Search results for 'synchrony' (try it on Scholar)

170 found
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  1.  13
    Satinder P. Gill (2012). Rhythmic Synchrony and Mediated Interaction: Towards a Framework of Rhythm in Embodied Interaction. [REVIEW] AI and Society 27 (1):111-127.
    Our everyday interactions increasingly involve both embodied face-to-face communication and various forms of mediated and distributed communication such as email, skype, and facebook. In daily face-to-face communications, we are connected in rhythm and synchrony at multiple levels ranging from the moment-by-moment continuity of timed syllables to emergent body and vocal rhythms of pragmatic sense-making. Our human capacity to synchronize with each other may be essential for our survival as social beings. Moving our bodies and voices together in time embodies (...)
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  2.  27
    Frank van der Velde & Marc de Kamps (2002). Synchrony in the Eye of the Beholder: An Analysis of the Role of Neural Synchronization in Cognitive Processes. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 3 (3):291-312.
    We discuss the role of synchrony of activationin higher-level cognitive processes. Inparticular, we analyze the question of whethersynchrony of activation provides a mechanismfor compositional representation in neuralsystems. We will argue that synchrony ofactivation does not provide a mechanism forcompositional representation in neural systems.At face value, one can identify a level ofcompositional representation in the models thatintroduce synchrony of activation for thispurpose. But behavior in these models isalways produced by means conjunctiverepresentations in the form of coincidencedetectors. Therefore, models (...)
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  3.  1
    Cynthia A. Graham (1991). Menstrual Synchrony. Human Nature 2 (4):293-311.
    Several studies have now documented menstrual synchrony in human females. There is a broad consensus that the phenomenon mainly occurs in women who spend a significant amount of time together, such as close friends and coworkers, and that social contact rather than a similar environment plays an important role in mediating the effect. However, the mechanisms involved and the adaptive function of menstrual synchrony are not understood. There is some evidence that olfactory cues between females might underlie the (...)
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  4.  6
    Anna Ziomkiewicz (2006). Menstrual Synchrony: Fact or Artifact? [REVIEW] Human Nature 17 (4):419-432.
    Although more than thirty years of intensive investigation have passed since McClintock first published results on menstrual synchrony, there is still no conclusive evidence for the existence of this phenomenon. Indeed, a growing body of nullresult studies, critiques of menstrual synchrony studies, and the lack of convincing evolutionary explanations bring into question the existence of this phenomenon. This paper presents results of a study conducted over five consecutive months in Polish student dormitories. In 18 pairs and 21 triples (...)
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  5.  71
    L. Shastri & V. Ajjanagadde (1993). From Simple Associations to Systematic Reasoning: A Connectionist Representation of Rules, Variables, and Dynamic Binding Using Temporal Synchrony. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):417-51.
    Human agents draw a variety of inferences effortlessly, spontaneously, and with remarkable efficiency – as though these inferences were a reflexive response of their cognitive apparatus. Furthermore, these inferences are drawn with reference to a large body of background knowledge. This remarkable human ability seems paradoxical given the complexity of reasoning reported by researchers in artificial intelligence. It also poses a challenge for cognitive science and computational neuroscience: How can a system of simple and slow neuronlike elements represent a large (...)
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  6.  62
    Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Alexander A. Fingelkurts, Sergio Bagnato, Cristina Boccagni & Giuseppe Galardi (2012). DMN Operational Synchrony Relates to Self-Consciousness: Evidence From Patients in Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States. Open Neuroimaging Journal 6:55-68.
    The default mode network (DMN) has been consistently activated across a wide variety of self-related tasks, leading to a proposal of the DMN’s role in self-related processing. Indeed, there is limited fMRI evidence that the functional connectivity within the DMN may underlie a phenomenon referred to as self-awareness. At the same time, none of the known studies have explicitly investigated neuronal functional interactions among brain areas that comprise the DMN as a function of self-consciousness loss. To fill this gap, EEG (...)
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  7.  18
    Michel le Van Quyen & Antoine Lutz, Comparison of Hilbert Transform and Wavelet Methods for the Analysis of Neuronal Synchrony.
    The quantification of phase synchrony between neuronal signals is of crucial importance for the study of large-scale interactions in the brain. Two methods have been used to date in neuroscience, based on two distinct approaches which permit a direct estimation of the instantaneous phase of a signal [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81 (1998) 3291; Human Brain Mapping 8 (1999) 194]. The phase is either estimated by using the analytic concept of Hilbert transform or, alternatively, by convolution with a complex wavelet. (...)
