Search results for 'vicious' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Christina Conroy (2008). No Lacuna and No Vicious Regress: A Reply to le Poidevin. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 23 (4):367-372.score: 18.0
    In his “Space, supervenience and substantivalism”, Le Poidevin proposes a substantivalism in which space is discrete, implying that there are unmediated spatial relations between neighboring primitive points. This proposition is motivated by his concern that relationism suffers from an explanatory lacuna and that substantivalism gives rise to a vicious regress. Le Poidevin implicitly requires that the relationist be committed to the “only x and y ” principle regarding spatial relations. It is not obvious that the relationist is committed to (...)
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  2. Jaakko Hintikka (2012). If Logic, Definitions and the Vicious Circle Principle. Journal of Philosophical Logic 41 (2):505-517.score: 18.0
    In a definition (∀ x )(( x є r )↔D[ x ]) of the set r, the definiens D[ x ] must not depend on the definiendum r . This implies that all quantifiers in D[ x ] are independent of r and of (∀ x ). This cannot be implemented in the traditional first-order logic, but can be expressed in IF logic. Violations of such independence requirements are what created the typical paradoxes of set theory. Poincaré’s Vicious Circle (...)
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  3. Philip Kremer (2010). How Truth Behaves When There's No Vicious Reference. Journal of Philosophical Logic 39 (4):344 - 367.score: 18.0
    In The Revision Theory of Truth (MIT Press), Gupta and Belnap (1993) claim as an advantage of their approach to truth "its consequence that truth behaves like an ordinary classical concept under certain conditions—conditions that can roughly be characterized as those in which there is no vicious reference in the language." To clarify this remark, they define Thomason models, nonpathological models in which truth behaves like a classical concept, and investigate conditions under which a model is Thomason: they argue (...)
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  4. Stefan Wintein (2014). Alternative Ways for Truth to Behave When There's No Vicious Reference. Journal of Philosophical Logic 43 (4):665-690.score: 18.0
    In a recent paper, Philip Kremer proposes a formal and theory-relative desideratum for theories of truth that is spelled out in terms of the notion of ‘no vicious reference’. Kremer’s Modified Gupta-Belnap Desideratum (MGBD) reads as follows: if theory of truth T dictates that there is no vicious reference in ground model M, then T should dictate that truth behaves like a classical concept in M. In this paper, we suggest an alternative desideratum (AD): if theory of truth (...)
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  5. Philip Hugly & Charles Sayward (1979). A Semantical Account of the Vicious Circle Principle. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 20 (3):595-598.score: 15.0
    Here we give a semantical account of propositional quantification that is intended to formally represent Russell’s view that one cannot express a proposition about "all" propositions. According to the account the authors give, Russell’s view bears an interesting relation to the view that there are no sets which are members of themselves.
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  6. Spencer Anderson (2000). William James and "Vicious Intellectualism" in Psychology. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 20 (1):61-75.score: 15.0
  7. Charles S. Chihara (1973). Ontology and the Vicious-Circle Principle. Ithaca [N.Y.]Cornell University Press.score: 15.0
  8. Ricki Leigh Bliss (2013). Viciousness and the Structure of Reality. Philosophical Studies 166 (2):399-418.score: 12.0
    Given the centrality of arguments from vicious infinite regress to our philosophical reasoning, it is little wonder that they should also appear on the catalogue of arguments offered in defense of theses that pertain to the fundamental structure of reality. In particular, the metaphysical foundationalist will argue that, on pain of vicious infinite regress, there must be something fundamental. But why think that infinite regresses of grounds are vicious? I explore existing proposed accounts of viciousness cast in (...)
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  9. Ricki Bliss (2014). Viciousness and Circles of Ground. Metaphilosophy 45 (2):245-256.score: 12.0
    Metaphysicians of a certain stripe are almost unanimously of the view that grounding is necessarily irreflexive, asymmetric, transitive, and well-founded. They deny the possibility of circles of ground and, therewith, the possibility of species of metaphysical coherentism. But what's so bad about circles of ground? One problem for coherentism might be that it ushers in anti-foundationalism: grounding loops give rise to infinite regresses. And this is bad because infinite grounding regresses are vicious. This article argues that circles of ground (...)
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  10. Megan Wallace, The Weak-Willed Vs. The Vicious.score: 12.0
    Abstract: Virtue Ethicists typically hold that the weak-willed person is less morally culpable than the vicious person. However, I have reasons to think that this intuition is incorrect. What’s more, I think that insofar as there is an asymmetry in the moral culpability between the weak-willed and the vicious, the asymmetry works the opposite way. Moreover, I think that Virtue Ethicists should think this, too. In the following paper, I will first discuss the plausibility of the vicious (...)
