Search results for 'value of knowledge' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Patrick Hawley (2007). Skepticism and the Value of Knowledge. In Chienkuo Mi Ruey-lin Chen (ed.), Naturalized Epistemology and Philosophy of Science.score: 540.0
    The main claim of this essay is that knowledge is no more
    valuable than lasting true belief.
    This claim is surprising. Doesn't knowledge have a unique
    and special value? If the main claim is correct and if, as it seems,
    knowledge is not lasting true belief, then knowledge does not have a unique value:
    in whatever way knowledge is valuable, lasting true belief is just as valuable.
    However, this result does not show that knowledge is worthless, nor (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Klemens Kappel (2010). Expressivism About Knowledge and the Value of Knowledge. Acta Analytica 25 (2):175-194.score: 540.0
    The aim of the paper is to state a version of epistemic expressivism regarding knowledge, and to suggest how this expressivism about knowledge explains the value of knowledge. The paper considers how an account of the value of knowledge based on expressivism about knowledge responds to the Meno Problem, the Swamping Problem, and a variety of other questions that pertains to the value of knowledge, and the role of knowledge in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Jonathan L. Kvanvig (2003). The Value of Knowledge and the Pursuit of Understanding. Cambridge University Press.score: 462.0
    Epistemology has for a long time focused on the concept of knowledge and tried to answer questions such as whether knowledge is possible and how much of it there is. Missing from this inquiry, however, is a discussion on the value of knowledge. In The Pursuit of Knowledge and the Value of Understanding Jonathan Kvanvig argues that epistemology properly conceived cannot ignore the question of the value of knowledge. He also questions one (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Simon M. Huttegger (2013). Learning Experiences and the Value of Knowledge. Philosophical Studies:1-10.score: 459.0
    Generalized probabilistic learning takes place in a black-box where present probabilities lead to future probabilities by way of a hidden learning process. The idea that generalized learning can be partially characterized by saying that it doesn’t foreseeably lead to harmful decisions is explored. It is shown that a martingale principle follows for finite probability spaces.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Duncan Pritchard (2010). The Nature and Value of Knowledge: Three Investigations. Oxford University Press.score: 432.0
    The value problem -- Unpacking the value problem -- The swamping problem -- fundamental and non-fundamental epistemic goods -- The relevance of epistemic value monism -- Responding to the swamping problem I : the practical response -- Responding to the swamping problem II : the monistic response -- Responding to the swamping problem III : the pluralist response -- Robust virtue epistemology -- Knowledge and achievement -- Interlude : is robust virtue epistemology a reductive theory of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Wayne Davis & Christoph Jäger (2012). Reliabilism and the Extra Value of Knowledge. Philosophical Studies 157 (1):93-105.score: 432.0
    Goldman and Olsson ( 2009 ) have responded to the common charge that reliabilist theories of knowledge are incapable of accounting for the value knowledge has beyond mere true belief. We examine their “conditional probability solution” in detail, and show that it does not succeed. The conditional probability relation is too weak to support instrumental value, and the specific relation they describe is inessential to the value of knowledge. At best, they have described conditions (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Michael Hannon (2014). Fallibilism and the Value of Knowledge. Synthese 191 (6):1119-1146.score: 429.0
    This paper defends the epistemological doctrine of fallibilism from recent objections. In “The Myth of Knowledge” Laurence BonJour argues that we should reject fallibilism for two main reasons: first, there is no adequate way to specify what level of justification is required for fallible knowledge; second, we cannot explain why any level of justification that is less than fully conclusive should have the significance that makes knowledge valuable. I will reply to these challenges in a way that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Sherrilyn Roush (2010). The Value of Knowledge and the Pursuit of Survival. Metaphilosophy 41 (3):255-278.score: 429.0
    Abstract: Knowledge requires more than mere true belief, and we also tend to think it is more valuable. I explain the added value that knowledge contributes if its extra ingredient beyond true belief is tracking . I show that the tracking conditions are the unique conditions on knowledge that achieve for those who fulfill them a strict Nash Equilibrium and an Evolutionarily Stable Strategy in what I call the True Belief Game. The added value of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. J. Adam Carter, Benjamin Jarvis & Katherine Rubin (2013). Knowledge and the Value of Cognitive Ability. Synthese 190 (17):3715-3729.score: 423.0
