Search results for 'will to power' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  8
    Nina Power (2010). The Will to Poem. The Philosophers' Magazine 51:104-105.
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  2.  10
    Transforming Will (2010). Samoans Have a Word for “Will”—Loto—but Anthropologists Have Not Always Translated It Thusly, Which Puzzled Me When I First Began Doing Ethnography in American Sāmoa in the 1980s. I Was Taking a Language Class Kindly Offered to Stateside Teachers by a High-Ranking Member of the Government. He Decided to Teach Us a Love Song, Chanting the Language Into Our Heads. He Gave Us the Samoan Version and an English Translation with Every Word Glossed but One—Loto. After Class, I Asked Him to Translate It. He ... [REVIEW] In Keith M. Murphy & C. Jason Throop (eds.), Toward an Anthropology of the Will. Stanford University Press 123.
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  3.  4
    Truth Or Power (2003). He Main Thesis for Which I Intend to Argue is That There is an Exclusi-T Ve Disjunction Between Two Options for the Foundations of Morality: There is Truth or There is the Exercise of Power. 1 In Other Words, the Deni. In P. Schaber & R. Huntelmann (eds.), Grundlagen der Ethik. 123.
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  4. Babette Babich (2007). Heidegger’s Will to Power. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 38 (1):37-60.
    On Heidegger's Beitraege and the influence of Nietzsche's Will to Power (a famous non-book).
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  5. Donovan Miyasaki (2013). Nietzsche's Will to Power as Naturalist Critical Ontology. History of Philosophy Quarterly 30 (3):251-69.
    In this paper, I argue that Nietzsche’s published works contain a substantial, although implicit, argument for the will to power as ontology—a critical and descriptive, rather than positive and explanatory, theory of reality. Further, I suggest this ontology is entirely consistent with a naturalist methodology. The will to power ontology follows directly from Nietzsche’s naturalist rejection of three metaphysical presuppositions: substance, efficient causality, and final causality. I show that a number of interpretations, including those of Clark, (...)
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  6.  12
    William McNeill (2013). The Secret of Life: Explorations of Nietzsche's Conception of Life as Will to Power. Research in Phenomenology 43 (2):177-192.
    The essay presents a series of explorations of Nietzsche’s conception of life as will to power, relying extensively on fragments from Nietzsche’s later notebooks, but also commenting on key selections from Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Beyond Good and Evil, and On the Genealogy of Morality. I argue that Nietzsche understands himself to be engaged in a unique kind of phenomenology of the body, and that will to power, as the primal force of life, should be understood not (...)
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  7.  20
    Léa Cléret & Mike McNamee (2012). Olympism, The Values Of Sport, and the Will to Power: De Coubertin And Nietzsche Meet Eugenio Monti. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 6 (2):183-194.
    The ?values of sport? is a concept that is often used to justify actions and policies by a range of agents and agencies from coaches and teachers to governing bodies and educational institutions. From a philosophical point of view, these values deserve to be analysed with great care to make sure we understand their nature and reach. The aim of this paper is to critically examine the values carried by the educational conception of sport that Pierre de Coubertin developed and (...)
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  8.  7
    Christian J. Emden (2016). Nietzsche's Will to Power: Biology, Naturalism, and Normativity. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 47 (1):30-60.
    There can be little doubt that the “will to power” remains one of Nietzsche’s most controversial philosophical concepts. Leaving aside its colorful and controversial political history in the first half of the twentieth century, the will to power poses considerable problems for any serious reconstruction of Nietzsche’s project. This is particularly the case for analytic reconstructions, which view Nietzsche’s philosophical naturalism largely through the lens of metaethical concerns that are themselves grounded in a psychological reading of (...)
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  9.  22
    J. Keeping (2012). The Thousand Goals and the One Goal: Morality and Will to Power in Nietzsche's Zarathustra. European Journal of Philosophy 20 (S1):e73-e85.
    Nietzsche's critical stance toward morality appears to support some version of moral relativism. Yet he praises some actions and attributes while condemning others. Are these evaluations expressions of his moral prejudices, or is there a basis for them in his thought? Through a close reading of key passages from ThusSpokeZarathustra, I attempt to demonstrate that morality for Nietzsche is the historically situated working-out of will to power and therefore subject to critique on that basis.
