Search results for 'subset view' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Brandon N. Towl, The Subset View of Realization: Five Problems.score: 180.0
    The Subset View of realization, though it has some attractive advantages, also has several problems. In particular, there are five main problems that have emerged in the literature: Double-Counting, The Part/Whole Problem, The “No Addition of Being” Problem, The Problem of Projectibility, and the Problem of Spurious Kinds. Each is reviewed here, along with solutions (or partial solutions) to them. Taking these problems seriously constrains the form that a Subset view can take, and thus limits the (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Desktop View, Desktop View.score: 120.0
    Zuckerberg almost always tells users that change is hard, often referring back to the early days of Facebook when it had barely any of the features people know and love today. He says sharing and a more open and connected world are had barely any of the features people know and love today. He says sharing and a more open and connected world are good, and often he says he appreciates all the feedback.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Jaegwon Kim (2010). Thoughts on Sydney Shoemaker's Physical Realization. Philosophical Studies 148 (1):101 - 112.score: 66.0
    This paper discusses in broad terms the metaphysical projects of Sydney Shoemaker’s Physical Realization . Specifically, I examine the effectiveness of Shoemaker’s novel “subset” account of realization for defusing the problem of mental causation, and compare the “subset” account with the standard “second-order” account. Finally, I discuss the physicalist status of the metaphysical worldview presented in Shoemaker’s important new contribution to philosophy of mind and metaphysics.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Robert Schroer (2011). Can Determinable Properties Earn Their Keep? Synthese 183 (2):229-247.score: 60.0
  5. Justin Tiehen (2014). Subset Realization and the Problem of Property Entailment. Erkenntnis 79 (2):471-480.score: 54.0
    Brian McLaughlin has objected to Sydney Shoemaker’s subset account of realization, posing what I call the problem of property entailment. Recently, Shoemaker has revised his subset account in response to McLaughlin’s objection. In this paper I argue that Shoemaker’s revised view fails to solve the problem of property entailment, and in fact makes the problem worse. I then put forward my own solution to the problem.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Kevin Morris (2011). Subset Realization, Parthood, and Causal Overdetermination. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 92 (3):363-379.score: 48.0
    Defenders of the subset view of realization have claimed that we can resolve well-known worries about mental-physical causal overdetermination by holding that mental properties are subset realized by physical properties, that instances of subset realized properties are parts of physical realizers, and that part-whole overdetermination is unproblematic. I challenge the claim that the overdetermination generated by the subset view can be legitimated by appealing to more mundane part-whole overdetermination. I conclude that the subset (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Kevin Morris (2011). Subset Realization and Physical Identification. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (2):317-335.score: 48.0
    According to a prominent line of thought, we can be physicalists, but not reductive physicalists, by holding that mental and other ‘higher-level’ or ‘nonbasic’ properties — properties that are not obviously physical properties — are all physically realized. Spelling this out requires an account of realization, an account of what it is for one property to realize another. And while several accounts of realization have been advanced in recent years,1 my interest here is in the ‘subset view,’ which (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Carl Gillett (2010). Moving Beyond the Subset Model of Realization: The Problem of Qualitative Distinctness in the Metaphysics of Science. Synthese 177 (2):165 - 192.score: 48.0
    Understanding the 'making-up' relations, to put things neutrally, posited in mechanistic explanations the sciences is finally an explicit topic of debate amongst philosophers of science. In particular, there is now lively debate over the nature of the so-called 'realization' relations between properties posited in such explanations. Despite criticism (Gillett, Analysis 62: 316-323, 2002a), the most common approach continues to be that of applying machinery developed in the philosophy of mind to scientific concepts in what is known as the 'Flat' or (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Kevin Morris (2013). On Two Arguments for Subset Inheritance. Philosophical Studies 163 (1):197-211.score: 42.0
    A physicalist holds, in part, that what properties are instantiated depends on what physical properties are instantiated; a physicalist thinks that mental properties, for example, are instantiated in virtue of the instantiation of physical “realizer” properties. One issue that arises in this context concerns the relationship between the “causal powers” of instances of physical properties and instances of dependent properties, properties that are instantiated in virtue of the instantiation of physical properties. After explaining the significance of this issue, I evaluate (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Jonathan Cohen & Craig Callender (2010). Special Sciences, Conspiracy and the Better Best System Account of Lawhood. Erkenntnis 73 (3):427 - 447.score: 24.0
