Search results for 'what matters in survival' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Heidi Savage, What Matters in Survival: Life Trajectories and the Possibility of Virtual Immersion.score: 1632.0
    The immediate goal of this paper is to establish that one can both agree with Parfit that identity is not what matters in survival and yet still maintain that the concept of a persisting person requires singularity over time. That is, fission cannot preserve what matters in survival. This can be maintained once one recognizes an externalist constraint on preserving what matters. Specifically, I claim that what matters in the (...) of persons is something Parfit might call the “quasi-continuation” of what I term their “life trajectories.” The motivation for this externalist conception of what matters in survival comes from considering the implications of certain kinds of cases of complete virtual immersion -- the immersion of a psychological subject in a completely virtual world, a world in which her experiences are de-correlated with events in the objective world. Of course, the idea that externalist constraints are important in a complete metaphysical account of the nature of persons is not new, but I propose my own specific account about how to understand these constraints. Furthermore, this account not only rules out fission cases as those in which we have what matters equally as well as in single cases on metaphysical grounds, it also can be used to explain our reactions to different virtual immersion scenarios. Therefore, simply on explanatory grounds alone, my view is to be preferred over pure psychological continuity theories. (shrink)
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  2. Scott Campbell (2005). Is Causation Necessary for What Matters in Survival? Philosophical Studies 126 (3):375-396.score: 1248.0
    In this paper I shall argue that if the Parfitian psychological criterion or theory of personal identity is true, then a good case can be made out to show that the psychological theorist should accept the view I call “psychological sequentialism”. This is the view that a causal connection is not necessary for what matters in survival, as long as certain other conditions are met. I argue this by way of Parfit’s own principle that what (...) in survival cannot depend upon a trivial fact. (shrink)
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  3. Raymond Martin (1998). Self-Concern: An Experiential Approach to What Matters in Survival. Cambridge University Press.score: 1224.0
    This book is a major contribution to the philosophical literature on the nature of the self, personal identity, and survival. Its distinctive methodology is one that is phenomenologically descriptive rather than metaphysical and normative. On the basis of this approach Raymond Martin shows that the distinction between self and other is not nearly as fundamental a feature of our so-called egoistic values as has been traditionally thought. He explains how the belief in a self as a fixed, continuous point (...)
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  4. Anthony L. Brueckner (1993). Parfit on What Matters in Survival. Philosophical Studies 70 (1):1-22.score: 1134.0
    Parfit's most controversial claim about personal identity is that personal identity does not matter in the way we uncritically think it does) I would like to analyze Parfit's reasons for making this claim. These reasons are complex, and they stand in some tension with one another. I would like to examine them carefully and to try to arrive at the strongest case that can be made for Parfit's controversial claim about what matters.
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  5. James Baillie (1993). What Matters in Survival. Southern Journal of Philosophy 31 (3):255-61.score: 1112.0
    I examine Derek Parfit’s claim that it doesn’t matter whether he survives in the future, if someone survives who is psychologically connected to him by “Relation R.” Thus, were his body to perish and be replaced by an exact duplicate, both physically and psychologically identical to him, this would be just as good as “ordinary” survival. Parfit takes the corollary view that replacement of loved ones by exact duplicates is no loss. In contrast, Peter Unger argues that we place (...)
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  6. Torin Alter & Stuart Rachels (2005). Nothing Matters in Survival. Journal of Ethics 9 (3-4):311-330.score: 1110.0
    Do I have a special reason to care about my future, as opposed to yours? We reject the common belief that I do. Putting our thesis paradoxically, we say that nothing matters in survival: nothing in our continued existence justifies any special self-concern. Such an "extreme" view is standardly tied to ideas about the metaphysics of persons, but not by us. After rejecting various arguments against our thesis, we conclude that simplicity decides in its favor. Throughout the essay (...)
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  7. Stuart Rachels & Torin Alter (2005). Nothing Matters in Survival. Journal of Ethics 9 (3/4):311 - 330.score: 1110.0
    Do I have a special reason to care about my future, as opposed to yours? We reject the common belief that I do. Putting our thesis paradoxically, we say that nothing matters in survival: nothing in our continued existence justifies any special self-concern. Such an "extreme" view is standardly tied to ideas about the metaphysics of persons, but not by us. After rejecting various arguments against our thesis, we conclude that simplicity decides in its favor. Throughout the essay (...)
