Search results for 'worship' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Geo-Lyong Lee, Relic Worship, Yang-Gyu An, Sung-ja Han, Buddhist Feminism, Seung-mee Jo, Young-tae Kim, Jeung-bae Mok, On Translating Wonhyo & Robert E. Buswell Jr (2003). On the Buddha as an Avatara of Visnu. In S. R. Bhatt (ed.), Buddhist Thought and Culture in India and Korea. Indian Council of Philosophical Research
     
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  2. Aaron Smuts (2012). The Power to Make Others Worship. Religious Studies 48 (2):221 - 237.
    Can any being worthy of worship make others worship it? I think not. By way of an analogy to love, I argue that it is perfectly coherent to think that one could be made to worship. However, forcing someone to worship violates their autonomy, not because worship must be freely given, but because forced worship would be inauthentic—much like love earned through potions. For this reason, I argue that one cannot be made to (...) properly; forced worship would be unfitting. My principal claim is that no being worthy of worship could exercise the power to make others worship it, since the act of making another worship would necessarily make one unworthy of worship. (shrink)
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  3.  72
    Wesley D. Cray (2011). Omniscience and Worthiness of Worship. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 70 (2):147-153.
    At first glance, the properties being omniscient and being worthy of worship might appear to be perfectly co-instantiable. But there are reasons to be worried about this co-instantiability, as it turns out that, depending on our commitments with respect to certain kinds of knowledge and notions of personhood, it might be the case that no being—God included—could instantiate both. In this paper, I lay out and motivate this claim before going on to consider a variety of responses—some more plausible (...)
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  4.  29
    Joe Mintoff (2004). Rule Worship and the Stability of Intention. Philosophia 31 (3-4):401-426.
    David Gauthier and Edward McClennen have claimed that it could be rational to form an intention to A because it maximizes utility to intend to A, and that acting on such an intention could be rational even if it maximizes utility not to A. Michael Bratman has objected to this way of thinking, claiming that it is equivalent to the familiar rule-utilitarian mistake of rule-worship. The purpose of this paper is to argue that, so long as one is aware (...)
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  5.  4
    Max Kadushin (1978). Worship and Ethics: A Study in Rabbinic Judaism. Greenwood Press.
    CHAPTER I Introduction A. RABBINIC WORSHIP AND HALAKAH Rabbinic worship is personal experience and yet it is governed by Halakah, law. ...
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  6.  7
    Max Kadushin (1963). Worship and Ethics. [Evanston, Ill.]Northwestern University Press.
    CHAPTER I Introduction A. RABBINIC WORSHIP AND HALAKAH Rabbinic worship is personal experience and yet it is governed by Halakah, law. ...
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  7. Steven G. Smith (1996). On the Borders of the Worthwhile: Intoxication and Worship. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 30 (1-2):279-292.
    Our actions, if we care about them positively, assume judgments of worthwhileness that have been made or could be made in their favor. But a huge proportion of humanity makes a point of engaging in two kinds of action that are (are are meant to be) specially difficult to justify as worthwhile: getting intoxicated and worshiping. Drawing comparisons with worth forms associated with play and work, I ask how intoxication and worship can be seen as worthwhile and conclude that (...)
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  8. Ninian Smart (1972). The Concept of Worship. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  9.  13
    Oswald Bayer & M. Alan (eds.) (1996). Worship and Ethics: Lutherans and Anglicans in Dialogue. Walter De Gruyter.
    The Anglican Tradition of Moral Theology Alan M. Suggate Hooker and the via media For the English who experienced the impact of the Reformation on the ...
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  10. Roger Hazelton (1946). The God We Worship. New York, the Macmillan Company.
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  11.  17
    Ronelle Sonnenberg, Malan Nel, Jos de Kock & Marcel Barnard (2015). Being Together in Youth Worship: An Empirical Study in Protestant Dutch Contexts. Hts Theological Studies 71 (2):01-10.
