Search results for 'working memory' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Working Memory (2012). Features and Conjunctions in Visual Working Memory. In Jeremy M. Wolfe & Lynn C. Robertson (eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman. Oxford University Press. 369.score: 1740.0
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  2. Working Memory (1990). Patricia S. Goldman-Rakic. In J. McGaugh, Jerry Weinberger & G. Lynch (eds.), Brain Organization and Memory. Guilford Press. 285.score: 300.0
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  3. David Caplan & Gloria S. Waters (1999). Verbal Working Memory and Sentence Comprehension. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):77-94.score: 240.0
    This target article discusses the verbal working memory system used in sentence comprehension. We review the concept of working memory as a short-duration system in which small amounts of information are simultaneously stored and manipulated in the service of accomplishing a task. We summarize the argument that syntactic processing in sentence comprehension requires such a storage and computational system. We then ask whether the working memory system used in syntactic processing is the same as (...)
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  4. Daniel S. Ruchkin, Jordan Grafman, Katherine Cameron & Rita S. Berndt (2003). Working Memory Retention Systems: A State of Activated Long-Term Memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):709-728.score: 240.0
    High temporal resolution event-related brain potential and electroencephalographic coherence studies of the neural substrate of short-term storage in working memory indicate that the sustained coactivation of both prefrontal cortex and the posterior cortical systems that participate in the initial perception and comprehension of the retained information are involved in its storage. These studies further show that short-term storage mechanisms involve an increase in neural synchrony between prefrontal cortex and posterior cortex and the enhanced activation of long-term memory (...)
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  5. Jakub Szymanik & Marcin Zajenkowski (2011). Contribution of Working Memory in the Parity and Proportional Judgments. Belgian Journal of Linguistics 25:189-206.score: 240.0
    The paper presents an experimental evidence on differences in the sentence-picture verification under additional memory load between parity and proportional quantifiers. We asked subjects to memorize strings of 4 or 6 digits, then to decide whether a quantifier sentence is true at a given picture, and finally to recall the initially given string of numbers. The results show that: (a) proportional quantifiers are more difficult than parity quantifiers with respect to reaction time and accuracy; (b) maintaining either 4 or (...)
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  6. Iro Xenidou‐Dervou, Ernest C. D. M. Lieshout & Menno Schoot (2014). Working Memory in Nonsymbolic Approximate Arithmetic Processing: A Dual‐Task Study With Preschoolers. Cognitive Science 38 (1):101-127.score: 240.0
    Preschool children have been proven to possess nonsymbolic approximate arithmetic skills before learning how to manipulate symbolic math and thus before any formal math instruction. It has been assumed that nonsymbolic approximate math tasks necessitate the allocation of Working Memory (WM) resources. WM has been consistently shown to be an important predictor of children's math development and achievement. The aim of our study was to uncover the specific role of WM in nonsymbolic approximate math. For this purpose, we (...)
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  7. Alicia Callejas, Gordon L. Shulman & Maurizio Corbetta (2011). False Belief Vs. False Photographs: A Test of Theory of Mind or Working Memory? Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 240.0
    Theory of Mind, the ability to reason about other people’s thoughts and beliefs, has been traditionally studied in behavioral and neuroimaging experiments by comparing performance in ‘false belief’ and ‘false photograph’ (control) stories. However, some evidence suggests that these stories are not matched in difficulty, complicating the interpretation of results. Here, we more fully evaluated the relative difficulty of comprehending these stories and drawing inferences from them. Subjects read false belief and false photograph stories followed by comprehension questions that probed (...)
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  8. Jan W. De Fockert (2013). Beyond Perceptual Load and Dilution: A Review of the Role of Working Memory in Selective Attention. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 240.0
    The perceptual load and dilution models differ fundamentally in terms of the proposed mechanism underlying variation in distractibility during different perceptual conditions. However, both models predict that distracting information can be processed beyond perceptual processing under certain conditions, a prediction that is well-supported by the literature. Load theory proposes that in such cases, where perceptual task aspects do not allow for sufficient attentional selectivity, the maintenance of task-relevant processing depends on cognitive control mechanisms, including working memory. The key (...)