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  10. R. Lanier Anderson (2005). Nietzsche's Will to Power as a Doctrine of the Unity of Science. Angelaki 10 (1):77 – 93.
    (2005). Nietzsche's will to Power as a Doctrine of the Unity of Science. Angelaki: Vol. 10, continental philosophy and the sciences the german traditionissue editor: damian veal, pp. 77-93.
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  11.  15
    Hope K. Fitz (2005). Nietzche\'s Philosophy of the Will to Power a Kind of Elan Vital and Creative Expression. Dialogue and Universalism 15 (5-6):43-54.
    In this paper I argue that, for Nietzsche, the will to power is a kind of élan vital, i.e., vital impulse, force or drive. In living creatures, it is a drive to express their natures. In human beings, it is complex and must be developed in stages. The initial stages include becoming independent and striving for freedom of spirit and expression. Of the few that achieve the last stage, some will become the Übermensch or superior persons who (...)
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  12.  21
    James Genone (2001). Genealogy and Will to Power. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 57 (2):285 - 298.
    Nietzsche's book On the Genealogy of Morals is often taken to be the high point of his critical project. Many of the positive aspects of Genealogy are often ignored, however, because they are difficult to explain. This article attempts to give an interpretation of the second essay of Genealogy in terms of Nietzsche's concept of will to power. On this basis, the second essay shows itself not to be simply an account of "bad conscience", but rather an account (...)
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  13.  7
    Peter Sedgwick (2007). Nietzsche, Normativity, And Will To Power. Nietzsche-Studien 36:214-242.
    The paper argues for a normative rather than psychological interpretation of Nietzsche's conceptions of power and will - and hence will to power. It does so with a view to rethinking the questions of Nietzsche's relationship to Enlightenment thought. Jürgen Habermas's view of Nietzsche's philosophy of power as epitomizing a counter-Enlightenment instrumentalism is contrasted with Maudmarie Clark's attempt to divest it of its power aspect in order to place him within the tradition of Enlightenment. (...)
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  14.  12
    Frederick Olafson (1991). Nietzsche's Philosophy of Culture: A Paradox in the Will to Power. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (3):557-572.
    I examine Nietzsche's concept of a nihilism of strength\nand the relationship in which it stands to the kind of\nvital self-assertion that he admired in archaic\naristocracies. What is new in Nietzsche's nihilism of\nstrength is a self-awareness that was lacking in the past\nand that would enable a fully autonomous human being to\nrecognize the "being" he imposes on "becoming" as the\nexpression of his own will to power. I show that this idea\nleads to serious incoherencies in Nietzsche's account of\nthis new kind of (...)
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  15.  7
    Charles W. Nuckolls (1995). Motivation and the Will to Power: Ethnopsychology and the Return of Thomas Hobbes. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 25 (3):345-359.
    Like the concept "structure" a generation ago, "power" now figures prominently in the anthropological understanding of human action. This essay attempts to locate the concept of power in the cultural history of Anglo-Saxon political discourse. Discussion focuses on a specific domain of inquiry—"ethnopsychology"— and on one of the texts recognized as exemplary of that domain, Lutz's Unnatural Emotions. In a field largely concerned with matters of cognitive process, of knowledge structures and patterns of inference, the concept of " (...)" is used to supply motivational force; motivation is the will to power. This is intelligible, however, only against the implicit background of Anglo-Saxon political theory, best represented historically in the work of Thomas Hobbes. It is argued that the circumstances of "post-modernity" make the return of Hobbesianism inevitable and that it is this tradition that ethnopsychology unwittingly reproduces in the quest to understand cognition, emotion, and agency. (shrink)
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  16. Carol Diethe (2007). Nietzsche's Sister and the Will to Power: A Biography of Elisabeth Förster-Nietzsche. University of Illinois Press.
    _A penetrating study of the sister who betrayed and endangered her famous brother's legacy_ In 1901, a year after her brother Friedrich's death, Elisabeth Förster-Nietzsche published _The Will to Power,_ a hasty compilation of writings he had never intended for print. In _Nietzsche's Sister and the Will to Power,_ Carol Diethe contends that Förster-Nietzsche's own will to power and her desire to place herself--not her brother--at the center of cultural life in Germany are centrally (...)
     
