Search results for 'wave function' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Shan Gao, The Wave Function and Its Evolution.score: 240.0
    The meaning of the wave function and its evolution are investigated. First, we argue that the wave function in quantum mechanics is a description of random discontinuous motion of particles, and the modulus square of the wave function gives the probability density of the particles being in certain locations in space. Next, we show that the linear non-relativistic evolution of the wave function of an isolated system obeys the free Schrödinger equation due (...)
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  2. Shan Gao, Protective Measurement and the Meaning of the Wave Function.score: 240.0
    This article analyzes the implications of protective measurement for the meaning of the wave function. According to protective measurement, a charged quantum system has mass and charge density proportional to the modulus square of its wave function. It is shown that the mass and charge density is not real but effective, formed by the ergodic motion of a localized particle with the total mass and charge of the system. Moreover, it is argued that the ergodic motion (...)
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  3. Shan Gao, Meaning of the Wave Function.score: 240.0
    We investigate the meaning of the wave function by analyzing the mass and charge density distributions of a quantum system. According to protective measurement, a charged quantum system has effective mass and charge density distributing in space, proportional to the square of the absolute value of its wave function. In a realistic interpretation, the wave function of a quantum system can be taken as a description of either a physical field or the ergodic motion (...)
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  4. Shan Gao, Derivation of the Meaning of the Wave Function.score: 240.0
    We show that the physical meaning of the wave function can be derived based on the established parts of quantum mechanics. It turns out that the wave function represents the state of random discontinuous motion of particles, and its modulus square determines the probability density of the particles appearing in certain positions in space.
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  5. Shan Gao, Comment on "How to Protect the Interpretation of the Wave Function Against Protective Measurements" by Jos Uffink.score: 240.0
    It is shown that Uffink's attempt to protect the interpretation of the wave function against protective measurements fails due to several errors in his arguments.
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  6. Shan Gao, The Wave Function and Particle Ontology.score: 240.0
    In quantum mechanics, the wave function of a N-body system is a mathematical function defined in a 3N-dimensional configuration space. We argue that wave function realism implies particle ontology when assuming: (1) the wave function of a N-body system describes N physical entities; (2) each triple of the 3N coordinates of a point in configuration space that relates to one physical entity represents a point in ordinary three-dimensional space. Moreover, the motion of particles (...)
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  7. Lajos Diósi (2014). Gravity-Related Wave Function Collapse. Foundations of Physics 44 (5):483-491.score: 240.0
    The gravity-related model of spontaneous wave function collapse, a longtime hypothesis, damps the massive Schrödinger Cat states in quantum theory. We extend the hypothesis and assume that spontaneous wave function collapses are responsible for the emergence of Newton interaction. Superfluid helium would then show significant and testable gravitational anomalies.
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  8. Mauro Dorato & Federico Laudisa (forthcoming). Realism and Instrumentalism About the Wave Function. How Should We Choose? In Shao Gan (ed.), Protective Measurements and Quantum Reality: Toward a New Understanding of Quantum Mechanics. CUP.score: 240.0
    The main claim of the paper is that one can be ‘realist’ (in some sense) about quantum mechanics without requiring any form of realism about the wave function. We begin by discussing various forms of realism about the wave function, namely Albert’s configuration-space realism, Dürr Zanghi and Goldstein’s nomological realism about Ψ, Esfeld’s dispositional reading of Ψ Pusey Barrett and Rudolph’s realism about the quantum state. By discussing the articulation of these four positions, and their interrelation, (...)
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  9. Roland Omnès (2011). Decoherence and Wave Function Collapse. Foundations of Physics 41 (12):1857-1880.score: 240.0
    The possibility of consistency between the basic quantum principles of quantum mechanics and wave function collapse is reexamined. A specific interpretation of environment is proposed for this aim and is applied to decoherence. When the organization of a measuring apparatus is taken into account, this approach leads also to an interpretation of wave function collapse, which would result in principle from the same interactions with environment as decoherence. This proposal is shown consistent with the non-separable character (...)
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  10. Bradley Monton (2002). Wave Function Ontology. Synthese 130 (2):265 - 277.score: 180.0
    I argue that the wave function ontology for quantum mechanics is an undesirable ontology. This ontology holds that the fundamental space in which entities evolve is not three-dimensional, but instead 3N-dimensional, where N is the number of particles standardly thought to exist in three-dimensional space. I show that the state of three-dimensional objects does not supervene on the state of objects in 3N-dimensional space. I also show that the only way to guarantee the existence of the appropriate mental (...)
