Search results for 'transitory aspect of time' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  14
    Rögnvaldur Ingthorsson (2013). The Elusive Appearance of Time. In Christer Svennerlind, Jan Almäng & Rögnvaldur Ingthorsson (eds.), ohanssonian Investigations: Essays in Honour of Ingvar Johansson on his Seventieth Birthday. Ontos Verlag 304–316.
    It is widely assumed that time appears to be tensed, i.e. divided into a future, present and past, and transitory, i.e. involving some kind of ‘flow’ or ‘passage’ of times or events from the future into the present and away into the distant past. In this paper I provide some reasons to doubt that time appears to be tensed and transitory, or at least that philosophers who have suggested that time appears to be that way (...)
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  2.  2
    Rögnvaldur Ingthorsson (2013). The Elusive Appearance of Time. In Christer Svennerlind, Jan Almäng & Rögnvaldur Ingthorsson (eds.), Johanssonian Investigations. Ontos Verlag 5--304.
    It is widely assumed that time appears to be tensed, i.e. divided into a future, present and past, and transitory, i.e. involving some kind of ‘flow’ or ‘passage’ of times or events from the future into the present and away into the distant past. In this paper I provide some reasons to doubt that time appears to be tensed and transitory, or at least that philosophers who have suggested that time appears to be that way (...)
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  3.  15
    Gilbert Plumer (1984). Why Time is Extensive. Mind 93 (370):265-270.
    I attempt to show, via considering Schlesinger’s device of putting the word ‘now’ in capitals, that the transient view of time can explicate temporal extensivity without presupposing it, and the static view can’t. The argument hinges on the point that duration is generated by continuance of the present—such that ‘the present’ here is used in a nontechnical, nonindexical, and nonreflexive sense, which Schlesinger and others unknowingly give to the word ‘now’ (by “NOW” or “Now” or “’now’”).
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  4. Alice G. B. ter Meulen (1997). Representing Time in Natural Language the Dynamic Interpretation of Tense and Aspect. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  5.  3
    Peter Hallman (2009). Proportions in Time: Interactions of Quantification and Aspect. [REVIEW] Natural Language Semantics 17 (1):29-61.
    Proportional quantification and progressive aspect interact in English in revealing ways. This paper investigates these interactions and draws conclusions about the semantics of the progressive and telicity. In the scope of the progressive, the proportion named by a proportionality quantifier (e.g. most in The software was detecting most errors) must hold in every subevent of the event so described, indicating that a predicate in the scope of the progressive is interpreted as an internally homogeneous activity. Such an activity interpretation (...)
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  6.  3
    James Luchte (2009). Under the Aspect of Time “Sub Specie Temporis”. Philosophy Today 53 (1):70-84.
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  7.  11
    Archie J. Bahm (1971). A Multiple-Aspect Theory of Time. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 2 (1/2):163-171.
  8. Ralf Meerbote (1992). Space and Time and Objects in Space and Time: Another Aspect of Kant's Transcendental Idealism. In Phillip D. Cummins & Guenter Zoeller (eds.), Minds, Ideas, and Objects: Essays in the Theory of Representation in Modern Philosophy. Ridgeview Publishing Company
  9.  21
    Michael Almeida (1997). Alice G. B. Ter Meulen, Representing Time in Natural Language: The Dynamic inTerpretation of Tense and Aspect. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 7 (3):438-442.
  10.  23
    Thomas Sheehan (1995). Heidegger's New Aspect: On in-Sein, Zeitlichkeit, and the Genesis of "Being and Time". Research in Phenomenology 25 (1):207-225.
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  11.  9
    Jean-Pascal Anfray (2012). In Search of the Arrow of Time. Temporal Asymmetries in Leibniz. Studia Leibnitiana 44 (1):81-106.
    This paper examines the problem of the basis of time’s asymmetry. I hold the view that there is an objective temporal asymmetry in Leibniz’s philosophy of time. I closely examine various asymmetrical phenomena, which can be candidates as an explanation of time’s asymmetry: (1) causation; (2) the flow of time; (3) the modal difference between past and present; (4) counterfactual dependence; and, finally (5) the asymmetry of the world’s progress and its direction and (6) of the (...)
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  12.  6
    Theo Jung (2014). The Politics of Time: Zeitgeist in Early Nineteenth-Century Political Discourse. Contributions to the History of Concepts 9 (1):24-49.