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  9. Klaus Oberauer (2013). The Focus of Attention in Working Memory—From Metaphors to Mechanisms. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 240.0
    Many verbal theories describe working memory in terms of physical metaphors such as information flow or information containers. These metaphors are often useful but can also be misleading. This article contrasts the verbal version of the author’s three-embedded-component theory with a computational implementation of the theory. The analysis focuses on phenomena that have been attributed to the focus of attention in working memory. The verbal theory characterizes the focus of attention by a container metaphor, which gives (...)
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  10. Torsten Schubert Tiina Salminen, Tilo Strobach (2012). On the Impacts of Working Memory Training on Executive Functioning. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 240.0
    Recent studies have reported improvements in a variety of cognitive functions following sole working memory (WM) training. In spite of the emergence of several successful training paradigms, the scope of transfer effects has remained mixed. This is most likely due to the heterogeneity of cognitive functions that have been measured and tasks that have been applied. In the present study, we approached this issue systematically by investigating transfer effects from WM training to different aspects of executive functioning. Our (...)
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  11. Oliver Wilhelm, Andrea Hildebrandt Hildebrandt & Klaus Oberauer (2013). What is Working Memory Capacity, and How Can We Measure It? Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 240.0
    A latent variable study examined whether different classes of working-memory tasks measure the same general construct of working-memory capacity (WMC). Data from 270 subjects were used to examine the relationship between Binding, Updating, Recall-N-back, and Complex Span tasks, and the relations of WMC with secondary memory measures, indicators of cognitive control from two response-conflict paradigms (Simon task and Eriksen flanker task), and fluid intelligence. Confirmatory factor analyses support the concept of a general WMC factor. Results (...)
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  12. Marie Arsalidou (2013). Working Memory Capacity: The Need for Process Task-Analysis. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 240.0
    Working memory capacity: the need for process task-analysis.
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  13. Yvonne Brehmer, Helena Westerberg & Lars Bäckman (2012). Working-Memory Training in Younger and Older Adults: Training Gains, Transfer, and Maintenance. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 240.0
    Working memory (WM), a key determinant of many higher-order cognitive functions, declines in old age. Current research attempts to develop process-specific WM training procedures, which may lead to general cognitive improvement. Adaptivity of the training as well as the comparison of training gains to performance changes of an active control group are key factors in evaluating the effectiveness of a specific training program. In the present study, 55 younger adults (20-30 years of age) and 45 older adults (60-70 (...)
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  14. R. J. Moran, P. Campo, F. Maestu, R. B. Reilly, R. J. Dolan & B. A. Strange (2009). Peak Frequency in the Theta and Alpha Bands Correlates with Human Working Memory Capacity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4:200-200.score: 240.0
    Theta oscillations in the local field potential of neural ensembles are considered key mediators of human working memory. Theoretical accounts arising from animal hippocampal recordings propose that the phase of theta oscillations serves to instantiate sequential neuronal firing to form discrete representations of items held online. Human evidence of phase relationships in visual working memory has enhanced this theory, implicating long theta cycles in supporting greater memory capacity. Here we use human magnetoencephalographic recordings to examine (...)
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  15. Steven J. Luck Po-Han Lin (2012). Proactive Interference Does Not Meaningfully Distort Visual Working Memory Capacity Estimates in the Canonical Change Detection Task. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    The change detection task has become a standard method for estimating the storage capacity of visual working memory. Most researchers assume that this task isolates the properties of an active short-term storage system that can be dissociated from long-term memory systems. However, long-term memory storage may influence performance on this task. In particular, memory traces from previous trials may create proactive interference that sometimes leads to errors, thereby reducing estimated capacity. Consequently, the capacity of visual (...)
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  16. Katherine Elizabeth Vytal, Brian R. Cornwell, Nicole Esther Arkin, Allison M. Letkiewicz & Christian Grillon (2013). The Complex Interaction Between Anxiety and Cognition: Insight From Spatial and Verbal Working Memory. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 240.0
    Anxiety can be distracting, disruptive, and incapacitating. Despite problems with empirical replication of this phenomenon, one fruitful avenue of study has emerged from working memory (WM) experiments where a translational method of anxiety induction (risk of shock) has been shown to disrupt spatial and verbal WM performance. Performance declines when resources (e.g., spatial attention, executive function) devoted to goal-directed behaviors are consumed by anxiety. Importantly, it has been shown that anxiety-related impairments in verbal WM depend on task difficulty, (...)
