Search results for 'yes-no question' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Maribel Romero & Chung-Hye Han (2004). On Negative Yes/No Questions. Linguistics and Philosophy 27 (5):609-658.score: 527.0
    Preposed negation yes/no (yn)-questions like Doesn''t Johndrink? necessarily carry the implicature that the speaker thinks Johndrinks, whereas non-preposed negation yn-questions like DoesJohn not drink? do not necessarily trigger this implicature. Furthermore,preposed negation yn-questions have a reading ``double-checking'''' pand a reading ``double-checking'''' p, as in Isn''t Jane comingtoo? and in Isn''t Jane coming either? respectively. We present otheryn-questions that raise parallel implicatures and argue that, in allthe cases, the presence of an epistemic conversational operator VERUMderives the existence and content of the (...)
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  2. Elena Guerzoni (2004). Even-NPIs in YES/NO Questions. Natural Language Semantics 12 (4):319-343.score: 378.0
    It has been a long-standing puzzle that Negative Polarity Items appear to split into two subvarieties when their effect on the interpretation of questions is taken into account: while questions with any and ever can be used as unbiased requests of information, questions with so-called `minimizers', i.e. idioms like lift a finger and the faintest idea, are always biased towards a negative answer (cf. Ladusaw 1979). Focusing on yes/no questions, this paper presents a solution to this puzzle. Specifically it is (...)
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  3. Maribel Romero, Biased Yes/No Questions: The Role of VERUM.score: 377.0
    Certain information-seeking yes/no (yn)-questions –e.g. Did Jorge really bring a present? and Doesn’t John drink?– convey an epistemic bias of the speaker. Two main approaches to biased yn-questions are compared: the VERUM approach and the Decision Theory approach. It is argued that, while Decision Theory can formally characterize the notion of “intent” of a question, VERUM is needed to derive the data.
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  4. Bruno Estigarribia (2010). Facilitation by Variation: Right‐to‐Left Learning of English Yes/No Questions. Cognitive Science 34 (1):68-93.score: 340.7
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  5. Scott Grimm, Not a Simple Yes or No: Uncertainty in Indirect Answers.score: 261.0
    There is a long history of using logic to model the interpretation of indirect speech acts. Classical logical inference, however, is unable to deal with the combinations of disparate, conflicting, uncertain evidence that shape such speech acts in discourse. We propose to address this by combining logical inference with probabilistic methods. We focus on responses to polar questions with the following property: they are neither yes nor no, but they convey information that can be used to infer such an answer (...)
     
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  6. Savas L. Tsohatzidis (2007). Yes-No Questions and the Myth of Content Invariance. In , John Searle's Philosophy of Language: Force, Meaning, and Mind. Cambridge University Press.score: 243.3
  7. Nancy Hedberg (2007). Yes-No Questions, Information Structure, and Prosody. In Noel Burton-Roberts (ed.), Pragmatics. Palgrave Macmillan. 2.score: 243.3
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  8. Andrzej WiĞniewski (2006). Reducibility of Safe Questions to Sets of Atomic Yes-No Questions. In J. Jadacki & J. Pasniczek (eds.), The Lvov-Warsaw School: The New Generation. Reidel. 6--215.score: 243.3
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  9. A. Wisniewski (1993). Reducibility of Questions to Sets of Yes-No Questions'. Bulletin of the Section of Logic 22:119-126.score: 243.3
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  10. Tomoyuki Yamada (2011). Acts of Requesting in Dynamic Logic of Knowledge and Obligation. European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 7 (2):59-82.score: 238.0
    Although it seems intuitively clear that acts of requesting are different from acts of commanding, it is not very easy to sate their differences precisely in dynamic terms. In this paper we show that it becomes possible to characterize, at least partially, the effects of acts of requesting and compare them with the effects of acts of commanding by combining dynamified deontic logic with epistemic logic. One interesting result is the following: each act of requesting is appropriately differentiated from an (...)