    This article traces the uses of zeitgeist in early nineteenth-century European political discourse. To explain the concept's explosive takeoff in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, two perspectives are combined. On the one hand, the concept is shown to be a key element in the new, “temporalized” discourses of cultural reflection emerging during this time. On the other, its pragmatic value as a linguistic tool in concrete political constellations is outlined on the basis of case studies from French, (...)
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  13.  1
    Stathis Livadas (2011). The Transcendence of Time in the Epistemology of Observation From a Phenomenological Standpoint. Manuscrito 34 (2):435-468.
    In this article I deal with time as a notion of epistemological content associated though with the notion of a subjective consciousness co-constitutive of physical reality. In this phenomenologically grounded approach I attempt to establish a ‘metaphysical’ aspect of time, within a strictly pistemological context, in the sense of an underlying absolute subjectivity which is non-objectifiable within objective temporality and thus non-susceptible of any ontological designation. My arguments stem, on the one hand, from a version of quantum-mechanical (...)
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  14.  83
    L. Nathan Oaklander (1996). Mctaggart's Paradox and Smith's Tensed Theory of Time. Synthese 107 (2):205 - 221.
    Since McTaggart first proposed his paradox asserting the unreality of time, numerous philosophers have attempted to defend the tensed theory of time against it. Certainly, one of the most highly developed and original is that put forth by Quentin Smith. Through discussing McTaggart's positive conception of time as well as his negative attack on its reality, I hope to clarify the dispute between those who believe in the existence of the transitory temporal properties of pastness, presentness (...)
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  15.  46
    Gal Yehezkel (2014). Theories of Time and the Asymmetry in Human Attitudes. Ratio 27 (1):68-83.
    An important aspect of the debate between the A-theory and the B-theory of time relates to the supposed implications of each for some of the most basic human attitudes and stances. The asymmetry in our attitudes towards past and future events in our life (pleasant and unpleasant), and towards the temporal limits of our existence, that is, toward birth and death, is supposedly considered differently by the two theories. I argue that our attitudes are neither justified nor discredited (...)
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  16.  38
    Humberto Maturana, The Nature of Time.
    I do not wish to deal with all the domains in which the word time enters as if it were referring to an obvious aspect of the world or worlds that we human live. Indeed, the very fact that time can be made an issue of reflection shows us that what the word time connotes changes with the circumstances in which it is used. This situation alone, however, would not constitute a problem inviting us to enter (...)
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  17.  55
    John Earman (1972). Notes on the Causal Theory of Time. Synthese 24 (1-2):74 - 86.
    I have argued that the most recent versions of the causal theory are subject to serious limitations. The causal analysis of spatiotemporal coincidence considered in Section IV does not apply to space-times in which (1) fails. And current versions of the theory collapse altogether for typical cases of relativistic space-times which are closed in their temporal aspects. Second, I have pointed out that the program of recent causal theorists is based on a false dichotomy — open vs. closed times; for (...)
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  18.  8
    Pierre Force (2011). The Teeth of Time: Pierre Hadot on Meaning and Misunderstanding in the History of Ideas1. History and Theory 50 (1):20-40.
    The French philosopher and intellectual historian Pierre Hadot (1922-2010) is known primarily for his conception of philosophy as spiritual exercise, which was an essential reference for the later Foucault. An aspect of his work that has received less attention is a set of methodological reflections on intellectual history and on the relationship between philosophy and history. Hadot was trained initially as a philosopher and was interested in existentialism as well as in the convergence between philosophy and poetry. Yet he (...)
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  19. Inderjeet Mani, James Pustejovsky & Robert Gaizauskas (eds.) (2005). The Language of Time: A Reader. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This reader collects and introduces important work in linguistics, computer science, artificial intelligence, and computational linguistics on the use of linguistic devices in natural languages to situate events in time: whether they are past, present, or future; whether they are real or hypothetical; when an event might have occurred, and how long it could have lasted. In focussing on the treatment and retrieval of time-based information it seeks to lay the foundation for temporally-aware natural language computer processing systems, (...)
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  20.  76
    Phil Dowe (1997). A Defense of Backwards in Time Causation Models in Quantum Mechanics. Synthese 112 (2):233-246.
