Search results for 'well-being' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Richard Kraut (2007). What is Good and Why: The Ethics of Well-Being. Harvard University Press.score: 240.0
    In search of good -- A Socratic question -- Flourishing and well-being -- Mind and value -- Utilitarianism -- Rawls and the priority of the right -- Right, wrong, should -- The elimination of moral rightness -- Rules and good -- Categorical imperatives -- Conflicting interests -- Whose good? The egoist's answer -- Whose good? The utilitarian's answer - Self-denial, self-love, universal concern -- Pain, self-love, and altruism -- Agent-neutrality and agent-relativity -- Good, conation, and pleasure -- "Good" and (...)
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  2. Jason Kawall (1999). The Experience Machine and Mental State Theories of Well-Being. Journal of Value Inquiry 33 (3):381-387.score: 240.0
    It is argued that Nozick's experience machine thought experiment does not pose a particular difficulty for mental state theories of well-being. While the example shows that we value many things beyond our mental states, this simply reflects the fact that we value more than our own well-being. Nor is a mental state theorist forced to make the dubious claim that we maintain these other values simply as a means to desirable mental states. Valuing more than our mental states (...)
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  3. William Lauinger (2013). The Missing-Desires Objection to Hybrid Theories of Well-Being. Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (2):270-295.score: 240.0
    Many philosophers have claimed that we might do well to adopt a hybrid theory of well-being: a theory that incorporates both an objective-value constraint and a pro-attitude constraint. Hybrid theories are attractive for two main reasons. First, unlike desire theories of well-being, hybrid theories need not worry about the problem of defective desires. This is so because, unlike desire theories, hybrid theories place an objective-value constraint on well-being. Second, unlike objectivist theories of well-being, hybrid theories need (...)
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  4. Alex Voorhoeve (2014). Review of Matthew D. Adler: Well-Being and Fair Distribution. Beyond Cost-Benefit Analysis. [REVIEW] Social Choice and Welfare 42 (1):245-54.score: 240.0
    In this extended book review, I summarize Adler's views and critically analyze his key arguments on the measurement of well-being and the foundations of prioritarianism.
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  5. William Lauinger (2012). Well-Being and Theism: Linking Ethics to God. Continuum.score: 240.0
    Well-Being and Theism is divided into two distinctive parts. The first part argues that desire-fulfillment welfare theories fail to capture the 'good' part of ‘good for’, and that objective list welfare theories fail to capture the 'for' part of ‘good for’. Then, with the aim of capturing both of these parts of ‘good for’, a hybrid theory–one which places both a value constraint and a desire constraint on well-being–is advanced. Lauinger then defends this proposition, which he calls the (...)
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  6. Guy Fletcher (2009). Rejecting Well-Being Invariabilism. Philosophical Papers 38 (1):21-34.score: 240.0
    This paper is an attempt to undermine a basic assumption of theories of well-being, one that I call well-being invariabilism. I argue that much of what makes existing theories of well-being inadequate stems from the invariabilist assumption. After distinguishing and explaining well-being invariabilism and well-being variabilism, I show that the most widely-held theories of well-being—hedonism, desire-satisfaction, and pluralist objective-list theories—presuppose invariabilism and that a large class of the objections to them arise because of it. (...)
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  7. H. E. Baber (2010). Worlds, Capabilities and Well-Being. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (4):377 - 392.score: 240.0
    Critics suggest that without some "objective" account of well-being we cannot explain why satisfying some preferences is, as we believe, better than satisfying others, why satisfying some preferences may leave us on net worse off or why, in a range of cases, we should reject life-adjustment in favor of life-improvement. I defend a subjective welfarist understanding of well-being against such objections by reconstructing the Amartya Sen's capability approach as a preferentist account of well-being. According to the proposed (...)
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  8. Robert A. Giacalone & Mark D. Promislo (2010). Unethical and Unwell: Decrements in Well-Being and Unethical Activity at Work. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 91 (2):275 - 297.score: 240.0
    Previous research on unethical business behavior usually has focused on its impact from a financial or philosophical perspective. While such foci are important to our understanding of unethical behavior, we argue that another set of outcomes linked to individual well-being are critical as well. Using data from psychological, criminological, and epidemiological sources, we propose a model of unethical behavior and well-being. This model postulates that decrements in well-being result from stress or trauma stemming from being victimized by, (...)
