Search results for 'think pair share' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Claude Gratton (2010). Critical Thinking and Small Group Activities. Informal Logic 30 (4).score: 198.0
    I mention the benefits, challenges, and costs of using small group activities to enhance our students’ learning of critical thinking skills in our courses, and then describe ten examples of these groups. Two of these examples are not commonly reported in the literature on small groups, so I describe them in greater detail to facilitate their use in our courses.
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Moti Mizrahi (2011). A Pedagogical Challenge in Teaching Arguments for the Existence of God. APA Newsletter on Teaching Philosophy 11 (1):10-12.score: 180.0
    In this paper, I describe the way in which I introduce arguments for the existence of God to undergraduate students in Introduction to Philosophy.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. R. Peter Hobson (2007). We Share, Therefore We Think. In. In Daniel D. Hutto & Matthew Ratcliffe (eds.), Folk Psychology Re-Assessed. Kluwer/Springer Press. 41--61.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Graham Harman (2012). Object-Oriented France: The Philosophy of Tristan Garcia. Continent 2 (1):6-21.score: 81.0
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 6–21. The French philosopher and novelist Tristan Garcia was born in Toulouse in 1981. This makes him rather young to have written such an imaginative work of systematic philosophy as Forme et objet , 1 the latest entry in the MétaphysiqueS series at Presses universitaires de France. But this reference to Garcia’s youthfulness is not a form of condescension: by publishing a complete system of philosophy in the grand style, he has already done what none of us (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Lauren Haaftern-Schick & Sura Levine (2011). Remembering Robert Seydel. Continent 1 (2):141-144.score: 81.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 141-144. This January, while preparing a new course, Robert Seydel was struck and killed by an unexpected heart attack. He was a critically under-appreciated artist and one of the most beloved and admired professors at Hampshire College. At the time of his passing, Seydel was on the brink of a major artistic and career milestone. His Book of Ruth was being prepared for publication by Siglio Press. His publisher describes the book as: “an alchemical assemblage that composes (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Masha Tupitsyn & The Editors (2013). Ever Since the World Began: A Reading & Interview with Masha Tupitsyn. Continent 3 (1):7-12.score: 81.0
    "Ever Since This World Began" from Love Dog (Penny-Ante Editions, 2013) by Masha Tupitsyn continent. The audio-essay you've recorded yourself reading for continent. , “Ever Since the World Began,” is a compelling entrance into your new multi-media book, Love Dog (Success and Failure) , because it speaks to the very form of the book itself: vacillating and finding the long way around the question of love by using different genres and media. In your discussion of the face, one of the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. David Pitt (2004). The Phenomenology of Cognition, or, What is It Like to Think That P? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (1):1-36.score: 54.0
    A number of philosophers endorse, without argument, the view that there's something it's like consciously to think that p, which is distinct from what it's like consciously to think that q. This thesis, if true, would have important consequences for philosophy of mind and cognitive science. In this paper I offer two arguments for it. The first argument claims it would be impossible introspectively to distinguish conscious thoughts with respect to their content if there weren't something it's like (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. David Pitt, What Is It Like to Think That P?score: 54.0
    A number of philosophers endorse, without argument, the view that there’s something it’s like consciously to think that p, which is distinct from what it’s like consciously to think that q. This thesis, if true, would have important consequences for philosophy of mind and cognitive science. In this paper I offer two arguments for it. The first argument claims it would be impossible introspectively to distinguish conscious thoughts with respect to their content if there weren’t something it’s like (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Hangjun Lee & Chulki Hong (2012). The Cracked Share. Continent 2 (1):2-5.score: 54.0
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 2–5 To begin with, as we understand from a remote place like Seoul, there have been two different conceptions of materiality in the Western experimental ?lm history: materiality of cinema and of ?lm. The former has been represented by the practitioners of the so-called the “Expanded Cinema” and the latter by the tradition of the “Hand-made” ?lm. Whereas for the Expanded Cinema, the materiality or the “medium-speci?city” includes not only the ?lm material but also the entire condition (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Todd K. Shackelford, Aaron T. Goetz, Faith E. Guta & David P. Schmitt (2006). Mate Guarding and Frequent in-Pair Copulation in Humans. Human Nature 17 (3):239-252.score: 54.0