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  11. Pete A. Y. Gunter (2009). Collapse of the Quantum Wave Function. Process Studies 38 (2):304-318.score: 180.0
    The following introduction offers a broad survey of the history of quantum physics. It then outlines the position of each contributor in this Special Focus Section concerning the collapse of the quantum wave function and defines three important terms (Hilbert space, Schrödinger’s cat, and decoherence) used in discussing this topic.
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  12. K. Lewin (2009). The Wave Function Collapse as an Effect of Field Quantization. Foundations of Physics 39 (10):1145-1160.score: 180.0
    It is pointed out that ordinary quantum mechanics as a classical field theory cannot account for the wave function collapse if it is not seen within the framework of field quantization. That is needed to understand the particle structure of matter during wave function evolution and to explain the collapse as symmetry breakdown by detection. The decay of a two-particle bound s state and the Stern-Gerlach experiment serve as examples. The absence of the nonlocality problem in (...)
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  13. Andor Frenkel (1990). Spontaneous Localizations of the Wave Function and Classical Behavior. Foundations of Physics 20 (2):159-188.score: 180.0
    We investigate and develop further two models, the GRW model and the K model, in which the Schrödinger evolution of the wave function is spontaneously and repeatedly interrupted by random, approximate localizations, also called “self-reductions” below. In these models the center of mass of a macroscopic solid body is well localized even if one disregards the interactions with the environment. The motion of the body shows a small departure from the classical motion. We discuss the prospects and the (...)
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  14. Willem M. Muynck & Gidi P. Liempd (1986). On the Relation Between Indistinguishability of Identical Particles and (Anti)Symmetry of the Wave Function in Quantum Mechanics. Synthese 67 (3):477 - 496.score: 180.0
    Two different concepts of distinguishability are often mixed up in attempts to derive in quantum mechanics the (anti)symmetry of the wave function from indistinguishability of identical particles. Some of these attempts are analyzed and shown to be defective. It is argued that, although identical particles should be considered as observationally indistinguishable in (anti)symmetric states, they may be considered to be conceptually distinguishable. These two notions of (in)distinguishability have quite different physical origins, the former one being related to observations (...)
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  15. Mayeul Arminjon (2008). Dirac-Type Equations in a Gravitational Field, with Vector Wave Function. Foundations of Physics 38 (11):1020-1045.score: 180.0
    An analysis of the classical-quantum correspondence shows that it needs to identify a preferred class of coordinate systems, which defines a torsionless connection. One such class is that of the locally-geodesic systems, corresponding to the Levi-Civita connection. Another class, thus another connection, emerges if a preferred reference frame is available. From the classical Hamiltonian that rules geodesic motion, the correspondence yields two distinct Klein-Gordon equations and two distinct Dirac-type equations in a general metric, depending on the connection used. Each of (...)
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  16. G. C. Ghirardi, A. Rimini & T. Weber (1988). The Puzzling Entanglement of Schrödinger's Wave Function. Foundations of Physics 18 (1):1-27.score: 180.0
    A brief review of the conceptual difficulties met by the quantum formalism is presented. The main attempts to overcome these difficulties are considered and their limitations are pointed out. A recent proposal based on the assumption of the occurrence of a specific type of wave function collapse is discussed and its consequences for the above-mentioned problems are analyzed.
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  17. S. Nussinov (1998). Realistic Experiments for Measuring the Wave Function of a Single Particle. Foundations of Physics 28 (6):865-880.score: 180.0
    We suggest scattering experiments which implement the concept of “protective measurements” allowing the measurement of the complete wave function even when only one quantum system (rather than an ensemble) is available. Such scattering experiments require massive, slow, projectiles with kinetic energies lower than the first excitation of the system in question. The results of such experiments can have a (probabilistic) distribution (as is the case when the Born approximation for the scattering is valid) or be deterministic (in a (...)
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  18. Carl Frederick (1976). The Collapse of the Wave Function. Foundations of Physics 6 (5):607-611.score: 180.0
    Probability distributions are seen to be observer dependent. The probability function ψ†ψ can be put into an observer-dependent form. This eliminates the acausal behavior of the collapse of the wave function.
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  19. Mikio Namiki & Saverio Pascazio (1992). Many-Hilbert-Spaces Approach to the Wave-Function Collapse. Foundations of Physics 22 (3):451-466.score: 180.0
    The many-Hilbert-spaces approach to the measurement problem in quantum mechanics is reviewed, and the notion of wave function collapse by measurement is formulated as a dephasing process between the two branch waves of an interfering particle. Following the approach originally proposed in Ref. 1, we introduce a “decoherence parameter,” which yields aquantitative description of the degree of coherence between the two branch waves of an interfering particle. By discussing the difference between the wave function collapse and (...)