    In a qualitative empirical research project on youth worship, we discovered that 'being together' is primary quality of youth worship. This primary quality consists of at least four aspects. Firstly, community is celebrated through physical presence. More specifically, the physical presence of siblings plays an important part in the participation of youth in worship. Secondly, an empathetic and emotional aspect is essential for adolescents. 'Being together' in youth worship means being together in unity and trust and (...)
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  12.  43
    Yujin Nagasawa & Tim Bayne (2007). The Grounds of Worship Again: A Reply to Crowe. Religious Studies 43 (4):475-480.
    In this paper we respond to Benjamin Crowe's criticisms in this issue of our discussion of the grounds of worship. We clarify our previous position, and examine Crowe's account of what it is about God's nature that might ground our obligation to worship Him. We find Crowe's proposals no more persuasive than the accounts that we examined in our previous paper, and conclude that theists still owe us an account of what it is in virtue of which we (...)
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  13.  91
    Tim Bayne & Yujin Nagasawa (2006). The Grounds of Worship. Religious Studies 42 (3):299-313.
    Although worship has a pivotal place in religious thought and practice, philosophers of religion have had remarkably little to say about it. In this paper we examine some of the many questions surrounding the notion of worship, focusing on the claim that human beings have obligations to worship God. We explore a number of attempts to ground our supposed duty to worship God, and argue that each is problematic. We conclude by examining the implications of this (...)
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  14.  73
    Campbell Brown & Yujin Nagasawa (2005). I Can't Make You Worship Me. Ratio 18 (2):138–144.
    This paper argues that Divine Command Theory is inconsistent with the veiw, held by many theists, that we have a moral obligation to worship God.
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  15.  36
    Tim Bayne & Yujin Nagasawa (2007). The Grounds of Worship Again: A Reply to Crowe. Religious Studies 43 (4):475-480.
    Although one would not have guessed it from the amount of attention that the topic has received from recent philosophers of religion, the God of theism is first and foremost a being that is worthy of worship. In the paper that forms the target of Crowe’s discussion we attempted to shed some much-needed light on worship. Our focus was not on the question of whether theists hold that human beings are obliged to..
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  16.  18
    Scott F. Aikin (2010). The Problem of Worship. Think 9 (25):101-113.
    Theism is a cluster of views. The first of which is that God exists. Others are that God has all the relevant omni-attributes, that He created the world, and that He communicates with and performs miracles on behalf of humans. There is one additional view that is often overlooked. It is that humans are obligated to worship God. Importantly, this issue of worship is of central importance to traditional theism. And it extends into pagan thought that predates Christianity. (...)
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  17. Loren J. Samons (2004). What’s Wrong with Democracy?: From Athenian Practice to American Worship. University of California Press.
    Fifth-century Athens is praised as the cradle of democracy and sometimes treated as a potential model for modern political theory or practice. In this daring reassessment of classical Athenian democracy and its significance for the United States today, Loren J. Samons provides ample justification for our founding fathers' distrust of democracy, a form of government they scorned precisely because of their familiarity with classical Athens. How Americans have come to embrace "democracy" in its modern form—and what the positive and negative (...)
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  18.  9
    Bernd Wannenwetsch (2004). Political Worship: Ethics for Christian Citizens. OUP Oxford.
    How does Christian ethics begin? This pioneering study explores the grammar of the Christian life as it is embodied and learned in worship as the formative experience of Christian communities. In a careful analysis of biblical and traditional conceptions of worship, Wannenwetsch demonstrates how worship challenges the deepest antagonisms in political thought and social practice. Particular worship practices are examined and their ethical and political significance is explored.
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  19. Benjamin D. Crowe (2007). Reasons for Worship: A Response to Bayne and Nagasawa: BENJAMIN D. CROWE. Religious Studies 43 (4):465-474.
    Worship is a topic that is rarely considered by philosophers of religion. In a recent paper, Tim Bayne and Yujin Nagasawa challenge this trend by offering an analysis of worship and by considering some difficulties attendant on the claim that worship is obligatory. I argue that their case for there being these difficulties is insufficiently supported. I offer two reasons that a theist might provide for the claim that worship is obligatory: a divine command, and the (...)
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  20.  2
    Jeremy Gwiazda (2010). Worship and Threshold Obligations: Jeremy Gwiazda. Religious Studies 47 (4):521-525.
