Search results for 'war crimes' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. War Crimes & Just War (2007). Best in Scholarship. Philosophy and Public Affairs 942:660.score: 2400.0
  2. J. Angelo Corlett (2010). Us Responsibility for War Crimes in Iraq. Res Publica 16 (2):227-244.score: 240.0
    This paper examines the recent actions by the United States in Iraq in the light of just war principles, and sets forth a program for holding accountable those most responsible for war crimes in Iraq.
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  3. Michael Clark & Peter Cave (2010). Nowhere to Run? Punishing War Crimes. Res Publica 16 (2):197-207.score: 240.0
    This paper’s aim is to provide overview of the punishment of war crimes. It considers first the rationale of the law of war, the identification and scope of war crimes, and proceeds to consider the justification of punishing war crimes, arguing for a consequentialist view with side-constraints. It then considers the alternative of reconciliation.
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  4. Claire Garbett (2012). Transitional Justice and 'National Ownership': An Assessment of the Institutional Development of the War Crimes Chamber of Bosnia and Herzegovina. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 13 (1):65-84.score: 240.0
    In anticipation of its closure in 2014, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia has begun to set out proposals for preserving and promoting its legacy of prosecuting persons responsible for violations of humanitarian law during the conflicts of the 1990s. A key aspect of this legacy has been to support the ‘national ownership’ of the justice systems in the former Yugoslavia that will continue to try war crimes cases in the years to come. This study explores the (...)
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  5. Bill Wringe (2010). War Crimes and Expressive Theories of Punishment: Communication or Denunciation? Res Publica 16 (2):119-133.score: 216.0
    In a paper published in 2006, I argued that the best way of defending something like our current practices of punishing war criminals would be to base the justification of this practice on an expressive theory of punishment. I considered two forms that such a justification could take—a ‘denunciatory’ account, on which the purpose of punishment is supposed to communicate a commitment to certain kinds of standard to individuals other than the criminal and a ‘communicative’ account, on which the purpose (...)
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  6. Anthony Ellis (2010). War Crimes, Punishment and the Burden of Proof. Res Publica 16 (2):181-196.score: 210.0
    This paper argues that there is a default presumption that punishment has some deterrent effect, and that the burden of proof is upon those who allege that the costs of any particular penal system are insufficient to offset its deterrent benefits. This burden of proof transmits to the discussion of international law, with the conclusion that it is those who oppose international jurisdiction, rather than their opponents, who must prove their position. This they have so far failed to do.
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  7. Larry May (2006). Prosecuting Military Leaders for War Crimes. Metaphilosophy 37 (3-4):469–488.score: 210.0
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  8. Angelo Corlett (2012). Reparations for U.S. War Crimes Against Iraq. Filozofija I Drustvo 23 (4):193-217.score: 210.0
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  9. Larry May (2007). War Crimes and Just War. Cambridge University Press.score: 192.0
    Larry May argues that the best way to understand war crimes is as crimes against humanness rather than as violations of justice.
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  10. Lejla Hadzic (2008). As Dayton Undergoes Proposals for Reform, the Status of Freedom of Movement, Refugee Returns, and War Crimes in Bosnia And Herzegovina. Human Rights Review 9 (1):137-151.score: 164.0
    The Dayton General Framework Agreement for Peace of late 1995 brought a ceasefire and an end to the killings in Bosnia. More than 11 years after its signing, some of Dayton’s outlined aims for Bosnia remain unfulfilled or realized with mixed results. Late in 2005, on the occasion of the 10th anniversary of Dayton, leading world political figures raved about the successes of Dayton, but the immediate calls for the reform of Constitution included in the Dayton agreement, which followed the (...)
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  11. David Luban (2008). War Crimes : The Law of Hell. In Larry May & Emily Crookston (eds.), War: Essays in Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 156.0
     
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  12. Djordje Ignjatovic (2002). Comprehension of War Crimes Against Civilian Population by the Tribunal in The Hague. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 15 (1):53-78.score: 152.0
    In the text, the author criticizesattitudes and conclusions in the document ofthe Hague Tribunal under the title ``FinalReport to the Prosecutor by the CommitteeEstablished to Review the NATO Bombing CampaignAgainst the FRY''. At the beginning of thepaper, it is indicated to what extent generallegal estimation on damage inflicted to naturalenvironment, the use of projectiles withdepleted uranium, cluster bombs as well aslegal questions related to the choice oftargets for attacks are controversial andhardly maintainable.Also, it is given a comment on thegeneral estimation (...)