    An important obstacle to lawhood in the special sciences is the worry that such laws would require metaphysically extravagant conspiracies among fundamental particles. How, short of conspiracy, is this possible? In this paper we'll review a number of strategies that allow for the projectibility of special science generalizations without positing outlandish conspiracies: non-Humean pluralism, classical MRL theories of laws, and Albert and Loewer's theory. After arguing that none of the above fully succeed, we consider the conspiracy problem through the lens (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Herman Cappelen (2011). Against Assertion. In Jessica Brown & Herman Cappelen (eds.), Assertion: New Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    The view defended in this paper - I call it the No-Assertion view - rejects the assumption that it is theoretically useful to single out a subset of sayings as assertions: (v) Sayings are governed by variable norms, come with variable commitments and have variable causes and effects. What philosophers have tried to capture by the term 'assertion' is largely a philosophers' invention. It fails to pick out an act-type that we engage in and it is not (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Lara Denis (2008). Animality and Agency: A Kantian Approach to Abortion. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (1):117-37.score: 24.0
    This paper situates abortion in the context of women’s duties to themselves. I argue that Kant’s fundamental moral requirement (found in the formula of humanity) to respect oneself as a rational being, combined with Kant’s view of our animal nature, form the basis for a view of pregnancy and abortion that focuses on women’s agency and moral character without diminishing the importance of their bodies and emotions. The Kantian view of abortion that emerges takes abortion to be (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Marion Hourdequin (2012). Empathy, Shared Intentionality, and Motivation by Moral Reasons. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):403 - 419.score: 24.0
    Internalists about reasons generally insist that if a putative reason, R, is to count as a genuine normative reason for a particular agent to do something, then R must make a rational connection to some desire or interest of the agent in question. If internalism is true, but moral reasons purport to apply to agents independently of the particular desires, interests, and commitments they have, then we may be forced to conclude that moral reasons are incoherent. Richard Joyce (2001) develops (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Daniel D. Hutto (2011). Understanding Fictional Minds Without Theory of Mind! Style 45 (2):276-282.score: 24.0
    This paper explores the idea that when dealing with certain kinds of narratives, ‘like it or not’, consumers of fiction will bring the same sorts of skills (or at least a subset of them) to bear that they use when dealing with actual minds. Let us call this the ‘Same Resources Thesis’. I believe the ‘Same Resources Thesis’ is true. But this is because I defend the view that engaging in narrative practices is the normal developmental route through (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Peter Schroeder-Heister & Frank Schaefer (1989). Reduction, Representation and Commensurability of Theories. Philosophy of Science 56 (1):130-157.score: 24.0
    Theories in the usual sense, as characterized by a language and a set of theorems in that language ("statement view"), are related to theories in the structuralist sense, in turn characterized by a set of potential models and a subset thereof as models ("non-statement view", J. Sneed, W. Stegmüller). It is shown that reductions of theories in the structuralist sense (that is, functions on structures) give rise to so-called "representations" of theories in the statement sense and vice (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Carolyn McLeod & Andrew Botterell (forthcoming). Not For the Faint of Heart: Assessing the Status Quo on Adoption and Parental Licensing. In Francoise Baylis & Carolyn McLeod (eds.), Family Making: Contemporary Ethical Challenges. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    The process of adopting a child is “not for the faint of heart.” This is what we were told the first time we, as a couple, began this process. Part of the challenge lies in fulfilling the licensing requirements for adoption, which, beyond the usual home study, can include mandatory participation in parenting classes. The question naturally arises for many people who are subjected to these requirements whether they are morally justified. We tackle this question in this paper. In our (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Enzo Rossi, Liberal Legitimacy : A Study of the Normative Foundations of Liberalism.score: 24.0
    This thesis is a critique of the prominent strand of contemporary liberal political theory which maintains that liberal political authority must, in some sense, rest on the free consent of those subjected to it, and that such a consensus is achieved if a polity’s basic structure can be publicly justified to its citizenry, or to a relevant subset of it. Call that the liberal legitimacy view. I argue that the liberal legitimacy view cannot provide viable normative foundations (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Andrew Higgins & Brittany Smith, A Citation Based View of the Ontology Community in Philosophy. Proceedings of the ACM Web Science 2013.score: 24.0
