Search results for 'theological voluntarism' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Mark C. Murphy (2012). Restricted Theological Voluntarism. Philosophy Compass 7 (10):679-690.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Antoni Malet (1997). Isaac Barrow on the Mathematization of Nature: Theological Voluntarism and the Rise of Geometrical Optics. Journal of the History of Ideas 58 (2):265-287.score: 150.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Byron Robert Levy (1993). Robert Boyle's Theological Voluntarism in Context.score: 150.0
  4. Mark Murphy (forthcoming). Theological Voluntarism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Philip Quinn (2006). Theological Voluntarism. In David Copp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory. Oxford University Press. 63--90.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Christian Miller (forthcoming). Moral Realism and Anti-Realism. In Jerome Gellman (ed.), The History of Evil. Acumen Press.score: 90.0
    This chapter surveys work in meta-ethics in the past fifty years which explicitly deals with issues associated with evil. It discusses two examples from secular discussions: the argument developed by Gilbert Harman on the explanatory role of moral facts, and the argument developed by Gilbert Harman and John Doris on the empirical inadequacy of the virtues. The chapter then turns to two topics related to theistic meta-ethics: the problem of evil and moral realism, and theological voluntarism and evil.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Christian Miller (2009). Divine Desire Theory and Obligation. In Yujin Nagasawa & Erik J. Wielenberg (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Religion. Palgrave Macmillan. 105--24.score: 60.0
    Thanks largely to the work of Robert Adams and Philip Quinn, the second half of the twentieth century witnessed a resurgence of interest in divine command theory as a viable position in normative theory and meta-ethics. More recently, however, there has been some dissatisfaction with divine command theory even among those philosophers who claim that normative properties are grounded in God, and as a result alternative views have begun to emerge, most notably divine intention theory (Murphy, Quinn) and divine motivation (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Catherine Wilson (1997). Theological Foundations for Modern Science? Dialogue 36 (03):597-.score: 60.0
    The paper is a critical notice of Margaret Osler, "Divine Will and the Mechanical Philosophy". Criticism focuses on Osler's claim that theological voluntarism and intellectualism and associated ideas about the necessity of physical laws and the certainty of scientific beliefs provide an underlying framework for understanding Gassendi's and Descartes's natural philosophies.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Benjamin Carter (2010). Ralph Cudworth and the Theological Origins of Consciousness. History of the Human Sciences 23 (3):29-47.score: 54.0
    The English Neoplatonic philosopher Ralph Cudworth introduced the term ‘consciousness’ into the English philosophical lexicon. Cudworth uses the term to define the form and structure of cognitive acts, including acts of freewill. In this article I highlight the important role of theological disputes over the place and extent of human freewill within an overarching system of providence. Cudworth’s intellectual development can be understood in the main as an increasingly detailed and nuanced reaction to the strict voluntarist Calvinism that is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Felipe Ochoa R. (2005). Newton and the God of Dominion. Voluntarist Theology Illustrated in the Concepts of Absolute Space, Absolute Time and Universal Gravitation. Estudios de Filosofía 31:105-126.score: 50.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. John Henry (2009). Voluntarist Theology at the Origins of Modern Science: A Response to Peter Harrison. History of Science 47 (155):79-113.score: 40.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Wesley Erdelack (2011). Antivoluntarism and the Birth of Autonomy. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (4):651-679.score: 36.0
    Traditionalist and radical orthodox critiques of the Enlightenment assert that the modern discourse on moral self-government constitutes a radical break with the theocentric model of morality which preceded it. Against this view, this paper argues that the conceptions of autonomy emerged from the effort to reconcile commitments within the Christian tradition. Through an analysis of the moral thought of the Cambridge Platonist Ralph Cudworth, this paper contends that distinctively Christian theological concerns concerning moral accountability to God and the character (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. J. Haldane (1989). Voluntarism and Realism in Medieval Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 15 (1):39-44.score: 36.0