    In this reply to Tim Bayne and Yujin Nagasawa, I defend the possibility of a maximal-excellence account of the grounding of the obligation to worship God. I do not offer my own account of the obligation to worship God; rather I argue that the major criticism fails. Thus maximal-excellence can ground an obligation to worship God.
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  21.  28
    Benjamin D. Crowe (2007). Reasons for Worship: A Response to Bayne and Nagasawa. Religious Studies 43 (4):465-474.
    Worship is a topic that is rarely considered by philosophers of religion. In a recent paper, Tim Bayne and Yujin Nagasawa challenge this trend by offering an analysis of worship and by considering some difficulties attendant on the claim that worship is obligatory. I argue that their case for there being these difficulties is insufficiently supported. I offer two reasons that a theist might provide for the claim that worship is obligatory: (1) a divine command, and (...)
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  22.  1
    Scott T. Allison & George R. Goethals (2016). Hero Worship: The Elevation of the Human Spirit. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 46 (2):187-210.
    In this article, we review the psychology of hero development and hero worship. We propose that heroes and hero narratives fulfill important cognitive and emotional needs, including the need for wisdom, meaning, hope, inspiration, and growth. We propose a framework called the heroic leadership dynamic to explain how need-based heroism shifts over time, from our initial attraction to heroes to later retention or repudiation of heroes. Central to the HLD is idea that hero narratives fulfill both epistemic and energizing (...)
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  23.  4
    Scott T. Allison & George R. Goethals (2015). Hero Worship: The Elevation of the Human Spirit. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 46 (1).
    In this article, we review the psychology of hero development and hero worship. We propose that heroes and hero narratives fulfill important cognitive and emotional needs, including the need for wisdom, meaning, hope, inspiration, and growth. We propose a framework called the heroic leadership dynamic to explain how need-based heroism shifts over time, from our initial attraction to heroes to later retention or repudiation of heroes. Central to the HLD is idea that hero narratives fulfill both epistemic and energizing (...)
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  24.  2
    C. Brown & Y. Nagasawa, I Can't Make You Worship Me.
    This paper argues that Divine Command Theory is inconsistent with the veiw, held by many theists, that we have a moral obligation to worship God.
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  25.  6
    R. Song (2005). Christian Bioethics and the Church's Political Worship. Christian Bioethics 11 (3):333-348.
    Christian bioethics springs from the worship that is the response of the Church to the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Such worship is distinctively political in nature, in that it acknowledges Christ as Lord. Because it is a political worship, it can recognize no other lords and no other prior claims on its allegiance: these include the claims of an allegedly universal ethics and politics determined from outside the Church. However the Church is called not just to be (...)
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  26.  5
    Joseph L. Lombardi (1988). Worship and Moral Autonomy: JOSEPH L. LOMBARDI. Religious Studies 24 (2):101-119.
    A number of years ago, James Rachels presented an argument for the necessary non–existence of God. It was based upon a supposed inconsistency between worship and what might be called ‘autonomous moral agency’. In Rachels' view, one person's being the worshipper of another is partially determined by the way in which it is appropriate for the first to respond to the commands of the second. In brief, a worshipper's obedience to commands should be ‘ unqualified ’. Rachels thought that (...)
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  27.  8
    Timoschuk Alexey (2008). Unity and Diversity Principle in Jagannatha's Worship. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:27-31.
    Xenophanes claimed that God is a ball, which means that he is a perfect body. This idea is well developed in Jagannatha worship, who is a central Deity in Orissa, India. It’s a round form of Krishna, who is usually depicted in a human like form. Jagannatha, his brother Baladeva and sister Subhadra are justified as round forms because of their specific manifestation of ecstasy, that, according to aesthetical theory (rasa tattva) happened to them. Yet there are many other (...)
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  28.  7
    Jeremy Gwiazda (2011). Worship and Threshold Obligations. Religious Studies 47 (4):521-525.
