Search results for 'vicious' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  25
    Gregory Stoutenburg (2016). Vicious Regresses, Conceptual Analysis, and Strong Awareness Internalism. Ratio 29 (2):115-129.
    That a philosophical thesis entails a vicious regress is commonly taken to be decisive evidence that the thesis is false. In this paper, I argue that the existence of a vicious regress is insufficient to reject a proposed analysis provided that certain constraints on the analysis are met. When a vicious regress is present, some further consequence of the thesis must be established that, together with the presence of the vicious regress, shows the thesis to be (...)
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  2. Christina Conroy (2008). No Lacuna and No Vicious Regress: A Reply to le Poidevin. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 23 (4):367-372.
    In his “Space, supervenience and substantivalism”, Le Poidevin proposes a substantivalism in which space is discrete, implying that there are unmediated spatial relations between neighboring primitive points. This proposition is motivated by his concern that relationism suffers from an explanatory lacuna and that substantivalism gives rise to a vicious regress. Le Poidevin implicitly requires that the relationist be committed to the “only x and y ” principle regarding spatial relations. It is not obvious that the relationist is committed to (...)
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  3.  42
    Philip Kremer (2010). How Truth Behaves When There's No Vicious Reference. Journal of Philosophical Logic 39 (4):344 - 367.
    In The Revision Theory of Truth (MIT Press), Gupta and Belnap (1993) claim as an advantage of their approach to truth "its consequence that truth behaves like an ordinary classical concept under certain conditions—conditions that can roughly be characterized as those in which there is no vicious reference in the language." To clarify this remark, they define Thomason models, nonpathological models in which truth behaves like a classical concept, and investigate conditions under which a model is Thomason: they argue (...)
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  4.  10
    Stefan Wintein (2014). Alternative Ways for Truth to Behave When There's No Vicious Reference. Journal of Philosophical Logic 43 (4):665-690.
    In a recent paper, Philip Kremer proposes a formal and theory-relative desideratum for theories of truth that is spelled out in terms of the notion of ‘no vicious reference’. Kremer’s Modified Gupta-Belnap Desideratum (MGBD) reads as follows: if theory of truth T dictates that there is no vicious reference in ground model M, then T should dictate that truth behaves like a classical concept in M. In this paper, we suggest an alternative desideratum (AD): if theory of truth (...)
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  5.  61
    Jaakko Hintikka (2012). If Logic, Definitions and the Vicious Circle Principle. Journal of Philosophical Logic 41 (2):505-517.
    In a definition (∀ x )(( x є r )↔D[ x ]) of the set r, the definiens D[ x ] must not depend on the definiendum r . This implies that all quantifiers in D[ x ] are independent of r and of (∀ x ). This cannot be implemented in the traditional first-order logic, but can be expressed in IF logic. Violations of such independence requirements are what created the typical paradoxes of set theory. Poincaré’s Vicious Circle (...)
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  6.  12
    Spencer Anderson (2000). William James and "Vicious Intellectualism" in Psychology. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 20 (1):61-75.
    Linguistic concepts allow us to break our world into intelligible parts. William James warns, however, that conceptualizing can easily turn into "vicious intellectualism." This happens when words subsume unique particulars under one name, a quality is abstracted from the many particulars, the two are contrasted vis-á-vis, and then the abstraction is declared independent of, temporally prior to, and causally related to the events or processes from which it was derived. Psychology has committed this logical fallacy with concepts such as (...)
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  7.  16
    Charles S. Chihara (1973). Ontology and the Vicious-Circle Principle. Ithaca [N.Y.]Cornell University Press.
  8.  15
    Philip Hugly & Charles Sayward (1979). A Semantical Account of the Vicious Circle Principle. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 20 (3):595-598.
    Here we give a semantical account of propositional quantification that is intended to formally represent Russell’s view that one cannot express a proposition about "all" propositions. According to the account the authors give, Russell’s view bears an interesting relation to the view that there are no sets which are members of themselves.
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  9.  11
    Charles M. Ess (2010). Trust and New Communication Technologies: Vicious Circles, Virtuous Circles, Possible Futures. [REVIEW] Knowledge, Technology and Policy 23 (3-4):287-305.
