Search results for 'unarticulated constituents' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. François Recanati (2002). Unarticulated Constituents. Linguistics and Philosophy 25 (3):299-345.score: 60.0
    In a recent paper (Linguistics and Philosophy 23, 4, June 2000), Jason Stanley argues that there are no `unarticulated constituents', contrary to what advocates of Truth-conditional pragmatics (TCP) have claimed. All truth-conditional effects of context can be traced to logical form, he says. In this paper I maintain that there are unarticulated constituents, and I defend TCP. Stanley's argument exploits the fact that the alleged unarticulated constituents can be `bound', that is, they can be (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Emma Borg, Saying What You Mean: Unarticulated Constituents and Communication.score: 60.0
    In this paper I want to explore the arguments for so-called ‘unarticulated constituents’ (UCs). Unarticulated constituents are supposed to be propositional elements, not presented in the surface form of a sentence, nor explicitly represented at the level of its logical form, yet which must be interpreted in order to grasp the (proper) meaning of that sentence or expression. Thus, for example, we might think that a sentence like ‘It is raining’ must contain a UC picking out (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. John Perry (1998). Indexicals, Contexts and Unarticulated Constituents. In Proceedings of the 1995 CSLI-Armsterdam Logic, Language and Computation Conference. CSLI Publications.score: 60.0
    Philosophers and logicians use the term “indexical” for words such as “I”, “you” and “tomorrow”. Demonstratives such as “this” and “that” and demonstratives phrases such as “this man” and “that computer” are usually reckoned as a subcategory of indexicals. (Following [Kaplan, 1989a].) The “context-dependence” of indexicals is often taken as a defining feature: what an indexical designates shifts from context to context. But there are many kinds of shiftiness, with corresponding conceptions of context. Until we clarify what we mean by (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Luisa Martí (2006). Unarticulated Constituents Revisited. Linguistics and Philosophy 29 (2):135 - 166.score: 60.0
    An important debate in the current literature is whether “all truth-conditional effects of extra-linguistic context can be traced to [a variable at; LM] logical form” (Stanley, ‘Context and Logical Form’, Linguistics and Philosophy, 23 (2000) 391). That is, according to Stanley, the only truth-conditional effects that extra-linguistic context has are localizable in (potentially silent) variable-denoting pronouns or pronoun-like items, which are represented in the syntax/at logical form (pure indexicals like I or today are put aside in this discussion). According to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Adam Sennet (2011). Unarticulated Constituents and Propositional Structure. Mind and Language 26 (4):412-435.score: 60.0
    Attempts to characterize unarticulated constituents (henceforth: UCs) by means of quantification over the parts of a sentence and the constituents of the proposition it expresses come to grief in more complicated cases than are commonly considered. In particular, UC definitions are inadequate when we consider cases in which the same constituent appears more than once in a proposition that only has one word with the constituent as its semantic value. This article explores some consequences of trying to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Luisa Marti (2006). Unarticulated Constituents Revisited. Linguistics and Philosophy 29 (2):135--166.score: 60.0
    An important debate in the current literature is whether "all truth-conditional effects of extra-linguistic context can be traced to [a variable at; LM] logical form" (Stanley, 'Context and Logical Form', Linguistics and Philosophy, 23 (2000) 391). That is, according to Stanley, the only truth-conditional effects that extra-linguistic context has are localizable in (potentially silent) variable-denoting pronouns or pronoun-like items, which are represented in the syntax/at logical form (pure indexicals like I or today are put aside in this discussion). According to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Marián Zouhar (2011). What is Wrong with Unarticulated Constituents? Human Affairs 21 (3):239-248.score: 59.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Herman Cappelen & Ernie Lepore (2007). The Myth of Unarticulated Constituents. In Michael O'Rourke & Corey Washington (eds.), Situating Semantics: Essays on the Philosophy of John Perry. MIT Press. 199-214.score: 52.0