    In contrast to other articles in this series on the history of moral philosophy the present essay is not devoted to expounding the views of a single author, or to examining a particular moral theory. Instead it discusses an important dispute between two medieval accounts of the relation between theological and moral propositions. In addition to its historical interest this debate is important both because it connects earlier and later ethical thought--being influenced by Greek moral theories and influencing subsequent (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. T. Allan Hillman & Tully Borland (2011). Leibniz and the Imitation of God. Philosophy and Theology 23 (1):3-27.score: 32.0
    The primary goal of this essay is to demonstrate that Leibniz’s objections to theological voluntarism are tightly connected to his overarching metaphysical system; a secondary goal is to show that his objections are not without some merit. Leibniz, it is argued, holds to strong versions of the imago dei doctrine, i.e., creatures are made in the image of God, and imitatio dei doctrine, i.e., creatures ought to imitate God. Consequently, God and creatures must possess similar structures of moral (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Herman Westerink (2012). Creatio Ex Nihilo, the Problem of Evil, and the Crisis in Ethics. Philosophy and Theology 24 (1):3-21.score: 32.0
    In his 1959–1960 seminar on the ethics of psychoanalysis the French psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan states that one can only fully understand the intellectual (philosophical, ethical) problems Freud addresses when one recognizes the filiation or cultural paternity that exists between him and a new direction of thought represented by Luther. In this article Lacan’s interest in Luther’s theological voluntarism, his conception of God, his articulation of what Lacan identifies as the modern crisis in ethics and his view on the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Patrick Kain (2004). Self-Legislation in Kant's Moral Philosophy. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 86 (3):257-306.score: 30.0
    Kant famously insisted that “the idea of the will of every rational being as a universally legislative will” is the supreme principle of morality. Recent interpreters have taken this emphasis on the self-legislation of the moral law as evidence that Kant endorsed a distinctively constructivist conception of morality according to which the moral law is a positive law, created by us. But a closer historical examination suggests otherwise. Kant developed his conception of legislation in the context of his opposition to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Martyna Koszkało (2012). Rozważania Franciszka Suareza nad zakresem działania mocy absolutnej Boga w odniesieniu do prawa naturalnego. Filo-Sofija 12 (17):121-135.score: 30.0
    FRANCIS SUÁREZ’S VIEWS ON THE RELATION BETWEEN THE ABSOLUTE POWER OF GOD AND THE NATURAL LAW The article presents Francis Suárez’s views concerning the problem of the possibility of granting dispensation from the natural law by the absolute power of God. Suárez’s opinions on this matter were shown in his comprehensive work on the philosophy of law: De legibus ac Deo legislatore, in Book II De lege aeterna, naturali, et jure gentium, chapter XV entitled Utrum Deus dispensare possit in lege (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Peter Baumann (2011). Empiricism, Stances, and the Problem of Voluntarism. Synthese 178 (1):27-36.score: 24.0
    Classical empiricism leads to notorious problems having to do with the (at least prima facie) lack of an acceptable empiricist justification of empiricism itself. Bas van Fraassen claims that his idea of the “empirical stance” can deal with such problems. I argue, however, that this view entails a very problematic form of voluntarism which comes with the threat of latent irrationality and normative inadequacy. However, there is also a certain element of truth in such a voluntarism. The main (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Matthias Steup (2011). Empiricism, Metaphysics, and Voluntarism. Synthese 178 (1):19-26.score: 24.0
    This paper makes three points: First, empiricism as a stance is problematic unless criteria for evaluating the stance are provided. Second, Van Fraassen conceives of the empiricist stance as receiving its content, at least in part, from the rejection of metaphysics. But the rejection of metaphysics seems to presuppose for its justification the very empiricist doctrine Van Fraassen intends to replace with the empiricist stance. Third, while I agree with Van Fraassen’s endorsement of voluntarism, I raise doubts about the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. James Montmarquet (2008). Virtue and Voluntarism. Synthese 161 (3):393 - 402.score: 24.0