    I approach the philosophical analyses of the phenomenon of trust vis-à-vis online communication beginning with an overview from within the framework of computer-mediated communication of concerns and paradigmatic failures of trust in the history of online communication. I turn to the more directly philosophical analyses of trust online by first offering an introductory taxonomy of diverse accounts of trust that have emerged over the past decade or so. In the face of important objections to the possibility of establishing and fostering (...)
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  10.  55
    Peter L. Samuelson & Ian M. Church (2014). When Cognition Turns Vicious: Heuristics and Biases in Light of Virtue Epistemology. Philosophical Psychology 28 (8):1095-1113.
    In this paper, we explore the literature on cognitive heuristics and biases in light of virtue epistemology, specifically highlighting the two major positions—agent-reliabilism and agent-responsibilism —as they apply to dual systems theories of cognition and the role of motivation in biases. We investigate under which conditions heuristics and biases might be characterized as vicious and conclude that a certain kind of intellectual arrogance can be attributed to an inappropriate reliance on Type 1, or the improper function of Type 2, (...)
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  11.  3
    Eric Gilbertson (forthcoming). Vicious Competitiveness and the Desire to Win. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport:1-15.
    This paper discusses the nature of competitiveness and argues that being competitive does not essentially involve a strong desire to win or to outperform others. The appeal of the ‘desire-to-win’ analysis of competitiveness can be explained away provided we distinguish between virtuous and vicious competitiveness. It is conceivable that a virtuously competitive athlete lack a strong desire to win or to outperform others. Moreover, there is empirical evidence that virtuous competitiveness and vicious competitiveness are distinct character traits. If (...)
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  12.  10
    Gregor Betz (2005). The Vicious Circle Theorem – a Graph-Theoretical Analysis of Dialectical Structures. Argumentation 19 (1):53-64.
    This article sets up a graph-theoretical framework for argumentation-analysis (dialectical analysis) which expands classical argument-analysis. Within this framework, a main theorem on the existence of inconsistencies in debates is stated and proved: the vicious circle theorem. Subsequently, two corollaries which generalize the main theorem are derived. Finally, a brief outlook is given on further expansions and possible applications of the developed framework.
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  13.  55
    John Greco (2011). Epistemic Circularity: Vicious, Virtuous and Benign. International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 1 (2):105-112.
    Sosa's work on epistemic circularity has significance beyond his own brand of virtue epistemology, with its characteristic distinction between animal and reflective knowledge. On the contrary, it demonstrates the necessity of embracing foundationalism and externalism in epistemology, while at the same time answering various charges (some perennial) against epistemology in general. This paper distinguishes six kinds of epistemic circularity that are discussed in Sosa's work: two virtuous, two vicious, and two benign. This framework is used to reconstruct Sosa's responses (...)
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  14.  17
    H. E. Baber (2013). The Virtuous and Vicious Circles of Academic Publishing. Dialogue and Universalism 19 (1/2):87-94.
    Traditional hardcopy publishing brought about a division of labor between producers and disseminators of information. Online publishing makes it feasible for authors to disseminate their work much more widely without any investment in equipment beyond the ubiquitous laptop, without labor costs and without any special technical expertise. As a consequence, the division of labor is no longer important and is, in a range of cases, inefficient. For some scholarly works and teaching materials in particular, traditional hardcopy publishing rather than rather (...)
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  15.  2
    Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). Is Scientism Epistemically Vicious? In Jeroen de Ridder, Rik Peels & René van Woudenberg (eds.), Scientism: Prospects and Problems. Oxford University Press
    This chapter offers a virtue epistemological framework for making sense of the common complaint that scientism is arrogant, dogmatic, or otherwise epistemically vicious. After characterising scientism in terms of stances , I argue that their components can include epistemically vicious dispositions, with the consequence that an agent who adopts such stances can be led to manifest epistemic vices. The main focus of the chapter is the vice of closed-mindedness, but I go on to consider the idea that arrogance (...)
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  16. Megan Wallace, The Weak-Willed Vs. The Vicious.
    Abstract: Virtue Ethicists typically hold that the weak-willed person is less morally culpable than the vicious person. However, I have reasons to think that this intuition is incorrect. What’s more, I think that insofar as there is an asymmetry in the moral culpability between the weak-willed and the vicious, the asymmetry works the opposite way. Moreover, I think that Virtue Ethicists should think this, too. In the following paper, I will first discuss the plausibility of the vicious (...)