    We challenge a line of thinking at the fore of recent work on epistemic value: the line (suggested by Kvanvig in The value of knowledge and the pursuit of understanding, 2003 and others) that if the value of knowledge is “swamped” by the value of mere true belief, then we have good reason to doubt its theoretical importance in epistemology. We offer a value-driven argument for the theoretical importance of knowledge—one that stands (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Peter P. Kirschenmann (2001). “Intrinsically” or Just “Instrumentally” Valuable? On Structural Types of Values of Scientific Knowledge. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 32 (2):237-256.score: 421.0
    Debates about scientific (though rarely about otherforms of) knowledge, research policies or academic trainingoften involve a controversy about whether scientificknowledge possesses just “instrumental” value or also “intrinsic” value. Questioning this common simpleopposition, I scrutinize the issues involved in terms of agreater variety of structural types of values attributableto (scientific) knowledge. (Intermittently, I address thepuzzling habit of attributing “intrinsic” value to quitedifferent things, e.g. also to nature, in environmentalethics.) After some remarks on relevant broader philosophicaldebates about (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Sheryle Drewe (2001). The Value of Knowledge/Rationality or the Knowledge/Rationality of Value?: Implications for Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (3):235-244.score: 393.0
    This paper reviews and augments important work in philosophy of education on intrinsic aims for education, of knowledge, of knowledge of values, and of rationality. A contemporary conception of knowledge as ``rationality's `data-base''' is proposed and an in-depth section on the intrinsic value of rationality is incorporated.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Danielle M. Wenner (2013). The Social Value of Knowledge and International Clinical Research. Developing World Bioethics 14 (2).score: 378.0
    In light of the growth in the conduct of international clinical research in developing populations, this paper seeks to explore what is owed to developing world communities who host international clinical research. Although existing paradigms for assigning and assessing benefits to host communities offer valuable insight, I criticize their failure to distinguish between those benefits which can justify the conduct of research in a developing world setting and those which cannot. I argue that the justification for human subjects research is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Berit Brogaard (2006). Can Virtue Reliabilism Explain the Value of Knowledge? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (3):335-354.score: 369.0
    Virtue reliabilism appears to have a major advantage over generic reliabilism: only the former has the resources to explain the intuition that knowledge is more valuable than mere true belief. I argue that this appearance is illusory. It is sustained only by the misguided assumption that a principled distinction can be drawn between those belief-forming methods that are grounded in the agent’s intellectual virtues, and those that are not. A further problem for virtue reliabilism is that of explaining why (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Jonathan Kvanvig (2009). ``Precìs of T He Value of Knowledge and the Pursuit of Understanding &Quot. In Pritchard, Haddock & MIllar (eds.), Epistemic Value. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 309-313.score: 369.0
    Reflection on the issues surrounding the value of knowledge and other cognitive states of interest to epistemologists can be traced to the conversation between Socrates and Meno in Plato’s dialogue named after the latter. The context of discussion concerns the hiring of a guide to get one to Larissa, and the proposal on the table is that one would want a guide who knows the way. Socrates sees a problem, however, for it is not clear why a guide (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Alvin I. Goldman & Erik J. Olsson (2009). ``Reliabilism and the Value of Knowledge&Quot. In A. Haddock, A. Millar & D. H. Pritchard (eds.), Epistemic Value. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 19--41.score: 366.0
    It is a widely accepted doctrine in epistemology that knowledge has greater value than mere true belief. But although epistemologists regularly pay homage to this doctrine, evidence for it is shaky. Is it based on evidence that ordinary people on the street make evaluative comparisons of knowledge and true belief, and consistently rate the former ahead of the latter? Do they reveal such a preference by some sort of persistent choice behavior? Neither of these scenarios is observed. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Justin P. McBrayer (2007). Process Reliabilism, Virtue Reliabilism, and the Value of Knowledge. Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (2):289-302.score: 366.0
