Search results for 'truthlikeness' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ilkka Niiniluoto (2014). Representation and Truthlikeness. Foundations of Science 19 (4):375-379.score: 24.0
    Woosuk Park’s paper “Misrepresentation in Context” is a useful plea for a theory of representation with promising interaction between cognitive science, philosophy of science, and aesthetics. In this paper, I argue that such a unified account is provided by Charles S. Peirce’s semiotics. This theory puts Park’s criticism of Nelson Goodman and Jerry Fodor in context. Some of Park’s pertinent remarks on the problem of misrepresentation can be illuminated by the account of truthlikeness and idealization developed by philosophers of (...)
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  2. Simon D'Alfonso (2011). Supplementing Belief Revision for The Aim of Truthlikeness. The Reasoner 5 (9):143-144.score: 21.0
  3. Ilkka Niiniluoto (2005). Abduction and Truthlikeness. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 83 (1):255-275.score: 18.0
    This paper studies the interplay between two notions which are important for the project of defending scientific realism: abduction and truthlikeness. The main focus is the generalization of abduction to cases where the conclusion states that the best theory is truthlike or approximately true. After reconstructing the recent proposals of Theo Kuipers within the framework of monadic predicate logic, I apply my own notion of truthlikeness. It turns out that a theory with higher truthlikeness does not always (...)
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  4. Graham Oddie, Truthlikeness. Stanford Encyclopedia.score: 18.0
    Truth is the aim of inquiry. Nevertheless, some falsehoods seem to realize this aim better than others. Some truths better realize the aim than other truths. And perhaps even some falsehoods realize the aim better than some truths do. The dichotomy of the class of propositions into truths and falsehoods should thus be supplemented with a more fine-grained ordering — one which classifies propositions according to their closeness to the truth, their degree of truthlikeness or verisimilitude. The logical problem (...)
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  5. Ilkka Niiniluoto (1997). Reference Invariance and Truthlikeness. Philosophy of Science 64 (4):546-554.score: 18.0
    A holistic account of the meaning of theoretical terms leads scientific realism into serious troubles. Alternative methods of reference fixing are needed by a realist who wishes to show how reference invariance is possible in spite of meaning variance. This paper argues that the similarity theory of truthlikeness and approximate truth, developed by logicians since the mid 1970s, helps to make precise the idea of charitable theoretical reference. Comparisons to the recent proposals by Kitcher and Psillos are given. This (...)
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  6. Gerhard Schurz (2005). Bayesian H-D Confirmation and Structuralistic Truthlikeness: Discussion and Comparison with the Relevant-Element and the Content-Part Approach. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 83 (1):141-159.score: 18.0
    In this paper it is shown that, in spite of their intuitive starting points, Kuipers' accounts lead to counterintuitive consequences. The counterintuitive results of Kuipers' account of H-D confirmation stem from the fact that Kuipers explicates a concept of partial (as opposed to full) confirmation. It is shown that Schurz-Weingartner's relevant-element approach as well as Gemes' content-part approach provide an account of full confirmation that does not lead to these counterintuitive results. One of the unwelcome results of Kuipers' account of (...)
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  7. Jesus P. Zamora Bonilla (2000). Truthlikeness, Rationality And Scientific Method. Synthese 122 (3):321-335.score: 18.0
    I. A. Kieseppä's criticism of the methodological use of the theory of verisimilitude, and D. B. Resnik's arguments against the explanation of scientific method by appeal to scientific aims are critically considered. Since the notion of verisimilitude was introduced as an attempt to show that science can be seen as a rational enterprise in the pursuit of truth, defenders of the verisimilitude programme need to show that scientific norms can be interpreted (at least in principle) as rules that try to (...)