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  20. Alyssa Ney & David Z. Albert (eds.) (2013). The Wave Function: Essays in the Metaphysics of Quantum Mechanics. Oxford University Press.score: 180.0
    This is a new volume of original essays on the metaphysics of quantum mechanics. The essays address questions such as: What fundamental metaphysics is best motivated by quantum mechanics? What is the ontological status of the wave function? What is the nature of the fundamental space (or space-time manifold) of quantum mechanics?
     
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  21. Robert E. Shaw, Endre E. Kadar & M. T. Turvey (1997). The Job Description of the Cerebellum and a Candidate Model of its “Tidal WaveFunction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):265-265.score: 174.0
    A path space integral approach to modelling the job description of the cerebellum is proposed. This new approach incorporates the equation into a kind of generalized Huygens's wave equation. The resulting exponential functional integral provides a mathematical expression of the inhibitory function by which the cerebellum the intended control signal from the background of neuronal excitation.
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  22. D. Bar (1998). The Feynman Path Integrals and Everett's Universal Wave Function. Foundations of Physics 28 (8):1383-1391.score: 164.0
    We study here the properties of some quantum mechanical wave functions, which, in contrast to the regular quantum mechanical wave functions, can be predetermined with certainty (probability 1) by performing dense measurements (or continuous observations). These specific “certain” states are the junction points through which pass all the diverse paths that can proceed between each two such neighboring “sure” points. When we compare the properties of these points to the properties of the well-known universal wave functions of (...)
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  23. Allen C. Dotson (1991). What Determines Whether a Wave Function is Inherently Necessary? Foundations of Physics 21 (7):821-829.score: 164.0
    The inherent necessity of wave functions may be determined in either of two ways. One way, frequently presupposed, states that the fundamental validity of wave functions is determined generically: The nature of the system determines the assignability of inherently necessary wave functions. The other approach holds that it is the specific experiment which determines the systems for which description by use of wave functions is fundamentally valid. A guideline based on this contextual approach is proposed and (...)
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  24. Nuri Ünal (1997). A Simple Model of the classicalZitterbewegung: Photon Wave Function. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 27 (5):731-746.score: 162.0
    We propose a simple classical model of the zitterbewegung. In this model spin is proportional to the velocity of the particle, the component parallel top is constant and the orthogonal components are oscillating with2p frequency. The quantization of the system gives wave equations for spin,0, 1/2, 1, 3/2,…, etc. respectively. These equations are convenient for massless particles. The wave equation of the spin-1, massless free particle is equivalent to the Maxwell equations and the state functions have a probability (...)
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  25. Eric Wallich (1993). Wave-Function and the Concept of a Nano-Mental Element of Representation. Acta Biotheoretica 41 (1-2).score: 152.0
    Scientific endeavour has often tried to localize superior cerebral functions either in areas like the ones described by Broca as being those connected with language in the left hemisphere, or in the huge array of the hundred billion of interconnected neurons. But in this last case the coined description of the grandmother neuron, tends to show humorously that hopes have fallen short of their target.Along the same lines, the specific timing of electric neural activity is known to take place around (...)
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  26. Tim Maudlin (1997). Descrying the World in the Wave Function. The Monist 80 (1):3-23.score: 150.0
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  27. Quentin Smith (1997). The Ontological Interpretation of the Wave Function of the Universe. The Monist 80 (1):160-185.score: 150.0
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  28. Hugh Everett Iii (1973). The Theory of the Universal Wave Function. In B. DeWitt & N. Graham (eds.), The Many-Worlds Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Princeton Up. 3.score: 150.0
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  29. Robert M. Wald (1991). The Role of Time in the Interpretation of the Wave Function of the Universe. In. In A. Ashtekar & J. Stachel (eds.), Conceptual Problems of Quantum Gravity. Birkhauser. 1--211.score: 150.0
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  30. S. H. Kim (1993). Principle of Random Wave-Function Phase of the Final State in Free-Electron Emission in a Wiggler. Apeiron 17:13-17.score: 150.0
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  31. F. Károlyházy, A. Frenkel & B. Lukács (1986). On the Possible Role of Gravity in the Reduction of the Wave Function. In. In Roger Penrose & C. J. Isham (eds.), Quantum Concepts in Space and Time. New York ;Oxford University Press. 1--109.score: 150.0
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  32. Don N. Page (1986). Hawking's Wave Function for the Universe. In. In Roger Penrose & C. J. Isham (eds.), Quantum Concepts in Space and Time. New York ;Oxford University Press. 1--274.score: 150.0
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  33. Douglas Snyder (1995). On the Quantum Mechanical Wave Function as a Link Between Cognition and the Physical World: A Role for Psychology. Journal of Mind and Behavior 16 (2):151-179.score: 150.0
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  34. David Albert Alyssa Ney (ed.) (2013). The Wave Function: Essays in the Metaphysics of Quantum Mechanics.score: 150.0
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  35. Emmanuel Haven (2008). Private Information and the 'Information Function': A Survey of Possible Uses. [REVIEW] Theory and Decision 64 (2-3):193-228.score: 120.0
    Under certain conditions private information can be a source of trade. Arbitrage for instance can occur as a result of the existence of private information. In this paper we want to explicitly model information. To do so we define an ‘information function’. This information function is a mathematical object, also known as a so called ‘wave function’. We use the definition of wave function as it is used in quantum mechanics and we attempt to (...)