    The value problem for knowledge is the problem of explaining why knowledge is cognitively more valuable than mere true belief. If an account of the nature of knowledge is unable to solve the value problemfor knowledge, this provides a pro tanto reason to reject that account. Recent literature argues that process reliabilism is unable to solve the value problem because it succumbs to an objection known as theswamping objection. Virtue reliabilism (i.e., agent reliabilism), (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Francis Warren Rempel (1965). The Role of Value in Karl Mannheim's Sociology of Knowledge. The Hague, Mouton.score: 363.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Christian Piller (2009). Reliabilist Responses to the Value of Knowledge Problem. Grazer Philosophische Studien 79 (1):121-135.score: 360.0
    After sketching my own solution to the Value of Knowledge Problem, which argues for a deontological understanding of justification and understands the value of knowing interesting propositions by the value we place on believing as we ought to believe, I discuss Alvin Goldman's and Erik Olsson's recent attempts to explain the value of knowledge within the framework of their reliabilist epistemology.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. E. J. Coffman (2010). Misleading Dispositions and the Value of Knowledge. Journal of Philosophical Research 35:241-258.score: 360.0
    Gettiered beliefs are those whose agents are subject to the kind of epistemologically significant luck illustrated by Gettier Cases. Provided that knowledge requires ungettiered belief, we can learn something about knowledge by figuring out how luck blocks it in Gettier Cases. After criticizing the most promising of the going approaches to gettiered belief—the Risk of False Belief Approach—, I explain and defend a new approach: the Risk of Misleading Dispositions Approach.Roughly, this view says that a belief is gettiered (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jonathan Kvanvig, The Value of Knowledge and Truth.score: 360.0
    The questions concerning the value of knowledge and truth range from complete skepticism about such value to more discriminating concerns about the precise nature of the value in question and the comparative judgment that one of the two is more valuable than the other.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Jason Baehr (2012). Credit Theories and the Value of Knowledge. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (246):1-22.score: 357.0
    One alleged advantage of credit theories of knowledge is that they are capable of explaining why knowledge is essentially more valuable than mere true belief. I argue that credit theories in fact provide grounds for denying this claim and therefore are incapable of overcoming the ‘value problem’ in epistemology. Much of the discussion revolves around the question of whether true belief is always epistemically valuable. I also consider to what extent, if any, my main argument should worry (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Jonathan L. Kvanvig (2011). Millar on the Value of Knowledge. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):83-99.score: 357.0
    Alan Millar's paper (2011) involves two parts, which I address in order, first taking up the issues concerning the goal of inquiry, and then the issues surrounding the appeal to reflective knowledge. I argue that the upshot of the considerations Millar raises count in favour of a more important role in value-driven epistemology for the notion of understanding and for the notion of epistemic justification, rather than for the notions of knowledge and reflective knowledge.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Paul Crowther (2003). Philosophy After Postmodernism: Civilized Values and the Scope of Knowledge. Routledge.score: 354.0
    This book formulates a new approach to philosophy which, instead of simply rejecting postmodern thought, tries to assimilate some of its main features. Paul Crowther identifies conceptual links between value, knowledge, personal identity and civilization, understood as a process of cumulative advance.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Jason Kawall (2010). Autonomy, Agency, and the Value of Enduring Beliefs. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (1):pp. 107-129.score: 351.0
    My central thesis is that philosophers considering questions of epistemic value ought to devote greater attention to the enduring nature of beliefs. I begin by arguing that a commonly drawn analogy between beliefs and actions is flawed in important respects, and that a better, more fruitful analogue for belief would be desire, or a similarly enduring state of an agent. With this in hand, I argue that treating beliefs as enduring, constitutive states of agents allows us to capture the (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. David Enoch, Levi Spectre & Talia Fisher (2012). Statistical Evidence, Sensitivity, and the Legal Value of Knowledge. Philosophy and Public Affairs 40 (3):197-224.score: 351.0