    In this reply to Tim Bayne and Yujin Nagasawa, I defend the possibility of a maximal-excellence account of the grounding of the obligation to worship God.I do not offer my own account of the obligation to worship God; rather I argue that the major criticism fails. Thus maximal-excellence can ground an obligation to worship God.
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  29.  5
    Richard Griffiths (2010). Poetry as a Resource for Worship in the Lenten Season. Interpretation 64 (1):44.
    This essay examines the suitability of poetry as a vehicle for prayer, worship and meditation. It takes two specific examples of Lenten courses based on poetry: one based on depictions of the events of Holy Week and one based on a discussion of the problem of suffering in a world created by a loving God. It also looks at the liturgical use of the arts in Holy Week services.
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  30.  4
    Albert Curry Winn (1975). Worship As a Healing Experience An Exposition of Matthew 17:1–9. Interpretation 29 (1):68-72.
    The transfiguration reminds us that Christian worship is on the way to the cross. . . . We rise from it to resume the way to the cross in a world full of suffering. But we have seen who Jesus really is and he has shown us that we do not need to be afraid.
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  31.  2
    Yujin Nagasawa (2007). The Grounds of Worship Again: A Reply to Crowe. Religious Studies 43 (4):475-480.
    In this paper we respond to Benjamin Crowe's criticisms in this issue of our discussion of the grounds of worship. We clarify our previous position, and examine Crowe's account of what it is about God's nature that might ground our obligation to worship Him. We find Crowe's proposals no more persuasive than the accounts that we examined in our previous paper, and conclude that theists still owe us an account of what it is in virtue of which we (...)
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  32.  2
    Benito Khotseng & A. Roger Tucker (2013). 'They Worship in Our Churches' - An Opportunity for the Church to Intervene in Order to Diminish the Corruption That is Hindering Service Delivery in South Africa? Hts Theological Studies 69 (2):01-11.
    This practical-theological study aims to develop a contextual theology in the areas of business and government that will aid a successful intervention by the church in diminishing the corrupt practices prevalent in South Africa. It seeks to prove that corruption is a major factor in causing the delays experienced in the implementation of service delivery, and that this is causing much anger and increasing disillusionment with the present system of democratic government. At the moment the church has a window of (...)
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  33. Oswald Bayer (1996). Worship and Theology. In Oswald Bayer & M. Alan (eds.), Worship and Ethics: Lutherans and Anglicans in Dialogue. Walter de Gruyter
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  34. Bruce Ellis Benson (2013). Liturgy as a Way of Life: Embodying the Arts in Christian Worship. Baker Academic.
    My goal here is to explore the deep and interpenetrating relationship of life, art, and worship, though not with the intent of merely sketching some theory about their relationship. Instead, it is about working out a way of life that can properly be termed "liturgical".
     
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  35. Inge Jonsson (2004). A Drama of Creation: Sources & Influences in Swedenborg's Worship & Love of God. Swedenborg Foundation Publishers.
    _The Worship and Love of God_ is one of the most unusual writings of Swedish scientist and theologian Emanuel Swedenborg. A "poetical novel," it dramatizes the Creation and examines the life of Adam and Eve as the first truly united couple. Considered Swedenborg's last work before he embarked on his visionary period, the manuscript was left unfinished by its author and published only after his death. Inge Jonsson, one of the world's leading scholars on Swedenborg's works, offers a scholarly (...)
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  36. Philip J. Rossi (1979). Narrative, Worship, and Ethics: Empowering Images for the Shape of Christian Moral Life. Journal of Religious Ethics 7 (2):239-248.
    Use of narrative metaphors in moral theory makes possible an account of public worship as the ground for Christian moral life. By enabling us to picture how our moral agency acknowledges the living God, such worship grounds the principle that Christian moral endeavor takes shape in God's living presence. The community professes that, in its worship, its heritage of images of human life under God-creation, redemption, church, and eternal life-effectively reshapes our lives. Thus worship empowers us (...)
     
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  37. Bertrand Russell (1917). A Free Man's Worship, and Other Essays. Unwin Books.
