Search results for 'stream of consciousness' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Barry F. Dainton (2000). Stream of Consciousness: Unity and Continuity in Conscious Experience. Routledge.score: 180.0
    Stream of Consciousness is about the phenomenology of conscious experience. Barry Dainton shows us that stream of consciousness is not a mosaic of discrete fragments of experience, but rather an interconnected flowing whole. Through a deep probing into the nature of awareness, introspection, phenomenal space and time consciousness, Dainton offers a truly original understanding of the nature of consciousness.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Thomas Natsoulas (2001). The Concrete State: The Basic Components of James's Stream of Consciousness. Journal Of Mind And Behavior 22 (4):427-449.score: 153.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Sebastian Watzl (2011). Attention as Structuring of the Stream of Consciousness. In Christopher Mole, Declan Smithies & Wayne Wu (eds.), Attention: Philosophical and Psychological Essays. Oxford University Press. 145.score: 148.0
    This paper defends and develops the structuring account of conscious attention: attention is the conscious mental process of structuring one’s stream of consciousness so that some parts of it are more central than others. In the first part of the paper, I motivate the structuring account. Drawing on a variety of resources I argue that the phenomenology of attention cannot be fully captured in terms of how the world appears to the subject, as well as against an atomistic (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Andrew R. Bailey (1999). Beyond the Fringe: William James on the Transitive Parts of the Stream of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (2-3):141-53.score: 146.0
    One of the aspects of consciousness deserving of study is what might be called its subjective unity - the way in which, though conscious experience moves from object to object, and can be said to have distinct ‘states', it nevertheless in some sense apparently forms a singular flux divided only by periods of unconsciousness. The work of William James provides a valuable, and rather unique, source of analysis of this feature of consciousness; however, in my opinion, this component (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Alex Watson (2014). The Self as a Dynamic Constant. Rāmakaṇṭha's Middle Ground Between a Naiyāyika Eternal Self-Substance and a Buddhist Stream of Consciousness-Moments. Journal of Indian Philosophy 42 (1):173-193.score: 129.0
    The paper gives an account of Rāmakaṇṭha’s (950–1000) contribution to the Buddhist–Brāhmaṇical debate about the existence or non-existence of a self, by demonstrating how he carves out middle ground between the two protagonists in that debate. First three points of divergence between the Brāhmaṇical (specifically Naiyāyika) and the Buddhist conceptions of subjectivity are identified. These take the form of Buddhist denials of, or re-explanations of (1) the self as the unitary essence of the individual, (2) the self as the substance (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. K. S. Pope (1978). How Gender, Solitude, and Posture Influence the Stream of Consciousness. In K. S. Pope & Jerome L. Singer (eds.), The Stream of Consciousness: Scientific Investigation Into the Flow of Experience. Plenum.score: 120.0
  7. Joseph F. Rychlak (1978). The Stream of Consciousness: Implications for a Humanistic Psychological Theory. In K. S. Pope & Jerome L. Singer (eds.), The Stream of Consciousness: Scientific Investigation Into the Flow of Experience. Plenum.score: 120.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. J. R. Strange (1978). A Search for the Sources of the Stream of Consciousness. In K. S. Pope & Jerome L. Singer (eds.), The Stream of Consciousness: Scientific Investigation Into the Flow of Experience. Plenum.score: 120.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Susan J. Blackmore (2002). There is No Stream of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (5):17-28.score: 113.0
    Throughout history there have been people who say it is all illusion. I think they may be right. But if they are right what could this mean? If you just say "It's all an illusion" this gets you nowhere - except that a whole lot of other questions appear. Why should we all be victims of an illusion, instead of seeing things the way they really are? What sort of illusion is it anyway? Why is it like that and not (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Marica Bernstein, Samantha Stiehl & John Bickle (2000). The Effect of Motivation on the Stream of Consciousness: Generalizing From a Neurocomputational Model of Cingulo-Frontal Circuits Controlling Saccadic Eye Movements. In Ralph D. Ellis & Natika Newton (eds.), The Caldron of Consciousness: Motivation, Affect and Self-Organization. John Benjamins. 133-160.score: 110.0