    My aim here is to characterize a certain type of ‘virtue approach’ to questions of responsibility for belief; then to explore the extent to which this is helpful with respect to one fundamental puzzle raised by the claims that we have, and that we do not have, voluntary control over our beliefs; and then ultimately to attempt a more exact statement of doxastic responsibility and, with it a plausible statement of ‘weak doxastic voluntarism.’.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2010). The Metaphysics of Spinoza's Theological Political Treatise. In Yitzhak Melamed (ed.), Spinoza's Theological Political Treatise: A Critical Guide. Cambridge.score: 24.0
  22. Danny Frederick (2013). Doxastic Voluntarism: A Sceptical Defence. International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 3 (1):24-44.score: 24.0
    Doxastic voluntarism maintains that we have voluntary control over our beliefs. It is generally denied by contemporary philosophers. I argue that doxastic voluntarism is true: normally, and insofar as we are rational, we are able to suspend belief and, provided we have a natural inclination to believe, we are able to rescind that suspension, and thus to choose to believe. I show that the arguments that have been offered against doxastic voluntarism fail; and that, if the denial (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Anjan Chakravartty (2011). A Puzzle About Voluntarism About Rational Epistemic Stances. Synthese 178 (1):37 - 48.score: 24.0
    The philosophy of science has produced numerous accounts of how scientific facts are generated, from very specific facilitators of belief, such as neo-Kantian constitutive principles, to global frameworks, such as Kuhnian paradigms. I consider a recent addition to this canon: van Fraassen's notion of an epistemic stance— a collection of attitudes and policies governing the generation of factual beliefs— and his commitment to voluntarism in this context: the idea that contrary stances and sets of beliefs are rationally permissible. I (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Andrew Jason Cohen (2008). Existentialist Voluntarism as a Source of Normativity. Philosophical Papers 37 (1):89-129.score: 24.0
    I defend a neo-Kantian view wherein we are capable of being completely autonomous and impartial and argue that this ability can ground normativity. As this view includes an existentialist conception of the self, I defend radical choice, a primary component of that conception, against arguments many take to be definitive. I call the ability to use radical choice “existentialist voluntarism” and bring it into a current debate in normative philosophy, arguing that it allows that we can be distanced from (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Robert P. Farell (2001). Feyerabend's Metaphysics: Process-Realism, or Voluntarist-Idealism? [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 32 (2):351-369.score: 24.0
    John Preston has contended that Paul Feyerabend retreated from his earlier commitment to realism and consciously embraced a ‘voluntarist’, social constructionist, idealism. Though there seems to be unmistakable subjective idealist statements in some of Feyerabend's writings, it will be argued that Feyerabend's idealistic period was short-lived, and that he returned to a form of realism in his later writings. Specifically, Feyerabend's distinction between theoretical/abstract and empirical/historical traditions of thought, when understood with Feyerabend's re evaluation of Bohr's philosophy of quantum physics (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Paul Teller (2011). Learning to Live with Voluntarism. Synthese 178 (1):49 - 66.score: 24.0
    This paper examines and finds wanting the arguments against van Fraassen's voluntarism, the view that the only constraint of rationality is consistency. Foundationalists claim that if we have no grounds or rationale for a belief or rule, rationality demands that we suspend it. But that begs the question by assuming that there have to be grounds or a rationale. Instead of asking, why should we hold a basic belief or rule, the question has to be: why should not we (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Patricia Easton (2009). Teaching & Learning Guide For: What is at Stake in the Cartesian Debates on the Eternal Truths? Philosophy Compass 4 (5):880-884.score: 24.0
    Any study of the 'Scientific Revolution' and particularly Descartes' role in the debates surrounding the conception of nature (atoms and the void v. plenum theory, the role of mathematics and experiment in natural knowledge, the status and derivation of the laws of nature, the eternality and necessity of eternal truths, etc.) should be placed in the philosophical, scientific, theological, and sociological context of its time. Seventeenth-century debates concerning the nature of the eternal truths such as '2 + 2 = (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Larry Krasnoff (2012). Voluntarism and Conventionalism in Hobbes and Kant. Hobbes Studies 25 (1):43-65.score: 24.0
