Search results for 'supernatural' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  38
    Benjamin G. Purzycki, Daniel N. Finkel, John Shaver, Nathan Wales, Adam B. Cohen & Richard Sosis (2012). What Does God Know? Supernatural Agents' Access to Socially Strategic and Non-Strategic Information. Cognitive Science 36 (5):846-869.
    Current evolutionary and cognitive theories of religion posit that supernatural agent concepts emerge from cognitive systems such as theory of mind and social cognition. Some argue that these concepts evolved to maintain social order by minimizing antisocial behavior. If these theories are correct, then people should process information about supernatural agents’ socially strategic knowledge more quickly than non-strategic knowledge. Furthermore, agents’ knowledge of immoral and uncooperative social behaviors should be especially accessible to people. To examine these hypotheses, we (...)
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  2.  77
    Steve Clarke (2009). Naturalism, Science and the Supernatural. Sophia 48 (2):127-142.
    There is overwhelming agreement amongst naturalists that a naturalistic ontology should not allow for the possibility of supernatural entities. I argue, against this prevailing consensus, that naturalists have no proper basis to oppose the existence of supernatural entities. Naturalism is characterized, following Leiter and Rea, as a position which involves a primary commitment to scientific methodology and it is argued that any naturalistic ontological commitments must be compatible with this primary commitment. It is further argued that properly applied (...)
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  3.  5
    Julia L. Cassaniti (2015). Intersubjective Affect and Embodied Emotion: Feeling the Supernatural in Thailand. Anthropology of Consciousness 26 (2):132-142.
    In this article I argue for increased attention to the supernatural as a site for inquiry into, and elaboration of, affect. In attending to how and when people encounter ghosts in Thailand, affect is approached as a moving, interpersonal field of wishes and desires. These wishes and desires circulate within intersubjective spaces, and are sometimes experienced as coalesced, embodied emotions. In highlighting such an orientation, affect can be understood as not just an intersubjective project but also a spiritual one. (...)
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  4.  33
    Steve Clarke (2007). The Supernatural and the Miraculous. Sophia 46 (3):277 - 285.
    Both intention-based and causation-based definitions of the miraculous make reference to the term ‘supernatural’. Philosophers who define the miraculous appear to use this term in a loose way, perhaps meaning the nonnatural, perhaps meaning a subcategory of the nonnatural. Here I examine the aetiology of the term ‘supernatural’. I consider three outstanding issues regarding the meaning of the term and conclude that the supernatural is best understood as a subcategory of the nonnatural. In light of this clarification, (...)
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  5.  25
    Morgan Luck (2007). Supernatural Miracles and Religious Inclusiveness. Sophia 46 (3):287 - 293.
    In this paper I shall assess Clarke’s assertion that all definitions of miracles that purport to satisfy the criterion of religious inclusiveness should substitute the term ‘supernatural’ for ‘non-natural’. In addition, I shall attempt to strengthen Clarke’s conception of the supernatural by offering an analysis of what it means for something to be ‘above’ nature. Lastly, I shall offer a new argument as to why Clarke’s intention-based definition of miracles is necessarily less religiously inclusive than Mumford’s causation-based definition.
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  6. Eulalio R. Baltazar (1966). Teilhard and the Supernatural. Baltimore, Helicon.
     
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  7. William Charlton (1998). The Physical, the Natural and the Supernatural Modern Ideas of Matter and Mind. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  8. Arthur Hazard Dakin (1934). Von Hügel and the Supernatural. Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge.
     
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  9. L. V. Lester-Garland (1934). The Idea of the Supernatural. New York, the Macmillan Co..
     
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  10. John Oman (1931). The Natural & the Supernatural. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.
     
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  11. John Oman (1885). The Natural and the Supernatural by John Wood Oman. --. University Press.
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  12.  49
    Contzen Pereira & Janice Harter (2016). Understanding Memories of a Near-Death Experience From the Perspective of Quantum Entanglement and in the Presence of the Supernatural. Journal of Metaphysics and Connected Consciousness 2.
    Near-death experiences are a big challenge to the fields of science and philosophy; termed as hallucinatory by neurologists and “stuff of which fantasies are made off” by sceptics, there are some unique near-death experiences which defy these claims. Memories generated during these experiences are of specific interest as they are created without a body and can be recalled post the experience. Call it the mind, soul, psyche or consciousness, if deliberated as a form of quantum generated energy, a strong correlation (...)
