Search results for 'stoicism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Claudia Card (1998). Stoicism, Evil, and the Possibility of Morality. Metaphilosophy 29 (4):245-253.score: 21.0
    Martha Nussbaum's work has been characterized by a sustained critique of Stoic ethics, insofar as that ethics denies the validity and importance of our valuing things that elude our control. This essay explores the idea that the very possibility of morality, understood as social or interpersonal ethics, presupposes that we do value such things. If my argument is right, Stoic ethics is unable to recognize the validity of morality (so understood) but can at most acknowledge duties to oneself. A further (...)
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  2. Author unknown, Stoicism. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 21.0
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  3. Jill Kraye (2012). Aπαθ&Epsi;Ια and Πρ&Ogr;Παθ&Epsi;Ιαι in Early Modern Discussions of the Passions: Stoicism, Christianity and Natural History. Early Science and Medicine 17 (1-2):230-253.score: 21.0
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  4. Christopher Brooke (2008). Grotius, Stoicism and 'Oikeiosis'. Grotiana 29 (1):25-50.score: 21.0
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  5. C. Kavin Rowe (2012). The Art of Retrieval: Stoicism? Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (4):706-719.score: 21.0
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  6. Margaret Graver (2007). Stoicism & Emotion. University of Chicago Press.score: 18.0
    On the surface, stoicism and emotion seem like contradictory terms. Yet the Stoic philosophers of ancient Greece and Rome were deeply interested in the emotions, which they understood as complex judgments about what we regard as valuable in our surroundings. Stoicism and Emotion shows that they did not simply advocate an across-the-board suppression of feeling, as stoicism implies in today’s English, but instead conducted a searching examination of these powerful psychological responses, seeking to understand what attitude toward (...)
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  7. Steven K. Strange & Jack Zupko (eds.) (2004). Stoicism: Traditions and Transformations. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Stoicism is now widely recognized as one of the most important philosophical schools of ancient Greece and Rome. But how did it influence Western thought after Greek and Roman antiquity? The contributors recruited for this volume include leading international scholars of Stoicism as well as experts in later periods of philosophy. They trace the impact of Stoicism and Stoic ideas from late antiquity through the medieval and modern periods.
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  8. Dirk Baltzly, Stoicism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 18.0
    Stoicism was one of the new philosophical movements of the Hellenistic period. The name derives from the porch (stoa poikilê) in the Agora at Athens decorated with mural paintings, where the members of the school congregated, and their lectures were held. Unlike ‘epicurean,’ the sense of the English adjective ‘stoical’ is not utterly misleading with regard to its philosophical origins. The Stoics did, in fact, hold that emotions like fear or envy (or impassioned sexual attachments, or passionate love of (...)
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  9. Christopher Gill (2010). Naturalistic Psychology in Galen and Stoicism. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This is a study of the psychological ideas of Galen (AD 129-c.210, the most important medical writer in antiquity) and Stoicism (a major philosophical theory in ...
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  10. Christian Maurer (2010). Hutcheson's Relation to Stoicism in the Light of His Moral Psychology. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (1):33-49.score: 18.0
    Without questioning Hutcheson's general affinities with the Stoics, this article focuses on two important differences in moral psychology that show the limits of the appropriation of Stoicism in Hutcheson's ethics of benevolence. First, Hutcheson's distinction between calm affections and violent passions does not fully match with the Stoic distinction between constantiæ and perturbationes, since the emotion of sorrow remains in Hutcheson's table of the calm affections. As far as sorrow as a public affection is concerned, this first point is (...)
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  11. Jim Cheney (1989). The Neo-Stoicism of Radical Environmentalism. Environmental Ethics 11 (4):293-325.score: 18.0
    Feminist analysis has eonvineed me that certain tendencies within that form of radical environmentalism known as deep ecology-with its supposed rejection of the Western ethical tradition and its adoption of what looks to be a feminist attitude toward the environment and our relationship to nature-constitute one more chapter in the story of Western alienation from nature. In this paper I deepen my critique of these tendencies toward alienation within deep ecology by historicizing my critique in the light of a development (...)
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  12. Mark A. Holowchak (2011). A Closer Look at 'Sophisticated Stoicism': Reply to Stephens and Feezell. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (3):341-354.score: 18.0
    Stephens and Feezell argue, in ?The Ideal of the Stoic Sportsman? (2004), that ?one need not be a scholar of ancient Greek philosophy to refer to ?stoic? conduct or a ?stoic? approach to certain matters, because the vocabulary related to this apparently antiquarian view of life has seeped into our common language?. Nonetheless, Stephens and Feezell go on to give a scholarly account of Stoicism as it relates to athletic participation. Their account, in part, takes the form of a (...)