    Kant's relation to Hobbesian voluntarism has recently become a source of controversy for the interpretation of Kant's practical philosophy. Realist interpreters, most prominently Karl Ameriks, have attacked the genealogies of Kantian autonomy suggested by J. B. Schneewind and Christine Korsgaard as misleadingly voluntarist and unacceptably anti-realist. In this debate, however, there has been no real discussion of Kant's own views about Hobbes. By examining the relation of Hobbes' voluntarism to a kind of conventionalism, and through a reading of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Kimberly Brewer & Eric Watkins (2012). A Difficulty Still Awaits: Kant, Spinoza, and the Threat of Theological Determinism. Kant-Studien 103 (2):163-187.score: 24.0
    In a short and much-neglected passage in the second Critique, Kant discusses the threat posed to human freedom by theological determinism. In this paper we present an interpretation of Kant’s conception of and response to this threat. Regarding his conception, we argue that he addresses two versions of the threat: either God causes appearances (and hence our spatio-temporal actions) directly or he does so indirectly by causing things in themselves which in turn cause appearances. Kant’s response to the first (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Felix Ó Murchadha (2007). Kairological Phenomenology: World, the Political and God in the Work of Klaus Held. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 15 (3):395 – 413.score: 24.0
    This article shows that Held's central philosophical concern is with the manner in which the withdrawal of world is apparent in kairological moments disclosed in fundamental moods. The phenomenology of world is for him a way of overcoming voluntarist nominalism. World is of its nature a limit to will and is experienced in the passivity of being acted upon. It is shown how Held emphasizes the common origins of philosophy and politics in the fundamental moods of wonder and awe. In (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Mohammad Saleh Zarepour (2013). Sunday School Student and Theological Fatalism. Sophia 52 (3):553-555.score: 24.0
    I will briefly argue that theological fatalism is not a genuine ‘theological’ problem, for it can be reduced to another alleged incompatibility that arises independently of the existence or non-existence of God. I will conclude that the way of arguing against the existence of God or His omniscience by appealing to theological fatalism is blocked for libertarian atheists.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Andrew Jason Cohen (1998). A Defense of Strong Voluntarism. American Philosophical Quarterly 35 (3):251-265.score: 24.0
    Critics of liberalism in the past two decades have argued that the fact that we are necessarily "situated" or "embedded" means that we can not always choose our own ends (for example, our conceptions of the good or our loyalties to others). Some suggest that we simply discover ourselves with these "connections." If correct, this would argue against (Rawlsian) hypothetical contract models and liberalism more broadly, make true impartiality impossible, and give support to traditionalist views like those of Alasdair MacIntyre, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. X. H. Meng, S. X. Zeng & C. M. Tam (2013). From Voluntarism to Regulation: A Study on Ownership, Economic Performance and Corporate Environmental Information Disclosure in China. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 116 (1):217-232.score: 24.0
    This article examines whether economic performance could affect EID and how the relationship is determined by the form of ownership from voluntarism to regulation under the current Chinese context. In this study, our empirical results show that the relationship between firms’ performance and EID is complex and the interactive impact of ownership and economic performance on EID significantly varies from voluntary disclosure to mandatory disclosure. This study provides a more comprehensive understanding of the motivations in corporate EID. The performance–impression (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Nicola Ciprotti (2008). Theological Compatibilism and Essential Properties. Nordicum-Mediterraneum 3 (1).score: 24.0
    Alvin Plantinga defends Theological Compatibilism (TC) and Essential- ism about property possession (E). TC is the claim that human freedom to act otherwise and God’s essential omniscience are compatible, while E is the claim that every individual entity whatsoever has a modal profile consisting in having both essential and accidental properties. I purport to show that, if E is assumed in the argument for TC, then the latter leads to a very puzzling upshot. I also intend to show that, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Fernando Suárez Müller (2013). From an Existentialist God to the God of Existence. The Theological Conjectures of Hans Jonas. Sophia 52 (4):657-672.score: 24.0
