Search results for 'vivisection' (try it on Scholar)

50 found
Sort by:
  1. Anita Guerrini (2013). Experiments, Causation, and the Uses of Vivisection in the First Half of the Seventeenth Century. Journal of the History of Biology 46 (2):227-254.score: 24.0
    Defining experiment was particularly vexed in the realm of anatomical dissection and vivisection. Was dissection merely descriptive, or something more? Harvey's discovery of the circulation of the blood and Aselli's discovery of the so-called lacteal veins shaped much anatomical research between the late 1620s and the 1650s. While the techniques of dissection and vivisection gained wide use, there was much debate on the validity of the circulation in particular, and its relationship to the lacteal veins. Critics, particularly the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. R. Allen Shotwell (2013). The Revival of Vivisection in the Sixteenth Century. Journal of the History of Biology 46 (2):171-197.score: 24.0
    In this article I examine the origins and progression of the practice of vivisection in roughly the first half of the sixteenth century, paying particular attention to the types of vivisection procedures performed, the classical sources for those procedures and the changing nature of the concerns motivating the anatomists who performed them. My goal is to reexamine a procedure typically treated as something revived by Vesalius from classical sources as a precursor to early modern discoveries by placing the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Hayley Rose Glaholt (2012). Vivisection as War: The Moral Diseases of Animal Experimentation and Slavery in British Victorian Quaker Pacifist Ethics. Society and Animals 20 (2):154-172.score: 21.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. R. G. Frey (1983). Vivisection, Morals and Medicine. Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (2):94-97.score: 15.0
    If one wishes to accept that some painful animal experimentation can be justified on grounds that benefit is conferred, one is faced with a difficult moral dilemma argues the first author, a philosopher. Either one needs to be able to say why human lives of any quality however low should be inviolable from painful experimentation when animal lives are not; or one should accept that sufficient benefit can justify certain painful experiments on human beings of sufficiently low quality of life. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. R. G. Frey (2005). Pain, Vivisection, and the Value of Life. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (4):202-204.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Jerome Nathanson (1939). Dewey's Vivisection of the Logical Process. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 6 (1):115 - 122.score: 15.0
  7. Rod Preece (2003). Darwinism, Christianity, and the Great Vivisection Debate. Journal of the History of Ideas 64 (3):399-419.score: 15.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. W. Paton (1983). Vivisection, Morals, Medicine: Commentary From a Vivisecting Professor of Pharmacology. Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (2):102-104.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. C. S. Myers (1904). Is Vivisection Justifiable? International Journal of Ethics 14 (3):312-322.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Charles S. Myers (1906). The Vivisection Problem: A Personal Explanation. International Journal of Ethics 16 (2):235.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. T. L. Sprigge (1983). Vivisection, Morals, Medicine: Commentary From an Antivivisectionist Philosopher. Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (2):98-101.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Simon Byl (1997). Controverses Antiques Autour de la Dissection Et de la Vivisection. Revue Belge de Philologie Et D'Histoire 75 (1):113-120.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. T. Ryan Gregory (2000). The Failure of Traditional Arguments in the Vivisection Debate. Public Affairs Quarterly 14 (2):159-182.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. J. Arthur Thomson (1896). Book Review:Vivisection: Can It Advance Mandkind? Charles Selby Oaklley. [REVIEW] Ethics 7 (1):129-.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Albert Leffingwell (1905). The Vivisection Problem: (A Reply). International Journal of Ethics 15 (2):221-231.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Jerome Nathanson (1939). Review: Dewey's Vivisection of the Logical Process. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 6 (1):115 - 122.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Stewart Richards (1986). Drawing the Life-Blood of Physiology: Vivisection and the Physiologists' Dilemma, 1870–1900. Annals of Science 43 (1):27-56.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Jonathan Balcombe (1998). Dissection and Vivisection Laws. In Marc Bekoff & Carron A. Meaney (eds.), Encyclopedia of Animal Rights and Animal Welfare. Greenwood Press. 144--146.score: 15.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. A. W. H. Bates (2014). Vivisection, Virtue Ethics, and the Law in 19th-Century Britain. Journal of Animal Ethics 4 (2):30-44,.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. R. G. Frev (forthcoming). Vivisection, Morals and Medicine: An Exchange. Bioethics: An Anthology.score: 15.