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  8.  4
    Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Alexander A. Fingelkurts & Tarja Kallio-Tamminen (2016). Long-Term Meditation Training Induced Changes in the Operational Synchrony of Default Mode Network Modules During a Resting State. Cognitive Processing 17 (1):27-37.
    Using theoretical analysis of self-consciousness concept and experimental evidence on the brain default mode network (DMN) that constitutes the neural signature of self-referential processes, we hypothesized that the anterior and posterior subnets comprising the DMN should show differences in their integrity as a function of meditation training. Functional connectivity within DMN and its subnets (measured by operational synchrony) has been measured in ten novice meditators using an electroencephalogram (EEG) recording in a pre-/post-meditation intervention design. We have found that while (...)
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  9.  25
    Michael J. Hove (2008). Shared Circuits, Shared Time, and Interpersonal Synchrony. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):29-30.
    The shared circuits model (SCM) is a useful explanatory framework that can be applied to interpersonal synchrony by incorporating temporal dynamics. Temporally precise predictive simulations and mirroring enable interpersonal synchrony. When partners' movements are highly synchronous, the self/other distinction can be blurred.
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  10.  21
    Eugene Feenberg (1979). Distant Synchrony and the One-Way Velocity of Light. Foundations of Physics 9 (5-6):329-337.
    A number of physical processes and experimental procedures are listed which appear to be inexplicable in the context of the conventionality thesis of Reichenbach and Grünbaum. Distant synchrony can be produced by procedures based on the free displacement or rotation of elastic solids. Results are expected to agree with Einstein's definition of distant synchrony (by means of light signals, assuming isotropy). The one-way velocity of light can be measured using a rotating shaft, slotted disks, and one stationary clock.
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  11.  7
    Peter Weeks (1996). Synchrony Lost, Synchrony Regained: The Achievement of Musical Co-Ordination. [REVIEW] Human Studies 19 (2):199 - 228.
    As part of a series of Ethnomethodological Studies of Work, this paper focusses upon a short stretch of a final concert performance of the Saint-Saens Septet by a set of amateur musicians in which timing errors occur but in response to which various manoeuvres successfully restore synchrony. I set out to demonstrate that these afford a strategic access for ethnomethodologists to sets of musicians' practices whereby musical synchrony is ongoingly accomplished. The central curiosity of this study is the (...)
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  12.  47
    Eric LaRock (2006). Why Neural Synchrony Fails to Explain the Unity of Visual Consciousness. Behavior and Philosophy 34:39-58.
    A central issue in philosophy and neuroscience is the problem of unified visual consciousness. This problem has arisen because we now know that an object's stimulus features (e.g., its color, texture, shape, etc.) generate activity in separate areas of the visual cortex (Felleman & Van Essen, 1991). For example, recent evidence indicates that there are very few, if any, neural connections between specific visual areas, such as those that correlate with color and motion (Bartels & Zeki, 2006; Zeki, 2003). So (...)
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  13.  15
    Lokendra Shastri (2006). Comparing the Neural Blackboard and the Temporal Synchrony-Based SHRUTI Architectures. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (1):84-86.
    Contrary to the assertions made in the target article, temporal synchrony, coupled with an appropriate choice of representational primitives, leads to a functionally adequate and neurally plausible architecture that addresses the massiveness of the binding problem, the problem of 2, the problem of variables, and the transformation of activity-based transient representations of events and situations into structure-based persistent encodings of the same.
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  14.  14
    Dennis Pozega & Paul Thagard, Neural Synchrony Through Controlled Tracking.
    We present a model for generating a kind of neural synchrony in which the individual spike trains of one neuron or group of neurons closely match the spike trains of another. This kind of neural synchrony has been observed in animals performing auditory, visual and attentional information processing tasks. Our model is realized in a system of functionally identical, refractory spiking neurons. Larger systems with more sophisticated information processing capabilities can be constructed from aggregated instances of the basic (...)
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  15.  6
    Susan Pockett & Mark D. Holmes (2009). Intracranial EEG Power Spectra and Phase Synchrony During Consciousness and Unconsciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):1049-1055.
    Power density spectra and phase synchrony measurements were taken from intracranial electrode grids implanted in epileptic subjects. Comparisons were made between data from the waking state and from the period of unconsciousness immediately following a generalised tonic–clonic seizure. Power spectra in the waking state resembled coloured noise. Power spectra in the unconscious state resembled coloured noise from 1 to about 5 Hz, but at higher frequencies changed in two out of three subjects to resemble white noise. This boosted unconscious (...)