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  13. Bill Wringe (2006). Why Punish War Crimes? Victor's Justice and Expressive Justifications of Punishment. Law and Philosophy 25 (2):159-191.score: 150.0
  14. Jesper Ryberg (2010). Punishing War Crimes, Genocide, and Crimes Against Humanity: Introduction. Res Publica 16 (2):99-100.score: 150.0
  15. Aaron Fichtelberg (2005). Crimes Beyond Justice? Retributivism and War Crimes. Criminal Justice Ethics 24 (1):31-46.score: 150.0
  16. D. Luban (2002). War Crimes and Collective Wrongdoing: A Reader. Philosophical Review 111 (4):620-624.score: 150.0
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  17. Donald A. Peppers (1974). War Crimes and Induction: A Case for Selective Nonconscientious Objection. Philosophy and Public Affairs 3 (2):129-166.score: 150.0
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  18. Sally Scholz (2006). Just War Theory, Crimes of War, and War Rape. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (1):143-157.score: 150.0
    Recent decades have witnessed rape and sexual violence used on such a massive scale and often in a widespread and systematic program that the international community has had to recognize that rape and sexual violence are not just war crimes but might be crimes against humanity or even genocide. I suggest that just war theory, while limited in its applicability to mass rape, might nevertheless offer some framework for making the determination of when sexual violence and rape constitute (...)
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  19. David Luban (2002). War Crimes and Collective Wrongdoing. Philosophical Review 111 (4):620-624.score: 150.0
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  20. Noam Chomsky, Green Light for War Crimes.score: 150.0
    "The evidence for a direct link between the militia and the military is beyond any dispute and has been overwhelmingly documented by UNAMET over the last four months. But the scale and thoroughness of the destruction of East Timor in the past week has demonstrated a new level of open participation of the military in the implementation of what was previously a more veiled operation.".
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  21. Noam Chomsky, War Crimes and Imperial Fantasies.score: 150.0
    I want to ask you about a painting that hangs in your office. It’s rather gruesome. You’ve commented to me that mostly U.S. citizens don’t seem to know who it is, but most foreigners that come to visit you and see it recognize it immediately.
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  22. Heinrich Rommen (1950). Natural Law and War-Crimes-Guilt. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 24:40-57.score: 150.0
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  23. Peter Tramel (2007). Review of Larry May, War Crimes and Just War. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (10).score: 150.0
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  24. Gary Jonathan Bass (2002). [Book Review] Stay the Hand of Vengeance, the Politics of War Crimes Tribunals. [REVIEW] Social Theory and Practice 28 (1):167-187.score: 150.0
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  25. Murat Metin Hakki (2004). The Second Iraq War One Year On: Can George W. Bush and Tony Blair Be Tried for War Crimes? [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 5 (2):86-103.score: 150.0
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  26. Bob Kerrey (2002). International Justice, War Crimes, and Terrorism. Social Research: An International Quarterly 69 (4):1019-1030.score: 150.0
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  27. David Scheffer (2002). War Crimes and the Clinton Administration. Social Research: An International Quarterly 69 (4):1115-1123.score: 150.0
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  28. Patricia M. Wald (2002). Punishment of War Crimes by International Tribunals. Social Research: An International Quarterly 69 (4):1125-1140.score: 150.0
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  29. Scheffer David (2002). War Crimes and the Clinton Administration. Social Research 69 (4).score: 150.0
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  30. H. Derks (2004). War Crimes of the Deutsche Bank and the Dresdner Bank. Office of Military Government (US) Reports. Edited by Christopher Simpson. [REVIEW] The European Legacy 9:388-388.score: 150.0
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  31. Anthony Ellis (2001). War Crimes and Collective Wrongdoing: A Reader. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 150.0
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  32. Erich Hula (forthcoming). Punishment for War Crimes. Social Research.score: 150.0
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  33. Dorothy Jones (1999). An Ardent Advocate War Crimes: Brutality, Genocide, Terror, and the Struggle for Justice, Aryeh Neier (New York: Times Books/Random House, 1998), 304 Pp., $25.00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 13:247-249.score: 150.0
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  34. Dorothy V. Jones (2001). For Humanity: Reflections of a War Crimes Investigator, Richard J. Goldstone (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2000), 152 Pp., $18.50 Cloth. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 15 (1):212-214.score: 150.0
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  35. Hersch Lauterpacht (2008). The Law of Nations and the Punishment of War Crimes. In Guénaël Mettraux (ed.), Perspectives on the Nuremberg Trial. Oup Oxford.score: 150.0
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  36. Sander H. Lee (1991). The Law and Morality in War Crimes Trials. In D. Sank & D. Caplan (eds.), To Be a Victim. Plenum. 333--56.score: 150.0