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Roberta Kalechofsky (1992). Dedicated to Descartes' Niece: The Women's Movement in the Nineteenth Century and Anti-Vivisection. Between the Species 8 (2):3.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Roberta Kalechofsky (1988). Metaphors of Nature: Vivisection and Pornography--The Manichean Machine. Between the Species 4 (3):8.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Stephen R. Kaufman (1995). Does Vivisection Pass the Utiliatrian Test? Public Affairs Quarterly 9 (2):127-137.score: 15.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Seung Gap Lee (2007). Ecodoctrines : Spirit, Creation, Atonement, Eschaton. Sacred-Land Theology : Green Spirit, Deconstruction, and the Question of Idolatry in Contemporary Earthen Christianity / Mark I. Wallace ; Grounding the Spirit : An Ecofeminist Pneumatology / Sharon Betcher ; Hearing the Outcry of Mute Things : Toward a Jewish Creation Theology / Lawrence Troster ; Creatio Ex Nihilo, Terra Nullius, and the Erasure of Presence / Whitney A. Bauman ; Surrogate Suffering : Paradigms of Sin, Salvation, and Sacrifice Within the Vivisection Movement / Antonia Gorman ; the Hope of the Earth : A Process Ecoeschatology for South Korea. [REVIEW] In Laurel Kearns & Catherine Keller (eds.), Ecospirit: Religions and Philosophies for the Earth. Fordham University Press.score: 15.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Albert Leffingwell (1905). The Vivisection Problem: A Rejoinder. International Journal of Ethics 15 (4):495-499.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Jerome Nathanson (1939). Dewey's Vivisection of the Logical Process (Review of L Ogic: The Theory of Inquiry by John Dewey). [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 6 (1):115-122.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Rivers Singleton Jr (1993). Whither Goest Vivisection? Historical and Philosophical Perspectives. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 37 (4):576-594.score: 15.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Rivers Singleton Jr (1993). Whither Goest Vivisection? Legislative and Regulatory Perspectives. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 38 (1):41-57.score: 15.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Thomas A. Woolsey & Robert E. Burke (1987). The Playwright, the Practitioner, the Politician, the President, and the Pathologist: A Guide to the 1900 Senate Document Titled" Vivisection". Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 30 (2):235.score: 15.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Domenico Bertoloni Meli (2013). Early Modern Experimentation on Live Animals. Journal of the History of Biology 46 (2):199-226.score: 9.0
    Starting from the works by Aselli (De lactibus sive lacteis venis, 1627) on the milky veins and Harvey (1628, translated in 1993) on the motion of the heart and the circulation of the blood, the practice of vivisection witnessed a resurgence in the early modern period. I discuss some of the most notable cases in the century spanning from Aselli’s work to the investigations of fluid pressure in plants and animals by Stephen Hales (Vegetable Staticks, 1727). Key figures in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Zohar Lederman (2014). Amoralist Rationalism? A Response to Joel Marks. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):115-116.score: 9.0
    In a recent article, Joel Marks presents the amoralist argument against vivisection, or animal laboratory experimentation. He argues that ethical theories that seek to uncover some universal morality are in fact useless and unnecessary for ethical deliberations meant to determine what constitutes an appropriate action in a specific circumstance. I agree with Marks’ conclusion. I too believe that vivisection is indefensible, both from a scientific and philosophical perspective. I also believe that we should become vegan (unfortunately, like the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Christopher E. Cosans (1998). Aristotle's Anatomical Philosophy of Nature. Biology and Philosophy 13 (3):311-339.score: 6.0
    This paper explores the anatomical foundations of Aristotle's natural philosophy. Rather than simply looking at the body, he contrives specific procedures for revealing unmanifest phenomena. In some cases, these interventions seem extensive enough to qualify as experiments. At the work bench, one can observe the parts of animals in the manner Aristotle describes, even if his descriptions seem at odds with 20th century textbooks. Manipulating animals allows us to recover his teleological thought more fully. This consideration of Aristotle as a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Joel Marks (2010). Innocent and Innocuous: The Case Against Animal Research. Between the Species (10):98-117.score: 6.0
    Animal research is a challenging issue for the animal advocate because of what, besides animal well-being, is considered to be at stake, namely, human health. This article seeks to vindicate the antivivisectionist position. The standard defense of animal research as promoting the overwhelming good of human health is refuted on both factual and logical, or normative-theoretical, grounds. The author then attempts to clinch the case by arguing that animal research violates a deontic principle. However, this principle falls to counterexample. The (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Joel Marks (2011). On Due Recognition of Animals Used in Research. Journal of Animal Ethics 1 (1):6-8.score: 6.0
