Search results for 'synonymy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Roger Wertheimer (2000). The Synonymy Antinomy. In A. Kanamori (ed.), The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy. Philosophy Document Center 67-88.
    Resolution of Frege's Puzzle by denying that synonym substitution in logical truths preserves sentence sense and explaining how logical form has semantic import. Intensional context substitutions needn't preserve truth, because intercepting doesn't preserve sentence meaning. Intercepting is nonuniformly substituting a pivotal term in syntactically secured truth. Logical sentences and their synonym interceptions share factual content. Semantic content is factual content in synthetic predications, but not logical sentences and interceptions. Putnam's Postulate entails interception nonsynonymy. Syntax and vocabulary explain only the factual (...)
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  2.  30
    Gary H. Merrill (2009). Concepts and Synonymy in the UMLS Metathesaurus. Journal of Biomedical Discovery and Collaboration 4 (7).
    This paper advances a detailed exploration of the complex relationships among terms, concepts, and synonymy in the UMLS Metathesaurus, and proposes the study and understanding of the Metathesaurus from a model-theoretic perspective. Initial sections provide the background and motivation for such an approach, and a careful informal treatment of these notions is offered as a context and basis for the formal analysis. What emerges from this is a set of puzzles and confusions in the Metathesaurus and its literature pertaining (...)
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  3.  10
    Dmitrii Y. Manin (2008). Zipf's Law and Avoidance of Excessive Synonymy. Cognitive Science 32 (7):1075-1098.
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  4.  52
    H. G. Callaway (1996). Synonymy and Analyticity. In Gerhardus D. Et al (ed.), Sprachphilosophie, Ein internationales Handbuch zeitgenössischer Forschung. De Gruyter
    This article is an invited overview of contemporary issues connected with meaning and the analytic-synthetic distinction.
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  5.  15
    Joeri Witteveen (forthcoming). Suppressing Synonymy with a Homonym: The Emergence of the Nomenclatural Type Concept in Nineteenth Century Natural History. Journal of the History of Biology.
    ‘Type’ in biology is a polysemous term. In a landmark article, Paul Farber (Journal of the History of Biology 9(1): 93–119, 1976) argued that this deceptively plain term had acquired three different meanings in early nineteenth century natural history alone. ‘Type’ was used in relation to three distinct type concepts, each of them associated with a different set of practices. Important as Farber’s analysis has been for the historiography of natural history, his account conceals an important dimension of early nineteenth (...)
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  6.  65
    Peter Pagin (2003). Quine and the Problem of Synonymy. Grazer Philosophische Studien 66 (1):171-197.
    On what seems to be the best interpretation, what Quine calls 'the problem of synonymy' in Two Dogmas is the problem of approximating the extension of our pretheoretic concept of synonymy by clear and respectable means. Quine thereby identified a problem which he himself did not think had any solution, and so far he has not been proven wrong. Some difficulties for providing a solution are discussed in this paper.
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  7.  76
    Peter Pagin (2001). A Quinean Definition of Synonymy. Erkenntnis 55 (1):7-32.
    The main purpose of this paper is to propose and defend anew definition of synonymy. Roughly (and slightly misleadingly), theidea is that two expressions are synonymous iff intersubstitutions insentences preserve the degree of doxastic revisability. In Section 1 Iargue that Quine''s attacks on analyticity leave room for such adefinition. The definition is presented in Section 2, and Section 3elaborates on the concept of revisability. The definition is defendedin Sections 4 and 5. It is, inter alia, shown that the definition (...)
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  8.  34
    Patrick Allo (2014). Synonymy and Intra-Theoretical Pluralism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (1):77-91.
    The starting point of this paper is a version of intra-theoretical pluralism that was recently proposed by Hjortland [2013]. In a first move, I use synonymy-relations to formulate an intuitively compelling objection against Hjortland's claim that, if one uses a single calculus to characterise the consequence relations of the paraconsistent logic LP and the paracomplete logic K3, one immediately obtains multiple consequence relations for a single language and hence a reply to the Quinean charge of meaning variance. In a (...)