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  11. Philippe Rouilhan (1992). Russell and the Vicious Circle Principle. Philosophical Studies 65 (1-2):169 - 182.score: 12.0
    The standard version of the story of Russell's theory of types gives legitimately precedence to the vicious circle principle, but it fails to appreciate the significance of the doctrine of incomplete symbols and of the ultimate universalist perspective of Russell's logic. It is what the Author tries to do. This enables him to resolve the apparent contradiction which exists in "Principles" between the ontological commitment of the theory itself with respect to individuals, propositions, and functions, and the inventory of (...)
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  12. Varol Akman (1997). Review of J. Barwise and L. Moss, Vicious Circles: On the Mathematics of Non-Wellfounded Phnenomena. [REVIEW] Journal of Logic, Language and Information 6 (4):460-464.score: 12.0
    This is a review of Vicious Circles: On the Mathematics of Non-Wellfounded Phenomena, by Jon <span class='Hi'>Barwise</span> and Lawrence Moss, published by CSLI (Center for the Study of Language and Information) Publications in 1996.
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  13. Darryl Jung (1999). Russell, Presupposition, and the Vicious-Circle Principle. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 40 (1):55-80.score: 12.0
    Prompted by Poincaré, Russell put forward his celebrated vicious-circle principle (vcp) as the solution to the modern paradoxes. Ramsey, Gödel, and Quine, among others, have raised two salient objections against Russell's vcp. First, Gödel has claimed that Russell's various renderings of the vcp really express distinct principles and thus, distinct solutions to the paradoxes, a claim that gainsays one of Russell's positions on the nature of the solution to the paradoxes, namely, that such a solution be uniform. Secondly, Ramsey, (...)
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  14. Peter L. Samuelson & Ian M. Church (forthcoming). When Cognition Turns Vicious: Heuristics and Biases in Light of Virtue Epistemology. Philosophical Psychology.score: 12.0
    In this paper, we explore the literature on cognitive heuristics and biases in light of virtue epistemology, specifically highlighting the two major positions—agent-reliabilism and agent-responsibilism (or neo-Aristotelianism)—as they apply to dual systems theories of cognition and the role of motivation in biases. We investigate under which conditions heuristics and biases might be characterized as vicious and conclude that a certain kind of intellectual arrogance can be attributed to an inappropriate reliance on Type 1, or the improper function of Type (...)
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  15. S. Weber (2011). Does Schmidt's Process-Orientated Philosophy Contain a Vicious Infinite Regress Argument? Constructivist Foundations 7 (1):34-35.score: 12.0
    Open peer commentary on the target article “From Objects to Processes: A Proposal to Rewrite Radical Constructivism” by Siegfried J. Schmidt. Upshot: This commentary asks if Schmidt’s latest process-orientated philosophy is based on a vicious infinite regress argument. The commentator uses recent literature on the distinction of vicious and benign infinite regresses (from Claude Gratton and Nicholas Rescher) and tries to show that – taken verbatim – there is a serious logical problem in Schmidt’s argumentation.
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  16. Charles M. Ess (2010). Trust and New Communication Technologies: Vicious Circles, Virtuous Circles, Possible Futures. [REVIEW] Knowledge, Technology and Policy 23 (3-4):287-305.score: 12.0
    I approach the philosophical analyses of the phenomenon of trust vis-à-vis online communication beginning with an overview from within the framework of computer-mediated communication (CMC) of concerns and paradigmatic failures of trust in the history of online communication. I turn to the more directly philosophical analyses of trust online by first offering an introductory taxonomy of diverse accounts of trust that have emerged over the past decade or so. In the face of important objections to the possibility of establishing and (...)
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  17. Adam Martin (2011). Rational Choice Without Closure: The Microfoundations of Virtuous Cycles and Vicious Circles. Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (4):345-361.score: 12.0
    Economic stories with a rational choice structure usually entail closure or equilibrium. This paper argues that Knightian uncertainty and Kirznerian alertness allow economists to construct plausible accounts of open-ended processes such as virtuous cycles and vicious circles without abandoning the centrality of instrumental rationality. The basic form of such stories is explored and two example cases are put forward.
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  18. Gregor Betz (2005). The Vicious Circle Theorem – a Graph-Theoretical Analysis of Dialectical Structures. Argumentation 19 (1):53-64.score: 12.0
    This article sets up a graph-theoretical framework for argumentation-analysis (dialectical analysis) which expands classical argument-analysis. Within this framework, a main theorem on the existence of inconsistencies in debates is stated and proved: the vicious circle theorem. Subsequently, two corollaries which generalize the main theorem are derived. Finally, a brief outlook is given on further expansions and possible applications of the developed framework.
