Search results for 'supernatural' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Steve Clarke (2009). Naturalism, Science and the Supernatural. Sophia 48 (2):127-142.score: 18.0
    There is overwhelming agreement amongst naturalists that a naturalistic ontology should not allow for the possibility of supernatural entities. I argue, against this prevailing consensus, that naturalists have no proper basis to oppose the existence of supernatural entities. Naturalism is characterized, following Leiter and Rea, as a position which involves a primary commitment to scientific methodology and it is argued that any naturalistic ontological commitments must be compatible with this primary commitment. It is further argued that properly applied (...)
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  2. Benjamin G. Purzycki, Daniel N. Finkel, John Shaver, Nathan Wales, Adam B. Cohen & Richard Sosis (2012). What Does God Know? Supernatural Agents' Access to Socially Strategic and Non-Strategic Information. Cognitive Science 36 (5):846-869.score: 18.0
    Current evolutionary and cognitive theories of religion posit that supernatural agent concepts emerge from cognitive systems such as theory of mind and social cognition. Some argue that these concepts evolved to maintain social order by minimizing antisocial behavior. If these theories are correct, then people should process information about supernatural agents’ socially strategic knowledge more quickly than non-strategic knowledge. Furthermore, agents’ knowledge of immoral and uncooperative social behaviors should be especially accessible to people. To examine these hypotheses, we (...)
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  3. Steve Clarke (2007). The Supernatural and the Miraculous. Sophia 46 (3):277 - 285.score: 18.0
    Both intention-based and causation-based definitions of the miraculous make reference to the term ‘supernatural’. Philosophers who define the miraculous appear to use this term in a loose way, perhaps meaning the nonnatural, perhaps meaning a subcategory of the nonnatural. Here I examine the aetiology of the term ‘supernatural’. I consider three outstanding issues regarding the meaning of the term and conclude that the supernatural is best understood as a subcategory of the nonnatural. In light of this clarification, (...)
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  4. Morgan Luck (2007). Supernatural Miracles and Religious Inclusiveness. Sophia 46 (3):287 - 293.score: 18.0
    In this paper I shall assess Clarke’s assertion that all definitions of miracles that purport to satisfy the criterion of religious inclusiveness should substitute the term ‘supernatural’ for ‘non-natural’. In addition, I shall attempt to strengthen Clarke’s conception of the supernatural by offering an analysis of what it means for something to be ‘above’ nature. Lastly, I shall offer a new argument as to why Clarke’s intention-based definition of miracles is necessarily less religiously inclusive than Mumford’s causation-based definition.
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  5. Eulalio R. Baltazar (1966). Teilhard and the Supernatural. Baltimore, Helicon.score: 15.0
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  6. L. V. Lester-Garland (1934). The Idea of the Supernatural. New York, the Macmillan Co..score: 15.0
     
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  7. John Oman (1931/1972). The Natural & the Supernatural. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.score: 15.0
     
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  8. Elliott Sober (2007). Intelligent Design Theory and the Supernatural—the 'God or Extra-Terrestrials' Reply. Faith and Philosophy 24 (1):72-82.score: 12.0
    When proponents of Intelligent Design (ID) theory deny that their theory is religious, the minimalistic theory they have in mind (the mini-ID theory) is the claim that the irreducibly complex adaptations found in nature were made by one or more intelligent designers. The denial that this theory is religious rests on the fact that it does not specify the identity of the designer—a supernatural God or a team of extra-terrestrials could have done the work. The present paper attempts to (...)
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  9. Thomas D. Senor (1991). God, Supernatural Kinds, and the Incarnation. Religious Studies 27 (3):353-370.score: 12.0
    Traditionally, the term ’God’ has been understood either as a proper name or as a description. However, according to a new view, the term God’ in a sentence like "Jesus Christ is God" functions as a kind term, much as the term ’tiger’ functions in the sentence "Tigger is a tiger." In this paper I examine the claim that divinity can be construed as a ’supernatural’ kind, developing the outlines of an account of the semantics of God’ along these (...)