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  9.  62
    S. D. Rieber (1994). The Paradoxes of Analysis and Synonymy. Erkenntnis 41 (1):103 - 116.
    The very idea of informative analysis gives rise to a well-known paradox. Yet a parallel puzzle, herein called the paradox of synonymy, arises for statements which do not express analyses. The paradox of synonymy has a straightforward metalinguistic solution: certain words are referring to themselves. Likewise, the paradox of analysis can be solved by recognizing that certain expressions in an analysis statement are referring to their own semantic structures.
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  10.  71
    Theodore J. Everett (2002). Analyticity Without Synonymy in Simple Comparative Logic. Synthese 130 (2):303 - 315.
    In this paper I provide some formal schemas for the analysis of vague predicates in terms of a set of semantic relations other than classical synonymy, including weak synonymy (as between "large" and "huge"), antonymy (as between "large" and "small"), relativity (as between "large" and "large for a dog"), and a kind of supervenience (as between "large" and "wide" or "long"). All of these relations are representable in the simple comparative logic CL, in accordance with the basic formula: (...)
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  11.  65
    Robert Barrett (1965). Quine, Synonymy and Logical Truth. Philosophy of Science 32 (3/4):361-367.
    W. V. O. Quine's well-known attack upon the analytic-synthetic distinction is held to affect only one of the two species of analytic statements he distinguishes. In particular it is not directed at and does not affect the so-called logical truths. In this paper the scope of Quine's attack is extended so as to embrace the logical truths as well. It is shown that the unclarifiability of the notion of 'synonymy' deprives us not only of "analytic statements that are obtainable (...)
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  12.  24
    Marek Tokarz (1988). Synonymy in Sentential Languages: A Pragmatic View. Studia Logica 47 (2):93 - 97.
    In this note two notions of meaning are considered and accordingly two versions of synonymy are defined, weaker and stronger ones. A new semantic device is introduced: a matrix is said to be pragmatic iff its algebra is in fact an algebra of meanings in the stronger sense. The new semantics is proved to be universal enough (Theorem 1), and it turns out to be in some sense a generalization of Wójcicki's referential semantics (Theorem 3).
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  13.  39
    Paul Vincent Spade (1980). Synonymy and Equivocation in Ockham's Mental Language. Journal of the History of Philosophy 18 (1):9-22.
    A textual and philosophical study of the claim that according to ockham there is no synonymy or equivocation in mental language. It is argued that ockham is committed to both claims, Either explicitly or in virtue of other features of his doctrine. Nevertheless, Both claims lead to difficulties for ockham's theory.
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  14.  13
    Fabrizio Amerini (2009). William of Ockham and Mental Synonymy. The Case of Nugation. Franciscan Studies 67 (1):375-403.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:I. William of Ockham and Mental SynonymyIn recent years an important point of discussion among the scholars of William of Ockham has been the possibility of accounting for a reductionist interpretation of Ockham's mental language. Especially, the debate focused on the legitimacy of eliminating connotative simple terms from mental language by reducing them to their nominal definition. The distinction between absolute and connotative terms plays an important role in (...)
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  15.  16
    Peter Spirtes & Clark Glymour (1982). Space-Time and Synonymy. Philosophy of Science 49 (3):463-477.
    In "The Epistemology of Geometry" Glymour proposed a necessary structural condition for the synonymy of two space-time theories. David Zaret has recently challenged this proposal, by arguing that Newtonian gravitational theory with a flat, non-dynamic connection (FNGT) is intuitively synonymous with versions of the theory using a curved dynamical connection (CNGT), even though these two theories fail to satisfy Glymour's proposed necessary condition for synonymy. Zaret allowed that if FNGT and CNGT were not equally well (bootstrap) tested by (...)
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  16.  4
    Harold Morick (1980). A Confirmation Criterion of Synonymy. Grazer Philosophische Studien 11:13-21.
    Two declarative sentences are synonymous if, and only if, the statements they can be used to make are. given certain assumptions about the truth or falsity of other statements, confirmed or disconfirmed to the same degree by the same evidence. This criterion of synonymy is Quinean in that it treats confirmation holistically. But unlike Quine's criterion of synonymy, it conforms to and explains our intuitions of sentence synonymy.