     
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  17.  31
    Philippe Rouilhan (1992). Russell and the Vicious Circle Principle. Philosophical Studies 65 (1-2):169 - 182.
    The standard version of the story of Russell's theory of types gives legitimately precedence to the vicious circle principle, but it fails to appreciate the significance of the doctrine of incomplete symbols and of the ultimate universalist perspective of Russell's logic. It is what the Author tries to do. This enables him to resolve the apparent contradiction which exists in "Principles" between the ontological commitment of the theory itself with respect to individuals, propositions, and functions, and the inventory of (...)
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  18.  29
    Varol Akman (1997). Review of J. Barwise and L. Moss, Vicious Circles: On the Mathematics of Non-Wellfounded Phnenomena. [REVIEW] Journal of Logic, Language and Information 6 (4):460-464.
    This is a review of Vicious Circles: On the Mathematics of Non-Wellfounded Phenomena, by Jon Barwise and Lawrence Moss, published by CSLI Publications in 1996.
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  19.  19
    Darryl Jung (1999). Russell, Presupposition, and the Vicious-Circle Principle. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 40 (1):55-80.
    Prompted by Poincaré, Russell put forward his celebrated vicious-circle principle (vcp) as the solution to the modern paradoxes. Ramsey, Gödel, and Quine, among others, have raised two salient objections against Russell's vcp. First, Gödel has claimed that Russell's various renderings of the vcp really express distinct principles and thus, distinct solutions to the paradoxes, a claim that gainsays one of Russell's positions on the nature of the solution to the paradoxes, namely, that such a solution be uniform. Secondly, Ramsey, (...)
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  20.  11
    S. Weber (2011). Does Schmidt's Process-Orientated Philosophy Contain a Vicious Infinite Regress Argument? Constructivist Foundations 7 (1):34-35.
    Open peer commentary on the target article “From Objects to Processes: A Proposal to Rewrite Radical Constructivism” by Siegfried J. Schmidt. Upshot: This commentary asks if Schmidt’s latest process-orientated philosophy is based on a vicious infinite regress argument. The commentator uses recent literature on the distinction of vicious and benign infinite regresses (from Claude Gratton and Nicholas Rescher) and tries to show that – taken verbatim – there is a serious logical problem in Schmidt’s argumentation.
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  21.  10
    Adam Martin (2011). Rational Choice Without Closure: The Microfoundations of Virtuous Cycles and Vicious Circles. Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (4):345-361.
    Economic stories with a rational choice structure usually entail closure or equilibrium. This paper argues that Knightian uncertainty and Kirznerian alertness allow economists to construct plausible accounts of open-ended processes such as virtuous cycles and vicious circles without abandoning the centrality of instrumental rationality. The basic form of such stories is explored and two example cases are put forward.
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  22.  5
    Michael Galanis (2011). Vicious Spirals in Corporate Governance: Mandatory Rules for Systemic (Re)Balancing? Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 31 (2):327-363.
    Until recently, as market forces gradually prevailed over government intervention, the contractarian view had emerged as a preferred method of economic governance due to its attractiveness for business. Following the recent collapse of financial markets and the resulting recession, however, this structural form is now being called into question as the calls for more regulation and government intervention increase. In this context, this article revisits the law versus contract debate in the field of corporate law and governance. Following a theoretical (...)
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  23.  1
    L. E. Fletschhacker (1979). Is Russell's Vicious Circle Principle False or Meaningless? Dialectica 33 (1):23-35.
    SummaryP. Vardy asserts the thesis that the vicious circle principle has the same structure as Russell's paradox. But structure is not the thing itself. It is the thing objectivated from the wiewpoint of a mathematician. So this structure can be expressed in a mathematical formalism, e. g. the Λ‐calculus. Russell's paradox is understood as a result of the error of taking purely logical concepts, like negation, as lkiewise formalisable without change of meaning. The illusion of meaning in the liar's (...)
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  24. L. Fleischhacker P. Vatrdy (1979). Some Remarks on the Relationship Between Russell's* Vicious‐Circle Principle and Russell's Paradox. Dialectica 33 (1):3-19.
