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Bibliography: Stuff in Metaphysics
  1. Hot Stuff (2000). Paul Needham. In J. Faye, U. Scheffler & M. Urchs (eds.), Things, Facts and Events. Rhodopi. 76--421.score: 30.0
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  2. Shieva Kleinschmidt (2007). Some Things About Stuff. Philosophical Studies 135 (3):407 - 423.score: 18.0
    I examine the implications of positing stuff (which occupies an ontological category distinct from things) as a way to avoid colocation in the case of the statue and the bronze that constitutes it. When characterising stuff, it’s intuitive to say we often individuate stuff kinds by appealing to things and their relations (e.g., water is water rather than gold because it is entirely divisible into subportions which constitute or partially constitute H2O molecules). I argue that if this (...)
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  3. Lucía Lewowicz & Olimpia Lombardi (2013). Stuff Versus Individuals. Foundations of Chemistry 15 (1):65-77.score: 18.0
    The general question to be considered in this paper points to the nature of the world described by chemistry: what is macro-chemical ontology like? In particular, we want to identify the ontological categories that underlie chemical discourse and chemical practice. This is not an easy task, because modern Western metaphysics was strongly modeled by theoretical physics. For this reason, we attempt to answer our question by contrasting macro-chemical ontology with the mainstream ontology of physics and of traditional metaphysics. In particular, (...)
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  4. Mark Steen (2011). More Problems for MaxCon: Contingent Particularity and Stuff-Thing Coincidence. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 26 (2):135-154.score: 18.0
    Ned Markosian argues (Australasian Journal of Philosophy 76:213-228, 1998a; Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82:332-340, 2004a, The Monist 87:405-428, 2004b) that simples are ‘maximally continuous’ entities. This leads him to conclude that there could be non-particular ‘stuff’ in addition to things. I first show how an ensuing debate on this issue McDaniel (Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81(2):265-275, 2003); Markosian (Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82:332-340, 2004a) ended in deadlock. I attempt to break the deadlock. Markosian’s view entails stuff-thing coincidence, which (...)
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  5. Maureen Donnelly & Thomas Bittner (2009). Summation Relations and Portions of Stuff. Philosophical Studies 143 (2):167 - 185.score: 18.0
    According to the prevalent ‘sum view’ of stuffs, each portion of stuff is a mereological sum of its subportions. The purpose of this paper is to re-examine the sum view in the light of a modal temporal mereology which distinguishes between different varieties of summation relations. While admitting David Barnett’s recent counter-example to the sum view (Barnett, Philos Rev 113:89–100, 2004), we show that there is nonetheless an important sense in which all portions of stuff are sums of (...)
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  6. Itay Shani (2010). Mind Stuffed with Red Herrings: Why William James' Critique of the Mind-Stuff Theory Does Not Substantiate a Combination Problem for Panpsychism. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 25 (4):413-434.score: 15.0
  7. Ned Markosian (2004). Simples, Stuff, and Simple People. The Monist 87 (3):405-428.score: 15.0
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  8. David Nicolas (2009). Mereological Essentialism, Composition, and Stuff: A Reply to Kristie Miller. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 71 (3):425 - 429.score: 12.0
    In ‘Essential stuff' (2008) and ‘Stuff' (2009), Kristie Miller argues that two generally accepted theses, often formulated as follows, are incompatible: - (Temporal) mereological essentialism for stuff (or matter), the thesis that any portion of stuff has the same parts at every time it exists. - Stuff composition, the thesis that for any two portions of stuff, there exists a portion of stuff that is their mereological sum (or fusion). She does this by (...)
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  9. David Barnett (2004). Some Stuffs Are Not Sums of Stuff. Philosophical Review 113 (1):89-100.score: 12.0
    Milk, sand, plastic, uranium, wood, carbon, and oil are kinds of stuff. The sand in Hawaii, the uranium in North Korea, and the oil in Iraq are portions of stuff. Not everyone believes in portions of stuff.1 Those who do are likely to agree that, whatever their more specific natures, portions of stuff can at least be identified with mereological sums of their subportions.2 It seems after all trivial that a given portion of stuff just (...)
