Search results for 'value for its own sake' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Wlodek Rabinowicz & Toni Rønnow-Rasmussen (2000). A Distinction in Value: Intrinsic and for its Own Sake. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 100 (1):33–51.score: 466.2
    The paper argues that the final value of an object-i.e., its value for its own sake-need not be intrinsic. Extrinsic final value, which accrues to things (or persons) in virtue of their relational rather than internal features, cannot be traced back to the intrinsic value of states that involve these things together with their relations. On the contrary, such states, insofar as they are valuable at all, derive their value from the things involved. The (...)
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  2. Wlodek Rabinowicz & Toni R.?Nnow-Rasmussen (2000). A Distinction in Value: Intrinsic and for Its Own Sake. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 100:33 - 51.score: 310.2
    The paper argues that the final value of an object-i.e., its value for its own sake-need not be intrinsic. Extrinsic final value, which accrues to things (or persons) in virtue of their relational rather than internal features, cannot be traced back to the intrinsic value of states that involve these things together with their relations. On the contrary, such states, insofar as they are valuable at all, derive their value from the things involved. The (...)
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  3. Thaddeus Metz (2009). Higher Education, Knowledge For Its Own Sake, and an African Moral Theory. Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (6):517-536.score: 258.4
    I seek to answer the question of whether publicly funded higher education ought to aim intrinsically to promote certain kinds of ‘‘blue-sky’’ knowledge, knowledge that is unlikely to result in ‘‘tangible’’ or ‘‘concrete’’ social benefits such as health, wealth and liberty. I approach this question in light of an African moral theory, which contrasts with dominant Western philosophies and has not yet been applied to pedagogical issues. According to this communitarian theory, grounded on salient sub-Saharan beliefs and practices, actions are (...)
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  4. Wlodek Rabinowicz & Toni Rønnow-Rasmussen (2005). A Distinction in Value: Intrinsic and for its Own Sake. In. In Toni Rønnow-Rasmussen & Michael J. Zimmerman (eds.), Recent Work on Intrinsic Value. Springer. 115--129.score: 235.2
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  5. Erik W. Schmidt (2010). How to Value the Liberal Arts for Their Own Sake Without Intrinsic Values. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 17 (2):37-47.score: 226.8
    I argue that there is an important problem with framing the value of a liberal arts education through a contrast between intrinsic and instrumental value. The paper breaks down into three sections. First, I argue that the traditional divide between intrinsic and instrumental value conflates two pairs of related concepts and that distinguishing those concepts frees us from an important impasse found in contemporary discussions about the liberal arts. Second, I argue that a liberal arts education is (...)
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  6. Toni Rønnow-Rasmussen (2007). Analysing Personal Value. Journal of Ethics 11 (4):405 - 435.score: 214.2
    It is argued that the so-called fitting attitude- or buck-passing pattern of analysis may be applied to personal values too (and not only to impersonal values, which is the standard analysandum) if the analysans is fine-tuned in the following way: An object has personal value for a person a, if and only if there is reason to favour it for a’s sake (where “favour” is a place-holder for different pro-responses that are called for by the value (...)
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  7. Alan Ryan (2002). Does Inequality Matter—for its Own Sake? Social Philosophy and Policy 19 (1):225-243.score: 157.2
    This is a simple essay. It raises a familiar question about equality, adduces a very small amount of empirical evidence about the social consequences of equality as distinct from prosperity, and broods on the difficulty of providing a really persuasive answer to the question raised. I begin with the view that there simply cannot be anything intrinsically wrong with inequality, move on to the view that there are extrinsic reasons for anxiety, dividing these into conceptual and empirical reasons, though without (...)
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  8. Adam Nguyen & Juan Meng (2013). Whether and to What Extent Consumers Demand Fair Pricing Behavior for Its Own Sake. Journal of Business Ethics 114 (3):529-547.score: 157.2
    This article contributes to scholarly understanding of the significance of procedural fairness in pricing contexts. It has been widely recognized that price fairness judgments concern both the outcome (fair price) and the procedure leading to the outcome (fair pricing). However, extant research has traditionally viewed procedural fairness as a means to outcome fairness. According to this instrumental view, procedural fairness is a component or antecedent of outcome fairness, but has no direct effects on consumers’ responses to prices. Building on the (...)