    Cuckoldry is an adaptive problem faced by parentally investing males of socially monogamous species (e.g., humans and many avian species). Mate guarding and frequent in-pair copulation (IPC) may have evolved as anti-cuckoldry tactics in avian species and in humans. In some avian species, the tactics are used concurrently, with the result that mate guarding behaviors and IPC frequency are correlated positively. In other avian species, the tactics are compensatory, with the result that mate guarding behaviors and IPC frequency are (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Arnold Hermann (2004). The Illustrated to Think Like God: Pythagoras and Parmenides, the Origins of Philosophy. Parmenides Pub..score: 54.0
    Intended for general readers, The Illustrated To Think Like God explores how philosophy became a speculative science, tracing its origins to the Greek colonies of southern Italy, from the late sixth century to the mid-fifth century BCE. In this lavishly illustrated full-color work, Arnold Hermann tells the story of the sage Pythagoras, the poet Xenophanes, and the lawmaker Parmenides, describing how each in his own way believed that true insight belonged only to the gods. With a sympathetic and critical (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Michael Bratman, Normative Thinking and Planning, Individual and Shared: Reflections on Allan Gibbard's Tanner Lectures.score: 48.0
    There is thinking, conducted by a single person, about how to live. And there is thinking together– a kind of “language infused”(5) shared activity – about how to live together. In the first of these fascinating and deeply probing Tanner Lectures Allan Gibbard is concerned with both of these phenomena and with how they interact.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. James Franklin (1997). Stove's Anti-Darwinism. Philosophy 72 (279):133-136.score: 43.0
    Stove's article, 'So you think you are a Darwinian?'[ 1] was essentially an advertisement for his book, Darwinian Fairytales.[ 2] The central argument of the book is that Darwin's theory, in both Darwin's and recent sociobiological versions, asserts many things about the human and other species that are known to be false, but protects itself from refutation by its logical complexity. A great number of ad hoc devices, he claims, are used to protect the theory. If co operation is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Maxwell Stephen Kennel (2013). What is a Compendium? Parataxis, Hypotaxis, and the Question of the Book. Continent 3 (1):44-49.score: 43.0
    Writing, the exigency of writing: no longer the writing that has always (through a necessity in no way avoidable) been in the service of the speech or thought that is called idealist (that is to say, moralizing), but rather the writing that through its own slowly liberated force (the aleatory force of absence) seems to devote itself solely to itself as something that remains without identity, and little by little brings forth possibilities that are entirely other: an anonymous, distracted, deferred, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. L. B. Resnick (1991). Shared Cognition: Thinking as Social Practice In: LB Resnick, JM Levine & SD Teasley. In Lauren Resnick, Levine B., M. John, Stephanie Teasley & D. (eds.), Perspectives on Socially Shared Cognition. American Psychological Association.score: 42.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Clotilde Pontecorvo (1993). Forms of Discourse and Shared Thinking. Ethics and Behavior 11 (3):189-196.score: 40.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Kevin Crowley, Maureen A. Callanan, Jennifer L. Jipson, Jodi Galco, Karen Topping & Jeff Shrager (2001). Shared Scientific Thinking in Everyday Parent‐Child Activity. Science Education 85 (6):712-732.score: 40.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Beverly C. Pestel (1993). Teaching Problem Solving Without Modeling Through “Thinking Aloud Pair Problem Solving”. Science Education 77 (1):83-94.score: 40.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Keith Horton (2011). Fairness and Fair Shares. Utilitas 23 (1):88.score: 38.0
    Some moral principles require agents to do more than their fair share of a common task, if others won’t do their fair share – each agent’s fair share being what they would be required to do if all contributed as they should. This seems to provide a strong basis for objecting to such principles. For it seems unfair to require agents who have already done their fair share to do more, just because other agents won’t do (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Cornelia Herbert & Stefan Sütterlin (2012). Do Not Respond! Doing the Think/No-Think and Go/No-Go Tasks Concurrently Leads to Memory Impairment of Unpleasant Items During Later Recall. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 38.0