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  9. Raffaele Rodogno (2008). On the Importance of Well-Being. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (2):197 - 212.score: 240.0
    Many among philosophers and non-philosophers would claim that well-being is important in moral theory because it is important to the individual whose well-being it is. The exact meaning of this claim, however, is in need of clarification. Having provided that, I will present a charge against it. This charge can be found in the recent work of both Joseph Raz and Thomas Scanlon. According to the latter the concept of well-being plays an unimportant role in an (...)
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  10. Alexander Sarch (2012). Multi-Component Theories of Well-Being and Their Structure. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 93 (4):439-471.score: 240.0
    The ‘adjustment strategy’ currently seems to be the most common approach to incorporating objective elements into one's theory of well-being. These theories face a certain problem, however, which can be avoided by a different approach – namely, that employed by ‘partially objective multi-component theories.’ Several such theories have recently been proposed, but the question of how to understand their mathematical structure has not been adequately addressed. I argue that the most mathematically simple of these multi-component theories fails, so I (...)
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  11. Donald W. Bruckner (2013). Present Desire Satisfaction and Past Well-Being. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (1):15 - 29.score: 240.0
    (2013). Present Desire Satisfaction and Past Well-Being. Australasian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 91, No. 1, pp. 15-29. doi: 10.1080/00048402.2011.632016.
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  12. M. Joseph Sirgy & Dong-Jin Lee (2008). Well-Being Marketing: An Ethical Business Philosophy for Consumer Goods Firms. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 77 (4):377 - 403.score: 240.0
    In this article we build on the program of research in well-being marketing by further conceptualizing and refining the conceptual domain of the concept of consumer well-being (CWB). We then argue that well-being marketing is a business philosophy grounded in business ethics. We show how this philosophy is an ethical extension of relationship marketing (stakeholder theory in business ethics) and is superior to transactional marketing (a business philosophy grounded in the principles of consumer sovereignty). Additionally, we argue (...)
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  13. Lorraine Besser-Jones (2008). Personal Integrity, Moraity, and Psychological Well-Being. Journal of Moral Philosophy 5 (3):361-383.score: 240.0
    Most moral theories purport to make claims upon agents, yet often it is not clear why those claims are ones that can be justifiably demanded of agents. In this paper, I develop a justification of moral requirements that explains why it is that morality makes legitimate claims on agents. This justification is grounded in the idea that there is an essential connection between morality and psychological well-being. I go on to suggest how, using this justification as a springboard, we (...)
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  14. Aaron Smuts (2013). Painful Art and the Limits of Well-Being. In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Suffering Art Gladly. Palgrave/ Macmillan.score: 240.0
    In this chapter I explore what painful art can tell us about the nature and importance of human welfare. My goal is not so much to defend a new solution to the paradox of tragedy, as it is to explore the implications of the kinds of solutions that I find attractive. Both nonhedonic compensatory theories and constitutive theories explain why people seek out painful art, but they have troublesome implications. On some narrow theories of well-being, they imply that painful (...)
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  15. William A. Lauinger (2013). The Strong-Tie Requirement and Objective-List Theories of Well-Being. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (5):953-968.score: 240.0
    Many philosophers with hedonistic sympathies (e.g., Mill, Sidgwick, Sumner, Feldman, Crisp, Heathwood, and Bradley) have claimed that well-being is necessarily experiential. Kagan once claimed something slightly different, saying that, although unexperienced bodily events can directly impact a person’s well-being, it is nonetheless true that any change in a person’s well-being must involve a change in her (i.e., either in her mind or in her body). Kagan elaborated by saying that a person’s well-being cannot float freely of (...)
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  16. Bruno S. Frey & Jana Gallus (2013). Subjective Well-Being and Policy. Topoi 32 (2):207-212.score: 240.0
    This paper analyses whether the aggregation of individual happiness scores to a National Happiness Index can still be trusted once governments have proclaimed their main objective to be the pursuit—or even maximization—of this National Happiness Index. The answer to this investigation is clear-cut: as soon as the National Happiness Index has become a policy goal, it can no longer be trusted to reflect people’s true happiness. Rather, the Index will be systematically distorted due to the incentive for citizens to answer (...)