    Hans Jonas developed in ‘Past and Truth’ (1991) a demonstration of the existence of God based on the ‘truth of past things’. And in ‘The Concept of God after Auschwitz’ (1984) he created a new myth of divine self-alienation in order to take away God’s responsibility for human misery. Both these texts were conceived as an alternative to a more Hegelian, objective idealist perspective on theology. This article shows that Jonas’s alternative does not fully succeed in this respect because his (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Sergi Rosell (2009). A New Rejection of Doxastic Voluntarism. Teorema (3):97-112.score: 24.0
    ABSTRACT This paper provides an argument against doxastic voluntarism. After discussing the sort of cases adduced by Carl Ginet as clear examples of voluntary belief-acquisition, I propose an alternative explanation based on the notion of acceptance and offer a defence of the belief/acceptance distinction as a consequence of the con-cept of belief. My general contention is: when someone acknowledges some eviden-tial states or doxastic reasons as showing that p, she immediately believes that p. I argue for this immediacy in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Jerome P. Soneson (2013). The Legacy of Gordon Kaufman: Theological Method and its Pragmatic Norms. Zygon 48 (3):533-543.score: 24.0
    I argue that the most significant contribution and legacy of Gordon Kaufman's work rests in his theological method. I limit my discussion to his methodological starting point, his concept of human nature, as he develops it in his book, In Face of Mystery. I show the relevance of this starting point for cultural and theological criticism by arguing two points: first, that this starting point embraces religious and cultural pluralism at its center, providing a framework for intercultural and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Sergio Cremaschi (2002). Two Views of Natural Law and the Shaping of Economic Science. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 2 (2):181-196.score: 24.0
    In this paper I argue that differences between the ‘new moral science’ of the seventeenth century and scholastic natural law theory originated primarily from the skeptical challenge the former had to face. Pufendorf’s project of a scientia practica universalis is the paramount expression of an anti-skeptical moral science, a ‘science’ that is both explanatory and normative, but also anti-dogmatic insofar as it tries to base its laws on those basic phenomena of human life which, supposedly, are immune to skeptical doubt. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Helen Cruz & Yves Maeseneer (2014). The Imago Dei: Evolutionary and Theological Perspectives. Zygon 49 (1):95-100.score: 24.0
    This short article provides an introduction to a special section, consisting of six papers on human evolution and the imago Dei. These papers are the result of dialogue between theologians and philosophers of religion at the University of Oxford and the Catholic University of Leuven. All contributors focus on the imago Dei, and consider how this theological notion can be understood from an evolutionary perspective, looking at a variety of disciplines, including the psychology of reasoning, cognitive science of religion, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Paige E. Hochschild (2012). Memory in Augustine's Theological Anthropology. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This book explores the theme of 'memory' in Augustine's works, tracing its philosophical and theological significance. It shows how Augustine inherits this theme from classical philosophy and how Augustine's theological understanding of Christ draws on and resolves tensions in the theme of memory.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. David James Stewart (2014). The Emergence of Consciousness in Genesis 1–3: Jung's Depth Psychology and Theological Anthropology. Zygon 49 (2):509-529.score: 24.0
    The development of a robust, holistic theological anthropology will require that theology and biblical studies alike enter into genuine interdisciplinary conversations. Depth psychology in particular has the capacity to be an exceedingly fruitful conversation partner for theology because of its commitment to the totality of the human experience (both the conscious and unconscious aspects) as well as its unique ability to interpret archetypal symbols and mythological thinking. By arguing for a psycho-theological hermeneutic that accounts for depth psychology's conviction (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Roberto Dell'Oro (2002). Theological Discourse and the Postmodern Condition: The Case of Bioethics. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 5 (2):127-136.score: 24.0