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  11. Emmanuel J. Genot & Justine Jacot (2012). How Can Yes-or-No Questions Be Informative Before They Are Answered? Episteme 9 (2).score: 225.0
     
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  12. Michael R. Prieur, Joan Atkinson, Laurie Hardingham, David Hill, Gillian Kernaghan, Debra Miller, Sandy Morton, Mary Rowell, John F. Vallely & Suzanne Wilson (2006). Stem Cell Research in a Catholic Institution: Yes or No? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 16 (1):73-98.score: 216.0
    : Catholic teaching has no moral difficulties with research on stem cells derived from adult stem cells or fetal cord blood. The ethical problem comes with embryonic stem cells since their genesis involves the destruction of a human embryo. However, there seems to be significant promise of health benefits from such research. Although Catholic teaching does not permit any destruction of human embryos, the question remains whether researchers in a Catholic institution, or any researchers opposed to destruction of human (...)
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  13. Pauline Graham (1998). Saying "No" to Compromise; "Yes" to Integration. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (9-10):1007-1013.score: 189.0
    The central fact underlying all relations is the question of power and how it can be used to get one's way. When power does not work, we move to compromise. This paper questions the validity of compromise as an effective means of settling differences. My standpoint is that compromise debases relationships, is wrong in principle and does not work in practice either. There is a better strategy: integration, when the contending parties find the wider solution that includes both their (...)
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  14. Carl Stecher (2014). God? No and Yes: A Skeptic's View. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 22 (1):93-108.score: 189.0
    After a mild indoctrination into the Christian faith, at the age of 15 I discovered myself to be a non-believer: the idea of an invisible, omniscient, omnipotent, omnipresent God suddenly seemed simply unbelievable. Years later I decided to re-examine the question. Perhaps I had missed something. This in turn led to a fascination with God questions and religious belief, but a re-confirmation of my earlier discovery: the traditional Christian concept of God was not only unbelievable, but incoherent and morally (...)
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  15. I. Rumfitt (2000). Yes and No. Mind 109 (436):781-823.score: 185.0
    In what does the sense of a sentential connective consist? Like many others, I hold that its sense lies in rules that govern deductions. In the present paper, however, I argue that a classical logician should take the relevant deductions to be arguments involving affirmative or negative answers to yes-or-no questions that contain the connective. An intuitionistic logician will differ in concentrating exclusively upon affirmative answers. I conclude by arguing that a well known intuitionistic criticism of classical logic fails if (...)
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  16. Tim Crane & D. H. Mellor (1990). There is No Question of Physicalism. Mind 99 (394):185-206.score: 164.0
    Many philosophers are impressed by the progress achieved by physical sciences. This has had an especially deep effect on their ontological views: it has made many of them physicalists. Physicalists believe that everything is physical: more precisely, that all entities, properties, relations, and facts are those which are studied by physics or other physical sciences. They may not all agree with the spirit of Rutherford's quoted remark that 'there is physics; and there is stamp-collecting',' but they all grant physical science (...)
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  17. Ben Ambridge, Caroline F. Rowland & Julian M. Pine (2008). Is Structure Dependence an Innate Constraint? New Experimental Evidence From Children's Complex‐Question Production. Cognitive Science 32 (1):222-255.score: 161.0
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  18. Jake H. Davis & David R. Vago (2013). Can Enlightenment Be Traced to Specific Neural Correlates, Cognition, or Behavior? No, and (a Qualified) Yes. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 144.0
    Can enlightenment be traced to specific neural correlates, cognition, or behavior? No, and (a qualified) Yes.
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  19. Brian R. Glenney (2013). Philosophical Problems, Cluster Concepts, and the Many Lives of Molyneux's Question. Biology and Philosophy 28 (3):541-558.score: 144.0
    Molyneux’s question, whether the newly sighted might immediately recognize tactilely familiar shapes by sight alone, has produced an array of answers over three centuries of debate and discussion. I propose the first pluralist response: many different answers, both yes and no, are individually sufficient as an answer to the question as a whole. I argue that this is possible if we take the question to be cluster concept of sub-problems. This response opposes traditional answers that isolate specific (...)