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  8. Eric Barnes (1995). Truthlikeness, Translation, and Approximate Causal Explanation. Philosophy of Science 62 (2):215-226.score: 18.0
    D. Miller's demonstrations of the language dependence of truthlikeness raise a profound problem for the claim that scientific progress is objective. In two recent papers (Barnes 1990, 1991) I argue that the objectivity of progress may be grounded on the claim that the aim of science is not merely truth but knowledge; progress thus construed is objective in an epistemic sense. In this paper I construct a new solution to Miller's problem grounded on the notion of "approximate causal explanation" (...)
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  9. Graham Oddie (1986). The Poverty of the Popperian Program for Truthlikeness. Philosophy of Science 53 (2):163-178.score: 18.0
    The importance for realism of the concept of truthlikeness was first stressed by Popper. Popper himself not only mapped out a program for defining truthlikeness (in terms of falsity content and truth content) but produced the first definitions within this program. These were shown to be inadequate. But the program lingered on, and the most recent attempt to revive it is that of Newton-Smith. His attempt is a failure, not because of some minor defect or technical flaw in (...)
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  10. I. A. Kieseppä (1996). Truthlikeness for Hypotheses Expressed in Terms of N Quantitative Variables. Journal of Philosophical Logic 25 (2):109 - 134.score: 18.0
    A qualitative theory of truthlikeness, based on a family of quantitative measures, is developed for hypotheses that are concerned with the values of a finite number of real-valued quantities. Representing hypotheses by subsets of $R^{n}$ , I first show that a straightforward application of the basic ideas of the similarity approach to truthlikeness does not work out for hypotheses with zero n-dimensional Lebesgue measure. However, it is easy to give a counterpart for the average measure preferred by Pavel (...)
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  11. Carlotta Piscopo & Mauro Birattari (2010). A Critique of the Constitutive Role of Truthlikeness in the Similarity Approach. Erkenntnis 72 (3):379 - 386.score: 18.0
    The similarity approach stands as a significant attempt to defend scientific realism from the attack of the pessimistic meta-induction. The strategy behind the similarity approach is to shift from an absolute notion of truth to the more flexible one of truthlikeness. Nonetheless, some authors are not satisfied with this attempt to defend realism and find that the notion of truthlikeness is not fully convincing. The aim of this paper is to analyze and understand the reasons of this dissatisfaction. (...)
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  12. Ilkka Niiniluoto (1982). Truthlikeness for Quantitative Statements. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1982:208 - 216.score: 18.0
    The most elaborate recent accounts of truthlikeness (verisimilitude) apply this notion primarily to generalizations in first-order languages with qualitative predicates. This paper outlines a new approach to the definition of truthlikeness for quantitative statements, including singular statements (point estimation), interval statements (interval estimation), and quantitative laws. In the case of laws, the basic issue is reduced to the topological problem of measuring the distance between two real-valued functions. The solution of this problem makes it possible to define also (...)
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  13. Jesus P. Zamora Bonilla (2000). Truthlikeness, Rationality and Scientific Method. Synthese 122 (3):321 - 335.score: 18.0
    I. A. Kieseppä's criticism of the methodological use of the theory of verisimilitude, and D. B. Resnik's arguments against the explanation of scientific method by appeal to scientific aims are critically considered. Since the notion of verisimilitude was introduced as an attempt to show that science can be seen as a rational enterprise in the pursuit of truth, defenders of the verisimilitude programme need to show that scientific norms can be interpreted (at least in principle) as rules that try to (...)
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  14. Thomas Mormann (2006). Truthlikeness for Theories on Countable Languages. In Ian Jarvie, Karl Milford & David Miller (eds.), Karl Popper: A Centenary Assessment vol. 3.score: 15.0
  15. Jesús P. Zamora Bonilla (2005). Truthlikeness with a Human Face: On Some Connections Between the Theory of Verisimilitude and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 83 (1):361-369.score: 15.0
    Verisimilitude theorists (and many scientific realists) assume that science attempts to provide hypotheses with an increasing degree of closeness to the full truth; on the other hand, radical sociologists of science assert that flesh and bone scientists struggle to attain much more mundane goals (such as income, power, fame, and so on). This paper argues that both points of view can be made compatible, for (1) rational individuals only would be interested in engaging in a strong competition (such as that (...)