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  17.  65
    Berm (2001). Bodily Self-Awareness and the Will: Reply to Power. Minds and Machines 11 (1):139-142.
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  18. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1968/2006). The Will to Power. London, Weidenfeld & Nicolson.
  19. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1967/2006). The Will to Power. New York, Random House.
  20.  16
    Wes Morriston (2005). Power, Liability, and the Free-Will Defence: Reply to Mawson. Religious Studies 41 (1):71-80.
    Tim Mawson argues that the ability to choose what one knows to be morally wrong is a power for some persons in some circumstances, but that it would be a mere liability for God. The lynchpin of Mawson 's argument is his claim that a power is an ability that it is good to have. In this rejoinder, I challenge this claim of Mawson 's, arguing that choosing a course of action is always an exercise of power, (...)
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  21. Bernard Reginster (2007). The Will to Power and the Ethics of Creativity. In Brian Leiter & Neil Sinhababu (eds.), Nietzsche and Morality. Oxford University Press 32--56.
     
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  22. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1974). The Will to Power: An Attempted Transvaluation of All Values. Gordon Press.
     
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  23. Edgar Bodenheimer (1973). Power, Law, and Society; a Study of the Will to Power and the Will to Law. New York,Crane, Russak.
     
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  24. Walter Kaufman, Heinz Ludwig Ansbacher, Helene Papanek & Big Sur Recordings (1971). [Will to Power Re-Examined]. Big Sur.
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  25. Stephen P. Schwartz (1998). Nietzsche's Doctrine of the Will to Power.
     
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  26. Linda L. Williams (2006). Nietzsche's Mirror: The World as Will to Power. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 31:66-68.
     
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  27.  10
    Ivan Soll (2015). Nietzsche Disempowered: Reading the Will to Power Out of Nietzsche's Philosophy. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 46 (3):425-450.
    Monistic or monistically reductive theories of human motivation are those theories that claim that all human behavior, despite its great variety, has only one basic and ultimate motivation. The most prevalent among them are psychological eudaimonism, the view that what fundamentally, ultimately, or solely motivates us is a desire to be happy, and psychological hedonism, the view that what fundamentally, ultimately, or solely motivates us is the desire to experience pleasure and avoid pain. Often the two theories are found fused, (...)
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  28.  42
    Robert C. Solomon (1998). The Virtues of a Passionate Life: Erotic Love and “the Will to Power”. Social Philosophy and Policy 15 (1):91.
    I would like to defend a conception of life that many of us in philosophy practice but few of us preach, and with it a set of virtues that have often been ignored in ethics. In short, I would like to defend what philosopher Sam Keen, among many others, has called the passionate life. It is neither exotic nor unfamiliar. It is a life defined by emotions, by impassioned engagement and belief, by one or more quests, grand projects, embracing affections. (...)
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  29.  12
    Marinus Schoeman (2003). Nietzsche: Perspektivisme, Agonistiese Pluralisme, En Die Wil Tot Mag. (Nietzsche: Perspectivism, Agonistic Pluralism, and Will to Power). South African Journal of Philosophy 22 (4):348-360.
    Nietzsche's philosophy of life-affirmation and perspectivism is often charged with skeptical relativism and a seemingly unsurmountable problem of self-referentiality that necessarily leads to a “performative contradiction” (Habermas). While the charge of skeptical relativism can be easily dismissed, the problem of self-reference is a much more complicated affair. After discussing certain aspects of Nietzsche's perspectivism, and particularly those texts in which he explicitly deals with the issue of self-referentiality, I come to the conclusion that Nietzsche's various judgements and his perspectivism can (...)
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  30. Friedrich Nietzsche (2010). How the "True World" Finally Became a Fable : The History of an Error : The Will to Power as Art. In Christopher Want (ed.), Philosophers on Art From Kant to the Postmodernists: A Critical Reader. Columbia University Press
     