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  10. Crawford L. Elder (2003). Destruction, Alteration, Simples and World Stuff. Philosophical Quarterly 53 (210):24–38.score: 12.0
    When a tree is chopped to bits, or a sweater unravelled, its matter still exists. Since antiquity, it has sometimes been inferred that nothing really has been destroyed: what has happened is just that this matter has assumed new form. Contemporary versions hold that apparent destruction of a familiar object is just rearrangement of microparticles or of 'physical simples' or 'world stuff'. But if destruction of a familiar object is genuinely to be reduced to mere alteration of something else, (...)
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  11. Martín Labarca & Olimpia Lombardi (2009). Klaus Ruthenberg and Jaap Van Brakel (Eds): Stuff. The Nature of Chemical Substances. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 11 (3):183-186.score: 12.0
    Klaus Ruthenberg and Jaap van Brakel (eds): Stuff. The nature of chemical substances Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 183-186 DOI 10.1007/s10698-009-9077-6 Authors Martín Labarca, CONICET, Universidad Nacional de Quilmes Buenos Aires Argentina Olimpia Lombardi, CONICET, Universidad de Buenos Aires Buenos Aires Argentina Journal Foundations of Chemistry Online ISSN 1572-8463 Print ISSN 1386-4238 Journal Volume Volume 11 Journal Issue Volume 11, Number 3.
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  12. Steven Weinstein, Review of "Space, Time, and Stuff", Frank Arntzenius, OUP 2012. [REVIEW]score: 12.0
    Review of "Space, Time, and Stuff" by Frank Arntzenius.
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  13. Francis Jeffry Pelletier (ed.) (2009). Kinds, Things, and Stuff: Mass Terms and Generics. OUP USA.score: 12.0
    A generic statement is a type of generalization that is made by asserting that a "kind" has a certain property. For example we might hear that marshmallows are sweet. Here, we are talking about the "kind" marshmallow and assert that individual instances of this kind have the property of being sweet. Almost all of our common sense knowledge about the everyday world is put in terms of generic statements. What can make these generic sentences be true even when there are (...)
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  14. Ron Broglio (2011). Thinking About Stuff: Posthumanist Phenomenology and Cognition. [REVIEW] AI and Society 26 (2):187-192.score: 12.0
    Emerging digital technologies, such as sensors and pervasive computing, provide a robust interplay between digital and physical space. Architecture as a disciplinary endeavor has subsumed the capacities of these technologies without allowing the difference these technologies afford to challenge fundamental notions of architecture, such as cognition, visibility, and presence. This essay explores the inverse of the architectural ground by exploring the cognitive capacity for non-animate entities. The implication of this posthuman phenomenology is that entities themselves pose questions and that “ (...)” thinks. Given an expanded definition of thinking, the environment is an active agent of entities that respond to human building with forces, tensions, marks, and crossings—physical elements that yield symbolic significance in our world. (shrink)
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  15. S. Llewellyn (2013). Such Stuff as Dreams Are Made On? Elaborative Encoding, the Ancient Art of Memory, and the Hippocampus. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (6):589-607.score: 12.0
    This article argues that rapid eye movement (REM) dreaming is elaborative encoding for episodic memories. Elaborative encoding in REM can, at least partially, be understood through ancient art of memory (AAOM) principles: visualization, bizarre association, organization, narration, embodiment, and location. These principles render recent memories more distinctive through novel and meaningful association with emotionally salient, remote memories. The AAOM optimizes memory performance, suggesting that its principles may predict aspects of how episodic memory is configured in the brain. Integration and segregation (...)
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  16. Linda Steet (2010). Girl Stuff: Same-Sex Relations in Girls' Public Reform Schools and the Institutional Response. Educational Studies 29 (4):341-358.score: 12.0
    (1998). Girl Stuff: Same-Sex Relations in Girls' Public Reform Schools and the Institutional Response. Educational Studies: Vol. 29, No. 4, pp. 341-358.
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  17. Jamie Horder (2008). Strange Stuff Indeed. Think 6 (17-18):205-209.score: 12.0
    Jamie Horder reviews The Stuff of Thought (London: Allen Lane, 2007) by Steven Pinker.