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  17. Frans Svensson (2011). Happiness, Well-Being, and Their Relation to Virtue in Descartes' Ethics. Theoria 77 (3):238-260.score: 240.0
    My main thesis in this article is that Descartes' ethics should be understood as involving a distinction between happiness and well-being. The distinction I have in mind is never clearly stated or articulated by Descartes himself, but I argue that we nevertheless have good reason to embrace it as an important component in a charitable reconstruction of his ethical thought. In section I, I present Descartes' account of happiness and of how he thinks happiness can (and cannot) be acquired. (...)
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  18. Mick Power (2013). Well-Being, Quality of Life, and the Naïve Pursuit of Happiness. Topoi 32 (2):145-152.score: 240.0
    The pursuit of happiness is a long-enshrined tradition that has recently become the cornerstone of the American Positive Psychology movement. However, “happiness” is an over-worked and ambiguous word, which, it is argued, should be restricted and only used as the label for a brief emotional state that typically lasts a few seconds or minutes. The corollary proposal for positive psychology is that optimism is a preferable stance over pessimism or realism. Examples are presented both from psychology and economics that illustrate (...)
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  19. Ishtiyaque Haji & Stefaan E. Cuypers (2011). Ultimate Educational Aims, Overridingness, and Personal Well-Being. Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (6):543-556.score: 240.0
    Discussion regarding education’s aims, especially its ultimate aims, is a key topic in the philosophy of education. These aims or values play a pivotal role in regulating and structuring moral and other types of normative education. We outline two plausible strategies to identify and justify education’s ultimate aims. The first associates these aims with a normative standpoint, such as the moral, prudential, or aesthetic, which is overriding, in a sense of ‘overriding’ to be explained. The second associates education’s ultimate aims (...)
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  20. Gert Olthuis & Wim Dekkers (2005). Quality of Life Considered as Well-Being: Views From Philosophy and Palliative Care Practice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (4):307-337.score: 240.0
    The main measure of quality of life is well-being. The aim of this article is to compare insights about well-being from contemporary philosophy with the practice-related opinions of palliative care professionals. In the first part of the paper two philosophical theories on well-being are introduced: Sumner’s theory of authentic happiness and Griffin’s theory of prudential perfectionism. The second part presents opinions derived from interviews with 19 professional palliative caregivers. Both the well-being of patients and the (...) of the carers themselves are considered in this empirical exploration. In the third part the attention shifts from the description of “well-being” to prescriptions for the promotion of well-being. Our interview data are analysed in light of the theories of Sumner and Griffin for clues to the promotion of “well-being.” The analysis (1) underscores the subject-relativity of well-being, (2) points out that values that are considered important in every life still seem to be relevant (at least in palliative care practice), and (3) shows the importance of living a certain sort of life when aiming to enhance dying patients’ well-being. (shrink)
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  21. Mario Fernando & Rafi M. M. I. Chowdhury (2010). The Relationship Between Spiritual Well-Being and Ethical Orientations in Decision Making: An Empirical Study with Business Executives in Australia. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (2):211 - 225.score: 240.0
    The relationship between spiritual wellbeing and ethical orientations in decision making is examined through a survey of executives in organizations listed on the Australian Stock Exchange. The four domains of spiritual well-being, personal, communal, environmental and transcendental (Fisher, Spiritual health: its nature and place in the school curriculum, PhD thesis, University of Melbourne, 1998; Gomez and Fisher, Pers Individ Differ 35:1975–1991, 2003) are examined in relation to idealism and relativism (Forsyth, J Pers Soc Psychol 39(1): 175–184, 1980). Results reveal (...)
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  22. Richard P. Haynes (2001). Do Regulators of Animal Welfare Need to Develop a Theory of Psychological Well-Being? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (2):231-240.score: 240.0
    The quest for a ``theory of nonhuman minds'''' to assessclaims about the moral status of animals is misguided. Misframedquestions about animal minds facilitate the appropriation ofanimal welfare by the animal user industry. When misframed, thesequestions shift the burden of proof unreasonably to animalwelfare regulators. An illustrative instance of misframing can befound in the US National Research Council''s 1998 publication thatreports professional efforts to define the psychologicalwell-being of nonhuman primates, a condition that the US 1985animal welfare act requires users of primates (...)
