Search results for 'stream of consciousness' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Barry F. Dainton (2000). Stream of Consciousness: Unity and Continuity in Conscious Experience. Routledge.
    Stream of Consciousness is about the phenomenology of conscious experience. Barry Dainton shows us that stream of consciousness is not a mosaic of discrete fragments of experience, but rather an interconnected flowing whole. Through a deep probing into the nature of awareness, introspection, phenomenal space and time consciousness, Dainton offers a truly original understanding of the nature of consciousness.
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  2. Thomas Natsoulas (2001). The Concrete State: The Basic Components of James's Stream of Consciousness. Journal of Mind and Behavior 22 (4):427-449.
    The basic components of James’s stream of consciousness are considered concretely and in a way that tends to be relatively neutral from a theoretical perspective. My ultimate goal is a general description of the states of consciousness, but I try here to be more “observational” than “theoretical” about them. Giving attention to James’s reports of his personal firsthand evidence, I proceed as though I were conversing with this most phenomenological and radically empirical of psychological authors. I disagree (...)
     
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  3. Sebastian Watzl (2011). Attention as Structuring of the Stream of Consciousness. In Christopher Mole, Declan Smithies & Wayne Wu (eds.), Attention: Philosophical and Psychological Essays. Oxford University Press 145.
    This paper defends and develops the structuring account of conscious attention: attention is the conscious mental process of structuring one’s stream of consciousness so that some parts of it are more central than others. In the first part of the paper, I motivate the structuring account. Drawing on a variety of resources I argue that the phenomenology of attention cannot be fully captured in terms of how the world appears to the subject, as well as against an atomistic (...)
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  4. Andrew R. Bailey (1999). Beyond the Fringe: William James on the Transitive Parts of the Stream of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (2-3):141-53.
    One of the aspects of consciousness deserving of study is what might be called its subjective unity - the way in which, though conscious experience moves from object to object, and can be said to have distinct ‘states', it nevertheless in some sense apparently forms a singular flux divided only by periods of unconsciousness. The work of William James provides a valuable, and rather unique, source of analysis of this feature of consciousness; however, in my opinion, this component (...)
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  5.  11
    Alex Watson (2014). The Self as a Dynamic Constant. Rāmakaṇṭha’s Middle Ground Between a Naiyāyika Eternal Self-Substance and a Buddhist Stream of Consciousness-Moments. Journal of Indian Philosophy 42 (1):173-193.
    The paper gives an account of Rāmakaṇṭha’s (950–1000) contribution to the Buddhist–Brāhmaṇical debate about the existence or non-existence of a self, by demonstrating how he carves out middle ground between the two protagonists in that debate. First three points of divergence between the Brāhmaṇical (specifically Naiyāyika) and the Buddhist conceptions of subjectivity are identified. These take the form of Buddhist denials of, or re-explanations of (1) the self as the unitary essence of the individual, (2) the self as the substance (...)
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  6. Thomas Natsoulas (2001). The Case for Intrinsic Theory: Incompatibilities Within the Stream of Consciousness. Journal of Mind and Behavior 22 (2):119-145.
    In The Varieties of Religious Experience, James explores in some depth, among much else, a kind of dividedness that can exist within the stream of consciousness — “the divided self.” This condition of the stream consists in crucial part of a phenomenological heterogeneity, inconsistency, discordance, or division of which disapproving notice is taken subjectively. The pertinent discordance exists among states of consciousness that comprise the same stream, is evident directly to inner awareness, (...)
     