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  9. Frederick Kraenzel (1991). Does Reason Command Itself for its Own Sake? Journal of Value Inquiry 25 (3):263-270.score: 154.2
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  10. Krister Bykvist, Garrett Cullity, Åsa Carlson, Johan Brännmark, Klemens Kappel, Ulrik Kihlbom, Ian Law, Hans Mathlein, Derek Parfit & Ingmar Persson (2005). A Distinction in Value: Intrinsic and for its Own Sake1. In Toni Rønnow-Rasmussen & Michael J. Zimmerman (eds.), Recent Work on Intrinsic Value. Springer. 115.score: 152.4
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  11. Steve Fuller (2010). History of Science for its Own Sake? History of the Human Sciences 23 (4):95-99.score: 151.2
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  12. T. S. Champlin (1987). Doing Something for Its Own Sake. Philosophy 62 (239):31 - 47.score: 151.2
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  13. Maryann P. Feldman & Pierre Desrochers (2004). Truth for Its Own Sake: Academic Culture and Technology Transfer at Johns Hopkins University. Minerva 42 (2):105-126.score: 151.2
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  14. John Ladd (1958). On the Desire to Do One's Duty for Its Own Sake. In A. I. Melden (ed.), Essays in Moral Philosophy. University of Washington Press.score: 151.2
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  15. Richard Taylor (1995). The Utilitarian Fallacy. Argumentation 9 (4):531-541.score: 151.2
    The utilitarian fallacy, most egregiously committed by J. S. Mill but perpetuated ever since, consists of supposing that “pleasure”, being a noun, is, in every true statement in which it occurs, the name of a feeling, and that “pleasant”, in any such statement, means that whatever is so described is conducive to that feeling. In fact, “pleasant” is more commonly used as a positive term of appraisal, indicating that the thing so described is liked, and usually liked for its own (...)
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  16. Toni Rønnow-Rasmussen (2009). On for Someone's Sake Attitudes. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (4):397 - 411.score: 128.8
    Personal value, i.e., what is valuable for us (rather than value simpliciter ), has recently been analysed in terms of so-called for-someone’s-sake attitudes. This paper is an attempt to add flesh to the bone of these attitudes that have not yet been properly analysed in the philosophical literature. By employing a distinction between justifiers and identifiers , which corresponds to two roles a property may play in the intentional content of an attitude, two different kinds of for-someone’s- (...) attitudes can be identified. Moreover, it is argued that one of these kinds is particularly difficult to include in an analysis of value simpliciter but not in an analysis of value for. (shrink)
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  17. Patrick Giddy (2012). The Ideal of African Scholarship and its Implications for Introductory Philosophy: The Example of Placide Tempels. South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (3):504-516.score: 113.4
    Thinking of an academic discipline in terms of a ‘social practice’ (MacIntyre) helps in formulating what the ideal captured in the slogan ‘African scholarship’ can contribute to the discipline. For every practice is threatened by the attractiveness of goods external to the practice – in particular, competitiveness for its own sake – and to counter this virtues of character are needed. African traditional culture prioritizes a normative picture of the human person which could very well contribute here to upholding (...)
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  18. Meena Krishnamurthy (2012). Reconceiving Rawls's Arguments for Equal Political Liberty and Its Fair Value. Social Theory and Practice 38 (2):258-278.score: 108.0
    Few have discussed Rawls's arguments for the value of democracy. This is because his arguments, as arguments that the principle of equal basic liberty should include democratic liberties, are incomplete. Rawls says little about the inclusion of political liberties of a democratic sort – such as the right to vote – among the basic liberties. And, at times, what he does say is unconvincing. My aim is to complete and, where they fail, to reconceive Rawls's arguments and to show (...)