    SummaryRussell's vicious‐circle principle is an endeavour to express a general principle of mathematics which, as the author feels, is fundamental for mathematics. This principle, in a sense warranty of formal consistency, interdicts in some form or other the selfapplication of mathematical entities. It is shown that the VCP is a vicious‐circle fallacy; that, although it can't be given an expression which is simultaneously formal and generally valid, it is generally presupposed by mathematics as far as a consistent formalism (...)
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  25. Eric Shyman (2016). Vicious Circles in Education Reform: Assimilation, Americanization, and Fulfilling the Middle Class Ethic. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Vicious Circles traces the history of development of public education and the near simultaneous advent of educational reform from its very beginning. Drawing on history, politics, law, sociology, and educational research, all aspects of public schooling are brought to light using a non-partisan analytical approach. Critically examining areas such as institutional racism, sexism, ableism, ethnocentrism, and xenophobia, as well as the corporatization and privatization of public schooling, Shyman extracts the fundamental problems that have ever plagued, and continue to plague, (...)
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  26. Daniel W. Smith (ed.) (1998). Nietzsche and the Vicious Circle. University of Chicago Press.
    Long recognized as a masterpiece of Nietzsche scholarship, _Nietzsche and the Vicious Circle_ is made available here for the first time in English. Taking a structuralist approach to the relation between Nietzsche's thought and his life, Klossowski emphasizes the centrality of the notion of Eternal Return for understanding Nietzsche's propensities for self-denial, self-reputation, and self-consumption. Nietzsche's ideas did not stem from personal pathology, according to Klossowski. Rather, he made a pathological use of his best ideas, anchoring them in his (...)
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  27. Herbert W. Schneider (1952). Note on a Not-so-Vicious Intellectualism. Journal of Philosophy 49 (4):121-122.
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  28.  79
    Lauren Olin & John M. Doris (2014). Vicious Minds. Philosophical Studies 168 (3):665-692.
    While there is now considerable anxiety about whether the psychological theory presupposed by virtue ethics is empirically sustainable, analogous issues have received little attention in the virtue epistemology literature. This paper argues that virtue epistemology encounters challenges reminiscent of those recently encountered by virtue ethics: just as seemingly trivial variation in context provokes unsettling variation in patterns of moral behavior, trivial variation in context elicits unsettling variation in patterns of cognitive functioning. Insofar as reliability is a condition on epistemic virtue, (...)
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  29.  94
    Robert K. Garcia & Nathan L. King (forthcoming). Toward Intellectually Virtuous Discourse: Two Vicious Fallacies and the Virtues That Inhibit Them. In Jason Baehr (ed.), Intellectual Virtues and Education: Essays in Applied Virtue Epistemology. Routledge
    We have witnessed the athleticization of political discourse, whereby debate is treated like an athletic contest in which the aim is to vanquish one's opponents. When political discourse becomes a zero-sum game, it is characterized by suspicions, accusations, belief polarization, and ideological entrenchment. Unfortunately, athleticization is ailing the classroom as well, making it difficult for educators to prepare students to make valuable contributions to healthy civic discourse. Such preparation requires an educational environment that fosters the intellectual virtues that characterize an (...)
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  30. Peter Klein (2003). When Infinite Regresses Are Not Vicious. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (3):718–729.
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  31.  36
    Candace A. Vogler (2002). Reasonably Vicious. Harvard University Press.
    Is unethical conduct necessarily irrational? Answering this question requires giving an account of practical reason, of practical good, and of the source or point of wrongdoing. By the time most contemporary philosophers have done the first two, they have lost sight of the third, chalking up bad action to rashness, weakness of will, or ignorance. In this book, Candace Vogler does all three, taking as her guides scholars who contemplated why some people perform evil deeds. In doing so, she sets (...)
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  32. Zac Cogley (2014). A Study of Virtuous and Vicious Anger. In Kevin Timpe & Craig Boyd (eds.), Virtues and Their Vices. Oxford University Press 199.
    This chapter presents an account of an angrily virtuous, or patient, person informed by research on emotion in empirical and philosophical psychology. It is argued that virtue for anger is determined by excellence and deficiency with respect to all three of anger’s psychological functions: appraisal, motivation, and communication. Many competing accounts of virtue for anger assess it by attention to just one function; it is argued that singular evaluations of a person’s anger will ignore important dimensions of anger that bear (...)
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  33.  7
    Eleanor R. E. O'Higgins (2006). Corruption, Underdevelopment, and Extractive Resource Industries: Addressing the Vicious Cycle. Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (2):235-254.