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  16.  5
    Ruth Feldman, Linda C. Mayes & James E. Swain (2005). Interaction Synchrony and Neural Circuits Contribute to Shared Intentionality. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):697-698.
    In the dyadic and triadic sharing of emotions, intentions, and behaviors in families, interactive synchrony is important to the early life experiences that contribute to the development of cultural cognition. This synchrony likely depends on neurobiological circuits, currently under study with brain imaging, that involve attention, stress response, and memory.
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  17.  88
    Antoine Lutz, Jacques Martinerie, Jean-Philippe Lachaux & Francisco J. Varela (2002). Guiding the Study of Brain Dynamics by Using First- Person Data: Synchrony Patterns Correlate with Ongoing Conscious States During a Simple Visual Task. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the Usa 99 (3):1586-1591.
    Laboratoire de Neurosciences Cognitives et Imagerie Ce´re´brale (LENA), Hoˆpital de La Salpeˆtrie`re, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS).
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  18.  3
    C. Neil Macrae, Oonagh K. Duffy, Lynden K. Miles & Julie Lawrence (2008). A Case of Hand Waving: Action Synchrony and Person Perception. Cognition 109 (1):152-156.
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  19.  58
    Lokendra Shastri (1996). Temporal Synchrony, Dynamic Bindings, and Shruti: A Representational but Nonclassical Model of Reflexive Reasoning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):331.
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  20.  3
    Nadja Althaus & Kim Plunkett (2015). Timing Matters: The Impact of Label Synchrony on Infant Categorisation. Cognition 139:1-9.
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  21.  22
    Peter J. Uhlhaas, Frédéric Roux, Eugenio Rodriguez, Anna Rotarska-Jagiela & Wolf Singer (2010). Neural Synchrony and the Development of Cortical Networks. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (2):72-80.
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  22.  23
    Vassilis Sevdalis & Peter E. Keller (2010). Cues for Self-Recognition in Point-Light Displays of Actions Performed in Synchrony with Music. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (2):617-626.
    Self–other discrimination was investigated with point-light displays in which actions were presented with or without additional auditory information. Participants first executed different actions in time with music. In two subsequent experiments, they watched point-light displays of their own or another participant’s recorded actions, and were asked to identify the agent . Manipulations were applied to the visual information and to the auditory information . Results indicate that self-recognition was better than chance in all conditions and was highest when observing relatively (...)
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  23.  7
    Rick Dale, Riccardo Fusaroli, Dorthe Døjbak Håkonsson, Patrick Healey, Dan Mønster, John J. McGraw, Panagiotis Mitkidis & Kristian Tylén (forthcoming). Beyond Synchrony: Complementarity and Asynchrony in Joint Action. Cognitive Science.
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  24.  9
    Riitta Hari, Tommi Himberg, Lauri Nummenmaa, Matti Hämäläinen & Lauri Parkkonen (2013). Synchrony of Brains and Bodies During Implicit Interpersonal Interaction. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (3):105-106.
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  25.  7
    Rex K. Kincaid, Natalia Alexandrov & Michael J. Holroyd (2009). An Investigation of Synchrony in Transport Networks. Complexity 14 (4):34-43.
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  26. Sam M. Doesburg, Keiichi Kitajo & Lawrence M. Ward (2005). Increased Gamma-Band Synchrony Precedes Switching of Conscious Perceptual Objects in Binocular Rivalry. Neuroreport 16 (11):1139-1142.
  27. C. Neil Macrae, Oonagh K. Duffy, Lynden K. Miles & Julie Lawrence (2008). A Case of Hand Waving: Action Synchrony and Person Perception. Cognition 109 (1):152-156.
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  28.  18
    William S. Bush & Hava T. Siegelmann (2007). Circadian Synchrony in Networks of Protein Rhythm Driven Neurons. Complexity 12 (6):46-46.
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  29. Nicole Edgar & Colleen A. McClung (2013). Major Depressive Disorder: A Loss of Circadian Synchrony? Bioessays 35 (11):940-944.
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  30.  13
    Jean Vroomen & Jeroen J. Stekelenburg (2011). Perception of Intersensory Synchrony in Audiovisual Speech: Not That Special. Cognition 118 (1):75-83.
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  31.  36
    Andrew A. Fingelkurts & Alexander A. Fingelkurts (2011). Persistent Operational Synchrony Within Brain Default-Mode Network and Self-Processing Operations in Healthy Subjects. Brain and Cognition 75 (2):79-90.