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  20. Dennis Vanden Auweele (2013). Metaxological 'Yes' and Existential 'No': William Desmond and Atheism. Sophia 52 (4):637-655.score: 144.0
    This article explores and critically assesses the metaxological account of a philosophy of God professed by William Desmond. Postmodern reflection on the philosophy of God has a tendency to focus on the 'signs' of God and urges for a passive acceptance of these signs. Desmond argues, contrary to this tendency, for a mindful togetherness of philosophical activity and religious passivity. After exploring Desmond's thought on this topic, I move to assess his 'metaxological yes' to God as the agapeic origin from (...)
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  21. Dale Jacquette (1994). Many Questions Begs the Question (but Questions Do Not Beg the Question). Argumentation 8 (3):283-289.score: 144.0
    The fallacy of many questions or the complex question, popularized by the sophism ‘Have you stopped beating your spouse?’ (when a yes-or-no answer is required), is similar to the fallacy of begging the question orpetitio principii. Douglas N. Walton inBegging the Question has recently argued that the two forms are alike in trying unfairly to elicit an admission from a dialectical opponent without meeting burden of proof, but distinct because of the circularity of question-begging argument and (...)
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  22. Michael Dummett (2002). ‘Yes’, ‘No’ and ‘Can't Say’. Mind 111 (442):289-296.score: 140.0
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  23. Peter J. Richerson & Lesley Newson (2009). Is Religion Adaptive? Yes, No, Neutral. But Mostly We Don't Know. In . Oxford Univ Pr. 100-117.score: 140.0
    Accession Number: ATLA0001788477; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 100-117.; Language(s): English; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  24. E. G. Beltrametti & G. Cassinelli (1977). On State Transformations Induced by Yes-No Experiments, in the Context of Quantum Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 6 (1):369 - 379.score: 140.0
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  25. Bert Baumgaertner (2014). Yes, No, Maybe So: A Veritistic Approach to Echo Chambers Using a Trichotomous Belief Model. Synthese 191 (11):2549-2569.score: 140.0
    I approach the study of echo chambers from the perspective of veritistic social epistemology. A trichotomous belief model is developed featuring a mechanism by which agents will have a tendency to form agreement in the community. The model is implemented as an agent-based model in NetLogo and then used to investigate a social practice called Impartiality, which is a plausible means for resisting or dismantling echo chambers. The implementation exposes additional factors that need close consideration in an evaluation of Impartiality. (...)
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  26. Megan Stern (2008). 'Yes:—No:—I Have Been Sleeping—and Now—Now—I Am Dead': Undeath, the Body and Medicine. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 39 (3):347-354.score: 140.0
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  27. Øistein Bjørnestad (1974). A Note on the so-Called Yes-No Experiments and the Foundations of Quantum Mechanics. Synthese 29 (1-4):243 - 253.score: 140.0
  28. Craig R. M. McKenzie, John T. Wixted, David C. Noelle & Gohar Gyurjyan (2001). Relation Between Confidence in Yes–No and Forced-Choice Tasks. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (1):140.score: 140.0
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  29. Tim Crane & D. H. Mellor (1995). Postscript to There is No Question of Physicalism. In P. Moser & J. D. Trout (eds.), Contemporary Materialism: a Reader. Routledge. 85-89.score: 140.0
     
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  30. Sol L. Garfield (1983). Does Psychotherapy Work? Yes, No, Maybe. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (2):292.score: 140.0
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  31. Christy Sylvest (forthcoming). CS2315-F08 December 7, 2008 Ethics and Therac-25 Some May Question Whether Software Engineering or Computer Programming Are Just Careers or If They Are Real Professions. But There is No Question That They Have the Ability to Affect the Public Either Through Good or Through Harm. Software Engineers Do Not Have to Have a License to Practice, but They Still Need to Abide by a Code of Ethics. Without This Code or a Set of Moral Rules to Guide Them They Cannot Be Expected to Feel Accountable for Their Actions. [REVIEW] Ethics.score: 140.0
     
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  32. 鈴木雅光 (2006). Yes-No 型の応答文の種類. Dialogos 6:143-149.score: 140.0
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  33. Katsuhiko Yabushita (2009). On the Cross-Linguistic Correlation Between the Usages of Yes/No Particles and the Presence/Absence of Negative Quantifiers. In Dingfang Shu & Ken Turner (eds.), Contrasting Meanings in Languages of the East and West. Peter Lang.score: 140.0
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  34. Massimo Pigliucci (2001). Design, Yes; Intelligent, No. Philosophy Now 32:26-29.score: 126.0
    Were we designed by an intelligent creation? Not likely: living organisms are designed, yes, but not intelligently...