    The experimental laboratory can be a horror house for rats, monkeys, and other nonhuman animals. Yet their use in this setting is usually reported in a routine manner in publications that discuss the results. These contentions are illustrated with an analysis of the way animal evidence is presented in David J. Linden’s recent book, The Accidental Mind: How Brain Evolution Has Given Us Love, Memory, Dreams, and God (Harvard University Press, 2007). The article concludes with a call to science authors (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Constance K. Perry (2001). A Compassionate Autonomy Alternative to Speciesism. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (3):237-246.score: 6.0
    Many people in the animal welfare communityhave argued that the use of nonhuman animals inmedical research is necessarily based onspeciesism, an unjustified prejudice based onspecies membership. As such it is morally akinto racism and sexism. This is misguided. Thecombined capacities for autonomy and sentiencewith the obligations derived from relationssupport a morally justifiable rationale forusing some nonhuman animals in order to limitthe risk of harm to humans. There may be a fewcases where it is morally better to use a neversentient human (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Fred Gifford (2000). Animal Care Ethics, ANZCCART, and Public Perceptions of Animal Use Ethics. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 13 (3-4):249-257.score: 6.0
    The public attitude to animal use in Australia and New Zealandcan be inferred from survey results and political activity. The publicis concerned about the rights of animals as far as any uses causing painare concerned, but takes a more utilitarian view of the taking of lifewhere no suffering is involved. Many of the participants in two recentANZCCART conferences fall short in their knowledge of and attitudetoward these concerns. Animal welfare legislation and standards need tobe reformed so that painful animal use (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Anita Guerrini & Domenico Bertoloni Meli (2013). Introduction: Experimenting with Animals in the Early Modern Era. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 46 (2):167-170.score: 6.0
    The aim of this special issue is to address issues surrounding the use of live animals in experimental procedures in the pre-modern era, with a special emphasis on the technical, anatomical, and philosophical sides. Such use raises philosophical, scientific, and ethical questions about the nature of life, the reliability of the knowledge acquired, and animal suffering.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Tobias Cheung (2013). Limits of Life and Death: Legallois's Decapitation Experiments. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 46 (2):283-313.score: 6.0
    In Expériences sur le principe de la vie (Chez D’Hautel, Paris, 1812), Jean César Legallois, a French physician and physiologist, explored the basic regulatory framework of vital processes of warm-blooded animals. He decapitated rabbits and cut off their limbs in order to search for a seat of life that is located in the spinal cord. Through ligatures and artificial pulmonary insufflations, he kept the trunks of rabbits alive for some minutes. Legallois thus criticized models of organic order in which the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Rod Preece (2007). Thoughts Out of Season on the History of Animal Ethics. Society and Animals 15 (4):365-378.score: 6.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Nancy Cervetti (2007). S. Weir Mitchell and His Snakes: Unraveling the “United Web and Woof of Popular and Scientific Beliefs”. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 28 (3):119-133.score: 6.0
    Although best known as a nineteenth-century neurologist and creator of the rest cure, S. Weir Mitchell was one of the first Americans to engage in large-scale animal experimentation. In 1860 he published Researches Upon the Venom of the Rattlesnake, and in 1886, in collaboration with Dr. Edward T. Reichert, he published Researches Upon the Venoms of Poisonous Serpents. Yet, Mitchell’s pioneering work in scientific medicine remains a little known aspect of his career. This essay, based mainly on primary source material, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Jean-Gaël Barbara (2012). Auguste Comte et la physiologie cérébrale de son temps. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 2:213-236.score: 6.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Eli Chernin (1988). An Artificial Heart Revives a Corpse: Sir Ronald Ross's Unpublished Story of 1882," The Vivisector Vivisected". Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 31 (3):341.score: 5.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Aaron Garrett, Richard Dean, Humphrey Primatt, John Oswald & Thomas Young (eds.) (1713/2000). Animal Rights and Souls in the Eighteenth Century. Thoemmes Press.score: 3.0