    A free man's worship.--Mysticism and logic.--The place of science in a liberal education.--The study of mathematics.--Mathematics and the metaphysicians.--On scientific method in philosophy.--The ultimate constituents of matter.--The relation of sense-data to physics.--On the notion of cause.--Knowledge by acquaintance and knowledge by description.
     
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  38. Loren J. Samons (2007). What’s Wrong with Democracy?: From Athenian Practice to American Worship. University of California Press.
    Fifth-century Athens is praised as the cradle of democracy and sometimes treated as a potential model for modern political theory or practice. In this daring reassessment of classical Athenian democracy and its significance for the United States today, Loren J. Samons provides ample justification for our founding fathers' distrust of democracy, a form of government they scorned precisely because of their familiarity with classical Athens. How Americans have come to embrace "democracy" in its modern form—and what the positive and negative (...)
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  39. Peter Sedgwick (1996). Worship and True or False Narrative. In Oswald Bayer & M. Alan (eds.), Worship and Ethics: Lutherans and Anglicans in Dialogue. Walter de Gruyter 254--275.
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  40. James K. Smith (2013). Imagining the Kingdom: How Worship Works. Baker Academic.
    How does worship work? How exactly does liturgical formation shape us? What are the dynamics of such transformation? In the second of James K. A. Smith's three-volume theology of culture, the author expands and deepens the analysis of cultural liturgies and Christian worship he developed in his well-recieved Desiring the Kingdom. He helps us understand and appreciate the bodily basis of habit formation and how liturgical formation - both "secular" and Christian - affects our fundamental orientation to the (...)
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  41. David R. Sorensen & Brent E. Kinser (eds.) (2013). On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and the Heroic in History. Yale University Press.
    Based on a series of lectures delivered in 1840, Thomas Carlyle’s_ On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and the Heroic in History_ considers the creation of heroes and the ways they exert heroic leadership. From the divine and prophetic to the poetic to the religious to the political, Carlyle investigates the mysterious qualities that elevate humans to cultural significance. By situating the text in the context of six essays by distinguished scholars that reevaluate both Carlyle’s work and his ideas, David Sorensen and (...)
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  42. Bernd Wannenwetsch (2009). Political Worship. OUP Oxford.
    Wannenwetsch shows how worship challenges the deepest antagonisms in political thought and social practice through careful analysis of biblical and traditional conceptions of worship. Particular worship practices are examined for their ethical and political significance.
     
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  43. Bernd Wannenwetsch & Margaret Kohl (2004). Political Worship: Ethics for Christian Citizens. Oxford University Press Uk.
    How does Christian ethics begin? This pioneering study explores the grammar of the Christian life as it is embodied and learned in worship as the formative experience of the 'fellow citizens of God's people'. The book presents the first in-depth theological investigation of the phenomenon of 'political worship' by exposing the political nature of worship and the worship dimension of politics. In a careful analysis of biblical and traditional conceptions of worship, Wannenwetsch demonstrates how the (...)
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  44.  86
    Ronald P. Byars (2013). The Four Gospels on Sunday: The New Testament and the Reform of Christian Worship by Gordon W. Lathrop. Interpretation 67 (3):290-292.
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  45. Richard Boyce (forthcoming). Book Review: Psalms for Preaching and Worship: A Lectionary Commentary. [REVIEW] Interpretation 65 (1):91-91.
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  46. Kimberleigh Buchanan (forthcoming). Book Review: Worship in the Shape of Scripture. [REVIEW] Interpretation 56 (2):230-230.
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  47.  97
    J. Clinton McCann (forthcoming). Book Review: The Vitality of Worship: A Commentary on the Book of Psalms. [REVIEW] Interpretation 53 (2):197-197.
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  48.  97
    Tracy Hartman (forthcoming). Book Review: Preaching and Worship. [REVIEW] Interpretation 59 (1):106-107.
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  49.  97
    Martha Moore-Keish (forthcoming). Book Review: Worship as Meaning: A Liturgical Theology for Late Modernity. [REVIEW] Interpretation 59 (1):106-106.
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  50.  93
    Dennis T. Olson (forthcoming). Book Review: The Torah's Vision of Worship. [REVIEW] Interpretation 55 (3):305-308.
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