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  17. Arjan Blokland Bart Aben, Sven Stapert (2012). About the Distinction Between Working Memory and Short-Term Memory. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    The theoretical concepts short-term memory (STM) and working memory (WM) have been used to refer to the maintenance and the maintenance plus manipulation of memory, respectively. Although they are conceptually different, the use of the terms STM and WM in literature is not always strict. Short-term memory and WM are different theoretical concepts that are assumed to reflect different cognitive functions. However, correlational studies have not been able to separate both constructs consistently and there is (...)
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  18. Daniel Bor & Anil K. Seth (2012). Consciousness and the Prefrontal Parietal Network: Insights From Attention, Working Memory, and Chunking. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    Consciousness has of late become a “hot topic” in neuroscience. Empirical work has centred on identifying potential neural correlates of consciousness (NCCs), with a converging view that the prefrontal parietal network (PPN) is closely associated with this process. Theoretical work has primarily sought to explain how informational properties of this cortical network could account for phenomenal properties of consciousness. However, both empirical and theoretical research has given less focus to the psychological features that may account for the NCCs. The PPN (...)
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  19. David Carmel, Jake Fairnie & Nilli Lavie (2012). Weight and See: Loading Working Memory Improves Incidental Identification of Irrelevant Faces. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    Are task-irrelevant stimuli processed to a level enabling individual identification? This question is central both for perceptual processing models and for applied settings (e.g., eyewitness testimony). Lavie’s load theory proposes that working memory actively maintains attentional prioritization of relevant over irrelevant information. Loading working memory thus impairs attentional prioritization, leading to increased processing of task-irrelevant stimuli. Previous research has shown that increased working memory load leads to greater interference effects from response competing distractors. Here (...)
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  20. Eddy J. Davelaar (2013). Short-Term Memory as a Working Memory Control Process. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 240.0
    Short-term memory as a working memory control process.
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  21. Nilli Lavie David Carmel, Jake Fairnie (2012). Weight and See: Loading Working Memory Improves Incidental Identification of Irrelevant Faces. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    Are task-irrelevant stimuli processed to a level enabling individual identification? This question is central both for perceptual processing models and for applied settings (e.g., eyewitness testimony). Lavie’s load theory proposes that working memory actively maintains attentional prioritization of relevant over irrelevant information. Loading working memory thus impairs attentional prioritization, leading to increased processing of task-irrelevant stimuli. Previous research has shown that increased working memory load leads to greater interference effects from response competing distractors. Here (...)
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  22. Patricia A. Reuter-Lorenz Joshua Carp, Leon Gmeindl (2010). Age Differences in the Neural Representation of Working Memory Revealed by Multi-Voxel Pattern Analysis. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 240.0
    Working memory function declines across the lifespan. Computational models of aging attribute such memory impairments to reduced distinctiveness between neural representations of different mental states in old age, a phenomenon termed dedifferentiation. These models predict that neural distinctiveness should be reduced uniformly across experimental conditions in older adults. In contrast, the Compensation-Related Utilization of Neural Circuits Hypothesis (CRUNCH) model predicts that the distinctiveness of neural representations should be increased in older adults (relative to young adults) at low (...)
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  23. Matthew D. Lieberman Meghan L. Meyer (2012). Social Working Memory: Neurocognitive Networks and Directions for Future Research. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    Navigating the social world requires the ability to maintain and manipulate information about people’s beliefs, traits, and mental states. We characterize this capacity as social working memory. To date, very little research has explored this phenomenon, in part because of the assumption that general working memory systems would support working memory for social information. Various lines of research, however, suggest that social cognitive processing relies on a neurocognitive network (i.e., the ‘mentalizing network’) that is (...)