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  13. Lawrence C. Becker (1998). A New Stoicism. Princeton University Press.score: 18.0
    The question addressed by this book is what, if anything, stoic ethics would be like today if stoicism had had a continuous history to the present day as a plausible and coherent set of philosophical commitments and methods. The book answers that question by arguing that most of the ancient doctrines of Stoic ethics remain defensible today, at least when ancient Stoicism's cosmological commitments are replaced by modern scientific ones.
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  14. P. H. Clarke (2000). Adam Smith, Stoicism and Religion in the 18th Century. History of the Human Sciences 13 (4):49-72.score: 18.0
    This article explores the influence of Stoicism and religion on Adam Smith. While other commentators have argued either that the main influence on Smith was Stoicism or that it was religion, the two influences have not been explicitly linked. In this article I attempt to make such a link, arguing that Smith can be seen as belonging to the strand of Christian Stoicism chiefly associated with his teacher, Francis Hutcheson. Finally, some comments are made about the implications (...)
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  15. Jean-Baptiste Gourinat (2009). Stoicism Today. Iris 1 (2):497-511.score: 18.0
    The aim of this paper is to elucidate the meaning of Stoicism today. First, it roughly sketches Stoicism as a philosophical system, namely its logic, physics and ethics. It argues that many aspects of its logic and physics are outdated but that the general Stoic approach to these disciplines may still be relevant to modern philosophers. Moreover, the more persuasive part of Stoicism is ethics: Stoic ethics is naturalistic and intellectualist. Stoics argue that virtue is the only (...)
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  16. P. A. Brunt & Michael Crawford (2013). Studies in Stoicism. Oup Oxford.score: 18.0
    Studies in Stoicism contains six unpublished and seven republished essays, the latter incorporating additions and changes which Brunt wished to be made. The papers have been integrated and arranged in chronological order by subject matter, with an accessible lecture to the Oxford Philological Society serving as Brunt's own introduction.
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  17. Katherine Nicolai (2014). Adam Ferguson's Pedagogy and His Engagement with Stoicism. 12 (2):199-212.score: 18.0
    Adam Ferguson, lecturer of moral philosophy at the University of Edinburgh (1764–1785), was one of the leading figures of the Scottish Enlightenment. His published works, however, have sometimes been dismissed as derivative and viewed as less important than some of his contemporaries, because of his reliance on ancient Stoic philosophy. An analysis of Ferguson's lecture notes, conversely, demonstrates Stoicism's pedagogical function. Rather than adopting Stoic principles, Ferguson used their terminology to teach philosophical concepts. Ferguson's nuanced discussion of ancient philosophy (...)
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  18. Ricardo Salles (2009). Introduction: God and Cosmos in Stoicism. In , God and Cosmos in Stoicism. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
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  19. Matthew D. Walz (2011). Stoicism as Anesthesia. International Philosophical Quarterly 51 (4):501-519.score: 18.0
    Boethius first identifies Philosophy in the Consolation as his medica, his “healer” or “physician.” Over the course of the dialogue Philosophy exercises her medical art systematically. In the second book Philosophy first gives Boethius “gentler remedies” that are preparatory for the “sharper medicines” that she administers later. This article shows that, philosophically speaking, Philosophy’s “gentler remedies” amount to persuading Boethius toward Stoicism, which functions as an anesthetic for the more invasive philosophical surgery that she performs afterwards. Seeing this, however, (...)