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  23. M. Joseph Sirgy, Grace B. Yu, Dong-Jin Lee, Shuqin Wei & Ming-Wei Huang (2012). Does Marketing Activity Contribute to a Society's Well-Being? The Role of Economic Efficiency. Journal of Business Ethics 107 (2):91-102.score: 240.0
    Does the level of marketing activity in a country contribute to societal well-being or quality of life? Does economic efficiency also play a positive role in societal well-being? Does economic efficiency also moderate or mediate the marketing activity effect on societal well-being? Marketing activity refers to the pervasiveness of promotion expenditures and number of retail outlets per capita in a country. Economic efficiency refers to the extent to which the economy is unhampered by corruption, burdensome government regulation, (...)
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  24. Matthew D. Adler (2011). Well-Being and Fair Distribution: Beyond Cost-Benefit Analysis. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
    This book addresses a range of relevant theoretical issues, including the possibility of an interpersonally comparable measure of well-being, or “utility” metric; the moral value of equality, and how that bears on the form of the social welfare function; social choice under uncertainty; and the possibility of integrating considerations of individual choice and responsibility into the social-welfare-function framework. This book also deals with issues of implementation, and explores how survey data and other sources of evidence might be used to (...)
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  25. Po-Keung Ip (2010). Business Ethics and the Well-Being of Nations — Is There a Connection? Journal of Business Ethics 95 (1):97 - 110.score: 240.0
    The aim of this paper is to examine whether and how business ethics is connected with the well-being of a nation. There has been active research in the well-being of nations across the globe in the last two decades, resulting in substantial theoretical progress and a wealth of empirical data on the well-beings of different nations across the globe. Dissatisfied with the conventional measures such as the GDP, well-being researchers have been developing alternative measures that can better (...)
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  26. Christopher A. Riddle (2013). Well-Being and the Capability of Health. Topoi 32 (2):153-160.score: 240.0
    In this paper, I argue that health plays a special role in the promotion of well-being within the capabilities approach framework. I do this by first presenting a scenario involving two individuals, both of whom lack access to only one capability. The first cannot secure the capability of bodily health due to an unhealthy lifestyle, whilst the second lacks access to bodily integrity due to a life of celibacy. Second, I explore these scenarios by assessing the nature of disadvantage (...)
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  27. M. Musalek (2013). Health, Well-Being and Beauty in Medicine. Topoi 32 (2):171-177.score: 240.0
    This paper aims at explicating the role of the connections and interactions between health, well being and beauty. The primary goal of all medical approaches, including the classic biomedical and humanistic or humane approaches, is to restore or create health, whereby medical approaches that include prevention go beyond the mere restoration of health to include the preservation of health. Equating well-being and thus health with a largely self-determined and joyful life, then not only does a healthy life become a (...)
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  28. Rudy Haryanto & P. Tommy Y. S. Suyasa (2010). Persepsi Terhadap Job Characteristic Model, Psychological Well-Being Dan Performance (Studi Pada Karyawan Pt. X). Phronesis 9 (1).score: 240.0
    The objective of this research is to interaction between perception in job characteristic model, psychological well-being, and performance. Job characteristic model are explained by skill variety, task identity, task significan, autonomy, and feedback about the job. Psychological well-being is explained by autonomy, environment mastery, good relationship with others, self acceptance, and personal growth. Performance measured by how employee done their task according their responsibility. Subject of this research are employees of PT. X (N = 60). The result of (...)
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  29. John White (2002). Education, the Market and the Nature of Personal Well-Being. British Journal of Educational Studies 50 (4):442 - 456.score: 240.0
    A central aim of education has to do with the promotion of the pupil's and other people's well-being. Recent work by John O'Neill locates the strongest justification of the market in an individualistic preference-satisfaction notion of well-being. His own preference for an objective theory of well-being allows us to make a clear separation of educational values from those of the market. Problems in O'Neill's account suggest a third notion of well-being which better supports the separation mentioned.