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  13. Iikka Pyysiainen (2009). Supernatural Agents: Why We Believe in Souls, Gods, and Buddhas. Oxford University Press Usa.
    The cognitive science of religion is a rapidly growing field whose practitioners apply insights from advances in cognitive science in order to provide a better understanding of religious impulses, beliefs, and behaviors. In this book Ilkka Pyysiäinen shows how this methodology can profitably be used in the comparative study of beliefs about superhuman agents. He begins by developing a theoretical outline of the basic, modular architecture of the human mind and especially the human capacity to understand agency. He then goes (...)
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  14. Elliott Sober (2007). Intelligent Design Theory and the Supernatural—the 'God or Extra-Terrestrials' Reply. Faith and Philosophy 24 (1):72-82.
    When proponents of Intelligent Design theory deny that their theory is religious, the minimalistic theory they have in mind is the claim that the irreducibly complex adaptations found in nature were made by one or more intelligent designers. The denial that this theory is religious rests on the fact that it does not specify the identity of the designer—a supernatural God or a team of extra-terrestrials could have done the work. The present paper attempts to show that this reply (...)
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  15. Thomas D. Senor (1991). God, Supernatural Kinds, and the Incarnation. Religious Studies 27 (3):353-370.
    Traditionally, the term ’God’ has been understood either as a proper name or as a description. However, according to a new view, the term God’ in a sentence like "Jesus Christ is God" functions as a kind term, much as the term ’tiger’ functions in the sentence "Tigger is a tiger." In this paper I examine the claim that divinity can be construed as a ’supernatural’ kind, developing the outlines of an account of the semantics of God’ along these (...)
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  16.  65
    Peter van Inwagen (2009). Explaining Belief in the Supernatural: Some Thoughts on Paul Bloom's 'Religious Belief as an Evolutionary Accident'. In Michael J. Murray & Jeffrey Schloss (eds.), The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion. Oxford University Press 128-138.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001788481; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 128-138.; Language(s): English; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay; Related Essays: By: Van Inwagen, Peter Explaining belief in the supernatural Believing primate, p 128-138. Oxford ; New York : Oxford Univ Pr, 2009 ATLA0001788481.
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  17.  37
    Thomas D. Senor (1991). God, Supernatural Kinds, and the Incarnation: THOMAS D. SENOR. Religious Studies 27 (3):353-370.
    Thinking about God often leads to thinking about ‘God’. And it has never been completely clear how best to understand this little English word. Traditionally, ‘God’ has been taken to be either a description or a name. However, a third option has recently captured the attention of philosophical theologians. It is claimed that just as one should think of, say, ‘humanity’ as a kind term, so one should think of ‘God’, or perhaps ‘divinity’, as a kind term. But given the (...)
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  18.  16
    Stefano Bigliardi (2011). Snakes From Staves? Science, Scriptures, and the Supernatural in Maurice Bucaille. Zygon 46 (4):793-805.
    Abstract The aim of this paper is to attain a philosophical evaluation of the ideas of the French author Maurice Bucaille. Bucaille formulated an influential discourse regarding the divinity of the Qur’an, which he tried to demonstrate through a comparison of some of its verses with what he defined as scientific data. With his works, which encompass a criticism of the Bible and a defense of creationism, Bucaille furthered the idea that Islam is in harmony with natural sciences, and ensured (...)
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  19.  85
    Nathalia L. Gjersoe & Bruce M. Hood (2006). The Supernatural Guilt Trip Does Not Take Us Far Enough. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):473-474.
    Belief in souls is only one component of supernatural thinking in which individuals infer the presence of invisible mechanisms that explain events as paranormal rather than natural. We believe it is important to place greater emphasis on the prevalence of supernatural beliefs across other domains, if only to counter simplistic divisions between rationality and irrationality recently aligned with the contentious science/religion debate.
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  20.  9
    Dominic Dp Johnson, Ryan T. McKay & Daniel C. Dennett (2009). God Would Be a Costly Accident: Supernatural Beliefs as Adaptive. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (6):523.
    I take up the challenge of why false beliefs are better than (target article, sect. 9) in navigating adaptive problems with asymmetric errors. I then suggest that there are interactions between supernatural beliefs, self-deception, and positive illusions, rendering elements of all such misbeliefs adaptive. Finally, I argue that supernatural beliefs cannot be rejected as adaptive simply because recent experiments are inconclusive. The great costs of religion betray its even greater adaptive benefits – we just have not yet nailed (...)