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  16. Ilkka Niiniluoto (1994). Truthlikeness Misapplied: A Reply to Ernest W. Adams. Synthese 101 (2):291 - 300.score: 15.0
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  17. Theo A. F. Kuipers (1997). Comparative Versus Quantitative Truthlikeness Definitions: Reply to Thomas Mormann. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 47 (2):187-192.score: 15.0
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  18. Ilkka Niiniluoto (1986). Truthlikeness and Bayesian Estimation. Synthese 67 (2):321 - 346.score: 15.0
  19. Ilkka Niiniluoto (1978). Truthlikeness: Comments on Recent Discussion. Synthese 38 (2):281 - 329.score: 15.0
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  20. Roger D. Rosenkrantz (1975). Truthlikeness: Comment on David Miller. Synthese 30 (1-2):193 - 197.score: 15.0
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  21. R. D. Rosenkrantz (1980). Measuring Truthlikeness. Synthese 45 (3):463 - 487.score: 15.0
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  22. David Pearce (1983). Truthlikeness and Translation: A Comment on Oddie. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 34 (4):380-385.score: 15.0
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  23. Theo A. F. Kuipers (ed.) (1987). What is Closer-to-the-Truth?: A Parade of Approaches to Truthlikeness. Rodopi.score: 15.0
    INTRODUCTION When Karl Popper published in' his definition of closer-to-the- truth this was an important intellectual event, but not a shocking one. ...
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  24. Ilkka Niiniluoto (1979). Degrees of Truthlikeness: From Singular Sentences to Generalisations. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 30 (4):371-376.score: 15.0
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  25. Jesús P. Zamora Bonilla (1992). Truthlikeness Without Truth: A Methodological Approach. Synthese 93 (3):343 - 372.score: 15.0
    In this paper, an attempt is made to solve various problems posed to current theories of verisimilitude: (1) the (Miller's) problem of linguistic variance; (2) the problem of which are the best scientific methods for getting the most verisimilar theories; and (3) the question of the ontological commitment in scientific theories. As a result of my solution ot these problems, and with the help of other considerations of epistemological character, I conclude that the notion of Tarskian truth is dispensable in (...)
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  26. Gustavo Cevolani & Luca Tambolo (2013). Truth May Not Explain Predictive Success, but Truthlikeness Does. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (4):590-593.score: 15.0
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  27. Theo A. F. Kuipers (2005). Confirmation and Truthlikeness: Reply to Gerhard Schurz. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 83 (1):160-166.score: 15.0
  28. Ilkka Niiniluoto (2010). Theory Change, Truthlikeness, and Belief Revision. In M. Dorato M. Suàrez (ed.), Epsa Epistemology and Methodology of Science. Springer. 189--199.score: 15.0
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  29. David Miller (1972). The Truth-Likeness of Truthlikeness. Analysis 33 (2):50 - 55.score: 15.0
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  30. Ilkka Niiniluoto (2002). 10 Truthlikeness and Economic Theories. In Uskali Mäki (ed.), Fact and Fiction in Economics: Models, Realism and Social Construction. Cambridge University Press. 214.score: 15.0
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  31. Graham Oddie (1987). Truthlikeness and the Convexity of Propositions. In Kuipers T. (ed.), What is Closer-to-the-Truth. Rodopi. 197-217.score: 15.0
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  32. Graham Oddie (2008). Truthlikeness and Value. In Pihlstrom S. (ed.), Approaching Truth: Essays in Honour of Ilkka Niiniluoto. College Publications. 225-40.score: 15.0
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  33. Jes�S. P. Zamora Bonilla (1992). Truthlikeness Without Truth: A Methodological Approach. Synthese 93 (3):343-372.score: 15.0
    In this paper, an attempt is made to solve various problems posed to current theories of verisimilitude: (1) the (Miller's) problem of linguistic variance; (2) the problem of which are the best scientific methods for getting the most verisimilar theories; and (3) the question of the ontological commitment in scientific theories. As a result of my solution to these problems, and with the help of other considerations of epistemological character, I conclude that the notion of 'Tarskian truth' is dispensable in (...)