    This paper evaluates arguments presented by John Perry (and Ken Taylor) in favor of the presence of an unarticulated constituent in the proposition expressed by utterance of, for example, (1):1 1. It's raining (at t). We contend that these arguments are, at best, inconclusive. That's the critical part of our paper. On the positive side, we argue that (1) has as its semantic content the proposition that it is raining (at t) and that this is a location-neutral proposition. According (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Thomas Hodgson (2013). Why We Should Not Identify Sentence Structure with Propositional Structure. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 43 (5-6):612-633.score: 45.0
    It is a common view among philosophers of language that both propositions and sentences are structured objects. One obvious question to ask about such a view is whether there is any interesting connection between these two sorts of structure. The author identifies two theses about this relationship. Identity (ID) – the structure of a sentence and the proposition it expresses are identical. Determinism (DET) – the structure of a sentence determines the structure of the proposition it expresses. After noting that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Francois Recanati (2013). 15. Unarticulated Constituents. In Maite Ezcurdia & Robert J. Stainton (eds.), The Semantics-Pragmatics Boundary in Philosophy. Broadview Press. 350.score: 45.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Ángela Rocío Bejarano Chaves (2013). " It Rains" a Controversy on the Unarticulated Constituents. Discusiones Filosóficas 14 (22):107-123.score: 45.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Lenny Clapp (2002). What Unarticulated Constituents Could Not Be. In Joseph K. Campbell, Michael O'Rourke & David Shier (eds.), Meaning and Truth - Investigations in Philosophical Semantics. Seven Bridges Press. 231--256.score: 45.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Dan Zeman (2011). Unarticulated Constituents, Variadic Functions and Relativism. Logique Et Analyse 54 (216).score: 45.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Marian Zouhar (2012). Two Kinds of Unarticulated Constituents. Organon F 19 (1).score: 45.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Marian Zouhar (2011). Unarticulated Constituents of Semantic Content and Syntactic Ellipsis. Filozofia 66 (8):725-745.score: 45.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Sarah Moss (2012). The Role of Linguistics in the Philosophy of Language. In Delia Graff Fara & Gillian Russell (eds.), Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Language.score: 30.0
    This paper discusses several case studies that illustrate the relationship between the philosophy of language and three branches of linguistics: syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. Among other things, I identify binding arguments in the linguistics literature preceding (Stanley 2000), and I invent binding arguments to evaluate various semantic and pragmatic theories of belief ascriptions.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Kristina Musholt (2013). Self-Consciousness and Nonconceptual Content. Philosophical Studies 163 (3):649-672.score: 30.0
    Self-consciousness can be defined as the ability to think 'I'-thoughts. Recently, it has been suggested that self-consciousness in this sense can (and should) be accounted for in terms of nonconceptual forms of self-representation. Here, I will argue that while theories of nonconceptual self-consciousness do provide us with important insights regarding the essential genetic and epistemic features of self-conscious thought, they can only deliver part of the full story that is required to understand the phenomenon of self-consciousness. I will provide two (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Jason Stanley (2000). Context and Logical Form. Linguistics and Philosophy 23 (4):391--434.score: 15.0
    In this paper, I defend the thesis that alleffects of extra-linguistic context on thetruth-conditions of an assertion are traceable toelements in the actual syntactic structure of thesentence uttered. In the first section, I develop thethesis in detail, and discuss its implications for therelation between semantics and pragmatics. The nexttwo sections are devoted to apparent counterexamples.In the second section, I argue that there are noconvincing examples of true non-sentential assertions.In the third section, I argue that there are noconvincing examples of what (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. François Récanati (2007). Perspectival Thought: A Plea for (Moderate) Relativism. Oxford University Press.score: 15.0
    Moderate relativism -- The framework -- The distribution of content -- Radical vs. moderate relativism -- Two levels of content -- Branch points for moderate relativism -- The debate over temporalism (1) : do we need temporal propositions? -- Modal vs. extensional treatments of tense -- What is at stake? -- Modal and temporal innocence -- Temporal operators and temporal propositions in an extensional framework -- The debate over temporalism (2) : can we believe temporal propositions? -- An epistemic argument (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Alison Hall (2008). Free Enrichment or Hidden Indexicals? Mind and Language 23 (4):426-456.score: 15.0