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  24. N. Meiran, M. W. Cole & T. S. Braver (2011). When Planning Results in Loss of Control: Intention-Based Reflexivity and Working-Memory. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:104-104.score: 240.0
    In this review, the authors discuss the seemingly paradoxical loss of control associated with states of high readiness to execute a plan, termed “intention-based reflexivity”. The review suggests that the neuro-cognitive systems involved in the preparation of novel plans are different than those involved in preparation of practiced plans (i.e., those that have been executed beforehand). When the plans are practiced, intention based reflexivity depends on the prior availability of response codes in long-term memory. When the plans are novel, (...)
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  25. Josefine Andin, Eleni Orfanidou, Velia Cardin, Emil Holmer, Cheryl M. Capek, Bencie Woll, Jerker Rönnberg & Mary Rudner (2013). Similar Digit-Based Working Memory in Deaf Signers and Hearing Non-Signers Despite Digit Span Differences. Frontiers in Psychology 4:942.score: 240.0
    Similar working memory (WM) for lexical items has been demonstrated for signers and non-signers while short-term memory (STM) is regularly poorer in deaf than hearing individuals. In the present study, we investigated digit-based WM and STM in Swedish and British deaf signers and hearing non-signers. To maintain good experimental control we used printed stimuli throughout and held response mode constant across groups. We showed that deaf signers have similar digit-based WM performance, despite shorter digit spans, compared to (...)
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  26. Gregory Hickok Corianne Rogalsky, William Matchin (2008). Broca's Area, Sentence Comprehension, and Working Memory: An fMRI Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 240.0
    The role of Broca's area in sentence processing remains controversial. According to one view, Broca's area is involved in processing a subcomponent of syntactic processing. Another view holds that it contributes to sentence processing via verbal working memory. Sub-regions of Broca's area have been identified that are more active during the processing of complex (object-relative clause) sentences compared to simple (subject-relative clause) sentences. The present study aimed to determine if this complexity effect can be accounted for in terms (...)
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  27. Christine L. Larson Daniel M. Stout, Alexander J. Shackman (2013). Failure to Filter: Anxious Individuals Show Inefficient Gating of Threat From Working Memory. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 240.0
    Dispositional anxiety is a well-established risk factor for the development of psychiatric disorders along the internalizing spectrum, including anxiety and depression. Importantly, many of the maladaptive behaviors characteristic of anxiety, such as anticipatory apprehension, occur when threat is absent. This raises the possibility that anxious individuals are less efficient at gating threat’s access to working memory, a limited capacity workspace where information is actively retained, manipulated, and used to flexibly guide goal-directed behavior when it is no longer present (...)
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  28. Raymond van Ee Ewa A. Miendlarzewska, Gijs van Elswijk, Carlo V. Cannistraci (2013). Working Memory Load Attenuates Emotional Enhancement in Recognition Memory. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 240.0
    Emotionally arousing stimuli are perceived and remembered better than neutral stimuli. Under threat, this negativity bias is further increased. We investigated whether working memory load can attenuate incidental memory for emotional images. Two groups of participants performed the N-back task with two working memory load levels. In one group, we induced anxiety using a threat-of-shock paradigm to increase attentional processing of negative information. During task performance we incidentally and briefly flashed emotional distracter images which prolonged (...)
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  29. Margaret Cecilia Jackson, David E. Linden & Jane E. Raymond (2012). “Distracters” Do Not Always Distract: Visual Working Memory for Angry Faces is Enhanced by Incidental Emotional Words. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    We are often required to filter out distraction in order to focus on a primary task during which working memory (WM) is engaged. Previous research has shown that negative versus neutral distracters presented during a visual WM maintenance period significantly impair memory for neutral information. However, the contents of WM are often also emotional in nature. The question we address here is how incidental information might impact upon visual WM when both this and the memory items (...)
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  30. Ian Spence Jing Feng, Jay Pratt (2012). Attention and Visuospatial Working Memory Share the Same Processing Resources. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    Attention and visuospatial working memory (VWM) share very similar characteristics; both have the same upper bound of about four items in capacity and they recruit overlapping brain regions. We examined whether both attention and visuospatial working memory share the same processing resources using a novel dual-task-costs approach based on a load-varying dual-task technique. With sufficiently large loads on attention and VWM, considerable interference between the two processes was observed. A further load increase on either process produced (...)