  11. L. Petchkovsky (2000). 'Stream of Consciousness' and 'Ownership of Thought' in Indigenous People in Central Australia. Journal of Analytical Psychology 45 (4):577-597.score: 105.0
  12. Timothy J. Bayne (2001). Co-Consciousness: Review of Barry Dainton's Stream of Consciousness. [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (3):79-92.score: 104.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Hermann Burchard (2011). The Role of Conscious Attention in Perception. Foundations of Science 16 (1):67-99.score: 104.0
    Impressions, energy radiated by phenomena in the momentary environmental scene, enter sensory neurons, creating in afferent nerves a data stream. Following Kant, by our inner sense the mind perceives its own thoughts as it ties together sense data into an internalized scene. The mind, residing in the brain, logically a Language Machine, processes and stores items as coded grammatical entities. Kantian synthetic unity in the linguistic brain is able to deliver our experience of the scene as we appear to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Bernard J. Baars (1993). How Does a Serial, Integrated and Very Limited Stream of Consciousness Emerge From a Nervous System That is Mostly Unconscious, Distributed, Parallel and of Enormous Capacity? In G. R. Bock & James L. Marsh (eds.), Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Consciousness. Ciba Foundation Symposium 174. 174--282.score: 104.0
  15. Marica Bernstein, Sara Stiehl & John Bickle (2000). Limbic Connectivities with Parietofrontal Circuits Controlling Saccadic Eye Movements: A Neurobiological Model for the Role of Affect in the Stream of Consciousness. In Ralph D. Ellis (ed.), The Caldron of Consciousness: Motivation, Affect and Self-Organization. John Benjamins.score: 104.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Daniel C. Dennett (1997). The Cartesian Theater and “Filling In” the Stream of Consciousness. In Ned Block, Owen Flanagan & Güven Güzeldere (eds.), The Nature of Consciousness: Philosophical Debates. Mit Press. 83--88.score: 104.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Owen Flanagan (1997). The Robust Phenomenology of the Stream of Consciousness. In Ned Block, Owen Flanagan & Güven Güzeldere (eds.), The Nature of Consciousness: Philosophical Debates. Mit Press. 89--93.score: 104.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Kenneth S. Pope & Jerome L. Singer (1980). The Waking Stream of Consciousness. In. In J. M. Davidson & Richard J. Davidson (eds.), The Psychobiology of Consciousness. Plenum. 169--191.score: 104.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Richard W. Taylor (1963). The Stream of Thoughts Versus Mental Acts. Philosophical Quarterly 13 (October):311-321.score: 102.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Daniel C. Dennett (1998). No Bridge Over the Stream of Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):753-754.score: 102.0
    Pessoa et al.'s target article shows that although filling-in of various kinds does appear to occur in the brain, it is not required in order to furnish a “bridge locus” where neural events are “isomorphic” to the features of visual consciousness. Some recently uncovered completion phenomena may well play a crucial role in the elaboration of normal visual experience, but others occur too slowly to contribute to normal visual content.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Shaun Gallagher (2003). Sync-Ing in the Stream of Experience Sync-Ing in the Stream of Experience: Time-Consciousness in Broad, Husserl, and Dainton. Psyche 9 (10).score: 101.0
    By examining Dainton's account of the temporality of consciousness in the context of long-running debates about the specious present and time consciousness in both the Jamesian and the phenomenological traditions, I raise critical objections to his overlap model. Dainton's interpretations of Broad and Husserl are both insightful and problematic. In addition, there are unresolved problems in Dainton's own analysis of conscious experience. These problems involve ongoing content, lingering content, and a lack of phenomenological clarity concerning the central concept (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Grace Natoli (2008). Augustinian Moral Consciousness and the Businessman. Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1-2):97 - 107.score: 101.0