    While many bibliometric techniques have been employed to represent the structure of academic research communities over the years, much of this work has been conducted on scientific fields as opposed to those in the humanities. Here we use graphing techniques to present two networks that allow us to explore the structure of a subset of the philosophy community by mapping the citations between philosophical texts on the topic of ontology (the study of what exists). We find a citation gap (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Ragnar Francén (2007). Metaethical Relativism: Against the Single Analysis Assumption. Dissertation, University of Gothenburgscore: 24.0
    This dissertation investigates the plausibility of metaethical relativism, or more specifically, what I call “moral truth-value relativism”: the idea that the truth of a moral statement or belief depends on who utters or has it, or who assesses it. According to the most prevalent variants of this view in philosophical literature – “standard relativism” – the truth-values are relative to people’s moralities, often understood as some subset of their affective or desirelike attitudes. Standard relativism has two main contenders: (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1997). Quantities, Magnitudes, and Numbers. Philosophy of Science 64 (3):377-410.score: 24.0
    Quantities are naturally viewed as functions, whose arguments may be construed as situations, events, objects, etc. We explore the question of the range of these functions: should it be construed as the real numbers (or some subset thereof)? This is Carnap's view. It has attractive features, specifically, what Carnap views as ontological economy. Or should the range of a quantity be a set of magnitudes? This may have been Helmholtz's view, and it, too, has attractive features. It (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. James G. Lennox (1995). Health as an Objective Value. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (5):499-511.score: 24.0
    Variants on two approaches to the concept of health have dominated the philosophy of medicine, here referred to as ‘reductionist’ and ‘relativis’. These two approaches share the basic assumption that the concept of health cannot be both based on an empirical biological foundation and be evaluative, and thus adopt either the view that it is ‘objective’ or evaluative. It is here argued that there are a subset of value concepts that are formed in recognition of certain fundamental facts (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Craig Edwards (2010). Beyond Mental Competence. Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (3):273-289.score: 24.0
    Justification for psychiatric paternalism is most easily established where mental illness renders the person mentally incompetent, depriving him of the capacity for rational agency and for autonomy, hence undermining the basis for liberal rights against paternalism. But some philosophers, and no doubt some doctors, have been deeply concerned by the inadequacy of the concept of mental incompetence to encapsulate some apparently appealing cases for psychiatric paternalism. We ought to view mental incompetence as just one subset of a broader (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Werner Ehm (2005). Meta-Analysis O Mind-Matter Experiments: A Statistical Modeling Perspective. Mind and Matter 3 (1):85-132.score: 24.0
    Are there relationships between consciousness and the material world? Empirical evidence for such a connection was reported in several meta-analyses of mind-matter experiments designed to address this question. In this paper we consider such meta-analyses from a statistical modeling perspective, emphasizing strategies to validate the models and the associated statistical procedures. In particular, we explicitly model increased data variability and selection mechanisms, which permits us to estimate 'selection profiles ' and to reassess the experimental effect in view of potential (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. K. B. Brothers (2011). Dependent Rational Providers. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (2):133-147.score: 24.0
    Provider claims to conscientious objection have generated a great deal of heated debate in recent years. However, the conflicts that arise when providers make claims to the "conscience" are only a subset of the more fundamental challenges that arise in health care practice when patients and providers come into conflict. In this piece, the author provides an account of patient-provider conflict from within the moral tradition of St. Thomas Aquinas. He argues that the practice of health care providers should (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Joshua Shepherd, Intentional Control And Consciousness.score: 24.0
    The power to exercise control is a crucial feature of agency. Necessarily, if S cannot exercise some degree of control over anything - any state of affairs, event, process, object, or whatever - S is not an agent. If S is not an agent, S cannot act intentionally, responsibly, or rationally, nor can S possess or exercise free will. In my dissertation I reflect on the nature of control, and on the roles consciousness plays in its exercise. I first consider (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Tracey J. Shors & Louis D. Matzel (1997). LTP: Memory, Arousal, Neither, Both. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):634-645.score: 24.0