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  10. Nathalia L. Gjersoe & Bruce M. Hood (2006). The Supernatural Guilt Trip Does Not Take Us Far Enough. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):473-474.score: 12.0
    Belief in souls is only one component of supernatural thinking in which individuals infer the presence of invisible mechanisms that explain events as paranormal rather than natural. We believe it is important to place greater emphasis on the prevalence of supernatural beliefs across other domains, if only to counter simplistic divisions between rationality and irrationality recently aligned with the contentious science/religion debate.
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  11. David Cohen & Angèle Consoli (2006). Production of Supernatural Beliefs During Cotard's Syndrome, a Rare Psychotic Depression. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):468-470.score: 12.0
    Cotard's syndrome is a psychotic condition that includes delusion of a supernatural nature. Based on insights from recovered patients who were convinced of being immortal, we can (1) distinguish biographical experiences from cultural and evolutionary backgrounds; (2) show that cultural significance dominates biographical experiences; and (3) support Bering's view of a cognitive system dedicated to forming illusory representations of immortality.
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  12. Kenneth D. Eberhard (1971). Karl Rahner and the Supernatural Existential. Thought 46 (4):537-561.score: 12.0
    The key to understanding Karl Rahner's theology is his doctrine of the supernatural existential; it is, moreover, a microcosm of many of his major theological themes.
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  13. Jesse M. Bering & Todd K. Shackelford (2004). Supernatural Agents May Have Provided Adaptive Social Information. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):732-733.score: 12.0
    Atran & Norenzayan's (A&N's) target article effectively combines the insights of evolutionary biology and interdisciplinary cognitive science, neither of which alone yields sufficient explanatory power to help us fully understand the complexities of supernatural belief. Although the authors' ideas echo those of other researchers, they are perhaps the most squarely grounded in neo-Darwinian terms to date. Nevertheless, A&N overlook the possibility that the tendency to infer supernatural agents' communicative intent behind natural events served an ancestrally adaptive function.
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  14. Brian R. Cornwell, Aron K. Barbey & W. Kyle Simmons (2004). The Embodied Bases of Supernatural Concepts. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):735-736.score: 12.0
    According to embodied cognition theory, our physical embodiment influences how we conceptualize entities, whether natural or supernatural. In serving central explanatory roles, supernatural entities (e.g., God) are represented implicitly as having unordinary properties that nevertheless do not violate our sensorimotor interactions with the physical world. We conjecture that other supernatural entities are similarly represented in explanatory contexts.
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  15. Lewis Vaughn (2000). The Failure of Supernatural Hypotheses. Philo 3 (2):68-73.score: 12.0
    By applying some of the standard criteria used to judge the adequacy of scientific explanations, Richard Swinburne tries to show that the best explanation of everything is that God exists. That is, he contends that the best explanation for the existence of the universe and human life is that there is a God. I contend that Swinburne is right to appeal to the criteria of adequacy but wrong to construe them as he does. The criteria, plausibly applied, show that the (...)
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  16. Jean Brown (2012). Supernatural Selection: How Religion Evolved [Book Review]. Australian Humanist, The (105):16.score: 12.0
    Brown, Jean Review(s) of: Indexer please enter the following minimum information (where available): TITLE, AUTHOR(S) and ISBN for each book reviewed.Supernatural selection: How religion Evolved, by Matt J. Rossano Oxford Press. 2010.
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  17. Sascha Talmor (1980). Scepticism and Belief in the Supernatural. Heythrop Journal 21 (2):137–152.score: 12.0
    THE OBJECT OF THIS ARTICLE IS TO SHOW THAT SCEPTICISM IS NOT ALWAYS USED TO CHALLENGE BELIEFS: IT IS SOMETIMES USED TO "FOSTER" CERTAIN BELIEFS. GLANVILL’S SCEPTICISM REGARDING OUR KNOWLEDGE OF NATURAL CAUSES IS BASED ON THE WEAKNESS AND LIMITATIONS OF HUMAN UNDERSTANDING. BUT THIS ALLOWS HIM TO ARGUE FOR THE EQUAL POSSIBILITY OF BOTH NATURAL AND NON-NATURAL CAUSES, AND THUS OPENS THE DOOR TO BELIEF IN THE SUPERNATURAL. HUME, HOWEVER, WHOSE SCEPTICISM IS ALSO BASED ON THE LIMITATIONS OF (...)