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  20. Thomas BenatouIl (2009). How Industrious Can Zeus Be? : The Extent and Objects of Divine Activity in Stoicism. In Ricardo Salles (ed.), God and Cosmos in Stoicism. Oxford University Press. 23.score: 18.0
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  21. Troels Engberg-Pedersen (2004). Stoicism in the Apostle Paul: A Philosophical Reading. In Steven K. Strange & Jack Zupko (eds.), Stoicism: Traditions and Transformations. Cambridge University Press. 52--75.score: 18.0
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  22. Calvin Normore (2004). Abelard's Stoicism and its Consequences. In Steven K. Strange & Jack Zupko (eds.), Stoicism: Traditions and Transformations. Cambridge University Press. 132--147.score: 18.0
     
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  23. John Stevens (2007). Platonism and Stoicism in Vergil's Aeneid. In Mauro Bonazzi & Christoph Helmig (eds.), Platonic Stoicism, Stoic Platonism: The Dialogue Between Platonism and Stoicism in Antiquity. Leuven University Press. 39.score: 18.0
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  24. Gerard Watson (1971). The Natural Law and Stoicism. In A. A. Long (ed.), Problems in Stoicism. Athlone Press. 216--38.score: 18.0
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  25. Amélie Rorty (1996). The Two Faces of Stoicism: Rousseau and Freud. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (3):335-356.score: 15.0
  26. David B. Wong (2006). The Meaning of Detachment in Daoism, Buddhism, and Stoicism. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (2):207-219.score: 15.0
  27. A. A. Long (1982). Soul and Body in Stoicism. Phronesis 27 (1):34 - 57.score: 15.0
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  28. Kenley R. Dove (2006). Logic and Theory in Aristotle, Stoicism, Hegel. Philosophical Forum 37 (3):265–320.score: 15.0
  29. Gisela Striker (2008). Stoicism and Emotion - by Margaret R. Graver. Philosophical Books 49 (4):372-373.score: 15.0
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  30. Brad Inwood (1985). Ethics and Human Action in Early Stoicism. Oxford University Press.score: 15.0
    This book reconstructs in detail the older Stoic theory of the psychology of action, discussing it in relation to Aristotelian, Epicurean, Platonic, and some of the more influential modern theories. Important Greek terms are transliterated and explained; no knowledge of Greek is required.
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  31. Runar M. Thorsteinsson (2010). Roman Christianity and Roman Stoicism: A Comparative Study of Ancient Morality. Oxford University Press.score: 15.0
    Runar M. Thorsteinsson presents a challenge to this view by comparing Christian morality in first-century Rome with contemporary Stoic ethics in the city ...
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  32. Brad Inwood (1986). Goal and Target in Stoicism. Journal of Philosophy 83 (10):547-556.score: 15.0
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  33. Anthony Pagden (2000). Stoicism, Cosmopolitanism, and the Legacy of European Imperialism. Constellations 7 (1):3-22.score: 15.0
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  34. Bernard Collette-Ducic (2011). Platonic StoicismStoic Platonism. The Dialogue Between Platonism and Stoicism in Antiquity. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 5 (1):187-191.score: 15.0
  35. Earle J. Coleman (2002). Aesthetic Commonalities in the Ethics of Daoism and Stoicism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 29 (3):385–395.score: 15.0
  36. Rick Anthony Furtak (2003). Thoreau's Emotional Stoicism. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 17 (2):122-132.score: 15.0
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  37. John Sellars (2006). Stoicism. Acumen.score: 15.0
    This book provides a lucid, comprehensive introduction to this great philosophical school.
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  38. Daniel Vázquez (2011). God and Cosmos in Stoicism. Dianoia 56 (66):200-210.score: 15.0
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  39. Mauro Bonazzi & Christoph Helmig (eds.) (2007). Platonic Stoicism, Stoic Platonism: The Dialogue Between Platonism and Stoicism in Antiquity. Leuven University Press.score: 15.0
    ... bénAtouïL (Université de nancy, Lphs-archives Henri Poincaré) cet article s' inscrit dans un projet plus large d'étude des rapports entre σχολή et ...
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  40. Tad Brennan (1996). Reasonable Impressions in Stoicism. Phronesis 41 (3):318-334.score: 15.0
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  41. Susan Sauvé Meyer (1999). Fate, Fatalism, and Agency in Stoicism. Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (02):250-.score: 15.0
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  42. R. J. Hankinson (1988). Stoicism, Science and Divination. Apeiron 21 (2):123 - 160.score: 15.0
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  43. Jill Kraye (2012). A and in Early Modern Discussions of the Passions: Stoicism, Christianity and Natural History. Early Science and Medicine 17 (1-2):1-2.score: 15.0
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  44. Ricardo Salles (ed.) (2009). God and Cosmos in Stoicism. Oxford University Press.score: 15.0
    This is a collective study, in nine new essays, of the close connection between theology and cosmology in Stoic philosophy.
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  45. James Warren (2008). Stoicism and Emotion (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):pp. 633-634.score: 15.0
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  46. Richard Bett (2009). The Stoics (M.R.) Graver Stoicism and Emotion. Pp. X + 289. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2007. Cased, US$37.50. ISBN: 978-0-226-30557-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (01):77-.score: 15.0
  47. Norman Gulley (1968). Ludwig Edelstein: The Meaning of Stoicism. (Martin Classical Lectures, Xxi.) Pp. Xii + 108. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1966. Cloth, 21s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 18 (01):118-119.score: 15.0
  48. Armand A. Maurer (1986). The Presence of Stoicism in Medieval Thought. Journal of the History of Philosophy 24 (2):264-266.score: 15.0
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  49. B. J. T. Dobbs (1985). Newton and Stoicism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (S1):109-123.score: 15.0
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