    This paper offers a defense of backwards in time causation models in quantum mechanics. Particular attention is given to Cramer's transactional account, which is shown to have the threefold virtue of solving the Bell problem, explaining the complex conjugate aspect of the quantum mechanical formalism, and explaining various quantum mysteries such as Schrödinger's cat. The question is therefore asked, why has this model not received more attention from physicists and philosophers? One objection given by physicists in assessing Cramer's (...)
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  21. Jean-Christophe Sarrazin, Axel Cleeremans & Patrick Haggard (2008). How Do We Know What We Are Doing?: Time, Intention and Awareness of Action. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):602-615.
    Time is a fundamental dimension of consciousness. Many studies of the “sense of agency” have investigated whether we attribute actions to ourselves based on a conscious experience of intention occurring prior to action, or based on a reconstruction after the action itself has occurred. Here, we ask the same question about a lower level aspect of action experience, namely awareness of the detailed spatial form of a simple movement. Subjects reached for a target, which unpredictably jumped to the (...)
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  22.  12
    Frank Heny (1982). Tense, Aspect and Time Adverbials. Linguistics and Philosophy 5 (1):109 - 154.
    In Section 1, we questioned the evidence for iteration of tenses, even with abstraction. To permit abstraction would in any case risk neutralizing our distinction between tensed and untensed sentences. Sequence of tense phenomena, far from supporting iteration, were incompatible with it. Instead, we argued, tense always retains its full deictic character; tenses never have scope over each other. The future modal WILL is exceptional (Section 2), but abstraction is not required to deal with this.An important suggestion, first made in (...)
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  23.  96
    Yusuke Kaneko (2014). The Constitution of Space and Time in the Aufbau Viewed From a Kantian Perspective. Journal of the Philosophy of Science Society, Japan 47 (1):19-36.
    The foremost aim of this paper is to realize the fourth part of the Aufbau. This part, which provides an actual phenomenalistic constitution system, is interpretable from a Kantian perspective (§§1-4). But Carnap plotted to overcome Kant’s old style of philosophy as well. We review this aspect of his constitution, focusing on space (§§7-13) and time (§§5-6), especially.
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  24.  19
    Panos Athanasopoulos & Emanuel Bylund (2013). Does Grammatical Aspect Affect Motion Event Cognition? A Cross-Linguistic Comparison of English and Swedish Speakers. Cognitive Science 37 (2):286-309.
    In this article, we explore whether cross-linguistic differences in grammatical aspect encoding may give rise to differences in memory and cognition. We compared native speakers of two languages that encode aspect differently (English and Swedish) in four tasks that examined verbal descriptions of stimuli, online triads matching, and memory-based triads matching with and without verbal interference. Results showed between-group differences in verbal descriptions and in memory-based triads matching. However, no differences were found in online triads matching and in (...)
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  25.  98
    Tomasz Placek (2000). Stochastic Outcomes in Branching Space-Time: Analysis of Bell's Theorem. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (3):445-475.
    The paper extends the framework of outcomes in branching space-time (Kowalski and Placek [1999]) by assigning probabilities to outcomes of events, where these probabilities are interpreted either epistemically or as weighted possibilities. In resulting models I define the notion of common cause of correlated outcomes of a single event, and investigate which setups allow for the introduction of common causes. It turns out that a deterministic common cause can always be introduced, but (surprisingly) only special setups permit the introduction (...)
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  26.  11
    J. -W. Lin (2005). Time in a Language Without Tense: The Case of Chinese. Journal of Semantics 23 (1):1-53.
    This paper outlines a framework of the temporal interpretation in Chinese with a special focus on complement and relative clauses. It argues that not only does Chinese have no morphological tenses but there is no need to resort to covert semantic features under a tense node in order to interpret time in Chinese. Instead, it utilises various factors such as the information provided by default aspect, the tense-aspect particles, and pragmatic reasoning to determine the temporal interpretation of (...)
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  27.  14
    Roxana Baiasu (2009). Puzzles of Discourse in Being and Time : Minding Gaps in Understanding. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 17 (5):681-706.
    This paper takes issue with Heidegger's claim that discourse and understanding are equally basic in the constitution of our making sense of the world. I argue that Heidegger cannot consistently establish this claim, and that discourse can be thought of as being more basic than understanding. The proposed line of thinking has the advantage of shedding light on both the finitude and the normativity of our making sense of the world. Thus, by setting up an exchange with the later Wittgenstein's (...)