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  21.  32
    Kenneth D. Eberhard (1971). Karl Rahner and the Supernatural Existential. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 46 (4):537-561.
    The key to understanding Karl Rahner's theology is his doctrine of the supernatural existential; it is, moreover, a microcosm of many of his major theological themes.
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  22.  15
    Joseph A. Bracken (2013). Actions and Agents: Natural and Supernatural Reconsidered. Zygon 48 (4):1001-1013.
    Using a process-oriented understanding of the relation between actions and agents, the author argues that an ontological agent is the ongoing effect or by-product rather than the antecedent cause of actions. Applied to the relation between natural and supernatural in philosophical cosmology, this allows one to claim, first, that agents (whether natural or supernatural) are not sensibly perceived, but only inferred from the ongoing observation of empirical actions; second, that the distinction between the natural and the supernatural (...)
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  23.  37
    David Cohen & Angèle Consoli (2006). Production of Supernatural Beliefs During Cotard's Syndrome, a Rare Psychotic Depression. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):468-470.
    Cotard's syndrome is a psychotic condition that includes delusion of a supernatural nature. Based on insights from recovered patients who were convinced of being immortal, we can (1) distinguish biographical experiences from cultural and evolutionary backgrounds; (2) show that cultural significance dominates biographical experiences; and (3) support Bering's view of a cognitive system dedicated to forming illusory representations of immortality.
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  24.  6
    G. Paul (2008). The Remote Prayer Delusion: Clinical Trials That Attempt to Detect Supernatural Intervention Are as Futile as They Are Unethical. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):e18-e18.
    Extreme rates of premature death prior to the advent of modern medicine, very low rates of premature death in First World nations with low rates of prayer, and the least flawed of a large series of clinical trials indicate that remote prayer is not efficacious in treating illness. Mass contamination of sample cohorts renders such clinical studies inherently ineffectual. The required supernatural and paranormal mechanisms render them implausible. The possibility that the latter are not benign, and the potentially adverse (...)
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  25.  16
    Lewis Vaughn (2000). The Failure of Supernatural Hypotheses. Philo 3 (2):68-73.
    By applying some of the standard criteria used to judge the adequacy of scientific explanations, Richard Swinburne tries to show that the best explanation of everything is that God exists. That is, he contends that the best explanation for the existence of the universe and human life is that there is a God. I contend that Swinburne is right to appeal to the criteria of adequacy but wrong to construe them as he does. The criteria, plausibly applied, show that the (...)
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  26.  26
    Brian R. Cornwell, Aron K. Barbey & W. Kyle Simmons (2004). The Embodied Bases of Supernatural Concepts. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):735-736.
    According to embodied cognition theory, our physical embodiment influences how we conceptualize entities, whether natural or supernatural. In serving central explanatory roles, supernatural entities (e.g., God) are represented implicitly as having unordinary properties that nevertheless do not violate our sensorimotor interactions with the physical world. We conjecture that other supernatural entities are similarly represented in explanatory contexts.
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  27.  16
    David Cockburn (1992). The Supernatural. Religious Studies 28 (3):285 - 301.
    The final chapter of Peter Winch's book on Simone Weil discusses Weil's idea of supernatural virtue. Weil uses this language in connection with certain exceptional actions: actions of a kind which are for most of us, most of the time, simply impossible. She is particularly struck by cases in which someone refrains from exercising a power which they have over another: in which, for example, someone refrains from killing or enslaving an enemy who has grievously harmed him and who (...)
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  28.  20
    Jesse M. Bering & Todd K. Shackelford (2004). Supernatural Agents May Have Provided Adaptive Social Information. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):732-733.
    Atran & Norenzayan's (A&N's) target article effectively combines the insights of evolutionary biology and interdisciplinary cognitive science, neither of which alone yields sufficient explanatory power to help us fully understand the complexities of supernatural belief. Although the authors' ideas echo those of other researchers, they are perhaps the most squarely grounded in neo-Darwinian terms to date. Nevertheless, A&N overlook the possibility that the tendency to infer supernatural agents' communicative intent behind natural events served an ancestrally adaptive function.
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  29.  8
    Jean Brown (2012). Supernatural Selection: How Religion Evolved [Book Review]. The Australian Humanist (105):16.