    Based on the theoretical analysis of self-consciousness concepts, we hypothesized that the spatio-temporal pattern of functional connectivity within the default-mode network (DMN) should persist unchanged across a variety of different cognitive tasks or acts, thus being task-unrelated. This supposition is in contrast with current understanding that DMN activated when the subjects are resting and deactivated during any attention-demanding cognitive tasks. To test our proposal, we used, in retrospect, the results from our two early studies ([Fingelkurts, 1998] and [Fingelkurts et al., (...)
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  32. F. Varela (2000). Neural Synchrony and Consciousness: Are We Getting Somewhere? Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):S26 - S27.
     
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  33.  13
    H. Farid (2002). Temporal Synchrony in Perceptual Grouping: A Critique. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (7):284-288.
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  34.  70
    S. Vanni (1999). Neural Synchrony and Dynamic Connectivity. Consciousness and Cognition 8 (2):159-163.
  35. Matthew Usher & N. Donnelly (1998). Visual Synchrony Affects Binding and Segmentation in Perception. Nature 394:179-82.
     
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  36.  28
    Catherine Tallon-Baudry (2004). Attention and Awareness in Synchrony. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (12):523-525.
  37.  70
    Sean D. Kelly, A Moment to Reflect Upon Perceptual Synchrony.
    & How does neuronal activity bring about the interpretation of visual space in terms of objects or complex perceptual events? If they group, simple visual features can bring about the integration of spikes from neurons responding to different features to within a few milliseconds. Considered as a potential solution to the ‘‘binding problem,’’ it is suggested that neuronal synchronization is the glue for binding together different features of the same object. This idea receives some support from correlated- and periodic-stimulus motion (...)
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  38.  4
    Yaoda Xu (2014). Inferior Frontal Junction Biases Perception Through Neural Synchrony. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (9):447-448.
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  39.  9
    Daniel C. Richardson, Rick Dale & Kevin Shockley (2008). Synchrony and Swing in Conversation: Coordination, Temporal Dynamics, and Communication. In Ipke Wachsmuth, Manuela Lenzen & Günther Knoblich (eds.), Embodied Communication in Humans and Machines. OUP Oxford 75--93.
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  40.  7
    Markus Werning (2003). Synchrony and Composition: Toward a Cognitive Architecture Between Classicism and Connectionism. In Benedikt Löwe, Thoralf Räsch & Wolfgang Malzkorn (eds.), Foundations of the Formal Sciences Ii. Kluwer 261--278.
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  41.  48
    R. C. O'Reilly, R. Busby & R. Soto (2003). Three Forms of Binding and Their Neural Substrates: Alternatives to Temporal Synchrony. In Axel Cleeremans (ed.), The Unity of Consciousness. Oxford University Press 168--192.
  42.  8
    Brian Ellis (1978). Is Signal Synchrony Independent of Transport Synchrony? Philosophy of Science 45 (2):309-311.
  43.  1
    Svenja Koehne, Alexander Hatri, John T. Cacioppo & Isabel Dziobek (2016). Perceived Interpersonal Synchrony Increases Empathy: Insights From Autism Spectrum Disorder. Cognition 146:8-15.
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  44.  2
    Clare Dixon, Cláudia Nalon & Michael Fisher (2004). Tableaux for Logics of Time and Knowledge with Interactions Relating to Synchrony. Journal of Applied Non-Classical Logics 14 (4):397-445.
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  45.  4
    Stephen Cooper (2002). Minimally Disturbed, Multicycle, and Reproducible Synchrony Using a Eukaryotic?Baby Machine? Bioessays 24 (6):499-501.
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  46.  3
    Stephen Grossberg (1993). Self-Organizing Neural Models of Categorization, Inference and Synchrony. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):460.
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  47.  1
    P. K. Monteiro, M. R. Pascoa & P. Smolensky (1999). Grammar-Based Connectionist Approaches to Language-A Connectionist Representation of Rule, Variables, and Dynamic Bindings Using Temporal Synchrony. Cognitive Science 23 (4):589-613.
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  48.  1
    Simon J. Thorpe (1993). Temporal Synchrony and the Speed of Visual Processing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):473.
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  49.  1
    Yi-Huang Su (2014). Peak Velocity as a Cue in Audiovisual Synchrony Perception of Rhythmic Stimuli. Cognition 131 (3):330-344.
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  50. F. Aiple & B. Fischer (1989). Synchrony of Spikes and Attention in Visual Cortex. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (3):397.
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