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  8. Scott Campbell (2001). Is Connectedess Necessary to What Matters in Survival? Ration 14 (3):193-202.score: 1044.0
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  9. Nicholas Measor (1980). On What Matters in Survival. Mind 89 (3):406-11.score: 1044.0
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  10. R. Martin (1987). Memory, Connecting, and What Matters in Survival. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 65 (March):82-97.score: 1020.0
  11. Marya Schechtman (2001). Book Review. Self-Concern: An Experiential Approach to What Matters in Survival Raymond Martin. [REVIEW] Mind 110 (438):504-507.score: 1020.0
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  12. J. Whiting (2005). Self-Concern: An Experiential Approach to What Matters in Survival; The Bounds of Agency: An Essay in Revisionary Metaphysics. Philosophical Review 114 (3):399-410.score: 1020.0
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  13. Raymond Martin (2008). What Really Matters. Synthese 162 (3):325 - 340.score: 846.0
    What really matters fundamentally in survival? That question—the one on which I focus—is not about what should matter or about metaphysics. Rather, it is a factual question the answer to which can be determined, if at all, only empirically. I argue that the answer to it is that in the case of many people it is not one’s own persistence, but continuing in ways that may involve one’s own cessation that really matters fundamentally in (...). Call this the surprising result. What are we to make of it? According to several philosophers, not much. I argue that these philosophers are wrong. What best explains the surprising result is that in the case of many people one’s special concern for oneself in the future is not fundamental, but derived. I explain what this means. Finally I explain why the task of explaining empirically what matters fundamentally in survival is in some ways more like a meditative quest than a traditional inquiry in western philosophy or social science and, as such, is best answered not by psychologists, but by philosophers. (shrink)
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  14. Huiyuhl Yi (2014). Against Psychological Sequentialism. Axiomathes 24 (2):247-262.score: 612.0
    Psychological Sequentialism holds that no causal constraint is necessary for the preservation of what matters in survival; rather, it is sufficient for preservation if two groups of mental states are similar enough and temporally close enough. Suppose that one’s body is instantaneously dematerialized and subsequently, by an amazing coincidence, a collection of molecules is configured to form a qualitatively identical human body. According to Psychological Sequentialism, these events preserve what matters in survival. In this (...)
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  15. Stuart Rachels -Torin Alter (2005). Nothing Matters in Survival. Journal of Ethics 9 (3-4):311-330.score: 526.5
    The Journal of Ethics, Vol. 9, No. 3-4 (October, 2005), pp. 311-330. Abstract: Do I have a special reason to care about my future, as opposed to yours? We reject the common belief that I do. Putting our thesis paradoxically, we say that nothing matters in survival: nothing in our continued existence justifies any special self-concern. Such an “extreme” view is standardly tied to ideas about the metaphysics of persons, but not by us. After rejecting various arguments against (...)
     
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  16. Kathy Behrendt (2011). Reasons to Live Versus Reasons Not to Die. Think 10 (28):67-76.score: 522.0
    ‘Any reason for living is an excellent reason for not dying’ (Steven Luper-Foy, 'Annihilation'). Some claims seem so clearly right that we don’t think to question them. Steven Luper-Foy’s remark is like that. It borders on the ‘trivially true’ (i.e. so obviously true as to be uninteresting). If I have a reason to live, surely I likewise have a reason not to die. It may then be surprising to learn that so many philosophers disagree with this claim—either directly or by (...)
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  17. Anthony Cunningham (2001). The Heart of What Matters: The Role for Literature in Moral Philosophy. University of California Press.score: 513.0
    The Heart of What Matters shows that literature has a powerful and unique role to play in understanding life's deepest ethical problems. Anthony Cunningham provides a rigorous critique of Kantian ethics, which has enjoyed a preeminent place in moral philosophy in the United States, arguing that it does not do justice to the reality of our lives. He demonstrates how fine literature can play an important role in honing our capacity to see clearly and choose wisely as he (...)