    Previous research using neuroimaging methods proposed a link between mechanisms controlling motor response inhibition and suppression of unwanted memories. The present study investigated this hypothesis behaviorally by combining the think-no-think paradigm (TNT) with a go/no-go motor inhibition task. Participants first learned unpleasant cue-target pairs. Cue words were then presented as go or no-go items in the TNT. Participants’ task was to respond to the cues and think of the target word aloud or to inhibit their response to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Agnes Verbiest (1989). Confrontation in Conversations: The Adjacency Pair as a Tool of the Descriptive Component of a Pragma-Dialectical Analysis. [REVIEW] Argumentation 3 (4):395-400.score: 38.0
    Within the Pragma-Dialectical School of argumentation theory both a normative and a descriptive component are essential in order to account for a reconstruction of argumentative language use. This paper concentrates on the descriptive component and discusses the choice of the adjacency pair as a tool for the systematic description of the confrontation stage of argumentative conversations. First a structural description of confrontation in conversation is developed from the discourse analytical approach to argumentation of Jackson and Jacobs, within the normative (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Thomas Pogge (2011). Allowing the Poor to Share the Earth. Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (3):335-352.score: 36.0
    Two of the greatest challenges facing humanity are environmental degradation and the persistence of poverty. Both can be met by instituting a Global Resources Dividend (GRD) that would slow pollution and natural-resource depletion while collecting funds to avert poverty worldwide. Unlike Hillel Steiner's Global Fund, which is presented as a fully just regime governing the use of planetary resources, the GRD is meant as merely a modest but widely acceptable and therefore realistic step toward justice. Paula Casal has set forth (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Mark Sainsbury (2012). Representing Unicorns: How to Think About Intensionality. In G. Currie, P. Kotatko & M. Pokorny (eds.), Mimesis: Metaphysics, Cognition, Pragmatics. College Publications.score: 36.0
    The paper focuses on two apparent paradoxes arising from our use of intensional verbs: first, their object can be something which does not exist, i.e. something which is nothing; second, the fact that entailment from a qualified to a non-qualified object is not guaranteed. In this paper, I suggest that the problems share a solution, insofar as they arise in connection with intensional verbs that ascribe mental states. The solution turns on (I) a properly intensional or nonrelational notion of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Hans B. Schmid (2003). Can Brains in Vats Think as a Team? Philosophical Explorations 6 (3):201-218.score: 36.0
    Abstract The specter of the ?group mind? or ?collective subject? plays a crucial and fateful role in the current debate on collective intentionality. Fear of the group mind is one important reason why philosophers of collective intentionality resort to individualism. It is argued here that this measure taken against the group mind is as unnecessary as it is detrimental to our understanding of what it means to share an intention. A non-individualistic concept of shared intentionality does not necessarily have (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. David Sloan Wilson (2007). Evolution for Everyone: How Darwin's Theory Can Change the Way We Think About Our Lives. Delacorte Press.score: 36.0
    What is the biological reason for gossip? For laughter? For the creation of art? Why do dogs have curly tails? What can microbes tell us about morality? These and many other questions are tackled by renowned evolutionist David Sloan Wilson in this witty and groundbreaking new book. With stories that entertain as much as they inform, Wilson outlines the basic principles of evolution and shows how, properly understood, they can illuminate the length and breadth of creation, from the origin of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Anna Wierzbicka (2012). Understanding Others Requires Shared Concepts. Pragmatics and Cognition 20 (2):356-379.score: 34.0
    “It is a noble task to try to understand others, and to have them understand you (…) but it is never an easy one“, says Everett (p. 327). This paper argues that a basic prerequisite for understanding others (and also for having them understand you) is to have some shared concepts on which this understanding can build. If speakers of different languages didn't share some concepts to begin with then cross-cultural understanding would not be possible even with the best (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Paul Fieldhouse (1996). Community Shared Agriculture. Agriculture and Human Values 13 (3):43-47.score: 34.0