    The neurophysiological phenomenon of LTP (long term potentiation) is considered by many to represent an adequate mechanism for acquiring or storing memories in the mammalian brain. In our target article, we reviewed the various arguments put forth in support of the LTP/memory hypothesis. We concluded that these arguments were inconsistent with the purported data base and proposed an alternative interpretation that we suggested was at least as compatible with the available data as the more widely held view. In doing (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Janet D. Stemwedel (2004). Explanation, Unification, and What Chemistry Gets From Causation. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):1060-1070.score: 24.0
    I consider a way the concept of causation could be excised from chemical practice, suggested by Kitcher's view that causes are just a subset of unifying patterns which play a particular psychological role for us. Kitcherian chemistry is at first blush well equipped to handle explanatory tasks. However, it would force chemists to accept certain unifying patterns as explanatory, which they do not think are at all explanatory. This might head off some descriptive lines of enquiry and damage (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Robert Jackson (1995). Religious Education's Representation of 'Religions' and 'Cultures'. British Journal of Educational Studies 43 (3):272 - 289.score: 24.0
    Multicultural education (of which 'multifaith' RE in England and Wales is sometimes regarded as a subset) was attacked by antiracists in Britain in the 1980s. Although it is arguable that not all of the criticisms were valid, the debate raises questions about the efficacy of religious education in countering racism. The paper argues that a lack of analysis of the concepts 'religions' and 'cultures' in British RE has led to a representation of religious traditions which essentialises them, playing down (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Prakash Mondal (2014). Does Computation Reveal Machine Cognition? Biosemiotics 7 (1):97-110.score: 24.0
    This paper seeks to understand machine cognition. The nature of machine cognition has been shrouded in incomprehensibility. We have often encountered familiar arguments in cognitive science that human cognition is still faintly understood. This paper will argue that machine cognition is far less understood than even human cognition despite the fact that a lot about computer architecture and computational operations is known. Even if there have been putative claims about the transparency of the notion of machine computations, these claims do (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. A. Polikarov (1993). Is There an Incommensurability Between Superseding Theories? Journal for General Philosophy of Science 24 (1):127 - 146.score: 24.0
    According to the Incommensurability Thesis (IT) superseding scientific theories (paradigms) are incommensurable. Unlike many authors we do not discuss whether there is a relationship of this kind. We take for granted that this may be the case, and see the problem in the endeavour to establish the domain of validity of the IT. The notion incommensurability (Ic) is derivative from the concepts of scientific paradigm (P) and scientific revolution (R). There are several concepts of P, as well as various conceptions (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Gerard Radnitzky (1990). The Birth of Modern Science Out of the 'European Miracle'. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 21 (2):275-292.score: 24.0
    Summary To understand the present situation we must know something about its history. The ‘Rise of the West’, which grew out of the ‘European Miracle’, is a special case of cultural evolution. The development of science is an important element in this process. Cultural evolution went hand in hand with biological evolution. Evolutionary epistemology illuminates the achievements and the evolution of cognitive sensory apparatus of various species. Man's cognitive sensory apparatus is adapted to the ‘mesocosmos’, the world of medium-sized dimensions. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Matthew D. Adler, Popular Constitutionalism and the Rule of Recognition: Whose Practices Ground U.score: 24.0
    The law within each legal system is a function of the practices of some social group. In short, law is a kind of socially grounded norm. H.L.A Hart famously developed this view in his book, The Concept of Law, by arguing that law derives from a social rule, the so-called “rule of recognition.” But the proposition that social facts play a foundational role in producing law is a point of consensus for all modern jurisprudents in the Anglo-American tradition: not (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. John W. Dienhart (2008). The Separation Thesis. Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (4):555-559.score: 24.0
    Is business intimately related to ethics or can the two be separated? I argue that examining this question by focusing on how the two areas might be separated is logically flawed. Examining how business and ethics are connected, however, can bear fruit. This examination shows that business is a proper subset of ethics. Understanding this intimate connection has two practical benefits. It removes the seemingly incommensurable conflict between financial and ethical responsibilities of managers and it gives us new and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Mark Van Atten, Phenomenology and Transcendental Argument in Mathematics: The Case of Brouwer's Bar Theorem.score: 24.0