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  18. Stefano Bigliardi (2011). Snakes From Staves? Science, Scriptures, and the Supernatural in Maurice Bucaille. Zygon 46 (4):793-805.score: 12.0
    Abstract The aim of this paper is to attain a philosophical evaluation of the ideas of the French author Maurice Bucaille. Bucaille formulated an influential discourse regarding the divinity of the Qur’an, which he tried to demonstrate through a comparison of some of its verses with what he defined as scientific data. With his works, which encompass a criticism of the Bible and a defense of creationism, Bucaille furthered the idea that Islam is in harmony with natural sciences, and ensured (...)
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  19. Joseph A. Bracken (2013). Actions and Agents: Natural and Supernatural Reconsidered. Zygon 48 (4):1001-1013.score: 12.0
    Using a process-oriented understanding of the relation between actions and agents, the author argues that an ontological agent is the ongoing effect or by-product rather than the antecedent cause of actions. Applied to the relation between natural and supernatural in philosophical cosmology, this allows one to claim, first, that agents (whether natural or supernatural) are not sensibly perceived, but only inferred from the ongoing observation of empirical actions; second, that the distinction between the natural and the supernatural (...)
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  20. T. S. Petrus & D. L. Bogopa (2007). Natural and Supernatural: Intersections Between the Spiritual and Natural Worlds in African Witchcraft and Healing with Reference to Southern Africa. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 7 (1).score: 12.0
    For generations, African beliefs and practices regarding witchcraft and traditional healing have been located at the intersection between the natural world and the supernatural world. Despite the impact of both colonialism and, in the contemporary context, modernization, the complex interplay between these worlds has not been reduced. The interaction between nature and religion, as a facet of culture, has long been a subject of inquiry in anthropology, and nowhere is this more evident than in the study of African witchcraft (...)
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  21. Dominic Dp Johnson, Ryan T. McKay & Daniel C. Dennett (2009). God Would Be a Costly Accident: Supernatural Beliefs as Adaptive. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (6):523.score: 12.0
    I take up the challenge of why false beliefs are better than (target article, sect. 9) in navigating adaptive problems with asymmetric errors. I then suggest that there are interactions between supernatural beliefs, self-deception, and positive illusions, rendering elements of all such misbeliefs adaptive. Finally, I argue that supernatural beliefs cannot be rejected as adaptive simply because recent experiments are inconclusive. The great costs of religion betray its even greater adaptive benefits – we just have not yet nailed (...)
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  22. Theodore S. Petrus (2006). Engaging the World of the Supernatural: Anthropology, Phenomenology and the Limitations of Scientific Rationalism in the Study of the Supernatural. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 6 (1).score: 12.0
    Scientific rationalism has long been considered one of the pillars of true science. It has been one of the criteria academics have used in their efforts to categorise disciplines as scientific. Perhaps scientific rationalism acquired this privileged status because it worked relatively well within the context of the natural sciences, where it seemed to be easy to apply this kind of rationalism to the solution of natural scientific problems. However, with the split in the scientific world between the natural sciences (...)
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  23. Ken Wilder, Neither Here nor Elsewhere: Displacement Devices in Representing the Supernatural.score: 12.0
    How might the supernatural be represented in those religious paintings that imply a continuity between the virtual space of painting and the real space of the beholder? Such an implied continuity, dependent upon an engagement where the beholder imaginatively realigns her frame of reference to that of the picture, might be thought to threaten a necessary distance demanded of religious works. This paper examines how a number of painters exploited innovative displacement devices, utilizing inherent ambiguities as to where a (...)
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  24. Leslie Marsh (2007). Taking the Super Out of the Supernatural. Zygon 42 (2):356.score: 9.0
    Metaphysical dualities divorce humankind from its natural environment, dualities that can precipitate environmental disaster. Loyal Rue in Religion Is Not About God (2005) seeks to resolve the abstract modalities of religion and naturalism in a unified monistic ecocentric metaphysic characterized as religious naturalism. Rue puts forward proposals for a general naturalistic theory of religion, a theory that lays bare the structural and functional features of religious phenomena as the critical first step on the road to badly needed religion-science realignment. Only (...)