    Abstract: The systemic role of corruption and its link to low human development is explored. The extractive resource industry is presented as an arena where conditions for corruption—monopoly and discretion without accountability—are especially intense. Corruption is maintained by a self-reinforcing cycle. Multiple stakeholders are involved in the maintenance of and/or opposition to the cycle: investing corporations, host country regimes and officials, inter-governmental bodies like the OECD, industry associations, non-governmental organization (NGO) watchdogs like Transparency International, and international agencies facilitating global investment (...)
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  34.  10
    Isidora Stojanovic, The Vicious Triangle of A Priori Truth, Contingent Truth, and Logical Truth.
    In this paper, I argue against the view there are contingent a priori truths, and against the related view that there are contingent logical truths. I will suggest that in general, predicates ›a priori‹ and ›contingent‹ are implicitly relativized to circumstances, and argue that apriority entails necessity, whenever the two are relativized to the same circumstance. I will then criticize the idea, inspired by David Kaplan's framework, of contingent contents »knowable under a priori characters.« I will also argue, against Kaplan, (...)
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  35. K. Jaakko J. Hintikka (1957). Vicious Circle Principle and the Paradoxes. Journal of Symbolic Logic 22 (3):245-249.
  36. Kathlyn J. Gan, Takashi Morihara & Michael A. Silverman (2015). Atlas Stumbled: Kinesin Light Chain-1 Variant E Triggers a Vicious Cycle of Axonal Transport Disruption and Amyloid-Β Generation in Alzheimer's Disease. Bioessays 37 (2):131-141.
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  37.  74
    Horace S. Fries (1939). Physics, a Vicious Abstraction. Philosophy of Science 6 (3):301-308.
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  38. Bas C. van Fraassen (1992). From Vicious Circle to Infinite Regress, and Back Again. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:6-29.
    The attempt to formulate a viable empiricist and non-foundationalist epistemology of science faces four problems here confronted. The first is an apparent loss of objectivity in science, in the conditions of use of models in applied science. The second derives from the theory-infection of scientific language, with an apparent loss of objective conditions of truth and reference. The third, often cited as objection to The Scientific Image, is the apparent theory-dependence of the distinction between what is and is not observable. (...)
     
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  39.  20
    Douglas N. Walton (1985). Are Circular Arguments Necessarily Vicious? American Philosophical Quarterly 22 (October):263-274.
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  40.  11
    Maya Bar-Hillel & Avishai Margalit (1988). How Vicious Are Cycles of Intransitive Choice? Theory and Decision 24 (2):119-145.
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  41.  1
    Pierre Klossowski (1998). Nietzsche and the Vicious Circle. University of Chicago Press.
  42.  12
    Mark Steiner (1975). Ontology and the Vicious Circle Principle. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 72 (7):184-196.
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  43.  44
    Romane Clark (1988). Vicious Infinite Regress Arguments. Philosophical Perspectives 2:369-380.
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  44.  78
    Michael Jacovides (2010). Hume's Vicious Regress. Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 5:247-97.
  45.  1
    Jay R. Elliott (forthcoming). Reply to Müller: Aristotle on Vicious Choice. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-11.
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  46.  39
    Oliver Leaman (1986). Harris on Non-Vicious Choice. Analysis 46 (2):106 - 107.
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  47.  12
    Elzbieta T. Kazmierczak (1998). In a Vicious Circle of Codependency. Semiotics:82-94.
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  48.  50
    Julia Driver (2004). Candace Vogler, Reasonably Vicious:Reasonably Vicious. Ethics 114 (4):845-848.
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  49.  12
    David Roochnik (2007). Aristotle's Account of the Vicious: A Forgivable Inconsistency. History of Philosophy Quarterly 24 (3):207 - 220.
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  50.  38
    Bas C. Van Fraassen (1992). From Vicious Circle to Infinite Regress, and Back Again. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:6 - 29.
    The attempt to formulate a viable empiricist and non-foundationalist epistemology of science faces four problems here confronted. The first is an apparent loss of objectivity in science, in the conditions of use of models in applied science. The second derives from the theory-infection of scientific language, with an apparent loss of objective conditions of truth and reference. The third, often cited as objection to The Scientific Image, is the apparent theory-dependence of the distinction between what is and is not observable. (...)
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