    On the intended interpretation of intuitionistic logic, Heyting's Proof Interpretation, a proof of a proposition of the form p -> q consists in a construction method that transforms any possible proof of p into a proof of q. This involves the notion of the totality of all proofs in an essential way, and this interpretation has therefore been objected to on grounds of impredicativity (e.g. Gödel 1933). In fact this hardly ever leads to problems as in proofs of implications usually (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Lawrence Lengbeyer (2007). Situated Cognition: The Perspect Model. In David Spurrett, Don Ross, Harold Kincaid & Lynn Stephens (eds.), Distributed Cognition and the Will: Individual Volition and Social Context. MIT Press. 227.score: 24.0
    The standard philosophical and folk-psychological accounts of cognition and action credit us with too much spontaneity in our activities and projects. We are taken to be fundamentally active rather than reactive, to project our needs and aims and deploy our full supporting arsenal of cognitive instruments upon an essentially passive environment. The corrected point of view presented here balances this image of active agency with an appreciation of how we are also continually responding to the world, that is, to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Louis Narens (2005). A Theory of Belief for Scientific Refutations. Synthese 145 (3):397 - 423.score: 24.0
    A probability function on an algebra of events is assumed. Some of the events are scientific refutations in the sense that the assumption of their occurrence leads to a contradiction. It is shown that the scientific refutations form a a boolean sublattice in terms of the subset ordering. In general, the restriction of to the sublattice is not a probability function on the sublattice. It does, however, have many interesting properties. In particular, (i) it captures probabilistic ideas inherent in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Tom Linton (1991). Countable Structures, Ehrenfeucht Strategies, and Wadge Reductions. Journal of Symbolic Logic 56 (4):1325-1348.score: 24.0
    For countable structures U and B, let $\mathfrak{U}\overset{\alpha}{\rightarrow}\mathfrak{B}$ abbreviate the statement that every Σ0 α (Lω1,ω) sentence true in U also holds in B. One can define a back and forth game between the structures U and B that determines whether $\mathfrak{U}\overset{\alpha}{\rightarrow}\mathfrak{B}$ . We verify that if θ is an Lω,ω sentence that is not equivalent to any Lω,ω Σ0 n sentence, then there are countably infinite models U and B such that $\mathfrak{U} \vDash \theta, \mathfrak{B} \vDash \neg \theta$ , (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. A. Polikarov (1993). Is There an Incommensurability Between Superseding Theories? On the Validity of the Incommensurability Thesis. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 24 (1):127 - 146.score: 24.0
    According to the Incommensurability Thesis (IT) superseding scientific theories (paradigms) are incommensurable. Unlike many authors we do not discuss whether there is a relationship of this kind. We take for granted that this may be the case, and see the problem in the endeavour to establish the domain of validity of the IT. The notion incommensurability (Ic) is derivative from the concepts of scientific paradigm (P) and scientific revolution (R). There are several concepts of P, as well as various conceptions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Michael Wright, Daniel Tony Bishop, Robin Jackson & Bruce Abernethy (2013). Brain Regions Concerned with the Identification of Deceptive Soccer Moves by Higher-Skilled and Lower-Skilled Players. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:851.score: 24.0
    Expert soccer players are able to utilize their opponents’ early body kinematics to predict the direction in which the opponent will move. We have previously demonstrated enhanced fMRI activation in experts in the motor components of an action observation network (AON) during sports anticipation tasks. Soccer players often need to prevent opponents from successfully predicting their line of attack, and consequently may try to deceive them; for example, by performing a step-over. We examined how AON activations and expertise effects are (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Heloisa Alves, Michelle Voss, Walter R. Boot, Andrea Deslandes, Victor Cossich, Jose Inacio Salles & Arthur F. Kramer (2013). Perceptual-Cognitive Expertise in Elite Volleyball Players. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    The goal of the current study was to investigate the relationship between sport expertise and perceptual and cognitive skills, as measured by the component skills approach. We hypothesized that athletes would outperform non-athlete controls in a number of perceptual and cognitive domains and that sport expertise would minimize gender differences. A total of 154 individuals (87 professional volleyball players and 67 non-athlete controls) participated in the study. Participants performed a cognitive battery, which included tests of executive control, memory, and visuo-spatial (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. John Basl (2010). State Neutrality and the Ethics of Human Enhancement Technologies. AJOB 1 (2):41-48.score: 24.0