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  19. Michael Galanis (2011). Vicious Spirals in Corporate Governance: Mandatory Rules for Systemic (Re)Balancing? Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 31 (2):327-363.score: 12.0
    Until recently, as market forces gradually prevailed over government intervention, the contractarian view had emerged as a preferred method of economic governance due to its attractiveness for business. Following the recent collapse of financial markets and the resulting recession, however, this structural form is now being called into question as the calls for more regulation and government intervention increase. In this context, this article revisits the law versus contract debate in the field of corporate law and governance. Following a theoretical (...)
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  20. Peter Brian Barry (2010). Extremity of Vice and the Character of Evil. Journal of Philosophical Research 35:25-42.score: 9.0
    It is plausible that being an evil person is a matter of having a particularly morally depraved character. I argue that suffering from extreme moral vices—and not consistently lacking moral vices, for example—suffices for being evil. Alternatively, I defend an extremity account concerning evil personhood against consistency accounts of evil personhood. After clarifying what it is for vices to be extreme, I note that the extremity thesis I defend allows that a person could suffer from both extremely vicious character (...)
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  21. Bas C. van Fraassen, From Vicious Circle to Infinite Regress, and Back Again.score: 9.0
    The demise of foundationalism in epistemology was complete by the time of the Second World War: knowledge and rational opinion do not rest on absolutely secure, self-authenticating foundations, neither in experience nor elsewhere. This realization came to philosophers in large measure at the hands of that same detested logical positivism so often been depicted as foundationalism's last gasp. (Cf. Reichenbach (1938), Ch. 3; in a larger historical perspective, the demise may possibly be dated much earlier.) I will not argue for (...)
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  22. Peter Klein (2003). When Infinite Regresses Are Not Vicious. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (3):718–729.score: 9.0
  23. Michael Jacovides (2010). Hume's Vicious Regress. Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 5:247-97.score: 9.0
  24. Romane Clark (1988). Vicious Infinite Regress Arguments. Philosophical Perspectives 2:369-380.score: 9.0
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  25. Candace A. Vogler (2002). Reasonably Vicious. Harvard University Press.score: 9.0
    Is unethical conduct necessarily irrational? Answering this question requires giving an account of practical reason, of practical good, and of the source or point of wrongdoing. By the time most contemporary philosophers have done the first two, they have lost sight of the third, chalking up bad action to rashness, weakness of will, or ignorance. In this book, Candace Vogler does all three, taking as her guides scholars who contemplated why some people perform evil deeds. In doing so, she sets (...)
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  26. Duncan Richter (1998). Is Abortion Vicious? Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (3):381-392.score: 9.0
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  27. Julia Driver (2004). Candace Vogler, Reasonably Vicious:Reasonably Vicious. Ethics 114 (4):845-848.score: 9.0
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  28. Elijah Millgram (2006). Review of Reasonably Vicious, by Candace Vogler. [REVIEW] European Journal of Philosophy 14 (3):430–434.score: 9.0
  29. Lauren Olin & John M. Doris (2014). Vicious Minds. Philosophical Studies 168 (3):665-692.score: 9.0
    While there is now considerable anxiety about whether the psychological theory presupposed by virtue ethics is empirically sustainable, analogous issues have received little attention in the virtue epistemology literature. This paper argues that virtue epistemology encounters challenges reminiscent of those recently encountered by virtue ethics: just as seemingly trivial variation in context provokes unsettling variation in patterns of moral behavior, trivial variation in context elicits unsettling variation in patterns of cognitive functioning. Insofar as reliability is a condition on epistemic virtue, (...)
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  30. Philip Kremer, Does Truth Behave Like a Classical Concept When There is No Vicious Reference?score: 9.0
    §1. Introduction. When truth-theoretic paradoxes are generated, two factors seem to be at play: the behaviour that truth intuitively has; and the facts about which singular terms refer to which sentences, and so on. For example, paradoxicality might be partially attributed to the contingent fact that the singular term, "the italicized sentence on page one", refers to the sentence, The italicized sentence on page one is not true. Factors of this second kind might be represented by a ground model: an (...)
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  31. Bas C. Van Fraassen (1992). From Vicious Circle to Infinite Regress, and Back Again. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:6 - 29.score: 9.0
    The attempt to formulate a viable empiricist and non-foundationalist epistemology of science faces four problems here confronted. The first is an apparent loss of objectivity in science, in the conditions of use of models in applied science. The second derives from the theory-infection of scientific language, with an apparent loss of objective conditions of truth and reference. The third, often cited as objection to The Scientific Image, is the apparent theory-dependence of the distinction between what is and is not observable. (...)