    The law views with suspicion statistical evidence, even evidence that is probabilistically on a par with direct, individual evidence that the law is in no way suspicious of. But it has proved remarkably hard to either justify this suspicion, or to debunk it. In this paper, we connect the discussion of statistical evidence to broader epistemological discussions of similar phenomena. We highlight Sensitivity – the requirement that a belief be counterfactually sensitive to the truth in a specific way – as (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Anne Meylan (2013). The Value Problem of Knowledge. Res Philosophica 90 (2):261-275.score: 348.0
    The value problem of knowledge is one of the prominent problems that philosophical accounts of knowledge are expected to solve. According to the creditsolution, a well-known solution to this problem, knowledge is more valuable than mere true belief because the former is creditable to a subject’s cognitive competence. But what is “credit value”? How does it connect to the already existing distinctions between values? The purpose of the present paper is to answer these questions. Its (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Everett W. Hall (1961). Our Knowledge of Fact and Value. Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina Press.score: 345.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. M. A. B. Degenhardt (1982). Education and the Value of Knowledge. G. Allen & Unwin.score: 342.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Marin Aiftincă (2008). The Part of Feeling Into Knowledge of Value. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 49:5-18.score: 339.0
    Starting again of thesis that the value appear to us like value in self, transcendental, and value for somebody, this paper enlarging upon idea that the value is object of knowledge but different of any others objects of the reality. The knowledge of value involve a emotional constituent and other rational constituent. Advancing the judgement of value, the feeling of value is essential for detection and to converted the being of (...) into reality of life and culture. This part of value feeling do not put in danger the unity and eternity of value and it is very important for the knowledge and the intercultural communication in the world. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Robert E. Shiller (1966/1967). New Methods of Knowledge and Value. New York, Philosophical Library.score: 333.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Christian Piller (2009). Valuing Knowledge: A Deontological Approach. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (4):413 - 428.score: 324.0
    The fact that we ought to prefer what is comparatively more likely to be good, I argue, does, contrary to consequentialism, not rest on any evaluative facts. It is, in this sense, a deontological requirement. As such it is the basis of our valuing those things which are in accordance with it. We value acting (and believing) well, i.e. we value acting (and believing) as we ought to act (and to believe). In this way, despite the fact that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Alan Thomas (2006). Value and Context: The Nature of Moral and Political Knowledge. Oxford University Press.score: 324.0
    In Value and Context Alan Thomas articulates and defends the view that human beings do possess moral and political knowledge but it is historically and culturally contextual knowledge in ways that, say, mathematical or chemical knowledge is not. In his exposition of "cognitive contextualism" in ethics and politics he makes wide-ranging use of contemporary work in epistemology, moral philosophy, and political theory.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jason Kawall (2007). Review of Alan Thomas, Value and Context: The Nature of Moral and Political Knowledge. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (9).score: 324.0
    This is, surprisingly enough, a review of Alan Thomas' "Value and Context: The Nature of Moral and Political Knowledge". A very nice book. More details in the review itself.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Christoph Kelp (forthcoming). Sosa on Knowledge, Assertion and Value. Erkenntnis:1-9.score: 324.0
    This paper takes issues with a couple of recent arguments due to Ernest Sosa according to which (i) knowledge is the norm of assertion and (ii) the thesis that knowledge is specially valuable is equivalent to the thesis that knowledge is the norm of assertion. It is argued that while both of these arguments fail, an argument that knowledge is the norm of belief and that the thesis that knowledge is specially valuable is equivalent to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Ralph Wedgwood (2012). The Nature and Value of Knowledge: Three Investigations, by Duncan Pritchard, Alan Millar, and Adrian Haddock. [REVIEW] Analysis 72 (1):187-189.score: 312.0
    This is a review of "The nature and value of knowlege: Three investigations", by Duncan Pritchard, Alan Millar, and Adrian Haddock (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2011).
