Search results for 'stoic logic' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  6
    Walter A. Carnielli, Itala M. L. D'ottaviano & Brazilian Conference on Mathematical Logic (1999). Advances in Contemporary Logic and Computer Science Proceedings of the Eleventh Brazilian Conference on Mathematical Logic, May 6-10, 1996, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. [REVIEW] Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    This volume presents the proceedings from the Eleventh Brazilian Logic Conference on Mathematical Logic held by the Brazilian Logic Society (co-sponsored by the Centre for Logic, Epistemology and the History of Science, State University of Campinas, Sao Paulo) in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. The conference and the volume are dedicated to the memory of professor Mario Tourasse Teixeira, an educator and researcher who contributed to the formation of several generations of Brazilian logicians. Contributions were made from leading (...)
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  2. Susanne Bobzien (2003). Stoic Logic. In Brad Inwood (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Stoic Philosophy. Cambridge University Press
    ABSTRACT: An introduction to Stoic logic. Stoic logic can in many respects be regarded as a fore-runner of modern propositional logic. I discuss: 1. the Stoic notion of sayables or meanings (lekta); the Stoic assertibles (axiomata) and their similarities and differences to modern propositions; the time-dependency of their truth; 2.-3. assertibles with demonstratives and quantified assertibles and their truth-conditions; truth-functionality of negations and conjunctions; non-truth-functionality of disjunctions and conditionals; language regimentation and ‘bracketing’ devices; (...)
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  3.  30
    Susanne Bobzien (1986). Die stoische Modallogik (Stoic Modal Logic). Königshausen & Neumann.
    ABSTRACT: Part 1 discusses the Stoic notion of propositions (assertibles, axiomata): their definition; their truth-criteria; the relation between sentence and proposition; propositions that perish; propositions that change their truth-value; the temporal dependency of propositions; the temporal dependency of the Stoic notion of truth; pseudo-dates in propositions. Part 2 discusses Stoic modal logic: the Stoic definitions of their modal notions (possibility, impossibility, necessity, non-necessity); the logical relations between the modalities; modalities as properties of propositions; contingent propositions; (...)
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  4.  36
    Anthony Speca (2001). Hypothetical Syllogistic and Stoic Logic. Brill.
    This book uncovers and examines the confusion in antiquity between Aristotle's hypothetical syllogistic and Stoic logic, and offers a fresh perspective on the ...
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  5.  7
    Marek Nasieniewski (2014). Is Stoic Logic Classical? Logic and Logical Philosophy 6:55.
    In this paper I would like to argue that Stoic logic is a kind ofrelevant logic rather than the classical logic. To realize this purpose I willtry to keep as close as possible to Stoic calculus as expressed with the helpof their arguments.
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  6.  41
    Raul Corazzon, Stoic Logic: The Dialectic and the Doctrine of Lekta (Sayables).
    reasons for the disappreciation as well as for the rehabilitation of Stoic logic; it is found in I. M. Bochenski's Ancient Formal Logic (Amsterdam, 1951), and it clearly portrays the difference in attitude of the logicians of the twentieth century towards the Stoic logical system.
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  7. J. Banas (2003). Aristotelian Versus Stoic Logic. Filozofia 58 (8):551-563.
    This paper deals with Aristotelian and Stoic logic. In the first part the author writes about the history of logic and shows, why Stoic logic had not been studied properly from the Middle Ages up to the beginning of the 20th century, when an increasing interest in the study of Stoic logic is visible. The paper describes the character of Aristotelian and Stoic logic respectively. Stoic logic is first introduced (...)
     
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  8.  23
    Benson Mates (1973). Stoic Logic. Berkeley,University of California Press.
  9. Anneli Luhtala (2000). On the Origin of Syntactical Description in Stoic Logic. Nodus.
  10. Jonathan Barnes (1999). Aristotle and Stoic Logic. In Katerina Ierodiakonou (ed.), Topics in Stoic Philosophy. Clarendon Press
     
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  11.  2
    Benson Mates (1950). Stoic Logic and the Text of Sextus Empiricus. Journal of Symbolic Logic 15 (1):63-64.
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  12.  16
    Peter Milne (1995). On the Completeness of Non-Philonian Stoic Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 16 (1):39-64.