    Brown, Jean Review(s) of: Indexer please enter the following minimum information (where available): TITLE, AUTHOR(S) and ISBN for each book reviewed.Supernatural selection: How religion Evolved, by Matt J. Rossano Oxford Press. 2010.
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  30.  4
    Ken Wilder (2011). Neither Here Nor Elsewhere: Displacement Devices in Representing the Supernatural. Estetika 1:46-62.
    How might the supernatural be represented in religious paintings that imply continuity between the virtual space of painting and the real space of the beholder? Such an implied continuity might be thought to threaten a necessary distance demanded of religious works. This article examines how a number of Italian paintings employ strategies for representing the supernatural through displacement devices that create a ‘gap’ within perception – an inviolable space that is implied as being outside normal spatiotemporal relations. The (...)
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  31.  4
    T. S. Petrus & D. L. Bogopa (2007). Natural and Supernatural: Intersections Between the Spiritual and Natural Worlds in African Witchcraft and Healing with Reference to Southern Africa. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 7 (1):1-10.
    For generations, African beliefs and practices regarding witchcraft and traditional healing have been located at the intersection between the natural world and the supernatural world. Despite the impact of both colonialism and, in the contemporary context, modernization, the complex interplay between these worlds has not been reduced. The interaction between nature and religion, as a facet of culture, has long been a subject of inquiry in anthropology, and nowhere is this more evident than in the study of African witchcraft (...)
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  32.  6
    Sascha Talmor (1980). Scepticism and Belief in the Supernatural. Heythrop Journal 21 (2):137–152.
    THE OBJECT OF THIS ARTICLE IS TO SHOW THAT SCEPTICISM IS NOT ALWAYS USED TO CHALLENGE BELIEFS: IT IS SOMETIMES USED TO "FOSTER" CERTAIN BELIEFS. GLANVILL’S SCEPTICISM REGARDING OUR KNOWLEDGE OF NATURAL CAUSES IS BASED ON THE WEAKNESS AND LIMITATIONS OF HUMAN UNDERSTANDING. BUT THIS ALLOWS HIM TO ARGUE FOR THE EQUAL POSSIBILITY OF BOTH NATURAL AND NON-NATURAL CAUSES, AND THUS OPENS THE DOOR TO BELIEF IN THE SUPERNATURAL. HUME, HOWEVER, WHOSE SCEPTICISM IS ALSO BASED ON THE LIMITATIONS OF (...)
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  33.  5
    Daniel Izuzquiza (2006). Can a Gift Be Wrapped? John Milbank and Supernatural Sociology. Heythrop Journal 47 (3):387–404.
    Do secular sciences provide theology with a neutral description of reality, as raw material for theology to reflect upon? Or, on the other side, can theology be considered a full‐blown social theory? What would a ‘supernatural sociology’ imply and look like? This essay addresses these questions following the insights of John Milbank. This British theologian has challenged mainline modern assumptions with his ‘radical orthodoxy’ project, stirring a fruitful debate not exempt from polemical exchanges. This essay offers a presentation of (...)
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  34.  3
    T. R. Miles (1966). On Excluding the Supernatural. Religious Studies 1 (2):141 - 150.
    Various attempts have been made in recent years to present Christianity in such a way that no use is made of the traditional dichotomy between the ‘natural’ and the ‘supernatural’. Braithwaite, Hare, and van Buren, for instance, appear to have no use for the dichotomy; and I think that, without too much distortion, one can say the same of Bultmann, Tillich, and Robinson. I am not, however, concerned in this paper with the work of any one thinker as such, (...)
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  35.  5
    Galen A. Foresman & William Irwin (eds.) (2013). Supernatural and Philosophy: Metaphysics and Monsters... For Idjits. Wiley-Blackwell.
    No doubt the years hunting monsters and saving the universe have had their toll on the Winchesters, but their toughest and most gruesome battles are contained in this book. Think Lucifer was diabolically clever? Think again. No son is more wayward than the one who squanders his intellect and academic career pursuing questions as poignant as “Half-awesome? That’s full-on good, right?” Gathered here for the first time since the formation of Purgatory, a collection of research so arcane and horrific that (...)
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  36. Galen A. Foresman & William Irwin (eds.) (2013). Supernatural and Philosophy: Metaphysics and Monsters... For Idjits. Wiley-Blackwell.