    Community shared agriculture is a concept that brings food producers and consumers together in a relationship that supports values associated with sustainable agriculture, community development, and food security. At the heart of the concept is the notion of sharing. Participants share the real costs of food production through fair prices for the farmer and by assuming part of the risk of poor harvests. They also share the rewards that come through a seasons supply of fresh produce, the development (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Ben Eggleston (2010). Practical Equilibrium: A Way of Deciding What to Think About Morality. Mind 119 (475):549 - 584.score: 30.0
    Practical equilibrium, like reflective equilibrium, is a way of deciding what to think about morality. It shares with reflective equilibrium the general thesis that there is some way in which a moral theory must, in order to be acceptable, answer to one’s moral intuitions, but it differs from reflective equilibrium in its specification of exactly how a moral theory must answer to one’s intuitions. Whereas reflective equilibrium focuses on a theory’s consistency with those intuitions, practical equilibrium also gives weight (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. David J. Cole (1999). I Don't Think So: Pinker on the Mentalese Monopoly. Philosophical Psychology 12 (3):283-295.score: 30.0
    Stephen Pinker sets out over a dozen arguments in The language instinct (Morrow, New York, 1994) for his widely shared view that natural language is inadequate as a medium for thought. Thus he argues we must suppose that the primary medium of thought and inference is an innate propositional representation system, mentalese. I reply to the various arguments and so defend the view that some thought essentially involves natural language. I argue mentalese doesn't solve any of the problems Pinker cites (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Stevan Harnad, Scholarly Skywri Ng at the Speed of Thought.score: 28.0
    The evolu on of language made it possible for us to think aloud, share our thoughts, pass them on by word‐of‐mouth.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Gregg Caruso (2007). Realism, Naturalism, and Pragmatism: A Closer Look at the Views of Quine and Devitt. Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 21:64-83.score: 24.0
    Michael Devitt’s views on realism and naturalism have a lot in common with those of W.V. Quine. Both appear to be realists; both accept naturalized epistemology and abandon the old goal of first philosophy; both view philosophy as continuous with the empirical procedures of science and hence view metaphysics as similarly empirical; and both seem to view realism as following from naturalism. Although Quine and Devitt share quite a bit ideologically, I think there is a deeper, more fundamental (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Andy Egan (2007). Epistemic Modals, Relativism and Assertion. Philosophical Studies 133 (1):1--22.score: 24.0
    I think that there are good reasons to adopt a relativist semantics for epistemic modal claims such as ``the treasure might be under the palm tree'', according to which such utterances determine a truth value relative to something finer-grained than just a world (or a <world, time> pair). Anyone who is inclined to relativise truth to more than just worlds and times faces a problem about assertion. It's easy to be puzzled about just what purpose would be served (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Elisabeth Camp (2009). Two Varieties of Literary Imagination: Metaphor, Fiction, and Thought Experiments. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 33 (1):107-130.score: 24.0
    Recently, philosophers have discovered that they have a lot to learn from, or at least to ponder about, fiction. Many metaphysicians are attracted to fiction as a model for our talk about purported objects and properties, such as numbers, morality, and possible worlds, without embracing a robust Platonist ontology. In addition, a growing group of philosophers of mind are interested in the implications of our engagement with fiction for our understanding of the mind and emotions: If I don’t believe that (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Mark Schroeder, Does Expressivism Have Subjectivist Consequences?score: 24.0