  13.  1
    Josiah Gould (1974). Deduction in Stoic Logic. In John Corcoran (ed.), Ancient Logic and its Modern Interpretations. Boston,Reidel 151--168.
  14.  4
    Alonzo Church (1950). Review: Benson Mates, Stoic Logic and the Text of Sextus Empiricus. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 15 (1):63-64.
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  15.  1
    Alonzo Church (1963). Review: Benson Mates, Stoic Logic. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 28 (4):295-295.
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  16.  1
    Czeslaw Lejewski (1954). Review: Benson Mates, Stoic Logic. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 19 (1):71-72.
  17.  8
    Ernest A. Moody (1954). Stoic Logic. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 51 (2):69-74.
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  18.  29
    Charles H. Kahn (1969). Stoic Logic and Stoic Logos. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 51 (2):158-172.
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  19.  9
    Mauro Nasti de Vincentis (1984). Stopper on Nasti's Contention and Stoic Logic. Phronesis 29 (3):313-324.
  20.  21
    Paolo Crivelli (1994). Indefinite Propositions and Anaphora in Stoic Logic. Phronesis 39 (2):187-206.
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  21.  12
    D. W. Hamlyn (1963). The Logic of the Stoics Benson Mates: Stoic Logic. Pp. Viii+148. Berkeley: University of California Press (London: Cambridge University Press), 1961. Paper, 12s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 13 (01):55-57.
  22. Claude Imbert (1980). Stoic Logic and Alexandrian Poetics. In Malcolm Schofield, Myles Burnyeat & Jonathan Barnes (eds.), Doubt and Dogmatism: Studies in Hellenistic Epistemology. Oxford University Press 182--216.
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  23.  6
    Paolo Crivelli (1994). Indefinite Propositions and Anaphora in Stoic Logic. Phronesis 39 (2):187 - 206.
  24. Joseph Clark (1953). Stoic Logic by Benson Mates. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 44:291-293.
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  25. Attila Fáj (1971). Platonic Anticipations of Stoic Logic. Apeiron 5 (2):1-19.
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  26. W. Kneale (1954). MATES, B. -Stoic Logic. [REVIEW] Mind 63:553.
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  27. J. M. Rist (1981). The Importance of Stoic Logic in the Contra Celsum. In A. H. Armstrong, H. J. Blumenthal & R. A. Markus (eds.), Neoplatonism and Early Christian Thought: Essays in Honour of A.H. Armstrong. Variorum Publications
  28.  21
    Ian Mueller (1979). The Completeness of Stoic Propositional Logic. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 20 (1):201-215.
  29. Susanne Bobzien (2011). The Combinatorics of Stoic Conjunction. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 40 (1):157-188.
    ABSTRACT: The 3rd BCE Stoic logician "Chrysippus says that the number of conjunctions constructible from ten propositions exceeds one million. Hipparchus refuted this, demonstrating that the affirmative encompasses 103,049 conjunctions and the negative 310,952." After laying dormant for over 2000 years, the numbers in this Plutarch passage were recently identified as the 10th (and a derivative of the 11th) Schröder number, and F. Acerbi showed how the 2nd BCE astronomer Hipparchus could have calculated them. What remained unexplained is why (...)
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  30. Susanne Bobzien (2014). Alexander of Aphrodisias on Aristotle's Theory of the Stoic Indemonstrables. In M. Lee (ed.), Strategies of Argument: Essays in Ancient Ethics, Epistemology, and Logic. OUP 199-227.
    ABSTRACT: Alexander of Aphrodisias’ commentaries on Aristotle’s Organon are valuable sources for both Stoic and early Peripatetic logic, and have often been used as such – in particular for early Peripatetic hypothetical syllogistic and Stoic propositional logic. By contrast, this paper explores the role Alexander himself played in the development and transmission of those theories. There are three areas in particular where he seems to have made a difference: First, he drew a connection between certain passages (...)
