwitz: A Postmodernist Perspective. Nursing Inquiry 13 (4):277-288.
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  17.  14
    C. B. S. Hodson (1929). Sterilization in Practice: First-Hand Impressions of American Methods and Experience. The Eugenics Review 21 (1):35.
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  18.  13
    R. Langdon-Down (1926). Sterilization as a Practical Policy. The Eugenics Review 18 (3):205.
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  19.  10
    R. A. Gibbons (1926). The Treatment of the Congenitally Unfit and of Convicts by Sterilization. The Eugenics Review 18 (2):100.
  20.  9
    Jonathan Freedland (1997). Forced Sterilization in Scandinavia. The Chesterton Review 23 (4):526-528.
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  21.  9
    Charles P. Blacker (1964). Voluntary Sterilization: Its Role in Human Betterment. The Eugenics Review 56 (2):77.
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  22.  9
    Harry H. Laughlin (1927). The Legalization of Voluntary Eugenical Sterilization. The Eugenics Review 19 (1):12.
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  23.  9
    Herbert Brewer (1934). Sterilization a Birth Control Method? The Eugenics Review 26 (2):166.
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  24.  9
    H. O. Wildenskov (1932). Sterilization in Denmark: A Eugenic as Well as a Therapeutic Clause. The Eugenics Review 23 (4):311.
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  25.  9
    C. P. Blacker (1951). Sterilization in North Carolina: A Sociological and Psychological Study. The Eugenics Review 43 (2):108.
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  26.  8
    W. Norwood East (1935). The Role of Sterilization in the Prevention of Mental Defect and Disorder. The Eugenics Review 26 (4):298.
  27.  6
    Susan L. Peck (1974). Voluntary Female Sterilization: Attitudes and Legislation. Hastings Center Report 4 (3):8-10.
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  28.  7
    Michael Fielding (1935). Sex Ethics: The Principles and Practice of Contraception, Abortion and Sterilization. The Eugenics Review 27 (3):240.
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  29.  10
    Charles P. Blacker (1962). Voluntary Sterilization: The Last Sixty Years. The Eugenics Review 54 (1):9.
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  30.  7
    C. P. Blacker (1931). The Sterilization Proposals: A History of Their Development. The Eugenics Review 22 (4):239.
  31.  12
    C. P. Blacker (1961). Voluntary Sterilization: Introduction and Summary. The Eugenics Review 53 (3):145.
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  32.  6
    Norman E. Himes (1933). Human Sterilization. The History of the Sexual Sterilization Movement. The Eugenics Review 25 (2):113.
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  33.  11
    Charles P. Blacker (1962). Voluntary Sterilization: Transitions Throughout the World. The Eugenics Review 54 (3):143.
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  34.  6
    Hans Maier (1934). Sterilization in Switzerland. The Eugenics Review 26 (1):19.
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  35.  6
    Herbert Brewer (1963). Constructive Fertility Control Through Sterilization. The Eugenics Review 55 (1):55.
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  36.  10
    Edgar Schuster (1914). Report of the Committee to Study and to Report on the Best Practical Means of Cutting Off the Defective Germ Plasm in the American Population. I. The Scope of the Committee's Work. II. The Legal, Legislative and Administrative Aspects of Sterilization. [REVIEW] The Eugenics Review 6 (3):247.
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  37.  10
    Raymond Pearl (1919). Sterilization of Degenerates and Criminals Considered From the Standpoint of Genetics. The Eugenics Review 11 (1):1.
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  38.  6
    Cecil Binney (1934). Legal Aspects of Sterilization. The Eugenics Review 26 (1):27.
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  39.  15
    E. J. Mahoney (1928). The Morality of Sterilization. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 3 (2):276-290.
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  40.  5
    C. J. Bond (1934). Human Sterilization to-Day: A Survey of Current Practice. The Eugenics Review 26 (2):150.
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  41.  12
    R. A. Hewitt (1938). Eugenical Sterilization. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 13 (3):524-524.
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  42.  9
    Herbert Brewer (1961). Male Sterilization and Spermatogenesis. The Eugenics Review 53 (3):175.
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  43.  8
    Edward Mapother (1934). Safeguards in Eugenic Sterilization. The Eugenics Review 26 (1):15.
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  44.  4
    Nils Von Hofsten (1938). Sterilization in Sweden. The Eugenics Review 29 (4):257.
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  45.  5
    George J. Annas (1981). Sterilization of the Mentally Retarded: A Decision for the Courts. Hastings Center Report 11 (4):18-19.
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  46.  4
    Fr Vincent M'Nabb (1930). The Ethics of Sterilization. The Eugenics Review 22 (1):16.
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  47.  4
    Felix Tietze (1934). The Graz Sterilization Trial: Judgment of the Supreme Court. The Eugenics Review 26 (3):213.
  48.  3
    Robert E. Mcgarrah (1974). Voluntary Female Sterilization: Abuses, Risks and Guidelines. Hastings Center Report 4 (3):5-7.
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  49.  7
    Herbert Brewer (1964). Reversibility Following Sterilization by Vasectomy. The Eugenics Review 56 (3):147.
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  50.  14
    John C. Ford (1945). The Morality of American Eugenical Sterilization. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 20 (1):192-192.
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