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  25. Maarten Boudry, Stefaan Blancke & Johan Braeckman (2010). How Not to Attack Intelligent Design Creationism: Philosophical Misconceptions About Methodological Naturalism. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 15 (3):227-244.score: 9.0
    In recent controversies about Intelligent Design Creationism (IDC), the principle of methodological naturalism (MN) has played an important role. In this paper, an often neglected distinction is made between two different conceptions of MN, each with its respective rationale and with a different view on the proper role of MN in science. According to one popular conception, MN is a self-imposed or intrinsic limitation of science, which means that science is simply not equipped to deal with claims of the (...) (Intrinsic MN or IMN). Alternatively, we will defend MN as a provisory and empirically grounded attitude of scientists, which is justified in virtue of the consistent success of naturalistic explanations and the lack of success of supernatural explanations in the history of science (Provisory MN or PMN). Science does have a bearing on supernatural hypotheses, and its verdict is uniformly negative. We will discuss five arguments that have been proposed in support of IMN: the argument from the definition of science, the argument from lawful regularity, the science stopper argument, the argument from procedural necessity, and the testability argument. We conclude that IMN, because of its philosophical flaws, proves to be an ill-advised strategy to counter the claims of IDC. Evolutionary scientists are on firmer ground if they discard supernatural explanations on purely evidential grounds, instead of ruling them out by philosophical fiat. (shrink)
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  26. Reed Richter, American Science and its Anti-Evolutionist Critics: It's the Evidence Stupid.score: 9.0
    This is an unpublished talk written for a meeting of French philosophers. The paper describes the evolution versus creationism/intelligent design controversy in the U.S. A number of philosophers and scientists try to resolve this issue by sharply distinguishing the realm of science versus any talk of the supernatural. These pro-evolutionists often appeal to science's essential commitment to "methodological naturalism," the view that scientific methodology is essentially committed to naturalism and cannot meaningfully entertain hypotheses concerning the supernatural. I criticize (...)
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  27. Scott Tanona (2010). The Pursuit of the Natural. Philosophical Studies 148 (1):79 - 87.score: 9.0
    In recent years, it has become common to defend science against charges of bias against the supernatural by explaining that science must remain methodologically natural but does not assume metaphysical naturalism. While such a response is correct, some details about the distinction between methodological naturalism and ontological or metaphysical naturalism have been lacking, as has a clear understanding of the distinction between the methodological restriction of science to natural explanations and naturalistic claims about the scope of those methods. We (...)
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  28. Scott Atran & Ara Norenzayan (2004). Religion's Evolutionary Landscape: Counterintuition, Commitment, Compassion, Communion. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):713-730.score: 9.0
    Religion is not an evolutionary adaptation per se, but a recurring cultural by-product of the complex evolutionary landscape that sets cognitive, emotional, and material conditions for ordinary human interactions. Religion exploits only ordinary cognitive processes to passionately display costly devotion to counterintuitive worlds governed by supernatural agents. The conceptual foundations of religion are intuitively given by task-specific panhuman cognitive domains, including folkmechanics, folkbiology, and folkpsychology. Core religious beliefs minimally violate ordinary notions about how the world is, with all of (...)
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  29. H. Price (2012). Causation, Chance, and the Rational Significance of Supernatural Evidence. Philosophical Review 121 (4):483-538.score: 9.0
    In “A Subjectivist’s Guide to Objective Chance,” David Lewis says that he is “led to wonder whether anyone but a subjectivist is in a position to understand objective chance.” The present essay aims to motivate this same Lewisean attitude, and a similar degree of modest subjectivism, with respect to objective causation. The essay begins with Newcomb problems, which turn on an apparent tension between two principles of choice: roughly, a principle sensitive to the causal features of the relevant situation, and (...)
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  30. Daniel Howard-Snyder (1996). God Without the Supernatural: A Defense of Scientific Theism. [REVIEW] Journal of Religion.score: 9.0
    This is a review of Peter Forrest's book.