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  31. M. Kawasaki & Y. Yamaguchi (2011). Individual Visual Working Memory Capacities and Related Brain Oscillatory Activities Are Modulated by Color Preferences. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:318-318.score: 240.0
    Subjective preferences affect many processes, including motivation, along with individual differences. Although incentive motivations are proposed to increase our limited visual working memory (VWM) capacity, much less is known about the effects of subjective preferences on VWM-related brain systems, such as the prefrontal and parietal cortices. Here, we investigate the differences in VWM capacities and brain activities during presentation of preferred and non-preferred colors. To this end, we used time-frequency analyses of electroencephalograph (EEG) data recorded during a delayed-response (...)
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  32. Lora T. Likova (2012). A Cross-Modal Perspective on the Relationships Between Imagery and Working Memory. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    Mapping the distinctions and interrelationships between imagery and working memory remains challenging. Although each of these major cognitive constructs is defined and treated in various ways across studies, most accept that both imagery and working memory involve a form of internal representation available to our awareness. In working memory, there is a further emphasis on active maintenance and use of this conscious representation to guide voluntary action. Multicomponent working memory models incorporate representational (...)
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  33. Po-Han Lin & Steven J. Luck (2012). Proactive Interference Does Not Meaningfully Distort Visual Working Memory Capacity Estimates in the Canonical Change Detection Task. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    The change detection task has become a standard method for estimating the storage capacity of visual working memory. Most researchers assume that this task isolates the properties of an active short-term storage system that can be dissociated from long-term memory systems. However, long-term memory storage may influence performance on this task. In particular, memory traces from previous trials may create proactive interference that sometimes leads to errors, thereby reducing estimated capacity. Consequently, the capacity of visual (...)
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  34. Andrew Michael, Margaret D. King, Stefan Ehrlich, Godfrey Pearlson, Tonya White, Daphne J. Holt, Nancy Andreasen, Unal Sakoglu, Beng-Choon Ho, S. Charles Schulz & Vince D. Calhoun (2011). A Data-Driven Investigation of Gray Matter–Function Correlations in Schizophrenia During a Working Memory Task. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:71.score: 240.0
    The brain is a vastly interconnected organ and methods are needed to investigate its long range structure(S)–function(F) associations to better understand disorders such as Schizophrenia that are hypothesized to be due to distributed disconnected brain regions. In previous work we introduced a methodology to reduce the whole brain S–F correlations to a histogram and here we reduce the correlations to brain clusters. The application of our approach to sMRI (gray matter concentration maps) and fMRI data (GLM activation maps during Encode (...)
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  35. Jun Moriya & Yoshinori Sugiura (2013). Socially Anxious Individuals with Low Working Memory Capacity Could Not Inhibit the Goal-Irrelevant Information. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:840.score: 240.0
    Socially anxious individuals are interfered by distractors. Recent work has suggested that low working memory capacity and inappropriate temporary goal induce attentional capture to distractors. We investigated the effects of working memory capacity and temporary goal on attentional capture to distractors in social anxiety. Participants viewed a rapid serial visual presentation, in which participants reported the identity of a single target letter drawn in red. Distractors appeared before the target was presented. When the color of distractors (...)
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  36. Nikki Pratt, Adrian Willoughby & Diane Swick (2011). Effects of Working Memory Load on Visual Selective Attention: Behavioral and Electrophysiological Evidence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:57-57.score: 240.0
    Working memory and attention interact in a way that enables us to focus on relevant items and maintain current goals. The influence of working memory on attention has been noted in several studies using dual task designs. Multitasking increases the demands on working memory and reduces the amount of resources available for cognitive control functions such as resolving stimulus conflict. However, few studies have investigated the temporal activation of the cortex while multitasking. The present (...)