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  37. Peter Li (2003). Hirhito's War Crimes Responsibility: The Unrepentant Emperor. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 4 (2):3-10.score: 150.0
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  38. Theodor Meron, Richard J. Goldstone, Aryeh Neier, Kenneth Anderson, Patricia M. Wald & Michael Walzer (forthcoming). Where Do We Go From Here? New and Emerging Issues in the Prosecution of War Crimes and Acts of Terrorism: A Panel Discussion. Social Research.score: 150.0
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  39. Guénaël Mettraux (2008). Judicial Inheritance: The Value and Significance of the Nuremberg Trial to Contemporary War Crimes Trials. In , Perspectives on the Nuremberg Trial. Oup Oxford.score: 150.0
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  40. Michael P. Scharf (1999). [Book Review] BALKan Justice, the Story Behind the First International War Crimes Trial Since Nuremberg. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 13:249-251.score: 150.0
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  41. Gerry J. Simpson (2008). Law, War and Crime: War Crimes Trials and the Reinvention of International Law. Journal of Military Ethics 7 (2).score: 150.0
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  42. Telford Taylor (2008). The Nuremberg War Crimes Trials. In Guénaël Mettraux (ed.), Perspectives on the Nuremberg Trial. Oup Oxford.score: 150.0
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  43. Paul Weindling (2006). From Medical War Crimes to Compensation : The Plight of the Victims of Human Experiments. In Wolfgang Uwe Eckart (ed.), Man, Medicine, and the State: The Human Body As an Object of Government Sponsored Medical Research in the 20th Century. Steiner.score: 150.0
     
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  44. David A. Wells (1991). War Crimes and Laws of War. University Press of America.score: 150.0
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  45. James B. Jacobs (1992). Rethinking the War Against Hate Crimes: A New York City Perspective. Criminal Justice Ethics 11 (2):55-61.score: 144.0
    (1992). Rethinking the war against hate crimes: A New York city perspective. Criminal Justice Ethics: Vol. 11, No. 2, pp. 55-61. doi: 10.1080/0731129X.1992.9991925.
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  46. Sanford Levinson (1973). Responsibility for Crimes of War. Philosophy and Public Affairs 2 (3):244-273.score: 120.0
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  47. Aleksandar Jokic (2012). What's A Just War Theorist? Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Criminology 4 (2):91-114.score: 120.0
    The article provides an account of the unlikely revival of the medieval Just War Theory, due in large part to the efforts of Michael Walzer. Its purpose is to address the question: What is a just war theorist? By exploring contrasts between scholarly activity and forms of international activism, the paper argues that just war theorists appear to be just war criminals, both on the count of aiding and abetting aggression and on the count of inciting troops to commit war (...)
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  48. John J. Davenport (2011). Just War Theory, Humanitarian Intervention, and the Need for a Democratic Federation. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (3):493-555.score: 102.0
    The primary purpose of government is to secure public goods that cannot be achieved by free markets. The Coordination Principle tells us to consolidate sovereign power in a single institution to overcome collective action problems that otherwise prevent secure provision of the relevant public goods. There are several public goods that require such coordination at the global level, chief among them being basic human rights. The claim that human rights require global coordination is supported in three main steps. First, I (...)
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  49. Gwyneth C. McClendon (2009). Building the Rule of International Criminal Law: The Role of Judges and Prosecutors in the Apprehension of War Criminals. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 10 (3):349-372.score: 96.0
    International criminal tribunals are weak institutions, especially since they do not have their own police forces to execute arrest warrants. Understandably then, much of the existing literature has focused exclusively on pressure from major powers and on changing domestic politics to explain the apprehension of suspected war criminals. In contrast, this article turns attention back to the tribunals themselves. I propose three ways in which the activities of international criminal tribunals impact compliance with arrest warrants: through the selection of individuals (...)
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  50. Michael Salter (1999). Neo-Fascist Legal Theory on Trial: An Interpretation of Carl Schmitt's Defence at Nuremberg From the Perspective of Franz Neumann's Critical Theory of Law. Res Publica 5 (2):161-193.score: 90.0
    This article addresses, from a Frankfurt School perspective on law identified with Franz Neumann and more recently Habermas, the attack upon the principles of war criminality formulated at the Nuremberg trials by the increasingly influential legal and political theory of Carl Schmitt. It also considers the contradictions within certain of the defence arguments that Schmitt himself resorted to when interrogated as a possible war crimes defendant at Nuremberg. The overall argument is that a distinctly internal, or “immanent”, form of (...)
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