    Abstract: A current debate in semantics and pragmatics is whether all contextual effects on truth-conditional content can be traced to logical form, or 'unarticulated constituents' can be supplied by the pragmatic process of free enrichment. In this paper, I defend the latter position. The main objection to this view is that free enrichment appears to overgenerate, not predicting where context cannot affect truth conditions, so that a systematic account is unlikely (Stanley, 2002a). I first examine the semantic alternative (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Peter Pagin (2005). Compositionality and Context. In Gerhard Preyer & Georg Peter (eds.), Contextualism in Philosophy: Knowledge, Meaning, and Truth. Oxford University Press. 303-348.score: 15.0
    This paper contains a discussion of how the concept of compositionality is to be extended from context invariant to context dependent meaning, and of how the compositionality of natural language might conflict with context dependence. Several new distinctions are needed, including a distinction between a weaker (e-) and a stronger (ec-) concept of compositionality for context dependent meaning. The relations between the various notions are investigated. A claim by Jerry Fodor that there is a general conflict between context dependence and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Wesley H. Holliday & John Perry (forthcoming). Roles, Rigidity, and Quantification in Epistemic Logic. In Alexandru Baltag & Sonja Smets (eds.), Trends in Logic, Outstanding Contributions: Johan van Benthem on Logic and Information Dynamics. Springer.score: 15.0
    Epistemic modal predicate logic raises conceptual problems not faced in the case of alethic modal predicate logic: Frege’s “Hesperus-Phosphorus” problem—how to make sense of ascribing to agents ignorance of necessarily true identity statements—and the related “Hintikka-Kripke” problem—how to set up a logical system combining epistemic and alethic modalities, as well as others problems, such as Quine’s “Double Vision” problem and problems of self-knowledge. In this paper, we lay out a philosophical approach to epistemic predicate logic, implemented formally in Melvin Fitting’s (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Kepa Korta (2011). Critical Pragmatics: An Inquiry Into Reference and Communication. Cambridge University Press.score: 15.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction; 2. A short history of reference; 3. Acts, roles and singular reference; 4. Elements of reference; 5. Demonstratives; 6. Context sensitivity and indexicals; 7. Names; 8. Definite descriptions; 9. Implicit reference and unarticulated constituents; 10. Locutionary content and speech acts; 11. Reference and implicature; 12. Semantics, pragmatics and critical pragmatics; 13. Harnessing information; 14. Examples.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Simon Prosser (2006). Temporal Metaphysics in Z-Land. Synthese 149 (1):77 - 96.score: 15.0
    John Perry has argued that language, thought and experience often contain unarticulated constituents. I argue that this idea holds the key to explaining away the intuitive appeal of the A-theory of time and the endurance theory of persistence. The A-theory has seemed intuitively appealing because the nature of temporal experience makes it natural for us to use one-place predicates like past to deal with what are really two-place relations, one of whose constituents is unarticulated. The endurance (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Esther Romero & Belén Soria (2010). On Phrasal Pragmatics and What is Descriptively Referred To. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 10 (1):63-84.score: 15.0
    In this paper, we discuss contextualism, a philosophical position that some pragmatists have endorsed as a result of the philosophical reflection on pragmatics as a science. In particular, we challenge, from the results on phrasal pragmatics, the contextualist approach on incomplete definite descriptions and referential metonymy according to which optional pragmatic processes of interpretation are required (an optional pragmatic process of recovering unarticulated constituents for incompleteness and an optional pragmatic process of transfer for metonymy). By contrast, we argue (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Daniel Rothschild, Syllabus.score: 15.0
    We will look at recent work on some topics at the intersection of semantics and pragmatics. First, we’ll begin surveying some foundational work in semantics and pragmatics. After this we’ll spend a few weeks each on: presupposition, scalar implicature, and unarticulated constituents. Two additional possible topics (if time permits) are: wide-scope indefinites and donkey anaphora. Anyone with particular interests in related areas are welcome to suggest topics or readings which can be substituted for existing topics.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Betty J. Haslett (1973). Effects of Syntactic Complexity on Processing and Retrieval of Sentential Constituents. Journal of Experimental Psychology 100 (2):419.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. John Perry (2009). Reference and Reflexivity. Center for the Study of Language and Information.score: 15.0
