Search results for 'value of life' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka, World Institute for Advanced Phenomenological Research and Learning & International Congress of Phenomenology/Philosophy and the Sciences Of Life (2002). The Creative Matrix of the Origins Dynamisms, Forces and the Shaping of Life. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  2.  47
    Hans-Jürgen Link (2013). Playing God and the Intrinsic Value of Life: Moral Problems for Synthetic Biology? Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):435-448.
    Most of the reports on synthetic biology include not only familiar topics like biosafety and biosecurity but also a chapter on ‘ethical concerns’; a variety of diffuse topics that are interrelated in some way or another. This article deals with these ‘ethical concerns’. In particular it addresses issues such as the intrinsic value of life and how to deal with ‘artificial life’, and the fear that synthetic biologists are tampering with nature or playing God. Its aim is (...)
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  3.  7
    Heiner Fangerau (2009). Genetics and the Value of Life: Historical Dimensions. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 1 (2):105-112.
    The value of life can be viewed from moral, biologic, and economic perspectives. In connection with the development of genetics, each of these perspectives has gained importance throughout history. Whereas agricultural genetics has always been directed towards having an economic impact, from the beginning genetics research in humans has focused on all dimensions of the value of life. Today, health insurance, employers, politicians, and public health scientists view genetics research as one of the key disciplines to (...)
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  4.  27
    Joachim Boldt (2013). Do We Have A Moral Obligation to Synthesize Organisms to Increase Biodiversity? On Kinship, Awe, and the Value of Life's Diversity. Bioethics 27 (8):411-418.
    Synthetic biology can be understood as expanding the abilities and aspirations of genetic engineering. Nonetheless, whereas genetic engineering has been subject to criticism due to its endangering biodiversity, synthetic biology may actually appear to prove advantageous for biodiversity. After all, one might claim, synthesizing novel forms of life increases the numbers of species present in nature and thus ought to be ethically recommended. Two perspectives on how to spell out the conception of intrinsic value of biodiversity are examined (...)
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  5.  54
    Christopher Cordner (2005). Life and Death Matters: Losing a Sense of the Value of Human Beings. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (3):207-226.
    The essay combines a specific and a more general theme. In attacking ‘the doctrine of the sanctity of human life’ Singer takes himself thereby to be opposing the conviction that human life has special value. I argue that this conviction goes deep in our lives in many ways that do not depend on what Singer identifies as central to that ‘doctrine’, and that his attack therefore misses its main target. I argue more generally that Singer’s own moral (...)
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  6.  66
    Joshua Glasgow (2013). The Shape of a Life and the Value of Loss and Gain. Philosophical Studies 162 (3):665-682.
    We ordinarily think that, keeping all else equal, a life that improves is better than one that declines. However, it has proven challenging to account for such value judgments: some, such as Fred Feldman and Daniel Kahneman, have simply denied that these judgments are rational, while others, such as Douglas Portmore, Michael Slote, and David Velleman, have proposed justifications for the judgments that appear to be incomplete or otherwise problematic. This article identifies problems with existing accounts and suggests (...)
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  7. Nicholas Maxwell (2009). How Can Life of Value Best Flourish in the Real World? In Leemon McHenry (ed.), Science and the Pursuit of Wisdom. Ontos Verlag
    The Urgent Need for an Intellectual Revolution For much of my working life (from 1972 onwards) I have argued, in and out of print, that we need to bring about a revolution in the aims and methods of science – and of academic inquiry more generally. Instead of giving priority to the search for knowledge, academia needs to devote itself to seeking and promoting wisdom by rational means, wisdom being the capacity to realize what is of value in (...)
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  8. Steven Horrobin (2006). Immortality, Human Nature, the Value of Life and the Value of Life Extension. Bioethics 20 (6):279–292.
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  9.  16
    Jeff Noonan (2013). The Life-Value of Death: Mortality, Finitude, and Meaningful Lives. Journal of Philosophy of Life 3 (1):1-23.