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  31. Susanne Bobzien (1999). Logic: The Stoics (Part Two). In Keimpe Algra, Jonathan Barnes & et al (eds.), The Cambridge History of Hellenistic Philosophy. CUP
    ABSTRACT: A detailed presentation of Stoic theory of arguments, including truth-value changes of arguments, Stoic syllogistic, Stoic indemonstrable arguments, Stoic inference rules (themata), including cut rules and antilogism, argumental deduction, elements of relevance logic in Stoic syllogistic, the question of completeness of Stoic logic, Stoic arguments valid in the specific sense, e.g. "Dio says it is day. But Dio speaks truly. Therefore it is day." A more formal and more detailed account (...)
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  32. Susanne Bobzien (1999). Logic: The Stoics (Part One). In Keimpe Algra & et al (eds.), The Cambridge History of Hellenistic Philosophy. Cambridge University Press
    ABSTRACT: A detailed presentation of Stoic logic, part one, including their theories of propositions (or assertibles, Greek: axiomata), demonstratives, temporal truth, simple propositions, non-simple propositions(conjunction, disjunction, conditional), quantified propositions, logical truths, modal logic, and general theory of arguments (including definition, validity, soundness, classification of invalid arguments).
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  33.  14
    David Hitchcock (2005). The Peculiarities of Stoic Propositional Logic. In John Woods, Kent A. Peacock & A. D. Irvine (eds.), Mistakes of Reason: Essays in Honour of John Woods. University of Toronto Press 224--242.
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  34.  7
    J. Eric Butler (2005). Stoic Metaphysics and the Logic of Sense. Philosophy Today 49 (5):128-137.
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  35.  19
    Ian Mueller (1969). Stoic and Peidpatetic Logic. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 51 (2):173-187.
  36.  7
    W. D. Ross (1907). Davidson's Stoic Creed The Stoic Creed. By William L. Davidson, M.A., LL.D., Professor of Logic and Metaphysics in the University of Aberdeen. Edinburgh : T. And T. Clark, 1907. 8vo. 1 Vol. Pp. Xxiii + 274. 4s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 21 (08):240-241.
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  37.  12
    William H. Hay (1969). Stoic Use of Logic. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 51 (2):145-157.
  38. J. Eric Butler (2005). Stoic Metaphysics and the Logic of Sense. Philosophy Today 49 (Supplement):128-137.
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  39.  46
    John Corcoran (ed.) (1974). Ancient Logic and its Modern Interpretations Proceedings of the Buffalo Symposium on Modernist Interpretations of Ancient Logic, 21 and 22 April, 1972. [REVIEW] Reidel.
    Articles by Ian Mueller, Ronald Zirin, Norman Kretzmann, John Corcoran, John Mulhern, Mary Mulhern,Josiah Gould, and others. Topics: Aristotle's Syllogistic, Stoic Logic, Modern Research in Ancient Logic.
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  40. Susanne Bobzien (1996). Stoic Syllogistic. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 14:133-92.
    ABSTRACT: For the Stoics, a syllogism is a formally valid argument; the primary function of their syllogistic is to establish such formal validity. Stoic syllogistic is a system of formal logic that relies on two types of argumental rules: (i) 5 rules (the accounts of the indemonstrables) which determine whether any given argument is an indemonstrable argument, i.e. an elementary syllogism the validity of which is not in need of further demonstration; (ii) one unary and three binary argumental (...)
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  41. Susanne Bobzien (2006). Logic, History Of: Ancient Logic. In Donald M. Borchert (ed.), Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Thomson Gale
    ABSTRACT: A comprehensive introduction to ancient (western) logic from earliest times to the 6th century CE, with a focus on issues that may be of interest to contemporary logicians and covering important topics in Post-Aristotelian logic that are frequently neglected (such as Peripatetic hypothetical syllogistic, the Stoic axiomatic system of propositional logic and various later ancient developments).
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  42. Susanne Bobzien (2002). Pre-Stoic Hypothetical Syllogistic in Galen. The Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies:57-72.
    ABSTRACT: This paper traces the evidence in Galen's Introduction to Logic (Institutio Logica) for a hypothetical syllogistic which predates Stoic propositional logic. It emerges that Galen is one of our main witnesses for such a theory, whose authors are most likely Theophrastus and Eudemus. A reconstruction of this theory is offered which - among other things - allows to solve some apparent textual difficulties in the Institutio Logica.