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  17.  1
    D. Goldstick (1980). Cognitive Synonymy. Dialectica 34 (3):183-203.
    SummaryThe crux of Quine's argument against synonymy— and therewith for a version of pragmatism, and independent/y against mentalism — is his challenge to the other side to explain the behavioural difference between the disposition to employ two predicates, say, interchangeably because of habitually “believing“ them coextensive, and the disposition to do so because of “meaning” the same by each. Since synonymy is taught behaviourally, the distinction in question must make a difference behaviourally, but not necessarily one explainable wholly (...)
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  18. Synonymy Necessity (2003). Ii. Necessity, Synonymy, and Logic. Grazer Philosophische Studien 66:141.
     
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  19. Rudolf Carnap (1955). Meaning and Synonymy in Natural Languages. Philosophical Studies 6 (3):33 - 47.
  20. Tyler Burge (1978). Belief and Synonymy. Journal of Philosophy 75 (3):119-138.
  21.  42
    Yiannis N. Moschovakis (2006). A Logical Calculus of Meaning and Synonymy. Linguistics and Philosophy 29 (1):27 - 89.
  22.  60
    Paul M. Pietroski (2003). Small Verbs, Complex Events: Analyticity Without Synonymy. In Louise M. Antony (ed.), Chomsky and His Critics. Malden Ma: Blackwell Publishing 179--214.
  23. B. L. Blose (1965). Synonymy. Philosophical Quarterly 15 (61):302-316.
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  24.  45
    Michael Tye (1981). On an Objection to the Synonymy Principle of Property Identity. Analysis 41 (1):22 - 26.
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  25. David J. Chalmers (1999). Is There Synonymy in Ockham's Mental Language. In P. V. Spade (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ockham. Cambridge 76.
    William of Ockham's semantic theory was founded on the idea that thought takes place in a language not unlike the languages in which spoken and written communication occur. This mental language was held to have a number of features in common with everyday languages. For example, mental language has simple terms, not unlike words, out of which complex expressions can be constructed. As with words, each of these terms has some meaning, or signification; in fact Ockham held that the signification (...)
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  26.  68
    Michael Tye (1982). A Note on the Synonymy Principle of Property Identity. Analysis 42 (1):52 - 55.
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  27. Roger Wertheimer, Synonymy Without Analyticity. International Philosophical Preprint Exchange.
    Analyticity is a bogus explanatory concept, and is so even granting genuine synonomy. Definitions can't explain the truth of a statement, let alone its necessity and/or our a priori knowledge of it. The illusion of an explanation is revealed by exposing diverse confusions: e.g., between nominal, conceptual and real definitions, and correspondingly between notational, conceptual, and objectual readings of alleged analytic truths, and between speaking a language and operating a calculus. The putative explananda of analyticity are (alleged) truths about essential (...)
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  28.  35
    Beverly Levin Robbins (1952). On Synonymy of Word-Events. Analysis 12 (4):98 - 100.
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  29. M. Lynne Murphy (2003). Semantic Relations and the Lexicon: Antonymy, Synonymy, and Other Paradigms. Cambridge University Press.
    This book explores how some word meanings are paradigmatically related to each other, for example, as opposites or synonyms, and how they relate to the mental organization of our vocabularies. Traditional approaches claim that such relationships are part of our lexical knowledge (our "dictionary" of mentally stored words) but Lynne Murphy argues that lexical relationships actually constitute our "metalinguistic" knowledge. The book draws on a century of previous research, including word association experiments, child language, and the use of synonyms and (...)
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  30.  63
    Lester Meckler (1954). On Goodman's Refutation of Synonymy. Analysis 14 (3):68 - 78.
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  31.  22
    Joseph Owens (1986). Synonymy and the Nonindividualistic Model of the Mental. Synthese 66 (3):361 - 382.
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  32.  57
    J. F. Thomson (1952). Some Remarks on Synonymy. Analysis 12 (3):73 - 76.
    To the author synonymity is easily defined, But a set of criteria are much harder to come up with. (staff).