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  28.  34
    Andrew Haas (2015). Notes on Time and Aspect. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 23 (4):504-517.
    What is time? Neither the numbering of the motion of things nor their schema, but their way of being. In language, time shows itself as tense. But every verb has both tense and aspect. So what is aspect? Irreducible to tense, it is the way in which anything is at any time whatsoever. Thus the way things are, their being, is not merely temporal – for it is just as aspectual.
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  29.  7
    Valtteri Arstila & Dan Lloyd (eds.) (2014). Subjective Time: The Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience of Temporality. The MIT Press.
    Our awareness of time and temporal properties is a constant feature of conscious life. Subjective temporality structures and guides every aspect of behavior and cognition, distinguishing memory, perception, and anticipation. This milestone volume brings together research on temporality from leading scholars in philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience, defining a new field of interdisciplinary research. The book's thirty chapters include selections from classic texts by William James and Edmund Husserl and new essays setting them in historical context; contemporary philosophical accounts (...)
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  30. Jiri Benovsky (2012). The Speed of Thought. Experience of Change, Movement, and Time: A Lockean Account. Locke Studies 12:85-110.
    This paper is about our experience of change and movement, and thus about our experience of time – at least under the reasonable assumption that we (can only) experience time by having experiences of change. This assumption is shared by Locke, whose view on temporal experience, expounded in Book II, Chap.14 of his Essay, will be the main focal point of my paper. Some of the most influential accounts of temporal experience embrace the notion of a "specious present" (...)
     
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  31.  26
    Shahar Arzy, Esther Adi-Japha & Olaf Blanke (2009). The Mental Time Line: An Analogue of the Mental Number Line in the Mapping of Life Events. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):781-785.
    A crucial aspect of the human mind is the ability to project the self along the time line to past and future. It has been argued that such self-projection is essential to re-experience past experiences and predict future events. In-depth analysis of a novel paradigm investigating mental time shows that the speed of this “self-projection” in time depends logarithmically on the temporal-distance between an imagined “location” on the time line that participants were asked to imagine (...)
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  32.  29
    Francesco Ferretti & Erica Cosentino (2013). Time, Language and Flexibility of the Mind: The Role of Mental Time Travel in Linguistic Comprehension and Production. Philosophical Psychology 26 (1):24-46.
    According to Chomsky, creativity is a critical property of human language, particularly the aspect of ?the creative use of language? concerning the appropriateness to a situation. How language can be creative but appropriate to a situation is an unsolvable mystery from the Chomskyan point of view. We propose that language appropriateness can be explained by considering the role of the human capacity for Mental Time Travel at its foundation, together with social and ecological intelligences within a triadic language-grounding (...)
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  33.  16
    Lauren Freeman (2009). Recognition Reconsidered: A Re-Reading of Heidegger’s Being and Time §26. Philosophy Today 53 (1):85-89.
    This article argues that notwithstanding Martin Heidegger’s explicit intentions to the contrary, his existential analysis in Being and Time provides more than the mere conditions for the possibility of ethics. More specifically, Heidegger’s account of solicitude, where he distinguishes between leaping in for and leaping ahead of the other, can be read as an account of recognition that has normative implications. This account is developed in light of both Charles Taylor and Axel Honneth’s positions on recognition. It is concluded (...)
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  34.  6
    P. Sloterdijk (2012). Nearness and Da-Sein: The Spatiality of Being and Time. Theory, Culture and Society 29 (4-5):36-42.
    This paper focuses on the latent spatial philosophy in Heidegger’s ‘Being and Time’, highlighting a key aspect of the Heideggerian oeuvre that has mostly been overlooked by commentators. It outlines the concept of an original spatiality of being that is opposed to the philosophies of space in both physics and Cartesian metaphysics. Through an elaboration of the essentially relational character of Da-sein, it is argued that Heidegger’s vocabulary in ‘Being and Time’ yields an onto-topology that shows Da-sein’s (...)
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  35.  12
    J. Sarrazin, A. CleeremAns & P. Haggard (2008). How Do We Know What We Are Doing? Time, Intention and Awareness of Action☆. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):602-615.