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  18. Frank Arntzenius (2012). Space, Time, & Stuff. Oxford Univ. Press.score: 12.0
    Frank Arntzenius presents a series of radical new ideas about the structure of space and time. Space, Time, and Stuff is an attempt to show that physics is geometry: that the fundamental structure of the physical world is purely geometrical structure. Along the way, he examines some non-standard views about the structure of spacetime and its inhabitants, including the idea that space and time are pointless, the idea that quantum mechanics is a completely local theory, the idea that antiparticles (...)
     
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  19. Frank Arntzenius (ed.) (2012). Space, Time, and Stuff. OUP Oxford.score: 12.0
    Frank Arntzenius presents a series of radical new ideas about the structure of space and time. Space, Time, and Stuff is an attempt to show that physics is geometry: that the fundamental structure of the physical world is purely geometrical structure. Along the way, he examines some non-standard views about the structure of spacetime and its inhabitants, including the idea that space and time are pointless, the idea that quantum mechanics is a completely local theory, the idea that antiparticles (...)
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  20. Vivian Mizrahi (2013). Sniff, Smell, and Stuff. Philosophical Studies:1-18.score: 10.0
    Most philosophers consider olfactory experiences to be very poor in comparison to other sense modalities. And because olfactory experiences seem to lack the spatial content necessary to object perception, philosophers tend to maintain that smell is purely sensational or abstract. I argue in this paper that the apparent poverty and spatial indeterminateness of odor experiences does not reflect the “subjective” or “abstract” nature of smell, but only that smell is not directed to particular things. According to the view defended in (...)
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  21. Paul Needham (2010). Transient Things and Permanent Stuff. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (1):147 – 166.score: 9.0
    A view of individuals as constituted of quantities of matter, both understood as continuants enduring over time, is elaborated in some detail. Constitution is a three-place relation which can't be collapsed to identity because of the place-holder for a time and because individuals and quantities of matter have such a radically different character. Individuals are transient entities with limited lifetimes, whereas quantities are permanent existents undergoing change in physical and chemical properties from time to time. Coincidence, considered as a matter (...)
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  22. Kurt A. Richardson, Paul Cilliers & Michael Lissack (2001). Complexity Science: A "Gray" Science for the "Stuff in Between&Quot;. Emergence 3 (2):6-18.score: 9.0
  23. Dean W. Zimmerman (1997). Coincident Objects: Could a ‘Stuff Ontology’ Help? Analysis 57 (1):19–27.score: 9.0
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  24. Thomas Bittner & M. Donnelly, A Temporal Mereology for Distinguishing Between Integral Objects and Portions of Stuff.score: 9.0
    In R. Holte and A. Howe (eds.), Proceedings of the Twenty-Second AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-07).
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  25. Michael B. Burke (1980). Cohabitation, Stuff and Intermittent Existence. Mind 89 (355):391-405.score: 9.0
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  26. Manuel Pérez Otero (2011). Possible Worlds: Structure and Stuff. Philosophical Papers 39 (2):209-237.score: 9.0
    Timothy Williamson has defended the claim that any philosophically satisfying conception of modality that encompasses possible worlds semantics (PWS) commits us to the Barcan Formula. His argument depends on the assumption that the domain of what there is (the domain of the actual world) has to be identified with the domain D(@), where @ is the index or possible world that in PWS represents , or stands for , the actual world. I work out an interpretation of the relation between (...)
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  27. Thomas Crowther (2011). The Matter of Events. Review of Metaphysics 65 (1):3- 39.score: 9.0
    A distinction has often been drawn between processes and accomplishments; between, say, *walking* and *walking to the shops*. But it has proved difficult to explain the nature of this distinction in a satisfying way. This paper offers an explanation of the nature of this distinction that is suggested by the idea that there is an ontologically significant correspondence between temporal and spatial notions. A number of writers, such as Alexander Mourelatos (1978) and Barry Taylor (1985), have argued that the spatial (...)
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  28. Thomas A. Blackson (1992). The Stuff of Conventionalism. Philosophical Studies 68 (1):65 - 81.score: 9.0
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  29. Wayne Wright (2006). Visual Stuff and Active Vision. Philosophical Psychology 19 (2):129-149.score: 9.0
    This paper examines the status of unattended visual stimuli in the light of recent work on the role of attention in visual perception. Although the question of whether attention is required for visual experience seems very interesting, this paper argues that there currently is no good reason to take a stand on the issue. Moreover, it is argued that much of the allure of that question stems from a continued attachment to the defective ‘inner picture view’ of experience and a (...)