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  35. Justin P. McBrayer (2012). Are Skeptical Theists Really Skeptics? Sometimes Yes and Sometimes No. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 72 (1):3-16.score: 126.0
    Skeptical theism is the view that God exists but, given our cognitive limitations, the fact that we cannot see a compensating good for some instance of evil is not a reason to think that there is no such good. Hence, we are not justified in concluding that any actual instance of evil is gratuitous, thus undercutting the evidential argument from evil for atheism. This paper focuses on the epistemic role of context and contrast classes to advance the debate over skeptical (...)
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  36. Mathew Abbott (2012). No Life is Bare, the Ordinary is Exceptional: Giorgio Agamben and the Question of Political Ontology. Parrhesia 14:23-36.score: 126.0
    In this article I develop a theory of political ontology, working to differentiate it from traditional political philosophy and Schmittian political theology. As with political theology, political ontology has its primary grounding not in disinterested contemplation from the standpoint of pure reason, but rather in a confrontation with an existential problem. Yet while for Schmitt this is the problem of how to live and think in obedience to God, the problem for political ontology is the question of being. Thus (...)
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  37. Kenneth V. Iserson (2007). Has Emergency Medicine Research Benefited Patients? An Ethical Question. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (3):289-295.score: 126.0
    From an ethical standpoint, the goal of clinical research is to benefit patients. While individual investigations may not yield results that directly improve patients’ evaluation or treatment, the corpus of the research should lead in that direction. Without the goal of ultimate benefit to patients, such research fails as a moral enterprise. While this may seem obvious, the need to protect and benefit patients can get lost in the milieu of clinical research. Many advances in emergency medicine have been based (...)
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  38. Ann Robson (1990). No Laughing Matter: John Stuart Mill's Establishment of Women's Suffrage as a Parliamentary Question. Utilitas 2 (01):88-.score: 126.0
    Of all my recollections connected with the H of C that of my having had the honour of being the first to make the claim of women to the suffrage a parliamentary question, is the most gratifying as I believe it to have been the most important public service that circumstances made it in my power to render. This is now a thing accomplished.….
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  39. Mariano Pérez Carrasco (2013). Writing philosophy in a language with no philosophical tradition. The language question at the origins of Modernity. Filosofia Unisinos 14 (2):152-161.score: 126.0
    This article analyzes some of the reasons that led to the adoption of vernacular languages as philosophical languages between the 14th and 17th centuries in France and Italy. The article focuses on Descartes’s Discours de la méthode (1637), Sperone Speroni’s Dialogo delle lingue (1542) and Dante Alighieri’s Convivio (circa 1304-1307). The three works not only chose to write philosophy in a language with no philosophical tradition, but also offered a philosophical rationale for this decision. The article exposes and analyzes that (...)