    Time is a fundamental dimension of consciousness. Many studies of the “sense of agency” have investigated whether we attribute actions to ourselves based on a conscious experience of intention occurring prior to action, or based on a reconstruction after the action itself has occurred. Here, we ask the same question about a lower level aspect of action experience, namely awareness of the detailed spatial form of a simple movement. Subjects reached for a target, which unpredictably jumped to the (...)
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  36.  58
    Matheson Russell (2008). Is There a Hermeneutics of Suspicion in Being and Time? Inquiry 51 (1):97 – 118.
    Hubert Dreyfus has claimed that Heidegger's phenomenological method involves a “hermeneutics of suspicion”. This is an intriguing suggestion, and if it were correct it would indicate that the standard interpretations overlook a significant aspect of the methodology of Being and Time. But is there really a hermeneutics of suspicion in Being and Time? Leslie MacAvoy has offered the most sustained challenge to Dreyfus on this point, arguing that his “hermeneutics of suspicion thesis” misconstrues both the overarching project (...)
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  37. M. D. Stafleu (2008). Time and History in the Philosophy of the Cosmonomic Idea. Philosophia Reformata 73 (2):154-169.
    This article identifies two trends in Dooyeweerd’s conception of ‘cosmic time’, and elaborates their consequences for the philosophy of history. The first trend, connecting time to modal diversity and the order of the modal aspects, prevails in Dooyeweerd’s analysis. The application of the second trend, emphasizing that in each relation frame the temporal order governs subject-subject relations and subjectobject relations, sheds a new light on the interpretation of history conceived of as development of the culture and civilization of (...)
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  38.  4
    Göran Blix (2006). Charting the "Transitional Period": The Emergence of Modern Time in the Nineteenth Century. History and Theory 45 (1):51–71.
    This paper seeks to chart a concept of historical experience that French Romantic writers first developed to describe their own relationship to historical time: the notion of the “transitional period.” At first, the term related strictly to the evolving periodic conception of history, one that required breaks, spaces, or zones of indeterminacy to bracket off periods imagined as organic wholes. These transitions, necessary devices in the new grammar of history, also began to attract interest on their own, conceived either (...)
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  39.  15
    Madeline J. Eacott & Alexander Easton (2007). Mental Time Travel in the Rat: Dissociation of Recall and Familiarity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):322-323.
    We examine and reject the claim that the past-directed aspect of mental time travel (episodic memory) is unique to humans. Recent work in our laboratory with rats has demonstrated behaviours that resemble judgements about past occasions. Similar to human episodic memory, we can also demonstrate a dissociation in the neural basis of recollection and familiarity in nonhumans.
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  40.  33
    L. Nathan Oaklander (2004). Absolute Becoming and the Myth of Passage. Philo 7 (1):36-46.
    In a recent paper, Steven Savitt attempts to demonstrate that there is an area of common ground between one classic proponent of temporal passage, C.D. Broad, and one classic opponent of passage, D.C. Williams. According to Savitt, Broad's notion of “absolute becoming” as the ordered occurrence of (simultaneity sets of) events, and Williams’ notion of “literal passage,” as the happening of events strung along the four-dimensional space-time manifold, are indistinguishable. Savitt recognizes that some might think it preposterous to maintain (...)
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  41.  1
    Tomáš Hlobil (2007). The Reception of Burke's Enquiry in the German-Language Area in the Second Half of the Eighteenth Century (A Regional Aspect). Estetika 44 (1-4):125-150.
    Although research to date has helped in important ways to shed light on the penetration of Burke’s Enquiry into the German-language area, a comprehensive treatment of this reception as a process distinguished not only by changes over time, but also characterized by regional variations, remains lacking. Based on the lectures on aesthetics by August Gottlieb Meißner at Prague University in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the paper seeks to illuminate this underexposed regional aspect. The first phase (...)
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  42.  54
    Maria Merritt (2009). Aristotelean Virtue and the Interpersonal Aspect of Ethical Character. Journal of Moral Philosophy 6 (1):23-49.
    I examine the Aristotelean conception of virtuous character as firm and unchangeable, a normative ideal endorsed in the currently influential, broadly Aristotelean school of thought known as 'virtue ethics'. Drawing on central concepts of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, I offer an account of how this ideal is supposed to be realized psychologically. I then consider present-day empirical findings about relevant psychological processes, with special attention to interpersonal processes. The empirical evidence suggests that over time, the same interpersonal processes that sometimes (...)