    The publication of 'Animal Rights and Souls in the 18th Century' will be welcomed by everyone interested in the development of the modern animal liberation movement, as well as by those who simply want to savour the work of enlightenment thinkers pushing back the boundaries of both science and ethics. At last these long out-of-print texts are again available to be read and enjoyed - and what texts they are! Gems like Bougeant's witty reductio of the Christian view of animals (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. T. L. S. Sprigge (1979). Metaphysics, Physicalism, and Animal Rights. Inquiry 22 (1-4):101 – 143.score: 3.0
    As ethical attitudinists say, ethical statements cannot be strictly true or false, since they express wishes or attitudes, not beliefs. However, the wishes expressed by basic moral judgments about human rights are such that it is a necessary truth that those who know what human beings are have them, and those who do not acknowledge these rights show their lack of a living sense of human reality. The same goes for basic judgments about the rights of animals, and it is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. J. L. Nelson (1988). Animals, Handicapped Children and the Tragedy of Marginal Cases. Journal of Medical Ethics 14 (4):191-193.score: 3.0
    There are human beings whose psychological capacities are rivalled or exceeded by many non-human animals; such humans are often referred to as 'marginal cases'. R G Frey has argued that there is no secure, non-arbitrary way of morally distinguishing between marginal humans and non-human animals. Hence, if the benefits of vivisection justify such painful and lethal procedures being performed on animals, so is the vivisection of marginal humans justified. This is a conclusion Frey is driven to with 'great (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. James Rachels (1993). Why Darwinians Should Support Equal Treatment for Other Great Apes. In Paolo Cavalieri Peter Singer (ed.), The Great Ape Project. Fourth Estate. 152--157.score: 3.0
    A few years ago I set out to canvass the literature on Charles Darwin. I thought it would be a manageable task, but I soon realized what a naïve idea this was. I do not know how many books have been written about him, but there seem to be thousands, and each year more appear.1 Why are there so many? Part of the answer is, of course, that he was a tremendously important figure in the history of human thought. But (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. M. Gregg Bloche (2001). Caretakers and Collaborators. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (3):275-284.score: 3.0
    A chilling subplot in the twentieth-century saga of state-sponsored mass murder, torture, and other atrocities was the widespread incidence of medical complicity. Nazi doctors' human and assistance in genocidal killing are the most oft-cited exemplar, but wartime Japanese physicians' human vivisection and other grotesque practices rivaled the Nazi medical horrors. Measured by these standards, Soviet psychiatrists' role in repressing dissent, Latin American and Turkish military doctors' complicity in torture, and even the South African medical profession's systematic involvement in apartheid (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Henning Schmidgen (2004). Pictures, Preparations, and Living Processes: The Production of Immediate Visual Perception (Anschauung) in Late-19th-Century Physiology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 37 (3):477 - 513.score: 3.0
    This paper addresses the visual culture of late-19th-century experimental physiology. Taking the case of Johann Nepomuk Czermak (1828-1873) as a key example, it argues that images played a crucial role in acquiring experimental physiological skills. Czermak, Emil Du Bois-Reymond (1818-1896) and other late-19th-century physiologists sought to present the achievements and perspective of their discipline by way of "immediate visual perception (unmittelbare Anschauung)." However, the images they produced and presented for this purpose were strongly mediated. By means of specifically designed instruments, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Lyle Munro (1999). From Vilification to Accommodation: Making a Common Cause Movement. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (1):46-57.score: 3.0
    The history of the vivisection debate is a case study in the use of vilification not unlike its rhetorical use by adversaries in the pro-life/pro-choice controversy. According to Vanderford, vilification in that debate serves a number of functions: to identify adversaries as ; to cast opponents in an exclusively negative light; to attribute diabolical motives to one's adversaries; and to magnify the opposition's power as an enemy capable of doing great evil. In the vivisection debate, both sides have (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Timothy L. S. Sprigge (2011). The Importance of Subjectivity: Selected Essays in Metaphysics and Ethics. Clarendon Press.score: 3.0
    Part I: Consciousness and the metaphysics of experience. Orientations. What I believe. The privacy of experience. Final causes. The importance of subjectivity : an inaugural lecture. Is consciousness mysterious? Consciousness. The distinctiveness of American philosophy. The world of description and the world of acquaintance -- Part II: The metaphysics of time and the absolute. The unreality of time. Ideal immortality. Russell and Bradley on relations. The self and its world in Bradley and Husserl. Absolute idealism. Pantheism -- Part III: Ethics, (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation