Search results for 'yes-no question' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Maribel Romero & Chung-Hye Han (2004). On Negative Yes/No Questions. Linguistics and Philosophy 27 (5):609-658.score: 411.0
    Preposed negation yes/no (yn)-questions like Doesn''t Johndrink? necessarily carry the implicature that the speaker thinks Johndrinks, whereas non-preposed negation yn-questions like DoesJohn not drink? do not necessarily trigger this implicature. Furthermore,preposed negation yn-questions have a reading ``double-checking'''' pand a reading ``double-checking'''' p, as in Isn''t Jane comingtoo? and in Isn''t Jane coming either? respectively. We present otheryn-questions that raise parallel implicatures and argue that, in allthe cases, the presence of an epistemic conversational operator VERUMderives the existence and content of the (...)
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  2. Elena Guerzoni (2004). Even-NPIs in YES/NO Questions. Natural Language Semantics 12 (4):319-343.score: 262.0
    It has been a long-standing puzzle that Negative Polarity Items appear to split into two subvarieties when their effect on the interpretation of questions is taken into account: while questions with any and ever can be used as unbiased requests of information, questions with so-called `minimizers', i.e. idioms like lift a finger and the faintest idea, are always biased towards a negative answer (cf. Ladusaw 1979). Focusing on yes/no questions, this paper presents a solution to this puzzle. Specifically it is (...)
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  3. Maribel Romero, Biased Yes/No Questions: The Role of VERUM.score: 261.0
    Certain information-seeking yes/no (yn)-questions –e.g. Did Jorge really bring a present? and Doesn’t John drink?– convey an epistemic bias of the speaker. Two main approaches to biased yn-questions are compared: the VERUM approach and the Decision Theory approach. It is argued that, while Decision Theory can formally characterize the notion of “intent” of a question, VERUM is needed to derive the data.
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  4. Bruno Estigarribia (2010). Facilitation by Variation: Right‐to‐Left Learning of English Yes/No Questions. Cognitive Science 34 (1):68-93.score: 243.3
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  5. Tomoyuki Yamada (2011). Acts of Requesting in Dynamic Logic of Knowledge and Obligation. European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 7 (2):59-82.score: 238.0
    Although it seems intuitively clear that acts of requesting are different from acts of commanding, it is not very easy to sate their differences precisely in dynamic terms. In this paper we show that it becomes possible to characterize, at least partially, the effects of acts of requesting and compare them with the effects of acts of commanding by combining dynamified deontic logic with epistemic logic. One interesting result is the following: each act of requesting is appropriately differentiated from an (...)
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  6. Scott Grimm, Not a Simple Yes or No: Uncertainty in Indirect Answers.score: 189.0
    There is a long history of using logic to model the interpretation of indirect speech acts. Classical logical inference, however, is unable to deal with the combinations of disparate, conflicting, uncertain evidence that shape such speech acts in discourse. We propose to address this by combining logical inference with probabilistic methods. We focus on responses to polar questions with the following property: they are neither yes nor no, but they convey information that can be used to infer such an answer (...)
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  7. Peter J. Richerson, Is Religion Adaptive? Yes, No, Neutral, but Mostly We Don't Know.score: 162.0
    The question of whether religion is adaptive or not is debated with much vigor and passion, but the question as usually posed is much too simplistic to be answerable. Religions are extremely diverse. What is true of one often will not apply to another. Given religions are complex systems of beliefs, emotions, rituals, moral injunctions, and social institutions and organizations. Some parts may be adaptive and others maladaptive. We know that cultural evolutionary processes can, in theory, lead to (...)
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  8. Savas L. Tsohatzidis (2007). Yes-No Questions and the Myth of Content Invariance. In , John Searle's Philosophy of Language: Force, Meaning, and Mind. Cambridge University Press.score: 146.0
  9. Nancy Hedberg (2007). Yes-No Questions, Information Structure, and Prosody. In Noel Burton-Roberts (ed.), Pragmatics. Palgrave Macmillan. 2.score: 146.0
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  10. Andrzej WiĞniewski (2006). Reducibility of Safe Questions to Sets of Atomic Yes-No Questions. In J. Jadacki & J. Pasniczek (eds.), The Lvov-Warsaw School: The New Generation. Reidel. 6--215.score: 146.0
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  11. A. Wisniewski (1993). Reducibility of Questions to Sets of Yes-No Questions'. Bulletin of the Section of Logic 22:119-126.score: 146.0
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  12. Michael R. Prieur, Joan Atkinson, Laurie Hardingham, David Hill, Gillian Kernaghan, Debra Miller, Sandy Morton, Mary Rowell, John F. Vallely & Suzanne Wilson (2006). Stem Cell Research in a Catholic Institution: Yes or No? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 16 (1):73-98.score: 144.0
    : Catholic teaching has no moral difficulties with research on stem cells derived from adult stem cells or fetal cord blood. The ethical problem comes with embryonic stem cells since their genesis involves the destruction of a human embryo. However, there seems to be significant promise of health benefits from such research. Although Catholic teaching does not permit any destruction of human embryos, the question remains whether researchers in a Catholic institution, or any researchers opposed to destruction of human (...)