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  19. Meena Krishnamurthy (2013). Completing Rawls's Arguments for Equal Political Liberty and its Fair Value: The Argument From Self-Respect. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 43 (2):179-205.score: 108.0
    Despite the vast literature on Rawls's work, few have discussed his arguments for the value of democracy. When his arguments have been discussed, they have received staunch criticism. Some critics have charged that Rawls's arguments are not deeply democratic. Others have gone further, claiming that Rawls's arguments denigrate democracy. These criticisms are unsurprising, since Rawls's arguments, as arguments that the principle of equal basic liberty needs to include democratic liberties, are incomplete. In contrast to his trenchant remarks about core (...)
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  20. Jeffrey Ketland (2003). Can a Many-Valued Language Functionally Represent its Own Semantics? Analysis 63 (4):292–297.score: 103.8
    Tarski’s Indefinability Theorem can be generalized so that it applies to many-valued languages. We introduce a notion of strong semantic self-representation applicable to any (sufficiently rich) interpreted many-valued language L. A sufficiently rich interpreted many-valued language L is SSSR just in case it has a function symbol n(x) such that, for any f Sent(L), the denotation of the term n(“f”) in L is precisely ||f||L, the semantic value of f in L. By a simple diagonal construction (finding a sentence (...)
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  21. Spencer K. Wertz (2007). The National Endowment for the Arts and its Opposition: Danto's Argument for Art for Our Sake. Journal of Aesthetic Education 41 (3):111-117.score: 93.0
    : A survey of arguments made by fiscal conservatives who wish to eliminate federal funding of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) is given and a critique of them stemming from Danto's argument for art for our sake. Following Hegel's lead, Danto shows us that there is an intimate relationship that exists between nations and their art—that is, that art is central to the political health of a nation. The arguments by conservatives are found wanting and pose no (...)
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  22. Manuel Carlos Vallejo (2008). Is the Culture of Family Firms Really Different? A Value-Based Model for its Survival Through Generations. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2):261 - 279.score: 92.6
    The current work represents a piece of research on the family firm of the semasiological, interpretive or culture creation type. In it we carry out a comparative analysis of the organizational culture of this type of firm along with firms not considered to be family firms, using as theoretical framework generally accepted theories in business administration, such as the systems, neoinstitutional, transformational leadership, and social identity theories. Our findings confirm the existence of certain elements of culture, especially values and allow (...)
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  23. Nicholas Stang (2012). Artworks Are Not Valuable for Their Own Sake. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (3):271-280.score: 92.4
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  24. Jonas Olson (2004). Intrinsicalism and Conditionalism About Final Value. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (1):31-52.score: 92.4
    The paper distinguishes between two rival views about the nature of final value (i.e. the value something has for its own sake) — intrinsicalism and conditionalism. The former view (which is the one adopted by G.E. Moore and several later writers) holds that the final value of any F supervenes solely on features intrinsic to F, while the latter view allows that the final value of F may supervene on features non-intrinsic to F. Conditionalism thus (...)
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  25. David A. Booth (2006). Money as Tool, Money as Resource: The Biology of Collecting Items for Their Own Sake. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):180-181.score: 89.4
    Money does not stimulate receptors in mimicry of natural agonists; so, by definition, money is not a drug. Attractions of money other than to purchase goods and services could arise from instincts similar to hoarding in other species. Instinctual activities without evolutionary function include earning a billion and writing for BBS. (Published Online April 5 2006).
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  26. Holmes Rolston (2004). Caring for Nature: From Fact to Value, From Respect to Reverence. Zygon 39 (2):277-302.score: 87.0
    . Despite the classical prohibition of moving from fact to value, encounter with the biodiversity and plenitude of being in evolutionary natural history moves us to respect life, even to reverence it. Darwinian accounts are value-laden and necessary for understanding life at the same time that Darwinian theory fails to provide sufficient cause for the historically developing diversity and increasing complexity on Earth. Earth is a providing ground; matter and energy on Earth support life, but distinctive to life (...)
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  27. Jonas Olson (2003). Revisiting the Tropic of Value: Reply to Rabinowicz and Rønnow-Rasmussen. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (2):412–422.score: 87.0
    In this paper, I defend the view that the values of concrete objects and persons are reducible to the final values of tropes. This reductive account has recently been discussed and rejected by Rabinowicz and Rønnow-Rasmussen (2003). I begin by explaining why the reduction is appealing in the first place. In my rejoinder to Rabinowicz and Rønnow-Rasmussen I defend trope-value reductionism against three challenges. I focus mainly on their central objection, that holds that the reduction is untenable since different (...)