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Julien Dutant (2012). The Value and Expected Value of Knowledge. Dialogue 51 (1):141-162.score: 306.0
    ABSTRACT: Menothe idea that knowing something is better than merely having a true belief about itswampings Thesis instead, as relying on a confusion between expected value and value proper. The proposed solution relies on an externalist view of rationality, which is presented.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Duncan Pritchard (2009). Anti-Skepticism and the Value of Knowledge. Iris 1 (2):419-428.score: 306.0
    It is argued that the debate regarding radical scepticism needs to be conducted in the light of a value-theoretic methodological constraint. It is further shown that such a methodological constraint raises some uncomfortable problems for the main anti-sceptical proposals in the literature.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Jonathan L. Kvanvig (2003). ``Scientific Naturalism and the Value of Knowledge&Quot. In Thomas F. Crisp (ed.), Knowledge and Reality: Essays in Honor of Alvin Plantinga. Dordrecht: Kluwer Publishing Co.. 193-214.score: 306.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Christoph Jäger (2011). Process Reliabilism and the Value Problem. Theoria 77 (3):201-213.score: 297.0
    Alvin Goldman and Erik Olsson have recently proposed a novel solution to the value problem in epistemology, i.e., to the question of how to account for the apparent surplus value of knowledge over mere true belief. Their “conditional probability solution” maintains that even simple process reliabilism can account for the added value of knowledge, since forming true beliefs in a reliable way raises the objective probability that the subject will have more true belief of a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Joachim Boldt (2013). Do We Have A Moral Obligation to Synthesize Organisms to Increase Biodiversity? On Kinship, Awe, and the Value of Life's Diversity. Bioethics 27 (8):411-418.score: 297.0
    Synthetic biology can be understood as expanding the abilities and aspirations of genetic engineering. Nonetheless, whereas genetic engineering has been subject to criticism due to its endangering biodiversity, synthetic biology may actually appear to prove advantageous for biodiversity. After all, one might claim, synthesizing novel forms of life increases the numbers of species present in nature and thus ought to be ethically recommended. Two perspectives on how to spell out the conception of intrinsic value of biodiversity are examined in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Piller (2012). Knowledge as Achievement -- Greco's Double Mistake. In C. Jaeger & W. Loeffler (ed.), Epistemology: Contexts, Values Disagreement.score: 291.0
    John Greco claims that knowledge is a kind of achievement. The value achievements have (as such) shows, according to Greco, why knowledge is better than mere true belief. I argue that, for a variety of reasons, it is not always good to know. Furthermore, it is wrong to think that achievements are always good – think of achieving what is bad. Greco is mistaken twice; this leaves the idea that knowledge is a kind of achievement intact.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Keith Hossack (2007). The Metaphysics of Knowledge. Oxford University Press.score: 285.0
    The Metaphysics of Knowledge presents the thesis that knowledge is an absolutely fundamental relation, with an indispensable role to play in metaphysics, philosophical logic, and philosophy of mind and language. Knowledge has been generally assumed to be a propositional attitude like belief. But Keith Hossack argues that knowledge is not a relation to a content; rather, it a relation to a fact. This point of view allows us to explain many of the concepts of philosophical logic (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Miranda Fricker (2009). The Value of Knowledge and The Test of Time. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84 (64):121-.score: 279.0
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. F. P. Ramsey (1990). Weight or the Value of Knowledge. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 41 (1):1-4.score: 279.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Duncan Pritchard (2009). The Value of Knowledge. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 16 (1):54-55.score: 279.0
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Brenda Almond (2010). The Value of Knowledge. In Richard Bailey (ed.), The Sage Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Sage Publication. 297.score: 279.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Jonathan L. Kvanvig (2009). Précis of the Value of Knowledge and the Pursuit of Understanding. In Pritchard, Haddock & MIllar (eds.), Epistemic Value. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 309--313.score: 279.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Brian Skyrms (1990). The Value of Knowledge. Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science 14:245-266.score: 279.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. David Carr (2009). Curriculum and the Value of Knowledge. In Harvey Siegel (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Oxford University Press. 281--299.score: 279.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000