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  32. K. Jaakko J. Hintikka (1957). Vicious Circle Principle and the Paradoxes. Journal of Symbolic Logic 22 (3):245-249.score: 9.0
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  33. D. F. M. Strauss (2010). The Significance of a Non-Reductionist Ontology for the Discipline of Mathematics: A Historical and Systematic Analysis. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 20 (1):19-52.score: 9.0
    A Christian approach to scholarship, directed by the central biblical motive of creation, fall and redemption and guided by the theoretical idea that God subjected all of creation to His Law-Word, delimiting and determining the cohering diversity we experience within reality, in principle safe-guards those in the grip of this ultimate commitment and theoretical orientation from absolutizing or deifying anything within creation. In this article my over-all approach is focused on the one-sided legacy of mathematics, starting with Pythagorean arithmeticism (“everything (...)
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  34. Peter Hylton (1992). The Vicious Circle Principle: Comments on Philippe de Rouilhan. Philosophical Studies 65 (1-2):183 - 191.score: 9.0
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  35. Pavel Tichý (1971). On the Vicious Circle in Definitions. Studia Logica 28 (1):19 - 40.score: 9.0
  36. Arthur Pap (1954). The Linguistic Hierarchy and the Vicious-Circle Principle. Philosophical Studies 5 (4):49 - 53.score: 9.0
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  37. Zac Cogley (2014). A Study of Virtuous and Vicious Anger. In Kevin Timpe & Craig Boyd (eds.), Virtues and Their Vices. Oxford University Press. 199.score: 9.0
    This chapter presents an account of an angrily virtuous, or patient, person informed by research on emotion in empirical and philosophical psychology. It is argued that virtue for anger is determined by excellence and deficiency with respect to all three of anger’s psychological functions: appraisal, motivation, and communication. Many competing accounts of virtue for anger assess it by attention to just one function; it is argued that singular evaluations of a person’s anger will ignore important dimensions of anger that bear (...)
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  38. Victor Lowe (1951). A Resurgence of "Vicious Intellectualism". Journal of Philosophy 48 (14):435-447.score: 9.0
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  39. J. van Heijendort (1974). Ontology and the Vicious-Circle Principle. International Studies in Philosophy 6:204-205.score: 9.0
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  40. Douglas N. Walton (1985). Are Circular Arguments Necessarily Vicious? American Philosophical Quarterly 22 (October):263-274.score: 9.0
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  41. E. M. Dadlez (2002). The Vicious Habits of Entirely Fictive People: Hume on the Moral Evaluation of Art. Philosophy and Literature 26 (1):143-156.score: 9.0
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  42. Eva M. Dadlez (2002). The Vicious Habits of Entirely Fictive People: Hume on the Moral Evaluation of Art. Philosophy and Literature 26 (1):143-156.score: 9.0
  43. John Greco (2011). Epistemic Circularity: Vicious, Virtuous and Benign. International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 1 (2):105-112.score: 9.0
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  44. David Roochnik (2007). Aristotle's Account of the Vicious: A Forgivable Inconsistency. History of Philosophy Quarterly 24 (3):207 - 220.score: 9.0
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  45. Nicholas S. Thompson (2001). Avoiding Vicious Circularity Requires More Than a Modicum of Care. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):557-558.score: 9.0
    Any general account of successful selection explanations must specify how they avoid being ad hoc or vacuous, hazards that arise from their recursive form.
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  46. Henry S. Richardson (2004). Reasonably Vicious. Journal of Philosophy 101 (4):211-215.score: 9.0
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  47. Fred Wilson (1975). Book Review:Ontology and the Vicious-Circle Principle Charles S. Chihara. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 42 (3):339-.score: 9.0
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  48. Claude Gratton (1994). Circular Definitions, Circular Explanations, and Infinite Regresses. Argumentation 8 (3):295-308.score: 9.0
    This paper discusses some of the ways in which circular definitions and circular explanations entail or fail to entail infinite regresses. And since not all infinite regresses are vicious, a few criteria of viciousness are examined in order to determine when the entailment of a regress refutes a circular definition or a circular explanation.
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  49. Andrew Smith (2006). Vicious (Magic) Circle. Legal Ethics 9 (2):152-155.score: 9.0
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  50. Arthur O. Lovejoy (1952). On a Supposed Resurgence of Vicious Intellectualism. Journal of Philosophy 49 (4):85-89.score: 9.0
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