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  18. L. Andra (2007). Multiple Occupancy, Identity, and What Matters. Philosophical Explorations 10 (3):211 – 225.score: 474.0
    As regards the question of what matters in survival two views have been identified: on the one hand, we have the view that what matters is identity (the so-called 'commonsense view') and, on the other hand, we have the view that what matters is the holding of certain psychological connections between various mental states over time (the relation R). Several attempts have tried to reconcile these two views involving the so-called 'multiple occupancy view' (...)
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  19. Andra Lăzăroiu (2007). Multiple Occupancy, Identity, and What Matters. Philosophical Explorations 10 (3):211-225.score: 474.0
    As regards the question of what matters in survival two views have been identified: on the one hand, we have the view that what matters is identity (the so-called ?commonsense view?) and, on the other hand, we have the view that what matters is the holding of certain psychological connections between various mental states over time (the relation R). Several attempts have tried to reconcile these two views involving the so-called ?multiple occupancy view? (...)
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  20. Ann Freeman Cook & Helena Hoas (2013). The Truth About the Truth: What Matters When Privacy and Anonymity Can No Longer Be Promised to Those Who Participate in Clinical Trial Research? Research Ethics 9 (3):97-108.score: 463.5
    The ramifications of including genetic components in the clinical studies conducted in non-academic settings create unique ethical challenges. We used a qualitative research design consisting of semi-structured interviews that took place between October 2010 and September 2012. The sample consisted of 80 participants − 38 physicians and 42 coordinators − who worked across a number of different settings, including clinics, private practices, small hospitals, free standing research centers, and blended hospital-institutes in both rural and urban communities in 13 states across (...)
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  21. Sophie R. Allen (2012). What Matters in (Naturalized) Metaphysics? Essays in Philosophy 13 (1):13.score: 447.8
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  22. L. Nathan Oaklander (1988). Shoemaker on the Duplication Argument, Survival, and What Matters. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 66 (June):234-239.score: 445.5
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  23. Joan Marques (2010). Spiritual Considerations for Managers: What Matters Most to Workforce Members in Challenging Times. Journal of Business Ethics 97 (3):381 - 390.score: 445.5
    A survey conducted among 50 members of the Los Angeles Workforce, all within the age range of 20-50 years, and with a minimum of 2 years of work experience and a minimum of 2 years of college education, delivered results that may be of interest to managers in their efforts to enhance workers' satisfaction and successfully transcend the challenges of these times. The focus of this study was on values that mattered most in challenging times to members of the workforces. (...)
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  24. Bernard E. Rollin (2011). Animal Pain: What It is and Why It Matters. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 15 (4):425-437.score: 442.0
    The basis of having a direct moral obligation to an entity is that what we do to that entity matters to it. The ability to experience pain is a sufficient condition for a being to be morally considerable. But the ability to feel pain is not a necessary condition for moral considerability. Organisms could have possibly evolved so as to be motivated to flee danger or injury or to eat or drink not by pain, but by “pangs of (...)
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  25. Benjamin M. Rottman & Frank C. Keil (2011). What Matters in Scientific Explanations: Effects of Elaboration and Content. Cognition 121 (3):324-337.score: 438.8
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  26. Ken Nickel (2001). Anti-Realist Excess: Losing Sight of What Matters in Sport. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 28 (2):173-192.score: 438.8
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  27. R. Martin & J. Barresi (2003). Personal Identity and What Mattes in Survival: An Historical Overview. In Raymond Martin & John Barresi (eds.), Personal Identity. Blackwell. 1--74.score: 438.8
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  28. Elizabeth Gould (2011). Feminist Imperative(s) in Music and Education: Philosophy, Theory, or What Matters Most. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (2):130-147.score: 436.5
    A historically feminized profession, education in North America remains remarkably unaffected by feminism, with the notable exception of pedagogy and its impact on curriculum. The purpose of this paper is to describe characteristics of feminism that render it particularly useful and appropriate for developing potentialities in education and music education. As a set of flexible methodological tools informed by Gilles Deleuze's notions of philosophy and art, I argue feminism may contribute to education's becoming more efficacious, reflexive, and reflective of the (...)
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  29. Christian Smith (2014). What is a Person? And Why It Matters in Religious Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (1):180-186.score: 436.5
    Here I respond to four critics of my book, What Is a Person?, seeking to find areas of common ground and crucial disagreement. Most importantly, I explore the question of whether all human knowledge is conceptually mediated, acknowledging that, no, indeed, there are likely forms of experiential knowledge that are purely and directly acquired without conceptual mediation.