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  7.  13
    Marta Jorba (2015). Thoughts, Processive Character and the Stream of Consciousness. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 23 (5):730-753.
    This paper explores the relation of thought and the stream of consciousness in the light of an ontological argument raised against cognitive phenomenology views. I argue that the ontological argument relies on a notion of ‘processive character’ that does not stand up to scrutiny and therefore it is insufficient for the argument to go through. I then analyse two more views on what ‘processive character’ means and argue that the process-part account best captures the intuition behind the argument. (...)
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  8. Susan J. Blackmore (2002). There is No Stream of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (5):17-28.
    Throughout history there have been people who say it is all illusion. I think they may be right. But if they are right what could this mean? If you just say "It's all an illusion" this gets you nowhere - except that a whole lot of other questions appear. Why should we all be victims of an illusion, instead of seeing things the way they really are? What sort of illusion is it anyway? Why is it like that and not (...)
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  9. K. S. Pope (1978). How Gender, Solitude, and Posture Influence the Stream of Consciousness. In K. S. Pope & Jerome L. Singer (eds.), The Stream of Consciousness: Scientific Investigation Into the Flow of Experience. Plenum
  10. Barry Dainton (2002). Stream of Consciousness: Unity and Continuity in Conscious Experience. Routledge.
    _Stream of Consciousness_ is about the phenomenology of conscious experience. Barry Dainton shows us that stream of consciousness is not a mosaic of discrete fragments of experience, but rather an interconnected flowing whole. Through a deep probing into the nature of awareness, introspection, phenomenal space and time consciousness, Dainton offers a truly original understanding of the nature of consciousness.
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  11. Barry Dainton (2006). Stream of Consciousness: Unity and Continuity in Conscious Experience. Routledge.
    Barry Dainton’s controversial and highly original _Stream of Consciousness_ aroused considerable interest when it was first published. This new paperback edition includes a postscript in which Dainton responds to some of his critics. Despite the recent upsurge of interest in consciousness, most of this has been focused on the relationship between consciousness and the brain. This has meant that significant and intriguing questions concerning the fundamental characteristics of consciousness itself have not received the attention they deserve. _Stream (...)
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  12. Joseph F. Rychlak (1978). The Stream of Consciousness: Implications for a Humanistic Psychological Theory. In K. S. Pope & Jerome L. Singer (eds.), The Stream of Consciousness: Scientific Investigation Into the Flow of Experience. Plenum
     
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  13. J. R. Strange (1978). A Search for the Sources of the Stream of Consciousness. In K. S. Pope & Jerome L. Singer (eds.), The Stream of Consciousness: Scientific Investigation Into the Flow of Experience. Plenum
     
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  14.  9
    Gregory Hickok (forthcoming). Rhythms of the Brain – It's Not a ʻStream of Consciousnessʼ. Rhuthmos.
    A version of this op-ed appeared in print on May 10, 2015, on page SR9 of the New York edition of The New York Times with the headline : “Rhythms of the Brain”. It is also online here. IN 1890, the American psychologist William James famously likened our conscious experience to the flow of a stream. “A ‘river' or a ‘stream' are the metaphors by which it is most naturally described,” he wrote. “In talking of it hereafter, let's (...)
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  15.  5
    David Wiggins (1976). Locke, Butler and the Stream of Consciousness: And Men as a Natural Kind: David Wiggins. Philosophy 51 (196):131-158.
    Locke defined a person as ‘a thinking intelligent being, that has reason and reflection, and can consider itself as itself, the same thinking thing, in different times and places” . To many who have been excited by the same thought as Locke, continuity of consciousness has seemed to be an integral part of what we mean by a person. The intuitive appeal of the idea that to secure the continuing identity of a person one experience must flow into (...)
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  16. Marica Bernstein, Samantha Stiehl & John Bickle (2000). The Effect of Motivation on the Stream of Consciousness: Generalizing From a Neurocomputational Model of Cingulo-Frontal Circuits Controlling Saccadic Eye Movements. In Ralph D. Ellis & Natika Newton (eds.), The Caldron of Consciousness: Motivation, Affect and Self-Organization. John Benjamins 133-160.
  17. Keith A. Choquette (2007). Process, Quantum Coherence, and the Stream of Consciousness. Journal of Mind and Behavior 28 (3-4):203-232.
    Process philosophy has emerged as an approach to consciousness within contemporary science although re-consideration of Whitehead and James clearly contrasts with twentieth century materialism. In spite of controversy a number of researchers have described the concept of quantum coherence within living organisms that provides the basis of new process oriented theories. Among these researchers are Penrose and Hameroff who suggest that quantum gravity yields coherent processes fundamental to the idea of consciousness. Pribram emphasizes holographic processes in the brain (...)
     