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  30. Gordon Bermant (2013). Working with (Out) a Net: Improvisational Theater and Enhanced Well-Being. Frontiers in Psychology 4:929.score: 240.0
    Working with(out) a net: improvisational theater and enhanced well-being.
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  31. Shakuntala A. Singh Ajai R. Singh (2008). Diseases of Poverty and Lifestyle, Well-Being and Human Development. Mens Sana Monographs 6 (1):187.score: 240.0
    _The problems of the haves differ substantially from those of the have-nots. Individuals in developing societies have to fight mainly against infectious and communicable diseases, while in the developed world the battles are mainly against lifestyle diseases. Yet, at a very fundamental level, the problems are the same-the fight is against distress, disability, and premature death; against human exploitation and for human development and self-actualisation; against the callousness to critical concerns in regimes and scientific power centres. While there has been (...)
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  32. Andrew Bloodworth & Mike McNamee (2007). Conceptions of Well-Being in Psychology and Exercise Psychology Research: A Philosophical Critique. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 15 (2):107-121.score: 240.0
    The potential of physical activity to improve our health has been the subject of extensive research [38]. The relationship between physical activity and well-being has prompted substantial interest from exercise psychologists in particular [3], and it seems, is generating increasing interest outside the academic community in healthcare policy and practice inter alia through GP referrals for exercise. Researchers in the field have benefited from a rich tradition within psychology that investigates subjective well-being and its antecedents [7]. We argue (...)
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  33. Afschin Gandjour (2001). Is Subjective Well-Being a Useful Parameter for Allocating Resources Among Public Interventions? Health Care Analysis 9 (4):437-447.score: 240.0
    Scarce public resources requiretrade-offs between competing programs indifferent sectors, and the careful allocationof fixed resources within a single sector. Thispaper argues that a general quality of lifeinstrument encompassing health-related andnon-health-related components is suitable fordetermining the best trade-offs betweensectors. Further, this paper suggests thatsubjective well-being shows the propertiescrucial to a general quality of life measureand has additional advantages that makes itparticularly useful for the allocation ofpublic and health care resources. The paperargues that Western societies are in anunusually prosperous situation today (...)
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  34. John P. Gluck (2014). Moving Beyond the Welfare Standard of Psychological Well-Being for Nonhuman Primates: The Case of Chimpanzees. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (2):105-116.score: 240.0
    Since 1985, the US Animal Welfare Act and Public Health Service policy have required that researchers using nonhuman primates in biomedical and behavioral research develop a plan “for a physical environment adequate to promote the psychological well-being of primates.” In pursuing this charge, housing attributes such as social companionship, opportunities to express species-typical behavior, suitable space for expanded locomotor activity, and nonstressful relationships with laboratory personnel are dimensions that have dominated the discussion. Regulators were careful not to direct a (...)
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  35. Mari Huhtala, Taru Feldt, Anna-Maija Lämsä, Saija Mauno & Ulla Kinnunen (2011). Does the Ethical Culture of Organisations Promote Managers' Occupational Well-Being? Investigating Indirect Links Via Ethical Strain. Journal of Business Ethics 101 (2):231-247.score: 240.0
    The present study had two major aims: first, to examine the construct validity of the Finnish 58-item Corporate Ethical Virtues scale (CEV; Kaptein in J Org Behav 29:923–947, 2008) and second, to examine whether the associations between managers’ perceptions of ethical organisational culture and their occupational well-being (emotional exhaustion and work engagement) are indirectly linked by ethical strain, i.e. the tension which arises from the difference in the ethical values of the individual and the organisation he or she works (...)
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  36. A. R. Singh (2010). Modern Medicine: Towards Prevention, Cure, Well-Being and Longevity. Mens Sana Monographs 8 (1):17.score: 240.0
    Modern medicine has done much in the fields of infectious diseases and emergencies to aid cure. In most other fields, it is mostly control that it aims for, which is another name for palliation. Pharmacology, psychopharmacology included, is mostly directed towards such control and palliation too. The thrust, both of clinicians and research, must now turn decisively towards prevention and cure. Also, longevity with well-being is modern medicine's other big challenge. Advances in vaccines for hypertension, diabetes, cancers etc, deserve (...)