    Metaethical expressivists claim that we can explain what moral words like ‘wrong’ mean without having to know what they are about – but rather by saying what it is to think that something is wrong – namely, to disapprove of it. Given the close connection between expressivists’ theory of the meaning of moral words and our attitudes of approval and disapproval, expressivists have had a hard time shaking the intuitive charge that theirs is an objectionably subjectivist or mind-dependent view (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Ned Block (1996). Holism, Mental and Semantic. In Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    Mental (or semantic) holism is the doctrine that the identity of a belief content (or the meaning of a sentence that expresses it) is determined by its place in the web of beliefs or sentences comprising a whole theory or group of theories. It can be contrasted with two other views: atomism and molecularism. Molecularism characterizes meaning and content in terms of relatively small parts of the web in a way that allows many different theories to share those parts. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Ferdinand Fellmann, The New Pair.score: 24.0
    The exclusive relationship, either as a pair or even as a married pair, has regained its attraction. Obviously, the traditional roles, the economically dependent woman who stands by the side of the ‘strong man’, no longer represent the pair bond.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Valia Allori (2013). On the Metaphysics of Quantum Mechanics. In Soazig Lebihan (ed.), Precis de la Philosophie de la Physique. Vuibert.score: 24.0
    What is quantum mechanics about? The most natural way to interpret quantum mechanics realistically as a theory about the world might seem to be what is called wave function ontology: the view according to which the wave function mathematically represents in a complete way fundamentally all there is in the world. Erwin Schroedinger was one of the first proponents of such a view, but he dismissed it after he realized it led to macroscopic superpositions (if the wave function evolves in (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Alison Bailey (2008). On Intersectionality, Empathy, and Feminist Solidarity. Peace and Justice Studies 18 (2):14-36.score: 24.0
    Naomi Zack's Inclusive Feminism: A Third Wave Theory of Women's Commonality (2005) begins with an original reading of the paradigm shift that ended U.S. second wave feminism. According to Zack there has been a crisis in academic and professional feminism since the late 1970s. It grew out of the anxieties about essentialism in the wake of white feminist's realization that our understandings of "sisterhood" and "women" excluded women of color and poor women. This realization eventually lead to the movement's foundational (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Michael C. Rea (1998). Sameness Without Identity: An Aristotelian Solution to the Problem of Material Constitution. Ratio 11 (3):316–328.score: 24.0
    In this paper, I present an Aristotelian solution to the problem of material constitution. The problem of material constitution arises whenever it appears that an object a and an object b share all of the same parts and yet are essentially related to their parts in different ways. (A familiar example: A lump of bronze constitutes a statue of Athena. The lump and the statue share all of the same parts, but it appears that the lump can, whereas (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Guy Axtell (2011). From Internalist Evidentialism to Virtue Responsibilism. In Trent Dougherty (ed.), Evidentialism and its Discontents. Oxford: Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Evidentialism as its leading proponents describe it has two distinct senses, these being evidentialism as a conceptual analysis of epistemic justification, and as a prescriptive ethics of belief—an account of what one ‘ought to believe’ under different epistemic circumstances. These two senses of evidentialism are related, but in the work of leading evidentialist philosophers, in ways that I think are deeply problematic. Although focusing on Richard Feldman’s ethics of belief, this chapter is critical of evidentialism in both senses. However, (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Laura Ruetsche (2011). Interpreting Quantum Theories: The Art of the Possible. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Traditionally, philosophers of quantum mechanics have addressed exceedingly simple systems: a pair of electrons in an entangled state, or an atom and a cat in Dr. Schrodinger's diabolical device. But recently, much more complicated systems, such as quantum fields and the infinite systems at the thermodynamic limit of quantum statistical mechanics, have attracted, and repaid, philosophical attention. Interpreting Quantum Theories has three entangled aims. The first is to guide those familiar with the philosophy of ordinary QM into the philosophy (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Mark Steedman & Matthew Stone, Is Semantics Computational?score: 24.0
    Both formal semantics and cognitive semantics are the source of important insights about language. By developing precise statements of the rules of meaning in fragmentary, abstract languages, formalists have been able to offer perspicuous accounts of how we might come to know such rules and use them to communicate with others. Conversely, by charting the overall landscape of interpretations, cognitivists have documented how closely interpretations draw on the commonsense knowledge that lets us make our way in the world. There is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. David Barnett (2010). You Are Simple. In Robert C. Koons & George Bealer (eds.), The Waning of Materialism. Oxford University Press. 161--174.score: 24.0