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  43.  31
    Harald Atmanspacher (1989). The Aspect of Information Production in the Process of Observation. Foundations of Physics 19 (5):553-577.
    The physical process of observation is considered from a specific information theoretical viewpoint. Using the modified concept of an information based on infinite alternatives, a formalism is derived describing the elementary transfer of one bit of information. This bit of information is produced on a virtual (nonreal) sub-quantum level of physical description. The interpretation of the formalism yields the following, complementary points: (i) the effect of spatiotemporal delocalization on the sub-quantum level, and (ii) a possible access to the concept of (...)
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  44.  17
    A. L. L. Videira, A. L. Rocha Barros & N. C. Fernandes (1985). Geometry as an Aspect of Dynamics. Foundations of Physics 15 (12):1247-1262.
    Contrary to the predominant way of doing physics, we claim that the geometrical structure of a general differentiable space-time manifold can be determined from purely dynamical considerations. Anyn-dimensional manifoldV a has associated with it a symplectic structure given by the2n numbersp andx of the2n-dimensional cotangent fiber bundle TVn. Hence, one is led, in a natural way, to the Hamiltonian description of dynamics, constructed in terms of the covariant momentump (a dynamical quantity) and of the contravariant position vectorx (a geometrical (...)
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  45.  27
    Murat BaÇ (2000). Structure Versus Process: Mach, Hertz, and the Normative Aspect of Science. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 31 (1):39-56.
    In the end of the nineteenth century, there was a remarkable ‘empiricist attitude’ found among certain philosopher-scientists, an attitude which arguably emerged in the main as a reaction to the anti-scientific mood prevalent in the culture that time. Those philosopher-scientists, such as Mach and Hertz, were particularly anxious to emphasize and laud the privileged status of the empirical dimension ofour scientific knowledge, distinguishing it carefully from the theoretical constructions and hypothetical entities that are ordinarily posited by scientists. Yet, as (...)
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  46.  16
    Jane Adams (2005). Class: An Essential Aspect of Watershed Planning. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (6):533-556.
    A study of a watershed planning process in the Cache River Watershed in southern Illinois revealed that class divisions, based on property ownership, underlay key conflicts over land use and decision-making relevant to resource use. A class analysis of the region indicates that the planning process served to endorse and solidify the locally-dominant theory that landownership confers the right to govern. This obscured the class differences between large full-time farmers and small-holders whose livelihood depends on non-farm labor. These two (...)
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  47.  54
    Nick Huggett & Robert Weingard (1994). On the Field Aspect of Quantum Fields. Erkenntnis 40 (3):293 - 301.
    In this paper we contrast the idea of a field as a system with an infinite number of degrees of freedom with a recent alternative proposed by Paul Teller in Teller (1990). We show that, although our characterisation lacks the immediate appeal of Teller's, it has more success producing agreement with intuitive categorisations than his does. We go on to extend the distinction to Quantum Mechanics, explaining the important role that it plays there. Finally, we take some time to (...)
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  48.  3
    Wang Yuanhua (1990). A Brief Discussion of One Aspect of the Shangtong Idea. Contemporary Chinese Thought 22 (1):3-10.
    In his "Lectures on the History of Philosophy," Hegel once commented that the characteristic of Eastern philosophy lies in that it only recognizes as real the singular ding-an-sich . If an individuality, or a singular entity, stands in opposition to the ontological entity that exists in itself and spontaneously acts in itself , then it cannot have any value in itself, and cannot attain any value at all. However, at the same time that the individual entity unites with the (...)
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  49.  1
    Peeter Torop (2013). The Ideological Aspect of Intersemiotic Translation and Montage. Sign Systems Studies 41 (2-3):241-265.
    The Estonian film The Last Relic offers an interesting case of ideological intersemiotic translation. At the same time, it is an innovative film from the point of view of text composition as well as combination of traditional montage with intersemiotic montage in which the speech of the heroes, the messages of the songs and repetition of visual and musical motifs are juxtaposed to create historical and ideological ambiguity. The specificity of this film is very close to later tendencies in (...)
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  50. A. N. Alymov (1976). The Economic Aspect of the Problem of Forming the New Human Being. Russian Studies in Philosophy 15 (1):15-18.
    The economic and social essence of the current revolution in science and technology taking place under the conditions of socialism is that it shapes new societal needs and at the same time creates the conditions for satisfying them.
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