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  30. Douglas Chismar (2003). Review of" The Heart of What Matters: The Role for Literature in Moral Philosophy". [REVIEW] Essays in Philosophy 4 (2):12.score: 436.5
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  31. Sharon Street (2009). In Defense of Future Tuesday Indifference: Ideally Coherent Eccentrics and the Contingency of What Matters. Philosophical Issues 19 (1):273-298.score: 427.5
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  32. Rupert Read (2003). Review: The Heart of What Matters: The Role for Literature in Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Mind 112 (447):506-509.score: 427.5
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  33. Ole Martin Skilleås (2003). The Heart of What Matters: The Role for Literature in Moral Philosophy. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (1):95-97.score: 427.5
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  34. Simon Stow (2002). The Heart of What Matters: The Role for Literature in Moral Philosophy (Review). Philosophy and Literature 26 (2):459-461.score: 427.5
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  35. James Lindemann Nelson (2004). Utility, Fairness, and What Really Matters in Organ Provision. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):27 – 29.score: 427.5
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  36. O. M. Skilleas (2003). The Heart of What Matters: The Role for Literature in Moral Philosophy. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (1):95-97.score: 427.5
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  37. Mary Lyndon Shanley (2002). [Book Review] Making Babies, Making Families, What Matters Most in an Age of Reproductive Technologies, Surrogacy, Adoption, and Same-Sex and Unwed Parents'rights. [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 32 (5):43-45.score: 427.5
  38. Karen L. Kramer (forthcoming). Why What Juveniles Do Matters in the Evolution of Cooperative Breeding. Human Nature.score: 427.5
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  39. Wendy N. Wyatt (2014). What Matters for Journalism in the Digital Age? Journal of Mass Media Ethics 29 (1):65-67.score: 427.5
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  40. Timothy Freundlich (1999). Investing in What Matters: Jobs, Homes, and Lives. Business Ethics 13 (5/6):28-28.score: 427.5
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  41. Timothy D. Knepper (2012). What's in the Names: Philosophy of Religion as Religious Philosophy, Theology as Multidisciplinary Comparative Inquiry Into Ultimate Matters. [REVIEW] Sophia 51 (2):299-302.score: 427.5
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  42. Susan Petrilli (2010). Whiteness Matters: What Lies in the Future? Semiotica 2010 (180):147-163.score: 427.5
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  43. Thomas Hurka (2010). The Best Things in Life: A Guide to What Really Matters. Oxford University Press.score: 414.0
    Feeling good: four ways -- Finding that feeling -- The place of pleasure -- Knowing what's what -- Making things happen -- Being good -- Love and friendship -- Putting it together.
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  44. Richard Kraut (2011). Review of Thomas Hurka, The Best Things in Life: A Guide to What Really Matters. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2011 (1).score: 405.0
  45. Gwen Bradford (2011). Thomas Hurka, The Best Things in Life: A Guide to What Really Matters. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 45 (4):487-490.score: 405.0
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  46. J. Kekes (2011). The Best Things in Life: A Guide to What Really Matters, by Thomas Hurka. Mind 120 (479):892-895.score: 405.0
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  47. Robert Kane (2012). Hurka Thomas . The Best Things in Life: A Guide to What Really Matters . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. 200. $18.95 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 122 (2):410-414.score: 405.0
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  48. Maria Alvarez, The Causalism/Anti-Causalism Debate in the Theory of Action: What It is and Why It Matters.score: 405.0
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  49. B. Gogarty (2003). What Exactly is an Exact Copy? And Why It Matters When Trying to Ban Human Reproductive Cloning in Australia. Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (2):84-89.score: 405.0
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  50. Diana Raffman Deutsch, George Schumm & Neil Tennant (1998). Clusions From Gödel's Incompleteness Theorems, and Related Results From Mathematical Logic. Languages, Minds, and Machines Figure Prominently in the Discussion. Gödel's Theorems Surely Tell Us Something About These Important Matters. But What? A Descriptive Title for This Paper Would Be “Gödel, Lucas, Penrose, Tur. [REVIEW] Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 4 (3).score: 405.0
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