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  43.  80
    Susanne Bobzien (2006). Ancient Logic. In Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    ABSTRACT: A comprehensive introduction to ancient (western) logic from earliest times to the 6th century CE, with an emphasis on topics which may be of interest to contemporary logicians. Content: 1. Pre-Aristotelian Logic 1.1 Syntax and Semantics 1.2 Argument Patterns and Valid Inference 2. Aristotle 2.1 Dialectics 2.2 Sub-sentential Classifications 2.3 Syntax and Semantics of Sentences 2.4 Non-modal Syllogistic 2.5 Modal Logic 3. The early Peripatetics: Theophrastus and Eudemus 3.1 Improvements and Modifications of Aristotle's Logic 3.2 (...)
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  44.  58
    John Corcoran (1974). Remarks on Stoic Deduction. In Ancient Logic and its Modern Interpretations. Boston,Reidel 169--181.
    This paper raises obvious questions undermining any residual confidence in Mates work and revealing our embarrassing ignorance of true nature of Stoic deduction. It was inspired by the challenging exploratory work of JOSIAH GOULD.
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  45.  8
    Dragan Stoianovici (2010). Formal Logic Vs. Philosophical Argument. Argumentation 24 (1):125-133.
    The wider topic to which the content of this paper belongs is that of the relationship between formal logic and real argumentation. Of particular potential interest in this connection are held to be substantive arguments constructed by philosophers reputed equally as authorities in logical theory. A number of characteristics are tentatively indicated by the author as likely to be encountered in such arguments. The discussion centers afterwards, by way of specification, on a remarkable piece of argument quoted in Cicero’s (...)
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  46. Susanne Bobzien (1996). Logic. In Simon Hornblower & A. Spawforth (eds.), The Oxford Classical Dictionary, 3rd edition. Oxford University Press
    ABSTRACT: A very brief summary presentation of western ancient logic for the non-specialized reader, from the beginnings to Boethius. For a much more detailed presentation see my "Ancient Logic" in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosopy (also on PhilPapers).
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  47. Susanne Bobzien (1993). Chrysippus' Modal Logic and Its Relation to Philo and Diodorus. In K. Doering & Th Ebert (eds.), Dialektiker und Stoiker. Franz Steiner 63--84.
    ABSTRACT: The modal systems of the Stoic logician Chrysippus and the two Hellenistic logicians Philo and Diodorus Cronus have survived in a fragmentary state in several sources. From these it is clear that Chrysippus was acquainted with Philo’s and Diodorus’ modal notions, and also that he developed his own in contrast of Diodorus’ and in some way incorporated Philo’s. The goal of this paper is to reconstruct the three modal systems, including their modal definitions and modal theorems, and to (...)
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  48. Theodor Ebert (1987). The Origin of the Stoic Theory of Signs in Sextus Empiricus. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 5:83-126.
    In this paper I argue that the Stoic theory of signs as reported by Sextus Empiricus in AM and in PH belongs to Stoic logicians which precede Chrysippus. I further argue that the PH-version of this theory presupposes the version in AM and is an attempt to improve the older theory. I tentatively attribute the PH-version to Cleanthes and the AM-version to Zeno. I finally argue that the origin of this Stoic theory is to be found in (...)
     
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  49.  31
    Susanne Bobzien (2015). Ancient Logic (Substantive Revision Dec 29, 2015). Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    ABSTRACT: A comprehensive introduction to ancient (western) logic from earliest times to the 6th century CE, with an emphasis on topics which may be of interest to contemporary logicians.
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  50.  51
    Stephen H. Daniel (2011). Stoicism in Berkeley's Philosophy. In Bertil Belfrage & Timo Airaksinen (eds.), Berkeley's Lasting Legacy: 300 Years Later. Cambridge Scholars 121-34.
    Commentators have not said much regarding Berkeley and Stoicism. Even when they do, they generally limit their remarks to Berkeley’s Siris (1744) where he invokes characteristically Stoic themes about the World Soul, “seminal reasons,” and the animating fire of the universe. The Stoic heritage of other Berkeleian doctrines (e.g., about mind or the semiotic character of nature) is seldom recognized, and when it is, little is made of it in explaining his other doctrines (e.g., immaterialism). None of this (...)
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