    Robust technological enhancement of core cognitive capacities is now a realistic possibility. From the perspective of neutralism, the view that justifications for public policy should be neutral between reasonable conceptions of the good, only members of a subset of the ethical concerns serve as legitimate justifications for public policy regarding robust technological enhancement. This paper provides a framework for the legitimate use of ethical concerns in justifying public policy decisions regarding these enhancement technologies by evaluating the ethical concerns (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. David Henderson, Comments Are Welcome.score: 24.0
    Contemporary accounts of what it is for an agent to be justified in holding a given belief commonly carry substantive commitments concerning what cognitive processes can and should be like. In this paper, we argue that concern for the plausiblity of such psychological commitments leads to significant epistemological results. In particular, it leads to a multi-faceted epistemology in which elements of traditionally conflicting epistemologies are vindicated within a single epistemological account. We suggest thinking of the epistemologically relevant cognitive processes in (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Clifford L. Sosis, Well-Being: The Good Syndrome.score: 24.0
    In the natural world there are things we call 'syndromes'. Depression is an example of a syndrome. There are many forms of depression, but generally, people with depression suffer from a subset of several unpleasant symptoms, such as lethargy, guilt and suicidal ideation. It appears that there is a pleasant syndrome: There are people who are enjoying a subset of the properties we tend to associate with well-being. These symptoms include, but are not necessarily limited to, above average (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Fernando Lourenço (2013). To Challenge the World View or to Flow with It? Teaching Sustainable Development in Business Schools. Business Ethics 22 (3):292-307.score: 22.0
    This paper explores the fundamental question of what ‘responsibility’ means to different sets of world views adopted implicitly by business students. The exploration adopts the stakeholder theory and three subsets of the Friedman mentality to explain how individuals may value sustainability initiatives. Subsequently, it explores whether it is better to flow with the dominant economic-driven world view as prescribed by the business school or to challenge it in order to cultivate business students with sustainability-driven values. The conclusion highlights implications (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Brian A. Davey & John C. Galati (2003). A Coalgebraic View of Heyting Duality. Studia Logica 75 (3):259 - 270.score: 22.0
    We give a coalgebraic view of the restricted Priestley duality between Heyting algebras and Heyting spaces. More precisely, we show that the category of Heyting spaces is isomorphic to a full subcategory of the category of all -coalgebras, based on Boolean spaces, where is the functor which maps a Boolean space to its hyperspace of nonempty closed subsets. As an appendix, we include a proof of the characterization of Heyting spaces and the morphisms between them.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. John I. Biro (2006). A Point of View on Points of View. Philosophical Psychology 19 (1):3-12.score: 18.0
    A number of writers have deployed the notion of a point of view as a key to the allegedly theory-resistant subjective aspect of experience. I examine that notion more closely than is usually done and find that it cannot support the anti-objectivist's case. Experience may indeed have an irreducibly subjective aspect, but the notion of a point of view cannot be used to show that it does.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Tomas Bogardus (2009). A Vindication of the Equal-Weight View. Episteme 6 (3):324-335.score: 18.0
    Some philosophers believe that when epistemic peers disagree, each has an obligation to accord the other's assessment the same weight as her own. I first make the antecedent of this Equal-Weight View more precise, and then I motivate the View by describing cases in which it gives the intuitively correct verdict. Next I introduce some apparent counterexamples – cases of apparent peer disagreement in which, intuitively, one should not give equal weight to the other party's assessment. To defuse (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Eric Dietrich (2008). The Bishop and Priest: Toward a Point-of-View Based Epistemology of True Contradictions. Logos Architekton 2 (2):35-58..score: 18.0
    True contradictions are taken increasingly seriously by philosophers and logicians. Yet, the belief that contradictions are always false remains deeply intuitive. This paper confronts this belief head-on by explaining in detail how one specific contradiction is true. The contradiction in question derives from Priest's reworking of Berkeley's argument for idealism. However, technical aspects of the explanation offered here differ considerably from Priest's derivation. The explanation uses novel formal and epistemological tools to guide the reader through a valid argument with, not (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000