    In his seminal reflection on the badness of death, Nagel links it to the permanent loss “of whatever good there is in living.” I will argue, following McMurtry, that “whatever good there is in living” is defined by the life-value of resources, institutions, experiences, and activities. Enjoyed expressions of the human capacities to experience the world, to form relationships, and to act as creative agents are intrinsically life-valuable, the reason why anyone would desire to go on living (...)
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  10. John Harris (1985). The Value of Life. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    This book, like the practice of medicine itself, is about the value of life. Health care is one of the clearest and most visible expressions of a society's ...
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  11. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2011). Speaking of the Value of Life. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 21 (2):181-199.
    The notion of the value of life is often invoked in discussions regarding medical care for the sick and the dying. This theme has figured in arguments about medical ethics for decades, but many of the phrases associated with this concept have received little serious scrutiny. It is true that some philosophers have declared a few commonly used phrases such as “the sanctity of life,” “the infinite value of life,” and “the value of (...) itself” to be unclear at best or misguided at worst. Their hasty dismissal of these phrases, however, is not the end of the story. I generally agree with this philosophical judgment but for reasons very different from those typically given by others. Moreover, the reasons I wish to .. (shrink)
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  12. John Harris (1999). The Concept of the Person and the Value of Life. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 9 (4):293-308.
    : The concept of the person has come to be intimately connected with questions about the value of life. It is applied to those sorts of beings who have some special value or moral importance and where we need to prioritize the needs or claims of different sorts of individuals. "Person" is a concept designating individuals like us in some important respects, but possibly including individuals who are very unlike us in other respects. What are these respects (...)
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  13.  18
    Paul T. Menzel (2011). The Value of Life at the End of Life: A Critical Assessment of Hope and Other Factors. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 39 (2):215-223.
    Low opportunity cost, weak influence of quality of life in the face of death, the social value of life extension to others, shifting psychological reference points, and hope have been proposed as factors to explain why people apparently perceive marginal life extension at the end of life to have disproportionately greater value than its length. Such value may help to explain why medical spending to extend life at the end of life (...)
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  14.  4
    R. Huxtable (2013). 'In a Twilight World'? Judging the Value of Life for the Minimally Conscious Patient. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):565-569.
    The recent ruling from England on the case of M is one of very few worldwide to consider whether life-sustaining treatment, in the form of clinically assisted nutrition and hydration, should continue to be provided to a patient in a minimally conscious state. Formally concerned with the English law pertaining to precedent autonomy (specifically advance decision-making) and the best interests of the incapacitated patient, the judgment issued in M's case implicitly engages with three different accounts of the value (...)
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  15.  1
    Amien Kacou (2008). Why Even Mind?--On The A Priori Value Of “Life”. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 4 (1-2):307-327.
    This article presents an analysis of the matter of the “meaning” of life in terms of whether it should even be lived in the first place. It begins with an attempt at defining the question as an inquiry on the a priori value of attention in general, and develops into an axiological reflection distantly inspired from Martin Heidegger’s notion of “care.” The main objective of the article is to “answer” the question objectively by “playing along” with its naïve (...)
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  16. John Haldane & Patrick Lee (2003). Aquinas on Human Ensoulment, Abortion and the Value of Life. Philosophy 78 (2):255-278.
    Although there is a significant number of books and essays in which Aquinas's thought is examined in some detail, there are still many aspects of his writings that remain unknown to those outside the field of Thomistic studies; or which are generally misunderstood. An example is Aquinas's account of the origins of individual human life. This is the subject of a chapter in a recent book by Robert Pasnau on Thomas Aquinas on Human Nature (Cambridge: CUP, 2001). Since there (...)
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  17.  20
    Andreas Hasman & Lars Peter Østerdal (2004). Equal Value of Life and the Pareto Principle. Economics and Philosophy 20 (1):19-33.