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  36. Leon Cohen (1992). Multipart Wave Functions. Foundations of Physics 22 (5):691-711.score: 100.0
    Some wave functions separate into two or more distinct regions in phase space. Each region is characterized by a trajectory and a spread about that trajectory. The trajectory is the quantum mechanical current. We show that these regions correspond to parts of the wave function and that these parts are generally nonorthogonal.
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  37. R. Aurich & F. Steiner (2001). Orbit Sum Rules for the Quantum Wave Functions of the Strongly Chaotic Hadamard Billiard in Arbitrary Dimensions. Foundations of Physics 31 (4):569-592.score: 96.0
    Sum rules are derived for the quantum wave functions of the Hadamard billiard in arbitrary dimensions. This billiard is a strongly chaotic (Anosov) system which consists of a point particle moving freely on a D-dimensional compact manifold (orbifold) of constant negative curvature. The sum rules express a general (two-point)correlation function of the quantum mechanical wave functions in terms of a sum over the orbits of the corresponding classical system. By taking the trace of the orbit sum rule (...)
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  38. Lipo Wang & R. F. O'Connell (1988). Quantum Mechanics Without Wave Functions. Foundations of Physics 18 (10):1023-1033.score: 96.0
    The phase space formulation of quantum mechanics is based on the use of quasidistribution functions. This technique was pioneered by Wigner, whose distribution function is perhaps the most commonly used of the large variety that we find discussed in the literature. Here we address the question of how one can obtain distribution functions and hence do quantum mechanics without the use of wave functions.
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  39. Shan Gao, Why the de Broglie-Bohm Theory is Probably Wrong.score: 90.0
    We investigate the validity of the field explanation of the wave function by analyzing the mass and charge density distributions of a quantum system. It is argued that a charged quantum system has effective mass and charge density distributing in space, proportional to the square of the absolute value of its wave function. This is also a consequence of protective measurement. If the wave function is a physical field, then the mass and charge density (...)
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  40. Shan Gao, An Exceptionally Simple Argument Against the Many-Worlds Interpretation.score: 90.0
    It is shown that the superposed wave function of a measuring device, in each branch of which there is a definite measurement result, does not correspond to many mutually unobservable but equally real worlds, as the superposed wave function can be observed in our world by protective measurement.
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  41. Shan Gao, Protective Measurement and the de Broglie-Bohm Theory.score: 90.0
    We investigate the implications of protective measurement for de Broglie-Bohm theory, mainly focusing on the interpretation of the wave function. It has been argued that the de Broglie-Bohm theory gives the same predictions as quantum mechanics by means of quantum equilibrium hypothesis. However, this equivalence is based on the premise that the wave function, regarded as a Ψ-field, has no mass and charge density distributions. But this premise turns out to be wrong according to protective measurement; (...)
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  42. Valia Allori (2013). On the Metaphysics of Quantum Mechanics. In Soazig Lebihan (ed.), Precis de la Philosophie de la Physique. Vuibert.score: 90.0
    What is quantum mechanics about? The most natural way to interpret quantum mechanics realistically as a theory about the world might seem to be what is called wave function ontology: the view according to which the wave function mathematically represents in a complete way fundamentally all there is in the world. Erwin Schroedinger was one of the first proponents of such a view, but he dismissed it after he realized it led to macroscopic superpositions (if the (...)