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  18.  66
    Timothy J. Bayne (2001). Co-Consciousness: Review of Barry Dainton's Stream of Consciousness. [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (3):79-92.
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  19.  5
    Bernard J. Baars (1993). How Does a Serial, Integrated and Very Limited Stream of Consciousness Emerge From a Nervous System That is Mostly Unconscious, Distributed, Parallel and of Enormous Capacity? In G. R. Bock & James L. Marsh (eds.), Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Consciousness. Ciba Foundation Symposium 174 174--282.
  20. Daniel C. Dennett (1997). The Cartesian Theater and “Filling In” the Stream of Consciousness. In Ned Block, Owen Flanagan & Güven Güzeldere (eds.), The Nature of Consciousness: Philosophical Debates. MIT Press 83--88.
     
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  21. Owen Flanagan (1997). The Robust Phenomenology of the Stream of Consciousness. In Ned Block, Owen Flanagan & Güven Güzeldere (eds.), The Nature of Consciousness: Philosophical Debates. MIT Press 89--93.
     
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  22.  1
    Kenneth S. Pope & Jerome L. Singer (1980). The Waking Stream of Consciousness. In J. M. Davidson & Richard J. Davidson (eds.), The Psychobiology of Consciousness. Plenum 169--191.
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  23. Marica Bernstein, Sara Stiehl & John Bickle (2000). Limbic Connectivities with Parietofrontal Circuits Controlling Saccadic Eye Movements: A Neurobiological Model for the Role of Affect in the Stream of Consciousness. In Ralph D. Ellis (ed.), The Caldron of Consciousness: Motivation, Affect and Self-Organization. John Benjamins
     
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  24. Shaun Gallagher (2003). Sync-Ing in the Stream of Experience: Time-Consciousness in Broad, Husserl, and Dainton. Psyche 9 (10).
    By examining Dainton's account of the temporality of consciousness in the context of long-running debates about the specious present and time consciousness in both the Jamesian and the phenomenological traditions, I raise critical objections to his overlap model. Dainton's interpretations of Broad and Husserl are both insightful and problematic. In addition, there are unresolved problems in Dainton's own analysis of conscious experience. These problems involve ongoing content, lingering content, and a lack of phenomenological clarity concerning the central concept (...)
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  25.  37
    Daniel C. Dennett (1998). No Bridge Over the Stream of Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):753-754.
    Pessoa et al.'s target article shows that although filling-in of various kinds does appear to occur in the brain, it is not required in order to furnish a “bridge locus” where neural events are “isomorphic” to the features of visual consciousness. Some recently uncovered completion phenomena may well play a crucial role in the elaboration of normal visual experience, but others occur too slowly to contribute to normal visual content.
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  26.  52
    Thomas Natsoulas (1988). Sympathy, Empathy, and the Stream of Consciousness. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 18 (June):169-195.
  27.  18
    L. Petchkovsky (2000). 'Stream of Consciousness' and 'Ownership of Thought' in Indigenous People in Central Australia. Journal of Analytical Psychology 45 (4):577-597.
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  28. K. S. Pope & Jerome L. Singer (eds.) (1978). The Stream of Consciousness: Scientific Investigations Into the Flow of Human Experience. Plenum Press.
  29.  66
    Aron Gurwitsch (1943). William James' Theory of the "Transitive Parts" of the Stream of Consciousness. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 3 (June):449-477.
  30. Barry F. Dainton (2004). Precis of Stream of Consciousness. Psyche 10 (1).
    That our ordinary everyday experience exhibits both unity and continuity is uncontroversial, and on the face of it utterly unmysterious. At any moment we have some conscious awareness of both the world about us, as revealed through our perceptual experiences, and our own inner states.
     