    No doubt the years hunting monsters and saving the universe have had their toll on the Winchesters, but their toughest and most gruesome battles are contained in this book. Think Lucifer was diabolically clever? Think again. No son is more wayward than the one who squanders his intellect and academic career pursuing questions as poignant as “Half-awesome? That’s full-on good, right?” Gathered here for the first time since the formation of Purgatory, a collection of research so arcane and horrific that (...)
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  37. Galen A. Foresman & William Irwin (eds.) (2013). Supernatural and Philosophy: Metaphysics and Monsters... For Idjits. Wiley-Blackwell.
    No doubt the years hunting monsters and saving the universe have had their toll on the Winchesters, but their toughest and most gruesome battles are contained in this book. Think Lucifer was diabolically clever? Think again. No son is more wayward than the one who squanders his intellect and academic career pursuing questions as poignant as “Half-awesome? That’s full-on good, right?” Gathered here for the first time since the formation of Purgatory, a collection of research so arcane and horrific that (...)
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  38. Theodore S. Petrus (2006). Engaging the World of the Supernatural: Anthropology, Phenomenology and the Limitations of Scientific Rationalism in the Study of the Supernatural. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 6 (1):1-12.
    Scientific rationalism has long been considered one of the pillars of true science. It has been one of the criteria academics have used in their efforts to categorise disciplines as scientific. Perhaps scientific rationalism acquired this privileged status because it worked relatively well within the context of the natural sciences, where it seemed to be easy to apply this kind of rationalism to the solution of natural scientific problems. However, with the split in the scientific world between the natural sciences (...)
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  39.  17
    Maarten Boudry & Jerry Coyne (2016). Disbelief in Belief: On the Cognitive Status of Supernatural Beliefs. Philosophical Psychology 29 (4):601-615.
    Religious people seem to believe things that range from the somewhat peculiar to the utterly bizarre. Or do they? According to a new paper by Neil Van Leeuwen, religious “credence” is nothing like mundane factual belief. It has, he claims, more in common with fictional imaginings. Religious folk do not really “believe”—in the ordinary sense of the word—what they profess to believe. Like fictional imaginings, but unlike factual beliefs, religious credences are activated only within specific settings. We argue that Van (...)
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  40.  82
    H. Price (2012). Causation, Chance, and the Rational Significance of Supernatural Evidence. Philosophical Review 121 (4):483-538.
    In “A Subjectivist’s Guide to Objective Chance,” David Lewis says that he is “led to wonder whether anyone but a subjectivist is in a position to understand objective chance.” The present essay aims to motivate this same Lewisean attitude, and a similar degree of modest subjectivism, with respect to objective causation. The essay begins with Newcomb problems, which turn on an apparent tension between two principles of choice: roughly, a principle sensitive to the causal features of the relevant situation, and (...)
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  41.  4
    Cristine H. Legare & Susan A. Gelman (2008). Bewitchment, Biology, or Both: The Co‐Existence of Natural and Supernatural Explanatory Frameworks Across Development. Cognitive Science 32 (4):607-642.
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  42.  22
    Cristine H. Legare & André L. Souza (2012). Evaluating Ritual Efficacy: Evidence From the Supernatural. Cognition 124 (1):1-15.
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  43.  18
    Benjamin Grant Purzycki (2013). The Minds of Gods: A Comparative Study of Supernatural Agency. Cognition 129 (1):163-179.
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  44.  10
    Marjaana Lindeman, Annika M. Svedholm-Häkkinen & Jari Lipsanen (2015). Ontological Confusions but Not Mentalizing Abilities Predict Religious Belief, Paranormal Belief, and Belief in Supernatural Purpose. Cognition 134:63-76.
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  45.  5
    Marjaana Lindeman, Annika M. Svedholm-Häkkinen & Tapani Riekki (2016). Skepticism: Genuine Unbelief or Implicit Beliefs in the Supernatural? Consciousness and Cognition 42:216-228.
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  46.  15
    Moorad Alexanian (2011). Humans: The Supernatural in Nature. Perspectives on Science and Christian Faith 63 (3):215-216.
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  47.  85
    Gilbert Fulmer (1977). The Concept of the Supernatural. Analysis 37 (3):113 - 116.
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  48.  16
    Forrest S. Donahue (1938). Primitives and the Supernatural. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 13 (1):155-157.
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  49.  16
    Stuart Clark (2010). The Natural and the Supernatural in the Middle Ages. Common Knowledge 16 (2):290-290.
  50.  16
    W. L. P. (1973). The Supernatural. Review of Metaphysics 27 (1):133-135.
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