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  43. Shan Gao (2006). A Model of Wavefunction Collapse in Discrete Space-Time. International Journal of Theoretical Physics 45 (10):1965-1979.score: 90.0
    We give a new argument supporting a gravitational role in quantum collapse. It is demonstrated that the discreteness of space-time, which results from the proper combination of quantum theory and general relativity, may inevitably result in the dynamical collapse of thewave function. Moreover, the minimum size of discrete space-time yields a plausible collapse criterion consistent with experiments. By assuming that the source to collapse the wave function is the inherent random motion of particles described by the (...) function, we further propose a concrete model of wavefunction collapse in the discrete space-time. It is shown that the model is consistent with the existing experiments and macroscopic experiences. (shrink)
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  44. Fernando Birman (2009). Quantum Mechanics and the Plight of Physicalism. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 40 (2):207-225.score: 90.0
    The literature on physicalism often fails to elucidate, I think, what the word physical in physical ism precisely means. Philosophers speak at times of an ideal set of fundamental physical facts, or they stipulate that physical means non-mental , such that all fundamental physical facts are fundamental facts pertaining to the non-mental. In this article, I will probe physicalism in the very much tangible framework of quantum mechanics. Although this theory, unlike “ideal physics” or some “final theory of non-mentality”, is (...)
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  45. Agung Budiyono (2010). On Quantum-Classical Transition of a Single Particle. Foundations of Physics 40 (8):1117-1133.score: 90.0
    We discuss the issue of quantum-classical transition in a system of a single particle with and without external potential. This is done by elaborating the notion of self-trapped wave function recently developed by the author. For a free particle, we show that there is a subset of self-trapped wave functions which is particle-like. Namely, the spatially localized wave packet is moving uniformly with undistorted shape as if the whole wave packet is indeed a classical free (...)
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  46. Roderich Tumulka (2007). Comment on “The Free Will Theorem”. Foundations of Physics 37 (2):186-197.score: 90.0
    In a recent paper Conway and Kochen, Found. Phys. 36, 2006, claim to have established that theories of the Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber (RW) type, i.e., of spontaneous wave function collapse, cannot be made relativistic. On the other hand, relativistic GRW-type theories have already been presented, in my recent paper, J. Stat. Phys. 125, 2006, and by Dowker and Henson, J. Stat. Phys. 115, 2004. Here, I elucidate why these are not excluded by the arguments of Conway and Kochen.
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  47. Sergio Hernández-Zapata & Ernesto Hernández-Zapata (2010). Classical and Non-Relativistic Limits of a Lorentz-Invariant Bohmian Model for a System of Spinless Particles. Foundations of Physics 40 (5):532-544.score: 90.0
    A completely Lorentz-invariant Bohmian model has been proposed recently for the case of a system of non-interacting spinless particles, obeying Klein-Gordon equations. It is based on a multi-temporal formalism and on the idea of treating the squared norm of the wave function as a space-time probability density. The particle’s configurations evolve in space-time in terms of a parameter σ with dimensions of time. In this work this model is further analyzed and extended to the case of an interaction (...)
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  48. Roland Omnès (2013). Local Properties of Entanglement and Application to Collapse. Foundations of Physics 43 (11):1339-1368.score: 90.0
    When a quantum system is macroscopic and becomes entangled with a microscopic one, entanglement is not immediately total, but gradual and local. A study of this locality is the starting point of the present work and shows unexpected and detailed properties in the generation and propagation of entanglement between a measuring apparatus and a microscopic measured system. Of special importance is the propagation of entanglement in nonlinear waves with a finite velocity. When applied to the entanglement between a macroscopic system (...)
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  49. Diego L. Rapoport (2007). Torsion Fields, Cartan–Weyl Space–Time and State-Space Quantum Geometries, Their Brownian Motions, and the Time Variables. Foundations of Physics 37 (4-5):813-854.score: 90.0
    We review the relation between spacetime geometries with trace-torsion fields, the so-called Riemann–Cartan–Weyl (RCW) geometries, and their associated Brownian motions. In this setting, the drift vector field is the metric conjugate of the trace-torsion one-form, and the laplacian defined by the RCW connection is the differential generator of the Brownian motions. We extend this to the state-space of non-relativistic quantum mechanics and discuss the relation between a non-canonical quantum RCW geometry in state-space associated with the gradient of the quantum-mechanical expectation (...)
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  50. Marian B. Pour‐El & Ning Zhong (1997). The Wave Equation with Computable Initial Data Whose Unique Solution is Nowhere Computable. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 43 (4):499-509.score: 78.0
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