    A principle claiming equal entitlement to continued life has been strongly defended in the literature as a fundamental social value. We refer to this principle as ‘equal value of life'. In this paper we argue that there is a general incompatibility between the equal value of life principle and the weak Pareto principle and provide proof of this under mild structural assumptions. Moreover we demonstrate that a weaker, age-dependent version of the equal value (...)
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  18.  4
    Dan Usher (1985). The Value of Life for Decision Making in the Public Sector. Social Philosophy and Policy 2 (2):168.
    The Ministry of Transport is planning for the construction of new roads in its territory. Many projects are being considered, and the Ministry needs to identify the worthwhile projects for which the benefits exceed the costs. Among costs and benefits are the expense of constructing the road, the time saved by motorists using the new road rather than some other road, the time saved through the reduction of congestion on other roads, and the expected increase or decrease in the number (...)
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  19. Nicholas Maxwell (2006). Learning to Live a Life of Value. In Jason A. Merchey (ed.), Living a Life of Value. Values of the Wise Press 383--395.
    Much of my working life has been devoted to trying to get across the point that we urgently need to bring about a revolution in the aims and methods of academic inquiry, so that the basic aim becomes to seek and promote wisdom rather than just acquire knowledge.
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  20.  2
    Josef Seifert (ed.) (1997). What is Life?: The Originality, Irreducibility, and Value of Life. Rodopi.
    This book makes four bold claims: 1) life is an ultimate datum, open to philosophical analysis and irreducible to physical reality; hence all materialist-reductionist explanations - most current theories - of life are false. 2) All life presupposes "soul" without which a being would at best fake life. 3) The concept of life is analogous and the most direct access to life in its irreducibility is gained through consciousness; 4) All life possesses an (...)
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  21.  2
    Mara Miller (2014). “A Matter of Life and Death”: Kawabata on the Value of Art After the Atomic Bombings. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (3):261-275.
    This article explores the possible interpretations—and the implications of those interpretations—of a comment about the importance of art made by Yasunari Kawabata (1899–1972), later the first Japanese Nobel laureate for literature: that “looking at old works of art is a matter of life and death.” (In 1949, Kawabata visited Hiroshima in his capacity as president of the Japan literary society P.E.N. to inspect the damage caused by the atomic bombing of Hiroshima that helped end World War II. On his (...)
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  22.  9
    Till Grüne-Yanoff (2009). Mismeasuring the Value of Statistical Life. Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (2):109-123.
    The value of a statistical life (VSL) is an important tool for cost?benefit analysis of regulatory policies that concern fatality risks. Its proponents claim that it measures people's risk preferences, and that VSL therefore is a tool of vicarious governance. This paper criticizes the revealed preference method for measuring VSL. It specifies three minimal conditions for vicarious governance: sensitivity, fairness and hypothetical compromise, and shows that the VSL measure, in its common application in policy formation and analysis, violates (...)
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  23.  18
    Dan R. Dalton & Richard A. Cosier (1991). An Issue in Corporate Social Responsibility: An Experiential Approach to Establish the Value of Human Life. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 10 (4):311 - 315.
    While the notion of establishing a value for human life may be uncomfortable for some, we argue that it is a fundamental requirement for many aspects of public policy. We compare a number of approaches which have been traditionally relied on to make estimations. Also, we provide an exercise which provides an unusual, but we hope provocative, perspective on the evaluation of human life.
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  24. John H. Bryant (1995). Poverty, Vulnerability, the Value of Human Life, and the Emergence of Bioethics. In Zbigniew Bańkowski & John H. Bryant (eds.), Poverty, Vulnerability, the Value of Human Life, and the Emergence of Bioethics: Highlights and Papers of the Xxviiith Cioms Conference, Ixtapa, Guerrero State, Mexico, 17-20 April 1994. Cioms 28--27.
     
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  25. Jeff Noonan, Ecological Economics and the Life-Value of Labour.