    I argue that, unlike your brain, you are not composed of other things: you are simple. My argument centers on what I take to be an uncontroversial datum: for any pair of conscious beings, it is impossible for the pair itself to be conscious. Consider, for instance, the pair comprising you and me. You might pinch your arm and feel a pain. I might simultaneously pinch my arm and feel a qualitatively identical pain. But the pair (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Dan Zahavi (2007). Subjectivity and the First-Person Perspective. Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (S1):66-84.score: 24.0
    Phenomenology and analytical philosophy share a number of common concerns, and it seems obvious that analytical philosophy can learn from phenomenology, just as phenomenology can profit from an exchange with analytical philosophy. But although I think it would be a pity to miss the opportunity for dialogue that is currently at hand, I will in the following voice some caveats. More specifically, I wish to discuss two issues that complicate what might otherwise seem like rather straightforward interaction. The (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Ned Block (2002). Behaviorism Revisited. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):977-978.score: 24.0
    O'Regan and Noe declare that the qualitative character of experience is constituted by the nature of the sensorimotor contingencies at play when we perceive. Sensorimotor contingencies are a highly restricted set of input-output relations. The restriction excludes contingencies that don’t essentially involve perceptual systems. Of course if the ‘sensory’ in ‘sensorimotor’ were to be understood mentalistically, the thesis would not be of much interest, so I assume that these contingencies are to be understood non-mentalistically. Contrary to their view, experience is (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Pierre Jacob (2000). Can Selection Explain Content? In Bernard Elevitch (ed.), Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy, Volume 9. Philosophy Doc Ctr. 91-102.score: 24.0
    There are presently three broad approaches the project of naturalizing intentionality: a purely informational approach (Dretske and Fodor), a purely teleological approach (Millikan and Papineau), and a mixed informationally-based teleological approach (Dretske again). I will argue that the last teleosemantic theory offers the most promising approach. I also think, however, that the most explicit version of a pure teleosemantic theory of content, namely Millikan’s admirable theory, faces a pair of objections. My goal in this paper is to spell (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. John M. Collins (2005). Faculty Disputes. Mind and Language 19 (5):503-33.score: 24.0
    Jerry Fodor, among others, has maintained that Chomsky's language faculty hypothesis is an epistemological proposal, i.e. the faculty comprises propositional structures known (cognized) by the speaker/hearer. Fodor contrasts this notion of a faculty with an architectural (directly causally efficacious) notion of a module. The paper offers an independent characterisation of the language faculty as an abstractly specified nonpropositional structure of the mind/brain that mediates between sound and meaning—a function in intension that maps to a pair of structures that determine (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Jussi Suikkanen (2012). Reason-Statements As Non-Extensional Contexts. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (248):592-613.score: 24.0
    Many believe that, if true, reason-statements of the form ‘that X is F is a reason to φ’ describe a ‘favouring-relation’ between the fact that X is F and the act of φing. This favouring-relation has been assumed to share many features of other, more concrete relations. This combination of views leads to immediate problems. Firstly, unlike statements about many other relations, reason-statements can be true even when the relata do not exist, i.e., when the relevant facts do not (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. William Fish, Disjunctivism. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    Disjunctivism, as a theory of visual experience, claims that the mental states involved in a “good case” experience of veridical perception and a “bad case” experience of hallucination differ, even in those cases in which the two experiences are indistinguishable for their subject. Consider the veridical perception of a bar stool and an indistinguishable hallucination; both of these experiences might be classed together as experiences (as) of a bar stool or experiences of seeming to see a bar stool. This might (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000