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  37. Julia A. Schneiders, Bertram Opitz, Huijun Tang, Yuan Deng, Chaoxiang Xie, Hong Li & Axel Mecklinger (2012). The Impact of Auditory Working Memory Training on the Fronto-Parietal Working Memory Network. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 240.0
    Working memory training has been widely used to investigate working memory processes. We have shown previously that visual working memory benefits only from intra-modal visual but not from across-modal auditory working memory training. In the present functional magnetic resonance imaging study we examined whether auditory working memory processes can also be trained specifically and which training-induced activation changes accompany theses effects. It was investigated whether working memory training with (...)
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  38. I. G. Sligte, A. R. Vandenbroucke, H. S. Scholte & V. A. Lamme (2009). Detailed Sensory Memory, Sloppy Working Memory. Frontiers in Psychology 1:175-175.score: 240.0
    Visual short-term memory (VSTM) enables us to actively maintain information in mind for a brief period of time after stimulus disappearance. According to recent studies, VSTM consists of three stages - iconic memory, fragile VSTM, and visual working memory - with increasingly stricter capacity limits and progressively longer lifetimes. Still, the resolution (or amount of visual detail) of each VSTM stage has remained unexplored and we test this in the present study. We presented people with a (...)
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  39. Torkel Klingberg Stina Söderqvist, Sissela B. Nutley, Jon Ottersen, Katja M. Grill (2012). Computerized Training of Non-Verbal Reasoning and Working Memory in Children with Intellectual Disability. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 240.0
    Children with intellectual disabilities show deficits in both reasoning ability and working memory (WM) that impact everyday functioning and academic achievement. In this study we investigated the feasibility of cognitive training for improving WM and non-verbal reasoning (NVR) ability in children with intellectual disability. Participants were randomized to a 5-week adaptive training program (intervention group) or non-adaptive version of the program (active control group). Cognitive assessments were conducted prior to and directly after training, and one year later to (...)
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  40. Caterina Artuso, Paola Palladino & Paola Ricciardelli (2012). How Do We Update Faces? Effects of Gaze Direction and Facial Expressions on Working Memory Updating. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    The aim of the study was to investigate how the biological binding between different facial dimensions, and their social and communicative relevance, may impact updating processes in working memory (WM). We focused on WM updating because it plays a key role in ongoing processing. Gaze direction and facial expression are crucial and changeable components of face processing. Direct gaze enhances the processing of approach-oriented facial emotional expressions (e.g. joy), while averted gaze enhances the processing of avoidance-oriented facial emotional (...)
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  41. David Barrett (forthcoming). Consciousness, Attention, and Working Memory: An Empirical Evaluation of Prinz's Theory of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies.score: 240.0
    A popular issue in mind is to explain why conscious mental states are conscious. Prinz (2012) defends three claims in an effort to make such an explanation: (i)mental states become conscious when and only when we attend to them; (ii)attention is a process by which mental states become available to working memory; so (iii) mental states are conscious when and only when they become available to working memory. Here I attack Prinz's theory, made explicit in (iii), (...)
     
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  42. Claire Bradley & Joel Pearson (2012). The Sensory Components of High-Capacity Iconic Memory and Visual Working Memory. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    Early visual memory can be split into two primary components: a high-capacity, short-lived iconic memory followed by a limited-capacity visual working memory that can last many seconds. Whereas a large number of studies have investigated visual working memory for low-level sensory features, much research on iconic memory has used more “high-level” alphanumeric stimuli such as letters or numbers. These two forms of memory are typically examined separately, despite an intrinsic overlap in their (...)
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  43. Paola Ricciardelli Caterina Artuso, Paola Palladino (2012). How Do We Update Faces? Effects of Gaze Direction and Facial Expressions on Working Memory Updating. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    The aim of the study was to investigate how the biological binding between different facial dimensions, and their social and communicative relevance, may impact updating processes in working memory (WM). We focused on WM updating because it plays a key role in ongoing processing. Gaze direction and facial expression are crucial and changeable components of face processing. Direct gaze enhances the processing of approach-oriented facial emotional expressions (e.g. joy), while averted gaze enhances the processing of avoidance-oriented facial emotional (...)