    Preface to the second edition -- Preface to the first edition -- Introduction -- Contents and propositions -- Utterance and context -- Context and cognitive paths -- Meanings and contents -- Names and the co-reference problem -- Names, networks, and notions -- The no-reference problem -- Pragmatics -- Unarticulated constituents -- Contents and attitudes -- Conclusion.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. François Recanati (2007). Perspectival Thought: A Plea for (Moderate) Relativism. Clarendon Press.score: 15.0
    Our thought and talk are situated. They do not take place in a vacuum but always in a context, and they always concern an external situation relative to which they are to be evaluated. Since that is so, François Recanati argues, our linguistic and mental representations alike must be assigned two layers of content: the explicit content, or lekton, is relative and perspectival, while the complete content, which is absolute, involves contextual factors in addition to what is explicitly represented. Far (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Richard Brian Davis (2013). Are Bare Particulars Constituents? Acta Analytica 28 (4):395-410.score: 14.0
    In this article I examine an as yet unexplored aspect of J.P. Moreland’s defense of so-called bare particularism — the ontological theory according to which ordinary concrete particulars (e.g., Socrates) contain bare particulars as individuating constituents and property ‘hubs.’ I begin with the observation that if there is a constituency relation obtaining between Socrates and his bare particular, it must be an internal relation, in which case the natures of the relata will necessitate the relation. I then distinguish various (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Roderick Batchelor (2013). Complexes and Their Constituents. Theoria 79 (4):326-352.score: 14.0
    We sketch a general theory of complex objects and their constituents.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. James Blachowicz (1994). Unarticulated Meaning. Erkenntnis 40 (1):43 - 70.score: 12.0
    It is a common experience of mental life that we come to articulate meanings which we had initially grasped in only a sketchy way. In this paper, I consider how this idea of an initially unarticulated meaning may fit in a general theory of mental representation. I propose to identify unarticulated meanings with what I callspecific concepts, which are quite similar to Rosch's categories of basic objects and are distinct both from images and generic concepts (which come to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Petra B. Schumacher (2013). When Combinatorial Processing Results in Reconceptualization: Toward a New Approach of Compositionality. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 12.0
    Propositional content is often incomplete but comprehenders appear to adjust meaning and add unarticulated meaning constituents effortlessly. This happens at the propositional level (The baby drank the bottle) but also at the phrasal level (the wooden turtle). In two ERP experiments, combinatorial processing was investigated in container/content alternations and adjective-noun combination transforming an animate entity into a physical object. Experiment 1 revealed that container-for-content alternations (The baby drank the bottle) engendered a Late Positivity on the critical expression and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Markku Keinänen (2011). Tropes – The Basic Constituents of Powerful Particulars? Dialectica 65 (3):419-450.score: 10.0
    This article presents a trope bundle theory of simple substances, the Strong Nuclear Theory[SNT] building on the schematic basis offered by Simons's (1994) Nuclear Theory[NT]. The SNT adopts Ellis's (2001) dispositional essentialist conception of simple substances as powerful particulars: all of their monadic properties are dispositional. Moreover, simple substances necessarily belong to some natural kind with a real essence formed by monadic properties. The SNT develops further the construction of substances the NT proposes to obtain an adequate trope bundle theory (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Cody Gilmore (2014). Parts of Propositions. In Shieva Kleinschmidt (ed.), Mereology and Location. Oxford University Press. 156-208.score: 9.0
    Do Russellian propositions have their constituents as parts? One reason for thinking not is that if they did, they would generate apparent counterexamples to plausible mereological principles. As Frege noted, they would be in tension with the transitivity of parthood. A certain small rock is a part of Etna but not of the proposition that Etna is higher than Vesuvius. So, if Etna were a part of the given proposition, parthood would fail to be transitive. As William Bynoe has (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. L. A. Paul (2012). Building the World From its Fundamental Constituents. Philosophical Studies 158 (2):221-256.score: 9.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. István Aranyosi (2003). Physical Constituents of Qualia. Philosophical Studies 116 (2):103-131.score: 9.0