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  31.  53
    T. J. Bittner (2004). Could the Stream of Consciousness Flow Through the Brain. Philosophia 31 (3-4):449-473.
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  32. Thomas Natsoulas (2003). The Stream of Consciousness: XXVIII. Does Consciousness Exist? (First Part). Imagination, Cognition and Personality 23 (2):121-141.
     
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  33. Thomas Natsoulas (2006). The Stream of Consciousness: XXIX. Does Consciousness Exist? (Second Part). Imagination, Cognition and Personality 25 (1):69-84.
     
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  34.  41
    Milic Capek (1950). Stream of Consciousness and "Duree Reelle". Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 10 (March):331-353.
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  35. Thomas Natsoulas (2000). The Stream of Consciousness: XXII. Apprehension and the Feeling Aspect. Imagination, Cognition and Personality 20 (3):275-295.
     
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  36. Malia Fox Mason, In Search of a Default Mental Mode: Stimulus-Independent Thought, Stream of Consciousness, and the Psychology of Mindwandering.
     
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  37. Thomas Natsoulas (2001). The Stream of Consciousness: XXV. Awareness as Commentary (Part I). Imagination, Cognition and Personality 21 (4):347-366.
     
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  38. Donald Dryden (2001). Susanne Langer and William James: Art and the Dynamics of the Stream of Consciousness. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 15 (4):272-285.
  39.  7
    Georg Northoff (2014). Do Cortical Midline Variability and Low Frequency Fluctuations Mediate William James’ “Stream of Consciousness”? “Neurophenomenal Balance Hypothesis” of “Inner Time Consciousness”. Consciousness and Cognition 30:184-200.
  40. Matthew Soteriou (2007). Content and the Stream of Consciousness. Philosophical Perspectives 21 (1):543–568.
  41. John-Dylan Haynes & Geraint Rees (2005). Predicting the Stream of Consciousness From Activity in Human Visual Cortex. Current Biology 15 (14):1301-7.
  42. Joel Krueger (2007). Stream of Consciousness. In John Lachs & Robert Talisse (eds.), Encyclopedia of American Philosophy. Routledge
  43. Barry Dainton (2004). Precis: Stream of Consciousness. Psyche 10.
    That our ordinary everyday experience exhibits both unity and continuity is uncontroversial, and on the face of it utterly unmysterious. At any moment we have some conscious awareness of both the world about us, as revealed through our perceptual experiences, and our own inner states – our bodily sensations, thoughts, mental images and so on. Since once wakened we tend to stay awake for several hours, tracing out continuous routes through whatever environment we happen to find ourselves in, it is (...)
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  44.  7
    Christina Merrick, Melika Farnia, Tiffany K. Jantz, Adam Gazzaley & Ezequiel Morsella (2015). External Control of the Stream of Consciousness: Stimulus-Based Effects on Involuntary Thought Sequences. Consciousness and Cognition 33:217-225.
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  45.  36
    Evander Bradley McGilvary (1907). The Stream of Consciousness. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 4 (9):225-235.
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    Evander Bradley McGilvary (1907). The Stream of Consciousness. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 4 (9):225-235.
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  47. H. R. Pollio (1990). The Stream of Consciousness Since James. In M. Johnson & Tracy B. Henley (eds.), Reflections on "the Principles of Psychology": William James After a Century. Lawrence Erlbaum
  48.  25
    J. Kaag (2006). Paddling in the Stream of Consciousness: Describing the Movement of Jamesian Inquiry. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 20 (2):132-145.
  49.  4
    Lee F. Werth (1986). The Banks of the Stream of Consciousness. History of Philosophy Quarterly 3 (1):89 - 105.
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  50.  6
    Haim Callev (2000). The Stream of Consciousness: A Reply to Debaise. Film-Philosophy 4 (1).
    Didier Debaise The Mechanisms of Thought: A Jamesian Point of View on Resnais _Film-Philosophy_, vol. 4 no. 10, April 2000.
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