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  28. Michael J. Zimmerman, Intrinsic Vs. Extrinsic Value. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 86.4
    Intrinsic value has traditionally been thought to lie at the heart of ethics. Philosophers use a number of terms to refer to such value. The intrinsic value of something is said to be the value that that thing has “in itself,” or “for its own sake,” or “as such,” or “in its own right.” Extrinsic value is value that is not intrinsic.
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  29. John A. Bailey (1979). On Intrinsic Value. Philosophia 9 (1):1-8.score: 86.4
    Intrinsic value is differentiated from extrinsic, And assumed to be an empirical characteristic. Then six definitional hypotheses are introduced as to what "x has intrinsic value" means. Under examination, All collapse but d5. In d5, "x has intrinsic value" means "x is or would be liked or disliked for its own sake." d5's relations to ethical hedonism are next examined. Last, Moore's objection, That what one likes intrinsically, One may believe to be bad or not good (...)
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  30. Andrews Reath (2003). Value and Law in Kant's Moral Theory. Ethics 114 (1):127-155.score: 86.4
    Paul Guyer’s Kant on Freedom, Law, and Happiness is a collection of essays written over a period of ten years on the roles of freedom, reason, law, and happiness in Kant’s practical philosophy. The centrality of these concepts has always been acknowledged, but Guyer proposes a different way to understand their interconnections. Kant extols respect for moral law and conformity to moral principle for its own sake while at the same time celebrating the value of human freedom and (...)
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  31. Kelly Rogers (1994). Aristotle on Loving Another for His Own Sake. Phronesis 39 (3):291 - 302.score: 86.4
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  32. Gurpreet Rattan (2008). On the Value and Nature of Truth. Journal of Philosophical Research 33:235-251.score: 86.4
    The thought that truth is valuable for its own sake is obvious, yet difficult to explicate in a precise and vindicating way. The paper tries to explicate and vindicate this thought with an argument for the conclusion that truth is an epistemic value. Truth is an epistemic value in the sense that a commitment to the value of truth plays a role in the justification and explanation of a fundamental aspect of our epistemic practice, namely, critical (...)
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  33. Simon P. James (2003). Zen Buddhism and the Intrinsic Value of Nature. Contemporary Buddhism 4 (2):143-157.score: 86.4
    It is a perennial theme in the literature on environmental ethics that the exploitation of the environment is the result of a blindness to (or perhaps a refusal to recognize) the intrinsic value of natural beings. The general story here is that Western traditions of thought have tended to accord natural beings value only to the extent that they prove useful to humans, that they have tended to see nature as only instrumentally valuable. By contrast, it is said (...)
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  34. Michael J. Zimmerman (2001). The Nature of Intrinsic Value. Rowman and Littlefield.score: 86.4
    At the heart of ethics reside the concepts of good and bad; they are at work when we assess whether a person is virtuous or vicious, an act right or wrong, a decision defensible or indefensible, a goal desirable or undesirable. But there are many varieties of goodness and badness. At their core lie intrinsic goodness and badness, the sort of value that something has for its own sake. It is in virtue of intrinsic value that other (...)