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  33.  6
    Sergio Roncallo Dow (2012). Technique, Techno-Logy: Beyond Synonymy and Being Just Objects. Universitas Philosophica 29 (58):39-65.
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  34.  6
    Roy Harris (1973). Synonymy and Linguistic Analysis. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 34 (2):288-288.
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  35.  10
    Jay F. Rosenberg (1967). Synonymy and the Epistemology of Linguistics. Inquiry 10 (1-4):405-420.
    In Word and Object, Quine argues from the observation that ?there is no justification for collating linguistic meanings, unless in terms of men's dispositions to respond overtly to socially observable stimulations? to the conclusion that ?the enterprise of translation is found to be involved in a certain systematic indeterminacy?. In this paper, I propose to show (1) that Quine's thesis, when properly understood, reveals in the situation of translation no peculiar indeterminacy but merely the ordinary indeterminacy present in any case (...)
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  36.  26
    Israel Scheffler (1955). On Synonymy and Indirect Discourse. Philosophy of Science 22 (1):39-44.
  37.  43
    Jens Erik Fenstad (1962). Notes on Synonymy. Synthese 14 (1):35 - 77.
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  38.  11
    Jonathan Roper (2012). Synonymy and Rank in Alliterative Poetry. Sign Systems Studies 40 (1-2):82-92.
    This paper addresses the high sonic demands of alliterative metres, and the consequences of these demands for sense: the semantic stretching of common words and the deployment of uncommon (archaic, ‘poetic’) words. The notion of alliterative rank is discussed as an indicator of such consequences (examples are given from English and Estonian verse) and the range of onsets found for synonyms of key notions in verse traditions is remarked upon.
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  39.  40
    Reinhard Muskens, Synonymy, Common Knowledge, and the Social Construction of Meaning.
    In this paper it is shown how a formal theory of interpretation in Montague’s style can be reconciled with a view on meaning as a social construct. We sketch a formal theory in which agents can have their own theory of interpretation and in which groups can have common theories of interpretation. Frege solved the problem how different persons can have access to the same proposition by placing the proposition in a Platonic realm, independent from all language users but accessible (...)
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  40.  25
    Michael Tye (1981). Scientific Reduction and the Synonymy Principle of Property Identity. Philosophical Studies 40 (2):177 - 185.
  41.  19
    Massimo Grassia (2005). Frege's Criteria of Synonymy. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 13 (1):25-49.
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  42.  4
    Richard P. Honeck & Robert R. Hoffman (1979). Synonymy and Anomaly. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 14 (1):37-40.
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  43.  19
    Allan Silverman (1990). Self-Predication and Synonymy. Ancient Philosophy 10 (2):193-202.
  44.  8
    Ladislav Tondl (1977). On the Concept of Information Synonymy. Theory and Decision 8 (3):273-287.
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  45.  27
    Richard Taylor (1954). Disputes About Synonymy. Philosophical Review 63 (4):517-529.
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  46.  16
    Henry S. Leonard (1967). Synonymy and Systematic Definitions. The Monist 51 (1):33-68.
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  47.  26
    Shalom Lappin (1976). Goodman and Katz on Synonymy. Philosophical Studies 29 (4):279 - 281.
  48.  23
    George E. Weaver (1994). Syntactic Features and Synonymy Relations: A Unified Treatment of Some Proofs of the Compactness and Interpolation Theorems. Studia Logica 53 (2):325 - 342.
    This paper introduces the notion of syntactic feature to provide a unified treatment of earlier model theoretic proofs of both the compactness and interpolation theorems for a variety of two valued logics including sentential logic, first order logic, and a family of modal sentential logic includingM,B,S 4 andS 5. The compactness papers focused on providing a proof of the consequence formulation which exhibited the appropriate finite subset. A unified presentation of these proofs is given by isolating their essential feature and (...)
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  49.  26
    Jerrold J. Katz & Edwin Martin Jr (1967). The Synonymy of Actives and Passives. Philosophical Review 76 (4):476-491.
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  50.  14
    Bridgitte Arnold (2006). "It Began This Way": The Synonymy of Cartography and Writing as Utopian Cognitive Mapping in Herland. Utopian Studies 17 (2):299 - 316.
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