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  31.  12
    Henrik Rydenfelt (2013). Valuation and the Will to Power: Nietzsche's Ethics with Ontology. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (2):213-224.
    Nietzsche’s texts invite perplexing questions about the justification and objectivity of his ethical views. 1 On the one hand, Nietzsche often appears to subscribe to strong forms of antirealism or even nihilism about value. This has resulted in some classical readings such as Danto’s suggesting that, when reading Nietzsche, we are being asked “to abandon our meta-ethical beliefs (to use contemporary terms) as to the possibility of justifying whatever moral beliefs we have.” 2 On the other hand, many if not (...)
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  32.  17
    Eugene Garver (2006). Aristotle and the Will to Power. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 13 (2):74-83.
    Once we get past moral outrage, Aristotle’s notorious discussion of slavery has several ever more disquieting challenges to modern thinking. Not only are slaves in a certain sense “natural,” but so is the master/slave relationship and so is mastery. While he thinks that living the right kind of state and having the right kind of character is a permanent solution to problems of slavishness, problems of mastery, of the despotic cast of mind, are permanent political problems, since the desire to (...)
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  33. Nina Pelikan Straus (2007). Grand Theory on Trial: Kafka, Derrida, and the Will to Power. Philosophy and Literature 31 (2):378-393.
  34.  18
    J. T. (1968). The Will to Power. Review of Metaphysics 21 (3):558-558.
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  35. C. Fatta & J. Labadie (1960). Snobbism: One Aspect of the Will To Power. Diogenes 8 (30):24-40.
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  36.  78
    Maudemarie Clark (2000). Nietzsche's Doctrine of the Will to Power. International Studies in Philosophy 32 (3):119-135.
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  37.  21
    Andrew Huddleston, Normativity and the Will to Power: Challenges for a Nietzschean Constitutivism.
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  38.  84
    Ciano Aydin (2007). Nietzsche on Reality as Will to Power: Toward an "Organization–Struggle" Model. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 33 (1):25-48.
  39.  4
    R. Lanier Anderson (1994). Nietzsche's Will to Power as a Doctrine of the Unity of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (5):729-750.
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  40. Bernd Magnus (1988). The Use and Abuse of The Will to Power. In Robert C. Solomon & Kathleen Marie Higgins (eds.), Reading Nietzsche. Oxford University Press 218--35.
     
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  41.  20
    George J. Stack (1989). Emerson's Influence on Nietzsche's Concept of the Will to Power. Modern Schoolman 66 (3):175-195.
  42.  30
    Jacques Taminiaux (1999). On Heidegger's Interpretation of the Will To Power As Art. New Nietzsche Studies 3 (1-2):1-22.
  43.  30
    Scott Simmons (1996). A Concordance Indexing The Will to Power With the Critical Editions of Nietzsche's Collected Works (KGW & KSA). New Nietzsche Studies 1 (1-2):126-153.
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  44.  28
    Iain Morrisson (2001). Slave Morality, Will to Power, and Nihilism in On the Genealogy of Morality. International Studies in Philosophy 33 (3):127-144.
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  45.  12
    Ivan Soll (forthcoming). Nietzsche's Will to Power as a Psychological Thesis: Reactions to Bernard Reginster. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 43 (1):118-129.
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  46.  10
    Roger T. Ames (1984). Coextending Arising, Te, and Will to Power: Two Doctrines of Self-Transformation. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 11 (2):113-138.
  47. K. Gloy (1997). Nietzsche's Theory of the Will-to-Power as Critique of the Traditional Rule of Reason. Philosophisches Jahrbuch 104 (2).
     
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  48. Jacob Golomb (2013). Values: Nietzsche's Metaethical Stance / Nadeem J.Z. Hussain ; Nietzsche and the Arts of Life / Aaron Ridley ; Nietzsche on Autonomy / R. Lanier Anderson ; The Overman / Randall Havas ; Order of Rank / Robert Guay ; 'A Promise Made is a Debt Unpaid' : Nietzsche on the Morality of Commitment and the Commitments of Morality / Mare Migotti ; Will to Power : Does It Lead to the "Coldest of All Cold Monsters"? [REVIEW] In Ken Gemes & John Richardson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Nietzsche. OUP Oxford
  49.  11
    Mićo Savić (2010). Will to Power as Physis: Nietzsche and Aristotle. Theoria 53 (4):51-72.
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  50.  11
    Erik Parens (1991). From Philosophy to Politics: On Nietzsche's Ironic Metaphysics of Will to Power. [REVIEW] Man and World 24 (2):169-180.
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