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  34. Ilkka Niiniluoto (2007). Idealization, Counterfactuals, and Truthlikeness. In Jerzy Brzeziński, Andrzej Klawiter, Theo A. F. Kuipers, Krzysztof Łastowski, Katarzyna Paprzycka & Piotr Przybysz (eds.), The Courage of Doing Philosophy: Essays Dedicated to Leszek Nowak. Rodopi. 103--122.score: 15.0
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  35. I. Niiniluoto (1998). Truthlikeness: The Third Phase'. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49:1-31.score: 15.0
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  36. Graham Oddie (forthcoming). Truth and Truthlikeness. In Glanzberg M. (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Truth. Oxford University Press.score: 15.0
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  37. Graham Oddie (1987). The Picture Theory of Truthlikeness. In Kuipers T. (ed.), What is Closer-to-the-Truth. Rodopi. 25-46.score: 15.0
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  38. G. L. Pandit (1988). Science and Truthlikeness. Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 5.score: 15.0
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  39. David Pearce (1989). Review: Ilkka Niiniluoto, Truthlikeness. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 54 (1):297-300.score: 15.0
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  40. Gustavo Cevolani (2011). Strongly Semantic Information and Verisimilitude. Etica and Politica / Ethics and Politics (2):159-179.score: 9.0
    In The Philosophy of Information, Luciano Floridi presents a theory of “strongly semantic information”, based on the idea that “information encapsulates truth” (the so-called “veridicality thesis”). Starting with Popper, philosophers of science have developed different explications of the notion of verisimilitude or truthlikeness, construed as a combination of truth and information. Thus, the theory of strongly semantic information and the theory of verisimilitude are intimately tied. Yet, with few exceptions, this link has virtually pass unnoticed. In this paper, we (...)
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  41. Simon D'Alfonso (2011). On Quantifying Semantic Information. Information 2 (1):61-101.score: 9.0
    The purpose of this paper is to look at some existing methods of semantic information quantification and suggest some alternatives. It begins with an outline of Bar-Hillel and Carnap’s theory of semantic information before going on to look at Floridi’s theory of strongly semantic information. The latter then serves to initiate an in-depth investigation into the idea of utilising the notion of truthlikeness to quantify semantic information. Firstly, a couple of approaches to measure truthlikeness are drawn from the (...)
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  42. Graham Oddie (2013). The Content, Consequence and Likeness Approaches to Verisimilitude: Compatibility, Trivialization, and Underdetermination. Synthese 190 (9):1647-1687.score: 9.0
    Theories of verisimilitude have routinely been classified into two rival camps—the content approach and the likeness approach—and these appear to be motivated by very different sets of data and principles. The question thus naturally arises as to whether these approaches can be fruitfully combined. Recently Zwart and Franssen (Synthese 158(1):75–92, 2007) have offered precise analyses of the content and likeness approaches, and shown that given these analyses any attempt to meld content and likeness orderings violates some basic desiderata. Unfortunately their (...)
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  43. Jesús Zamora-Bonilla (2013). Why Are Good Theories Good? Reflections on Epistemic Values, Confirmation, and Formal Epistemology. Synthese 190 (9):1533-1553.score: 9.0
    Franz Huber’s (2008a) attempt to unify inductivist and hypothetico-deductivist intuitions on confirmation by means of a single measure are examined and compared with previous work on the theory of verisimilitude or truthlikeness. The idea of connecting ‘the logic of confirmation’ with ‘the logic of acceptability’ is also critically discussed, and it is argued that ‘acceptability’ takes necessarily into account some pragmatic criteria, and that at least two normative senses of ‘acceptability’ must be distinguished: ‘acceptable’ in the sense of ‘being (...)