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  40. Steven Schroeder (1995). No Goddess Was Your Mother. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 2 (1):27-32.score: 126.0
    This paper begins with three observations: 1) At what is generally believed to be its origin in ancient Greece, “Western” philosophy is not sharply distinguished from poetry, science, or theology; 2) At what is generally believed to be its origin, “Western” philosophy is not Western; it is born in a multicultural matrix consisting of African, Asian, Middle Eastern, and Southern European influences; 3) As philosophy comes to think of itself as “Western,” it separates itself from poetry, science, and the rest (...)
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  41. Roger W. Sperry (1980). Mind-Brain Interaction: Mentalism Yes, Dualism No. Neuroscience 5 (2):195-206.score: 120.0
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  42. Helga Kuhse (1995). Clinical Ethics and Nursing: "Yes" to Caring, but "No" to a Female Ethics of Care. Bioethics 9 (3):207–219.score: 120.0
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  43. Nate Charlow (forthcoming). Decision Theory: Yes! Truth Conditions: No! In Nate Charlow Matthew Chrisman (ed.), Deontic Modals. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
    This essay makes the case for, in the phrase of Angelika Kratzer, packing the fruits of the study of rational decision-making into our semantics for deontic modals—specifically, for parametrizing the truth-condition of a deontic modal to things like decision problems and decision theories (and ultimately also things like moral and epistemological views). Then it knocks it down. While the fundamental relation of the semantic theory must relate deontic modals to things like decision problems and theories, this semantic relation cannot be (...)
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  44. Ulysses T. Araña (2009). Yes to Realism! No to Non-Naturalism! Kritike: An Online Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):98.score: 120.0
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  45. Arthur I. Miller (1991). Have Incommensurability and Causal Theory of Reference Anything to Do with Actual Science?—Incommensurability, No; Causal Theory, Yes. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 5 (2):97 – 108.score: 120.0
    Abstract I propose to support these replies with actual episodes in late nineteenth and twentieth century physics. The historical record reveals that meaning does change but not in the Kuhnian manner which is tied to descriptive theories of meaning. A necessary part of this discussion is commentary on realist versus antirealist conceptions of science.
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  46. Andrew Crane (1999). Are You Ethical? Please Tick Yes □ or No □ on Researching Ethics in Business Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 20 (3):237 - 248.score: 120.0
    This paper seeks to explore the empirical agenda of business ethics research from a methodological perspective. It is argued that the quality of empirical research in the field remains relatively poor and unconvincing. Drawing on the distinctions between the two main philosophical positions from which methodologies in the social sciences are derived – positivism and interpretism – it is argued that it is business ethics' tradition of positivist, and highly quantitative approaches which may be at the root of these epistemological (...)
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  47. Kristie Dotson (forthcoming). Well, Yes and No: A Reply to Priest. Comparative Philosophy.score: 120.0
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  48. Julia O'Connell Davidson (2008). If No Means No, Does Yes Mean Yes? Consenting to Research Intimacies. History of the Human Sciences 21 (4):49-67.score: 120.0
    This article reflects on some ethical dilemmas presented by an ethnographic study of prostitution that I conducted in the 1990s. The study drew one research subject into a long and very close relationship with me, and though she was an active and fully consenting participant in the research, she was also objectified within both the field relationship and the textual products it generated. This kind of contradiction has been recognized and discussed as a more general problem for ethnography by feminist (...)
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  49. Susan Goldin-Meadow & Martha Wagner Alibali (1999). Does the Hand Reflect Implicit Knowledge? Yes and No. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):766-767.score: 120.0
    Gesture does not have a fixed position in the Dienes & Perner framework. Its status depends on the way knowledge is expressed. Knowledge reflected in gesture can be fully implicit (neither factuality nor predication is explicit) if the goal is simply to move a pointing hand to a target. Knowledge reflected in gesture can be explicit (both factuality and predication are explicit) if the goal is to indicate an object. However, gesture is not restricted to these two extreme positions. When (...)
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  50. Terry Horgan & Mark Timmons (2006). Expressivism, Yes! Relativism, No! Oxford Studies in Metaethics 1:73-98.score: 120.0
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