    Augustine of Hippo (354–430 A.D.) meditated on the transcendent attributes of numbers that accountants so skillfully employ and on the attributes of moral rules. He thereby achieved a profound awareness of their Source in Truth. Nature is also governed by numbers; it is a “melody” that, again, woos one to its Source in Beauty. Whereas some businessmen meditate to clear their minds of clutter so as to make successful business decisions, Augustine persisted beyond the mere absence of clutter. Within the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Elizabeth Schechter (2013). The Unity of Consciousness: Subjects and Objectivity. Philosophical Studies 165 (2):671-692.score: 100.0
    This paper concerns the role that reference to subjects of experience can play in individuating streams of consciousness, and the relationship between the subjective and the objective structure of consciousness. A critique of Tim Bayne’s recent book indicates certain crucial choices that works on the unity of consciousness must make. If one identifies the subject of experience with something whose consciousness is necessarily unified, then one cannot offer an account of the objective structure of consciousness. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Thomas Natsoulas (1988). Sympathy, Empathy, and the Stream of Consciousness. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 18 (June):169-195.score: 99.0
  25. Mara Miller (forthcoming). Aesthetics as Investigation of Self, Subject, and Ethical Agency Under Trauma in Kawabata's Post-War Novel The Sound of the Mountain. Philosophy and Literature.score: 99.0
    Yasunari Kawabata’s 1952 novel The Sound of the Mountain is widely praised for its aesthetic qualities, from its adaptation of aesthetics from the Tale of Genji, through the beauty of its prose and the patterning of its images, to the references to arts and nature within the text. This article, by contrast, shows that Kawabata uses these features to demonstrate the effects of the mass trauma following the Second World War and the complicated grief it induced, on the psychology of (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Thomas Natsoulas (2001). The Case for Intrinsic Theory: Incompatibilities Within the Stream of Consciousness. Journal Of Mind And Behavior 22 (2):119-145.score: 99.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. H. Sidky (2009). A Shaman's Cure: The Relationship Between Altered States of Consciousness and Shamanic Healing. Anthropology of Consciousness 20 (2):171-197.score: 98.0
    This study, which is based upon ethnographic data collected between 1999 and 2008 in Nepal, examines the connection between the shaman's altered states of consciousness (ASC; i.e., what goes on inside the healer's mind/brain) and therapeutic changes that take place in the patient's mind/body. Unlike other studies that primarily emphasize the shaman's internal psychological state, this article attempts to explain the role of the healer's ASC and elucidate how desired therapeutic changes depend upon patient–healer interactions. This question is explored (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Farid Masrour (forthcoming). Unity of Consciousness: In Defense of a Leibnizian View. In Christopher Hill David Bennett (ed.), Sensory Integration and the Unity of Consciousness. MIT Press.score: 98.0
    It is common to hold that our conscious experiences at a single moment are often unified. But when consciousness is unified, what are the fundamental facts in virtue of which it is unified? On some accounts of the unity of consciousness, the most fundamental fact that grounds unity is a form of singularity or oneness. These accounts are similar to Newtonian views of space according to which the most fundamental fact that grounds relations of co-spatiality between various points (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Wenyi Zhang (2014). Bearing the Decline of Animal Sacrifice: Enhanced State of Consciousness, Illness, Taboos, and the Government in Southwest China. Anthropology of Consciousness 25 (1):116-140.score: 98.0
    In this study, I analyze how economic development projects and the ethnic tourism project in Southwest China have contributed to the failure of the ethnic Kachin villagers to observe taboos involved in shamanic healing rituals. Such a failure, initially as a local response to politico-economic processes in Southwest China, exacerbates the increasingly poor health status of Kachin shamans in the local community. Taboos thus become an active site where the local decline of animal sacrifice intersects with regional processes of economic (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Barry Dainton, Précis: Stream of Consciousness.score: 96.0
    That our ordinary everyday experience exhibits both unity and continuity is uncontroversial, and on the face of it utterly unmysterious. At any moment we have some conscious awareness of both the world about us, as revealed through our perceptual experiences, and our own inner states – our bodily sensations, thoughts, mental images and so on. Since once wakened we tend to stay awake for several hours, tracing out continuous routes through whatever environment we happen to find ourselves in, it is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Barry F. Dainton (2004). Precis of Stream of Consciousness. Psyche 10 (1).score: 96.0