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  44. Gustavo Cevolani (2014). Truth Approximation, Belief Merging, and Peer Disagreement. Synthese 191 (11):2383-2401.score: 9.0
    In this paper, we investigate the problem of truth approximation via belief merging, i.e., we ask whether, and under what conditions, a group of inquirers merging together their beliefs makes progress toward the truth about the underlying domain. We answer this question by proving some formal results on how belief merging operators perform with respect to the task of truth approximation, construed as increasing verisimilitude or truthlikeness. Our results shed new light on the issue of how rational (dis)agreement affects (...)
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  45. Graham Oddie (1986). Likeness to Truth. Reidel.score: 9.0
    What does it take for one proposition to be closer to the truth than another. In this, the first published monograph on the topic, Oddie develops a comprehensive theory that takes the likeness in truthlikeness seriously.
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  46. Gustavo Cevolani, Vincenzo Crupi & Roberto Festa (2010). The Whole Truth About Linda: Probability, Verisimilitude and a Paradox of Conjunction. In Marcello D'Agostino, Federico Laudisa, Giulio Giorello, Telmo Pievani & Corrado Sinigaglia (eds.), New Essays in Logic and Philosophy of Science. College Publications. 603--615.score: 6.0
    We provide a 'verisimilitudinarian' analysis of the well-known Linda paradox or conjunction fallacy, i.e., the fact that most people judge the probability of the conjunctive statement "Linda is a bank teller and is active in the feminist movement" (B & F) as more probable than the isolated statement "Linda is a bank teller" (B), contrary to an uncontroversial principle of probability theory. The basic idea is that experimental participants may judge B & F a better hypothesis about Linda as compared (...)
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  47. Gustavo Cevolani, Vincenzo Crupi & Roberto Festa, A Verisimilitudinarian Analysis of the Linda Paradox. VII Conference of the Spanish Society for Logic, Methodology and Philosphy of Science.score: 6.0
    The Linda paradox is a key topic in current debates on the rationality of human reasoning and its limitations. We present a novel analysis of this paradox, based on the notion of verisimilitude as studied in the philosophy of science. The comparison with an alternative analysis based on probabilistic confirmation suggests how to overcome some problems of our account by introducing an adequately defined notion of verisimilitudinarian confirmation.
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  48. Theo A. F. Kuipers (1999). Abduction Aiming at Empirical Progress or Eventruth Approximationleading to a Challenge for Computational Modelling. Foundations of Science 4 (3):307-323.score: 6.0
    This paper primarily deals with theconceptual prospects for generalizing the aim ofabduction from the standard one of explainingsurprising or anomalous observations to that ofempirical progress or even truth approximation. Itturns out that the main abduction task then becomesthe instrumentalist task of theory revision aiming atan empirically more successful theory, relative to theavailable data, but not necessarily compatible withthem. The rest, that is, genuine empirical progress aswell as observational, referential and theoreticaltruth approximation, is a matter of evaluation andselection, and possibly new (...)
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  49. Gustavo Cevolani (2013). Truth Approximation Via Abductive Belief Change. Logic Journal of the Igpl 21 (6):999-1016.score: 6.0
    We investigate the logical and conceptual connections between abductive reasoning construed as a process of belief change, on the one hand, and truth approximation, construed as increasing (estimated) verisimilitude, on the other. We introduce the notion of ‘(verisimilitude-guided) abductive belief change’ and discuss under what conditions abductively changing our theories or beliefs does lead them closer to the truth, and hence tracks truth approximation conceived as the main aim of inquiry. The consequences of our analysis for some recent discussions concerning (...)
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