    Bioethic reflects — like many other disciplines — the cultural fragmentation and the complexity of what has come to be known as the postmodern condition. The case of bioethics is particularly acute because of its epistemological indeterminacy and the moral pluralism characterizing post liberal societies. A provisional solution to this situation is the retrieval of a neo-Kantian version of ethical formalism in which concern for a consensus on rules replaces universal dialogue on moral content. The article analyzes the possible consequences (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Michael J. Shaffer (2013). Doxastic Voluntarism, Epistemic Deontology and Belief-Contravening Commitments. American Philosophical Quarterly 50 (1):73-82.score: 24.0
    Defenders of doxastic voluntarism accept that we can voluntarily commit ourselves to propositions, including belief-contravening propositions. Thus, defenders of doxastic voluntarism allow that we can choose to believe propositions that are negatively implicated by our evidence. In this paper it is argued that the conjunction of epistemic deontology and doxastic voluntarism as it applies to ordinary cases of belief-contravening propositional commitments is incompatible with evidentialism. In this paper ED and DV will be assumed and this negative result (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Helga Varden (2006). Locke's Waste Restriction and His Strong Voluntarism. Locke Studies 6:127-141.score: 24.0
    This paper argues that there is a conflict between two principles informing Locke’s political philosophy, namely his waste restriction and his strong voluntarism. Locke’s waste restriction is proposed as a necessary, enforceable restriction upon rightful private property holdings and it yields arguments to preserve and redistribute natural resources. Locke’s strong voluntarism is proposed as the liberal ideal of political obligations. It expresses Locke’s view that each individual has a natural political power, which can only be transferred to a (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Jan-Olav Henriksen (2011). Finitude and Theological Anthropology: An Interdisciplinary Exploration Into Theological Dimensions of Finitude. Peeters.score: 24.0
    The finite body -- Experiencing finitude n the body and its world -- Finitude, language, and the alterity of the world -- The appearance of the other : and the disruption of finitude by infinity -- Transcending and affirming finitude in desire -- Finitude and authenticity : a discussion of some elements in Heidegger -- Finitude and concrete experience -- Hans Jonas : a limited life is a better life than one that goes on forever -- Coming to terms with (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Terence Irwin (2008). The Development of Ethics: Volume 2: From Suarez to Rousseau. OUP Oxford.score: 24.0
    The Development of Ethics is a selective historical and critical study of moral philosophy in the Socratic tradition, with special attention to Aristotelian naturalism. It discusses the main topics of moral philosophy as they have developed historically, including: the human good, human nature, justice, friendship, and morality; the methods of moral inquiry; the virtues and their connexions; will, freedom, and responsibility; reason and emotion; relativism, subjectivism, and realism; the theological aspect of morality. This volume examines early modern moral philosophy (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Terence Irwin (2011). The Development of Ethics: Three Volume Set. OUP Oxford.score: 24.0
    The Development of Ethics is a selective historical and critical study of moral philosophy in the Socratic tradition, with special attention to Aristotelian naturalism, its formation, elaboration, criticism, and defence. This three-volume set discusses the main topics of moral philosophy as they have developed historically, including: the human good, human nature, justice, friendship, and morality; the methods of moral inquiry; the virtues and their connexions; will, freedom, and responsibility; reason and emotion; relativism, subjectivism, and realism; the theological aspect of (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Kelly A. Witcraft (forthcoming). Cartesian Meditations on the Human Self, God, and Indubitable Knowledge of the External World. Indian Philosophical Quarterly.score: 24.0
    This article demonstrates how and why "meditations on first philosophy" is an unsuccessful attempt by rene descartes to reconcile his rationalist philosophy with his apparently conflicting voluntarism and with his adherence to certain theological principles.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000