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  30. J. Christopher Maloney (1987). The Right Stuff. Synthese 70 (March):349-72.score: 9.0
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  31. Richard E. Grandy (1975). Stuff and Things. Synthese 31 (3-4):479 - 485.score: 9.0
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  32. Kristie Miller (2008). Essential Stuff. Ratio 21 (1):55–63.score: 9.0
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  33. Robert Hanna (1984). The Relation of Form and Stuff in Husserl's Grammar of Pure Logic. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 44 (3):323-341.score: 9.0
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  34. Justin C. Fisher (1988). The Wrong Stuff: Chinese Rooms and the Nature of Understanding. Philosophical Investigations 11 (October):279-99.score: 9.0
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  35. Paul Needham (1993). Stuff. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 71 (3):270 – 290.score: 9.0
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  36. Robert C. Bishop (2009). What is This Naturalism Stuff All About? Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 29 (2):108-113.score: 9.0
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  37. Helen Morris Cartwright (1972). Chappell on Stuff and Things. Noûs 6 (4):369-377.score: 9.0
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  38. V. C. Chappell (1970). Stuff and Things. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 71:61 - 76.score: 9.0
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  39. Pascal Boyer (1987). The Stuff 'Traditions' Are Made Of: On the Implicit Ontology of an Ethnographic Category. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 17 (1):49-65.score: 9.0
  40. John E. Drabinski (1993). Radical Empiricism and Phenomenology: Philosophy and the Pure Stuff of Experience. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 7 (3):226-242.score: 9.0
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  41. Robert Fiengo (2010). Review of Francis Jeffrey Pelletier (Ed.), Kinds, Things, and Stuff: Mass Terms and Generics. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (4).score: 9.0
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  42. Laurence Goldstein, Fun Stuff.score: 9.0
    I was commissioned by Barry Smith, Editor of The Monist , to act as Advisory Editor for issue 88.1, January 2005 on the topic Humor, and we drafted the appended description. The deadline for submissions is January 31, 2004, and you are welcome to submit an article to me for consideration (word limit 7,500 words, including footnotes). What the Editor and I are, hoping for, is some serious and seriously good philosophical writing on this topic.
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  43. Steven Weinstein (2013). Space, Time, and Stuff. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 27 (1):98 - 101.score: 9.0
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  44. F. W. Frankland (1882). Prof. Royce on "Mind-Stuff" and Reality. Mind 7 (25):110-114.score: 9.0
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  45. Josiah Royce (1881). "Mind-Stuff" and Reality. Mind 6 (23):365-377.score: 9.0
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  46. John Beatty (1988). Book Review: The Wright Stuff. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 3 (2):275-283.score: 9.0
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  47. Grant R. Gillett (2003). Work and Talk: Handedness and the Stuff of Life. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):222-223.score: 9.0
    Wittgenstein shifted from a picture theory of meaning to a use-based theory of meaning in his philosophical work on language. The latter picture is deeply congenial to the view that language and the use of our hands in practical activity are closely related. Wittgenstein's theory therefore offers philosophical support for Corballis's suggestion that the development of spoken language is the basis of dominance phenomena.
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  48. Insoo Hyun (2008). Review of K. R. Monroe, R. B. Miller, and J. Tobis. Fundamentals of the Stem Cell Debate: The Scientific, Religious, Ethical and Political Issues . Review of C. B. Cohen. Renewing the Stuff of Life: Stem Cells, Ethics, and Public Policy . Review of R. Korobkin with S. R. Munzer. Stem Cell Century: Law and Policy for a Breakthrough Technology. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 8 (6):57 – 59.score: 9.0
  49. Timothy F. Murphy & Gladys B. White (2005). Dead Sperm Donors or World Hunger: Are Bioethicists Studying the Right Stuff? Hastings Center Report 35 (2):c3-c3.score: 9.0
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  50. Olimpia Lombardi (2009). Klaus Ruthenberg and Jaap Van Brakel (Eds): Stuff. The Nature of Chemical Substances Königshauen & Neumann, Würzburg, 2008, 179 Pp, Isbn 978-3-8260-3704-. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 11 (3):183-186.score: 9.0
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