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  37. Greg Bognar (2008). Well-Being and Health. Health Care Analysis 16 (2):97-113.score: 240.0
    One way of evaluating health is in terms of its impact on well-being. It has been shown, however, that evaluating health this way runs into difficulties, since health and other aspects of well-being are not separable. At the same time, the practical implications of the inseparability problem remain unclear. This paper assesses these implications by considering the relations between theories, components, and indicators of well-being.
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  38. Rafi M. M. I. Chowdhury & Mario Fernando (2013). The Role of Spiritual Well-Being and Materialism in Determining Consumers' Ethical Beliefs: An Empirical Study with Australian Consumers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 113 (1):61-79.score: 240.0
    A survey was conducted to investigate the relationship of Australian consumers’ lived (experienced) spiritual well-being and materialism with the various dimensions of consumer ethics. Spiritual well-being is composed of four domains—personal, communal, transcendental and environmental well-being. All four domains were examined in relation to the various dimensions of consumers’ ethical beliefs (active/illegal dimension, passive dimension, active/legal dimension, ‘no harm, no foul’ dimension and ‘doing good’/recycling dimension). The results indicated that lived communal well-being was negatively related to (...)
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  39. G. M. Manzoni, R. A. Cribbie, V. Villa, C. A. Arpin-Cribbie, L. Gondoni & G. Castelnuovo (2009). Psychological Well-Being in Obese Inpatients with Ischemic Heart Disease at Entry and at Discharge From a Four-Week Cardiac Rehabilitation Program. Frontiers in Psychology 1:38-38.score: 240.0
    The purposes of this observational pre-post study were twofold: 1- to evaluate psychological health in obese patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) at admission to cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and 2 - to examine the effectiveness of a four-week CR residential program in improving obese patients’ psychological well-being at discharge from CR. A sample of 177 obese patients completed the Psychological General Well-Being Inventory (PGWBI) at admission to the CR program and at discharge. The equivalence testing method with normative (...)
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  40. Stephen Wood, Johan Braeken & Karen Niven (2013). Discrimination and Well-Being in Organizations: Testing the Differential Power and Organizational Justice Theories of Workplace Aggression. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (3):617-634.score: 240.0
    People may be subjected to discrimination from a variety of sources in the workplace. In this study of mental health workers, we contrast four potential perpetrators of discrimination (managers, co-workers, patients, and visitors) to investigate whether the negative impact of discrimination on victims’ well-being will vary in strength depending on the relative power of the perpetrator. We further explore whether the negative impact of discrimination is at least partly explained by its effects on people’s sense of organizational justice, and (...)
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  41. Joelle Carpentier & Roxane de la Sablonnière (2013). Identity Profiles and Well-Being of Multicultural Immigrants: The Case of Canadian Immigrants Living in Quebec. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 240.0
    Studies worldwide point toward increased risk of mental health issues among immigrants. Immigrants’ ability to integrate the cultural identity of their new country has been found to be a key factor in their psychological well-being. Even though researchers agree on the crucial role of identity integration in immigrants’ well-being, the current literature has two main limitations: 1) researchers do not agree on the importance that should be allocated to each of the cultural identities, and 2) research has focused (...)
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  42. Karin Dahlberg, Les Todres & Kathleen Galvin (2009). Lifeworld-Led Healthcare is More Than Patient-Led Care: An Existential View of Well-Being. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (3):265-271.score: 240.0
    In this paper we offer an appreciation and critique of patient-led care as expressed in current policy and practice. We argue that current patient-led approaches hinder a focus on a deeper understanding of what patient-led care could be. Our critique focuses on how the consumerist/citizenship emphasis in current patient-led care obscures attention from a more fundamental challenge to conceptualise an alternative philosophically informed framework from where care can be led. We thus present an alternative interpretation of patient-led care that we (...)
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  43. Esther Usborne & Roxane Sablonnière (2014). Understanding My Culture Means Understanding Myself: The Function of Cultural Identity Clarity for Personal Identity Clarity and Personal Psychological Well‐Being. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (2).score: 240.0
    Culture is acknowledged to be a critical element in the construction of an individual's identity; however, in today's increasingly multicultural environments, the influence of culture is no longer straightforward. It is now important to explore cultural identity clarity—the extent to which beliefs about identity that arise from one's cultural group membership(s) are clearly and confidently understood. We describe a novel theoretical model to explain why having a clear and confident understanding of one's cultural identity is important for psychological well-being, (...)