    To the extent that classical, neoclassical, and Marxist political economy have traditionally ignored the problem of economic scale and valorized economic growth, all three have much to learn from ecological economics. Its most important contribution is the argument that the human economy is a subsystem of the finite earth’s natural life-support system. Implied in this argument is a new metric of economic health, the life-value rather than the money-value of that which economies produce and distribute.
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  26.  1
    Irving Singer (2009). Meaning in Life: The Creation of Value. The MIT Press.
    With a new preface by the authorWhat is meaning in life? Does anything really matter? How can a life achieve lasting significance? How can we explain the human propensity to struggle for ideals? How is meaning related to contentment, happiness, joy? Is meaning something we discover, or do we create it? What is the nature of value, and what are its sources in human experience? Can there be a meaning in life without religious faith? What is (...)
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  27.  19
    J. Harris (1987). QALYfying the Value of Life. Journal of Medical Ethics 13 (3):117-123.
    This paper argues that the Quality Adjusted Life Year or QALY is fatally flawed as a way of priority setting in health care and of dealing with the problem of scarce resources. In addition to showing why this is so the paper sets out a view of the moral constraints that govern the allocation of health resources and suggests reasons for a new attitude to the health budget.
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  28.  35
    Dena S. Davis (2001). Is Life of Infinite Value? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (3):239-246.
    : It is possible and necessary to compare stretches of human life with other goods, such as the good of conserving resources for others. A minute of human life is not of infinite value; all else being equal, a minute of life is less valuable than 10 years of the same life. Nevertheless, this ability to evaluate human life does not necessarily lead to total commodification of human life.
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  29. Peter Singer (1980). Animals and the Value of Life. In Tom L. Beauchamp & Tom Regan (eds.), Matters of Life and Death. Temple University Press
     
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  30.  4
    John Broome (1993). Goodness is Reducible to Betterness the Evil of Death is the Value of Life. In Peter Koslowski Yuichi Shionoya (ed.), The Good and the Economical: Ethical Choices in Economics and Management. Springer-Verlag 70–84.
    Most properties have comparatives, which are relations. For instance, the property of width has the comparative relation denoted by `_ is wider than _'. Let us say a property is reducible to its comparative if any statement that refers to the property has the same meaning as another statement that refers to the comparative instead. Width is not reducible to its comparative. To be sure, many statements that refer to width are reducible: for instance, `The Mississippi is wide' means the (...)
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  31. Jeff Noonan, Use Value, Life Value, and the Future of Socialism.
    The paper argues that the future of socialism depends upon the category of use value being grounded in a wider and deeper conception of life value. Only as such can it serve as the regulating principle of a future democratic socialist society. Life value is anchored in an understanding of the human life's space-time continuum understood as a continuum of life requirements. The multiple life crises regularly generated by capitalism are crises of (...)
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  32.  10
    John Kekes (1994). Pluralism and the Value of Life. Social Philosophy and Policy 11 (1):44-60.
    As an initial approximation, pluralism may be understood as the combination of four theses. First, there are many incommensurable values whose realization is required for living a good life. Second, these values often conflict with each other, and, as a result, the realization of some excludes the realization of others. Third, there is no authoritative standard that could be appealed to to resolve such conflicts, because there is also a plurality of standards; consequently, no single standard would be always (...)
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  33.  9
    H. Ramsay (1998). Distinctive Moralities: The Value of Life and Our Duties to the Handicapped. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (4):507-517.
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  34.  32
    Heike Baranzke (2012). "Sanctity-of-Life"—A Bioethical Principle for a Right to Life? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):295 - 308.