    That our ordinary everyday experience exhibits both unity and continuity is uncontroversial, and on the face of it utterly unmysterious. At any moment we have some conscious awareness of both the world about us, as revealed through our perceptual experiences, and our own inner states.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. T. J. Bittner (2004). Could the Stream of Consciousness Flow Through the Brain. Philosophia 31 (3-4):449-473.score: 96.0
  33. Aron Gurwitsch (1943). William James' Theory of the "Transitive Parts" of the Stream of Consciousness. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 3 (June):449-477.score: 96.0
  34. Milic Capek (1950). Stream of Consciousness and "Duree Reelle". Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 10 (March):331-353.score: 96.0
  35. Thomas Natsoulas (2000). The Stream of Consciousness: XXII. Apprehension and the Feeling Aspect. Imagination, Cognition and Personality 20 (3):275-295.score: 96.0
  36. Berit Brogaard (forthcoming). The Status of Consciousness in Nature. In Steven Miller (ed.), The Constitution of Consciousness, Volume 2. John Benjamins Publishing Company.score: 96.0
    The most central metaphysical question about phenomenal consciousness is that of what constitutes phenomenal consciousness, whereas the most central epistemic question about consciousness is that of whether science can eventually provide an explanation of phenomenal consciousness. Many philosophers have argued that science doesn't have the means to answer the question of what consciousness is (the explanatory gap) but that consciousness nonetheless is fully determined by the physical facts underlying it (no metaphysical gap). Others have (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Malia Fox Mason, In Search of a Default Mental Mode: Stimulus-Independent Thought, Stream of Consciousness, and the Psychology of Mindwandering.score: 96.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Thomas Natsoulas (2003). The Stream of Consciousness: XXVIII. Does Consciousness Exist? (First Part). Imagination, Cognition and Personality 23 (2):121-141.score: 96.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Thomas Natsoulas (2006). The Stream of Consciousness: XXIX. Does Consciousness Exist? (Second Part). Imagination, Cognition and Personality 25 (1):69-84.score: 96.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Thomas Natsoulas (2001). The Stream of Consciousness: XXV. Awareness as Commentary (Part I). Imagination, Cognition and Personality 21 (4):347-366.score: 96.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Ken Wilber (2000). Waves, Streams, States and Self: Further Considerations for an Integral Theory of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (11-12):145-176.score: 95.0
  42. J. Diaz (1996). The Stream Revisited: A Process Model of Phenomenological Consciousness. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness. MIT Press.score: 95.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Joel Krueger (2007). Stream of Consciousness. In John Lachs & Robert Talisse (eds.), Encyclopedia of American Philosophy. Routledge.score: 93.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Evander Bradley McGilvary (1907). The Stream of Consciousness. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 4 (9):225-235.score: 93.0
  45. Donald Dryden (2001). Susanne Langer and William James: Art and the Dynamics of the Stream of Consciousness. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 15 (4):272-285.score: 93.0
  46. Evander Bradley McGilvary (1907). The Stream of Consciousness. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 4 (9):225-235.score: 93.0
  47. J. Kaag (2006). Paddling in the Stream of Consciousness: Describing the Movement of Jamesian Inquiry. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 20 (2):132-145.score: 93.0
  48. Lee F. Werth (1986). The Banks of the Stream of Consciousness. History of Philosophy Quarterly 3 (1):89 - 105.score: 93.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Haim Callev (2000). The Stream of Consciousness: A Reply to Debaise. Film-Philosophy 4 (1).score: 93.0
    Didier Debaise The Mechanisms of Thought: A Jamesian Point of View on Resnais _Film-Philosophy_, vol. 4 no. 10, April 2000.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Keith A. Choquette (2007). Process, Quantum Coherence, and the Stream of Consciousness. Journal of Mind and Behavior 28 (3-4):203-232.score: 93.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000