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  35. Gary Borjesson (1999). Not for Their Own Sake: Species and the Riddle of Individuality. Review of Metaphysics 52 (4):867 - 896.score: 86.4
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  36. Gary Borjesson (2011). Not for Their Own Sake. Review of Metaphysics 52 (4):867-896.score: 86.4
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  37. Ben Almassi (2013). A Defense of Ignorance: Its Value for Knowers and Roles in Feminist and Social Epistemologies. By Cynthia Townley. Lanham, Md.: Lexington Books, 2011. [REVIEW] Hypatia 28 (1):215-217.score: 84.6
  38. S. C. Clark (1995). Piaget's Theory and its Value for Teachers. Educational Philosophy and Theory 27 (2):64–88.score: 84.6
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  39. Berkeley an Abstraction & Daniel E. Flage (1986). Marx, Justice, and the Dialectic Method, PHILIP J. KAIN Allen Wood has Argued That for Marx the Concept of Justice Belonging to Any Society Grows Out of That Society's Mode of Production in Such a Way That Each Social Epoch Can Be Judged by its Own Standards Alone, and, in Wood's View, Capitalism is Perfectly Just, for Marx. Others, Like ZI Hu. New Scholasticism 60 (4).score: 84.6
  40. Sandra L. Borden (2010). As Lee Wilkins Argues in Her Article in This Collection, Journalism Seems to Come Into its Own During Natural Disasters. The Sheer Drama of Such Events Makes for Great Storytelling and Provides a National Showcase for the Talents of Local Reporters. This Was Illustrated Again in 2005 When the Great Flood Caused by Hurricane Katrina Overcame New Orleans and Chased Out the Staff of the Times-Picayune. At First, the Paper Was Unable to Issue a Print Edi-Tion and Instead Published on its Affiliated Nola ... [REVIEW] In Christopher Meyers (ed.), Journalism Ethics: A Philosophical Approach. Oxford University Press. 53.score: 84.6
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  41. Paul F. Camenisch (1976). Abortion: For the Fetus's Own Sake? Hastings Center Report 6 (2):38-41.score: 84.6
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  42. Acta Pauli et Theclae & Theological Rules (2009). Where an Endnote Simply Gives a Reference to What is Mentioned in the Text, the Entry Refers to the Page of the Text: Where an Endnote Introduces Fresh References or Material, its Own Page is Given. Medieval Authors Are Listed Under Their Christian Names (Eg Thomas Aquinas), Though Not Where They Are Usually Known by Surnames (for Instance, Chaucer). In John Marenbon (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Boethius. Cambridge University Press. 343.score: 84.6
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  43. Harold Lockley (1993/2007). Dietrich Bonhoeffer: The Ethics and its Value for Christian Ethics Today. Davenant Press.score: 84.6
     
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  44. J. Perner (1996). Simulation as Explication of Prediction-Implicit Knowledge: Re-Assessing Its Value for Explaining the Development of Mental State Attributions. In Peter Carruthers & Peter K. Smith (eds.), Theories of Theories of Mind. Cambridge University Press.score: 84.6
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  45. Ronen Reichman (2010). 7 The Tosefta and its Value for Historical Research: Questioning the Historical Reliability of Case Stories. Proceedings of the British Academy 165:117.score: 84.6
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  46. Jeffrey Spike (2000). Controlled NHBD Protocol for a Fully Conscious Person: When Death is Intended as an End in Itself and It has its Own End. Journal of Clinical Ethics 11 (1):73.score: 84.6
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  47. Cynthia Townley (2011). A Defense of Ignorance: Its Value for Knowers and Roles in Feminist and Social Epistemologies. Lexington Books.score: 84.6
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  48. A. Staley Groves (2013). What Are Experts For? Continent 2 (4):254-259.score: 84.4
    In this issue we include contributions from the individuals presiding at the panel All in a Jurnal's Work: A BABEL Wayzgoose, convened at the second Biennial Meeting of the BABEL Working Group. Sadly, the contributions of Daniel Remein, chief rogue at the Organism for Poetic Research as well as editor at Whiskey & Fox , were not able to appear in this version of the proceedings. From the program : 2ND BIENNUAL MEETING OF THE BABEL WORKING GROUP CONFERENCE “CRUISING IN (...)
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  49. Clinton Free, Vaughan S. Radcliffe & Brent White (2013). Crisis, Committees and Consultants: The Rise of Value-For-Money Auditing in the Federal Public Sector in Canada. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):441-459.score: 84.2
    This paper investigates the key drivers behind the origins of value-for-money (VFM) audit in Canada and the aims, intents, and logics ascribed by the original proponents. Drawing on insights from governmentality and New Public Management, the paper utilizes analysis methods adapted from case study research to review a wide range of primary documentation (e.g., Hansards from the Public Accounts Committee, House of Commons debates, the so-called Wilson report and the FMCS study) and secondary documentation (newspaper articles, Office of the (...)
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