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  44. Asoka Bandarage (2013). Sustainability and Well-Being: The Middle Path to Environment, Society, and the Economy. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 240.0
    Introduction : environment, society, and the economy -- Environmental, social, and economic collapse -- Evolution of the domination paradigm -- Ecological and social justice movements -- Ethical path to sustainability and well-being.
     
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  45. Julien A. Deonna & Fabrice Teroni (forthcoming). Emotions and Well-Being. Philosophical Topics.score: 240.0
    It is striking that for each major theory of well-being, there exists a companion theory of the emotions. Thus, to classical hedonic views of well-being, there corresponds no less classical pure feeling views of the emotions; to desire views that conceive of well-being in terms of desire satisfaction, there corresponds a variety of theories approaching the emotions in terms of the satisfaction/frustration of desires; and finally, to so called objective list theories of well-being, there corresponds a (...)
     
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  46. Alberto Corsín Jiménez (ed.) (2008). Culture and Well-Being: Anthropological Approaches to Freedom and Political Ethics. Pluto Press.score: 240.0
    The concept of well-being has emerged as a key category of social and political thought, especially in the fields of moral and political philosophy, development studies, and economics. This book takes a critical look at the notion of well-being by examining what well-being means, or could mean, to people living in a number of different regions including Sudan, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, India, Sierra Leone, and the UK. The contributors take issue with some of the assumptions behind (...)
     
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  47. David Stawarczyk, Steve Majerus, Martial Van Der Linden & Arnaud D'Argembeau (2012). Using the Daydreaming Frequency Scale to Investigate the Relationships Between Mind-Wandering, Psychological Well-Being, and Present-Moment Awareness. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    Recent findings have shown that mind-wandering—the occurrence of stimulus-independent and task-unrelated thoughts—is associated with negative affect and lower psychological well-being. However, it remains unclear whether this relationship is due to the occurrence of mind-wandering per se or to the fact that people who mind wander more tend to be generally less attentive to present-moment experience. In three studies, we first validate a French translation of a retrospective self-report questionnaire widely used to assess the general occurrence of mind-wandering in daily (...)
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  48. Maya Adina Yampolsky, Catherine E. Amiot & Roxane de la Sablonnière (2013). Multicultural Identity Integration and Well-Being: A Qualitative Exploration of Variations in Narrative Coherence and Multicultural Identification. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 240.0
    Understanding the experiences of multicultural individuals is vital in our diverse populations. Multicultural people often need to navigate the different norms and values associated with their multiple cultural identities. Recent research on multicultural identification has focused on how individuals with multiple cultural groups manage these different identities within the self, and how this process predicts well-being. The current study built on this research by using a qualitative method to examine the process of configuring one’s identities within the self. The (...)
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  49. Clémence Lesimple & Martine Hausberger (forthcoming). How Accurate Are We at Assessing Others' Well-Being? Frontiers in Psychology.score: 222.0
    Healthcare practitioners underestimate patients’ pain causing undesirable consequences on treatment decisions. Over-exposure and group membership are two reasons invoked, but a combination of factors may be involved. Studying human decoding of animals’ expressions of emotions showed that “identification” was necessary to decode the other’s expressions. We tested here the impact of different factors on the evaluation of horses’ expressions of poor welfare, by comparing caretakers’ reports and ethological observations concerning the prevalence of animals presenting stereotypic behaviours. Here we show that (...)
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  50. Jason Raibley (2013). Health and Well-Being. Philosophical Studies 165 (2):469-489.score: 216.0
    Eudaimonistic theorists of welfare have recently attacked conative accounts of welfare. Such accounts, it is claimed, are unable to classify states normally associated with physical and emotional health as non-instrumentally good and states associated with physical and psychological damage as non-instrumentally bad. However, leading eudaimonistic theories such as the self-fulfillment theory and developmentalism have problems of their own. Furthermore, conative theorists can respond to this challenge by dispositionalizing their theories, i.e., by saying that it is not merely the realization of (...)
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