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  31. Gilbert Fulmer (1977). The Concept of the Supernatural. Analysis 37 (3):113 - 116.score: 9.0
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  32. David Macarthur (2004). Naturalizing the Human or Humanizing Nature: Science, Nature and the Supernatural. Erkenntnis 61 (1):29-51.score: 9.0
    The present paper challenges the narrow scientistic conception of Nature that underlies current projects of naturalization involving, say, evaluative or intentional discourse. It is more plausible to hold that science provides only a partial characterization of the natural world. I consider McDowell's articulation of a more liberal naturalism, one which recognizes autonomous normative facts about reasons, meanings and values, as genuine constituents of Nature on a more liberal conception of it. Several critics have claimed that this account is vitiated by (...)
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  33. John Perry (2005). 'Can Error Co-Exist with Supernatural Knowledge'? Juan Martinez de Ripalda's Seventeenth Century Study of Religious Error and its Contemporary Relevance. Heythrop Journal 46 (4):476–492.score: 9.0
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  34. J. J. C. Smart (1997). Forrest on God Without the Supernatural. Sophia 36 (1):24-37.score: 9.0
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  35. Mark Wynn (1998). Peter Forrest. God Without the Supernatural. A Defense of Scientific Theism, Cornell Studies in Philosophy of Religion. (Ithaca, Cornell University Press, 1996.) Pp. 256. £31.50 Cloth. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 34 (2):219-229.score: 9.0
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  36. Bradley Rives, Intelligent Design, Science, and the Supernatural.score: 9.0
    (a lecture I gave to an audience of undergraduates in Jan ‘06).
     
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  37. Qiong Zhang (1999). About God, Demons, and Miracles: The Jesuit Discourse On the Supernatural in Late Ming China. Early Science and Medicine 4 (1):1-36.score: 9.0
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  38. Edward L. Schoen (1998). Peter Forrest, God Without the Supernatural: A Defense of Scientific Theism. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 43 (2):130-132.score: 9.0
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  39. Alfred E. Garvie (1932). The Natural and the Supernatural. By John Oman. (Cambridge: At The University Press. 1931.). Philosophy 7 (26):225-.score: 9.0
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  40. Peter Forrest (2001). Mark Wynn's Defence of “The Supernatural”. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 75 (1):101-104.score: 9.0
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  41. G. Paul (2008). The Remote Prayer Delusion: Clinical Trials That Attempt to Detect Supernatural Intervention Are as Futile as They Are Unethical. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):e18-e18.score: 9.0
  42. Adonis Vidu (2007). The Suspended Middle: Henri de Lubac and the Debate Concerning the Supernatural. By John Milbank. Heythrop Journal 48 (2):311–313.score: 9.0
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  43. Allan Wolter (1949). Duns Scotus on the Natural Desire for the Supernatural. New Scholasticism 23 (3):281-317.score: 9.0
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  44. David Cockburn (1992). The Supernatural. Religious Studies 28 (3):285 - 301.score: 9.0
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  45. Simon J. Evnine (1999). God Without the Supernatural. Faith and Philosophy 16 (4):573-577.score: 9.0
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  46. Daniel Izuzquiza (2006). Can a Gift Be Wrapped? John Milbank and Supernatural Sociology. Heythrop Journal 47 (3):387–404.score: 9.0
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  47. Terrance W. Klein (2006). The Supernatural as Language Game. Zygon 41 (2):365-380.score: 9.0
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  48. Edward Petry Jr (1987). James, Peirce, Dewey and the Supernatural Origin of Ideals. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 35:35-42.score: 9.0
  49. Evan Fales (2013). Is a Science of the Supernatural Possible? In Massimo Pigliucci & Maarten Boudry (eds.), Philosophy of Pseudoscience: Reconsidering the Demarcation Problem. University of Chicago Press. 247.score: 9.0
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  50. F. Kerr (2000). Book Reviews : The Sense of the Supernatural, by Jean Borella, Translated by John Champoux. Edinburgh: T&T Clark, 1998. 160 Pp. Hb. 19.95. ISBN 0-567-08643-. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 13 (1):112-115.score: 9.0
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