    ABSTRACT. In this paper I propose a defense of a posteriori materialism. Prob- lems with a posteriori identity materialism are identi?ed, and a materialism based on composition, not identity, is proposed. The main task for such a proposal is to account for the relation between physical and phenomenal properties. Compos- ition does not seem to be ?t as a relation between properties, but I offer a peculiar way to understand property-composition, based on some recent ideas in the literature on ontology. (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Meinard Kuhlmann (2010). The Ultimate Constituents of the Material World - In Search of an Ontology for Fundamental Physics. ontos.score: 9.0
    Eventually, Kuhlmann proposes a dispositional trope ontology, according to which particularized properties and not things are the most basic entities.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Richard E. Aquila (1975). Causes and Constituents of Occurrent Emotion. Philosophical Quarterly 25 (October):346-349.score: 9.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Emmon W. Bach, Discontinous Constituents in Generalized Categorial Grammar.score: 9.0
    [1]. Recently renewed interest in non transformational approaches to syntax [2] suggests that it might be well to take another look at categorial grammars, since they seem to have been neglected largely because they had been shown to be equivalent to context free phrase structure grammars in weak generative capacity and it was believed that such grammars were incapable of describing natural languages in a natural way. It is my purpose here to sketch a theory of grammar which represents a (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Arda Denkel (1995). Artifacts and Constituents. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (2):311-322.score: 9.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Aristophanes Koutoungos (2008). Moral Sensitivity and Desire Attachment: In What Sense Are They Constituents of One's Rational Profile? [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 23 (2):125-145.score: 9.0
    A quantitative interpretation is given of the (in)coherence that moral agents experience as a tension between their ordered moral judgments over n physically incompatible actions, and the competitive ordering of motivating intensities (or, desires). Then a model describing one’s tendency to reduce the experienced in-coherence is constructed. In this model, moral sensitivity (S) and desire attachment (e) function as primitives that motivate from opposing perspectives the reduction of incoherence. Two distinct sub-processes of this reduction are therefore initiated by (S) and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Jaakko Hintikka (1972). Constituents and Finite Identifiability. Journal of Philosophical Logic 1 (1):45 - 52.score: 9.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Shlomo Sela (2001). Abraham Ibn Ezra's Scientific Corpus Basic Constituents and General Characterization. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 11 (1):91-149.score: 9.0
  45. Irving Thalberg (1973). Constituents and Causes of Emotion and Action. Philosophical Quarterly 23 (January):1-13.score: 9.0
  46. David Miller (1978). The Distance Between Constituents. Synthese 38 (2):197 - 212.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. GianCarlo Ghirardi (2013). The Parts and the Whole: Collapse Theories and Systems with Identical Constituents. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 44 (1):40-47.score: 9.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Evan Fales (1986). Essentialism and the Elementary Constituents of Matter. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 11 (1):391-402.score: 9.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Gilead Bar-Elli (1980). Constituents and Denotation in Russell. Theoria 46 (1):37-51.score: 9.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Frederick J. Wertz (1983). Some Constituents of Descriptive Psychological Reflection. Human Studies 6 (1):35 - 51.score: 9.0
    We have attempted to delineate various components of the researcher's participation in the reflection phase of descriptive psychology. The characteristic attitude or posture, operations for the comprehension of a particular event, and activities which achieve general knowledge have been touched upon. This presentation is a preliminary attempt to bring into view the complex process of analysis in descriptive research and is intended as an invitation to more faithful and detailed accounts of the process in the future.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000