    For about five decades the phrase "sanctity-of-life" has been part of the Anglo-American biomedical ethical discussion related to abortion and end-of-life questions. Nevertheless, the concept's origin and meaning are unclear. Much controversy is based on the mistaken assumption that the concept denotes the absolute value of human life and thus dictates a strict prohibition on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. In this paper, I offer an analysis of the religious and philosophical history of the idea of "sanctity-of- (...)." Drawing on biblical texts and interpretation as well as Kant's secularization of the concept, I argue that "sanctity" has been misunderstood as an ontological feature of biological human life, and instead locate the idea within the historical virtue-ethical tradition, which understands sanctification as a personal achievement through one's own actions. (shrink)
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  35. Stephen R. Kellert (1996). The Value of Life Biological Diversity and Human Society. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  36.  5
    Brian Domino (2012). Looking at the Meaning of Life Hydra-Scopically: Diderot and the Value of the Human. Philosophy and Literature 36 (2):363-377.
    In 1975 E. O. Wilson called for biologists to appropriate ethics.1 Few philosophers worried deeply about this potential usurpation because they felt firmly ensconced on the other side of the Humean wall from the biologists. Science can provide neither guidance nor values. Perhaps nowhere is this more clear than in the crowning question of ethics; namely, what is the meaning of life? Since evolution proposes an ateleological account of the natural world, biologists can dismiss the question to which we (...)
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  37.  43
    R. G. Frey (2005). Pain, Vivisection, and the Value of Life. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (4):202-204.
    Pain alone does not settle the issue of vivisectionIn his paper, Lab animals and the art of empathy, David Thomas presents his case against animal experimentation. That case is a rather unusual one in certain respects. It turns upon the fact that, for Thomas, nothing can be proved or established in ethics, with the result that what we are left to operate with, apart from assumptions about cases that we might choose to make, are people’s feelings. We cannot show or (...)
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  38.  73
    Songsuk Susan Hahn (2007). Contradiction in Motion: Hegel's Organic Concept of Life and Value. Cornell University Press.
    In this analysis of one of the most difficult and neglected topics in Hegelian studies, Songsuk Susan Hahn tackles the status of contradiction in Hegel's ...
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  39. Rudolf Eucken (1913). The Meaning and Value of Life. Black.
     
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  40.  4
    John Harris (1990). The Value of Life: An Introduction to Medical Ethics. Routledge.
    First published in 1985. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  41. Jeff McMahan (1988). Death and the Value of Life. Ethics 99 (1):32-61.
    Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available at http://www.jstor.org/about/terms.html. JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use provides, in part, that unless you have obtained prior permission, you may not download an entire issue of a journal or multiple copies of articles, and you may use content in the JSTOR archive only for your personal, non-commercial use.
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  42. A. G. M. Campbell (1979). Infanticide and the Value of Life. Journal of Medical Ethics 5 (3):150-150.
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  43. Kieran Setiya (2014). Love and the Value of a Life. Philosophical Review 123 (3):251-280.
    Argues that there is no one it is irrational to love, that it is rational to act with partiality to those we love, and that the rationality of doing so is not conditional on love. It follows that Anscombe and Taurek are right: you are not required to save three instead of one, even when those you could save are perfect strangers.
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  44. John Harris & Sarah Chan (2005). The Value of Life: An Introduction to Medical Ethics. Routledge.
    First published in 2011. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  45.  8
    Glenn C. Blomquist (2001). Value of Life, Economics Of. In N. J. Smelser & B. Baltes (eds.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. 16132--16139.
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  46. Paul Edwards (1997). Meaning and Value of Life. In Thomas L. Carson & Paul K. Moser (eds.), Morality and the Good Life. OUP Usa
     
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  47.  6
    A. Williams (1987). Brief Response: QALYfying the Value of Life. Journal of Medical Ethics 13 (3):123-123.
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  48.  6
    Theo van Willigenburg (2001). An Internalist View on the Value of Life and Some Tricky Cases Relevant to It. Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (1):25–35.
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  49.  5
    Mohammad Ali Shomali (2004). Value of Life in Islam. In Mehdi Faridzadeh (ed.), Philosophies of Peace and Just War in Greek Philosophy and Religions of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Global Scholarly Publications
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  50.  5
    C. Farsides (1991). Medical Ethics and the Value of Life. Journal of Medical Ethics 17 (2):111-111.
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