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  44. James Danckert Christopher L. Striemer, Susanne Ferber (2013). Spatial Working Memory Deficits Represent a Core Challenge for Rehabilitating Neglect. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 240.0
    Left neglect following right hemisphere injury is a debilitating disorder that has proven extremely difficult to rehabilitate. Traditional models of neglect have focused on impaired spatial attention as the core deficit and as such, most rehabilitation methods have tried to improve attentional processes. However, many of these techniques (e.g., visual scanning training, caloric stimulation, neck muscle vibration) produce only short-lived effects, or are too uncomfortable to use as a routine treatment. More recently, many investigators have begun examining the beneficial effects (...)
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  45. Pablo Campo Claudia Poch (2012). Neocortical-Hippocampal Dynamics of Working Memory in Healthy and Diseased Brain States Based on Functional Connectivity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 240.0
    Working memory is the ability to transiently maintain and manipulate internal representations beyond its external availability to the senses. This process is thought to support high level cognitive abilities and been shown to be strongly predictive of individual intelligence and reasoning abilities. While early models of working memory have relied on a modular perspective of brain functioning, more recent evidence suggests that cognitive functions emerge from the interactions of multiple brain regions to generate large-scale networks. Here (...)
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  46. Joel Pearson Claire Bradley (2012). The Sensory Components of High-Capacity Iconic Memory and Visual Working Memory. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    Early visual memory can be split into two primary components: a high-capacity, short-lived iconic memory followed by a limited-capacity visual working memory that can last many seconds. Whereas a large number of studies have investigated visual working memory for low-level sensory features, much research on iconic memory has used more “high-level” alphanumeric stimuli such as letters or numbers. These two forms of memory are typically examined separately, despite an intrinsic overlap in their (...)
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  47. María Dolores de la Rosa, Daniel Sanabria, Mariagrazia Capizzi & Angel Correa (2012). Temporal Preparation Driven by Rhythms is Resistant to Working Memory Interference. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    It has been recently shown that temporal orienting demands controlled attention (Capizzi, Sanabria, & Correa, 2012). However, there is current debate on whether temporal preparation guided by regular rhythms also requires the generation of endogenous temporal expectancies or rather involves a mechanism independent of executive control processes. We investigated this issue by using a dual-task paradigm in two different experiments. In Experiment 1, the single-task condition measured reaction time to respond to the onset of an auditory stimulus preceded by either (...)
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  48. Axel Mecklinger Julia A. Schneiders, Bertram Opitz, Huijun Tang, Yuan Deng, Chaoxiang Xie, Hong Li (2012). The Impact of Auditory Working Memory Training on the Fronto-Parietal Working Memory Network. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 240.0
    Working memory training has been widely used to investigate working memory processes. We have shown previously that visual working memory benefits only from intra-modal visual but not from across-modal auditory working memory training. In the present functional magnetic resonance imaging study we examined whether auditory working memory processes can also be trained specifically and which training-induced activation changes accompany theses effects. It was investigated whether working memory training with (...)
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  49. April Martin, Zhanna Bagdasarov & Shane Connelly (forthcoming). The Capacity for Ethical Decisions: The Relationship Between Working Memory and Ethical Decision Making. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-22.score: 240.0
    Although various models of ethical decision making (EDM) have implicitly called upon constructs governed by working memory capacity (WMC), a study examining this relationship specifically has not been conducted. Using a sense making framework of EDM, we examined the relationship between WMC and various sensemaking processes contributing to EDM. Participants completed an online assessment comprised of a demographic survey, intelligence test, various EDM measures, and the Automated Operation Span task to determine WMC. Results indicated that WMC accounted for (...)
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  50. Angel Correa María Dolores de la Rosa, Daniel Sanabria, Mariagrazia Capizzi (2012). Temporal Preparation Driven by Rhythms is Resistant to Working Memory Interference. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    It has been recently shown that temporal orienting demands controlled attention (Capizzi, Sanabria, & Correa, 2012). However, there is current debate on whether temporal preparation guided by regular rhythms also requires the generation of endogenous temporal expectancies or rather involves a mechanism independent of executive control processes. We investigated this issue by using a dual-task paradigm in two different experiments. In Experiment 1, the single-task condition measured reaction time to respond to the onset of an auditory stimulus preceded by either (...)
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