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  13. Ben Ambridge, Caroline F. Rowland & Julian M. Pine (2008). Is Structure Dependence an Innate Constraint? New Experimental Evidence From Children's Complex‐Question Production. Cognitive Science 32 (1):222-255.score: 143.0
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  14. Emmanuel J. Genot & Justine Jacot (2012). How Can Yes-or-No Questions Be Informative Before They Are Answered? Episteme 9 (2).score: 135.0
     
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  15. I. Rumfitt (2000). Yes and No. Mind 109 (436):781-823.score: 129.0
    In what does the sense of a sentential connective consist? Like many others, I hold that its sense lies in rules that govern deductions. In the present paper, however, I argue that a classical logician should take the relevant deductions to be arguments involving affirmative or negative answers to yes-or-no questions that contain the connective. An intuitionistic logician will differ in concentrating exclusively upon affirmative answers. I conclude by arguing that a well known intuitionistic criticism of classical logic fails if (...)
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  16. Brian R. Glenney (2013). Philosophical Problems, Cluster Concepts, and the Many Lives of Molyneux's Question. Biology and Philosophy 28 (3):541-558.score: 126.0
    Molyneux’s question, whether the newly sighted might immediately recognize tactilely familiar shapes by sight alone, has produced an array of answers over three centuries of debate and discussion. I propose the first pluralist response: many different answers, both yes and no, are individually sufficient as an answer to the question as a whole. I argue that this is possible if we take the question to be cluster concept of sub-problems. This response opposes traditional answers that isolate specific (...)
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  17. Dale Jacquette (1994). Many Questions Begs the Question (but Questions Do Not Beg the Question). Argumentation 8 (3):283-289.score: 126.0
    The fallacy of many questions or the complex question, popularized by the sophism ‘Have you stopped beating your spouse?’ (when a yes-or-no answer is required), is similar to the fallacy of begging the question orpetitio principii. Douglas N. Walton inBegging the Question has recently argued that the two forms are alike in trying unfairly to elicit an admission from a dialectical opponent without meeting burden of proof, but distinct because of the circularity of question-begging argument and (...)
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  18. Pauline Graham (1998). Saying "No" to Compromise; "Yes" to Integration. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (9-10):1007-1013.score: 117.0
    The central fact underlying all relations is the question of power and how it can be used to get one's way. When power does not work, we move to compromise. This paper questions the validity of compromise as an effective means of settling differences. My standpoint is that compromise debases relationships, is wrong in principle and does not work in practice either. There is a better strategy: integration, when the contending parties find the wider solution that includes both their (...)
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  19. Tim Crane & D. H. Mellor (1990). There is No Question of Physicalism. Mind 99 (394):185-206.score: 108.0
    Many philosophers are impressed by the progress achieved by physical sciences. This has had an especially deep effect on their ontological views: it has made many of them physicalists. Physicalists believe that everything is physical: more precisely, that all entities, properties, relations, and facts are those which are studied by physics or other physical sciences. They may not all agree with the spirit of Rutherford's quoted remark that 'there is physics; and there is stamp-collecting',' but they all grant physical science (...)
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  20. Kenneth V. Iserson (2007). Has Emergency Medicine Research Benefited Patients? An Ethical Question. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (3):289-295.score: 108.0
    From an ethical standpoint, the goal of clinical research is to benefit patients. While individual investigations may not yield results that directly improve patients’ evaluation or treatment, the corpus of the research should lead in that direction. Without the goal of ultimate benefit to patients, such research fails as a moral enterprise. While this may seem obvious, the need to protect and benefit patients can get lost in the milieu of clinical research. Many advances in emergency medicine have been based (...)
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  21. Steven Schroeder (1995). No Goddess Was Your Mother. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 2 (1):27-32.score: 108.0
    This paper begins with three observations: 1) At what is generally believed to be its origin in ancient Greece, “Western” philosophy is not sharply distinguished from poetry, science, or theology; 2) At what is generally believed to be its origin, “Western” philosophy is not Western; it is born in a multicultural matrix consisting of African, Asian, Middle Eastern, and Southern European influences; 3) As philosophy comes to think of itself as “Western,” it separates itself from poetry, science, and the rest (...)
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  22. Robert H. Keen (1973). The "20-Questions" Technique: Prediction of Visual Threshold and Measurement of Redundancy. Journal of Experimental Psychology 100 (1):158.score: 106.3
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  23. Caroline F. Rowland (2007). Explaining Errors in Children's Questions. Cognition 104 (1):106-134.score: 97.0
    The ability to explain the occurrence of errors in children's speech is an essential component of successful theories of language acquisition. The present study tested some generativist and constructivist predictions about error on the questions produced by ten English-learning children between 2 and 5 years of age. The analyses demonstrated that, as predicted by some generativist theories [e.g. Santelmann, L., Berk, S., Austin, J., Somashekar, S. & Lust. B. (2002). Continuity and development in the acquisition of inversion in yes/no questions: (...)
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  24. Manfred Krifka, For a Structured Meaning Account of Questions and Answers.score: 96.0
    In the logical, philosophical and linguistic literature, a number of theoretical frameworks have been proposed for the meaning of questions (see Ginzburg (1995), Groenendijk & Stokhof (1997) for recent overviews). I will concentrate on two general approaches that figured prominently in linguistic semantics, which I will call the proposition set approach and the structured meaning approach (sometimes called the “propositional” and the “categorial” or “functional” approach). I will show that the proposition set approach runs into three problems: It does not (...)
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  25. Jake H. Davis & David R. Vago (2013). Can Enlightenment Be Traced to Specific Neural Correlates, Cognition, or Behavior? No, and (a Qualified) Yes. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 96.0
    Can enlightenment be traced to specific neural correlates, cognition, or behavior? No, and (a qualified) Yes.
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  26. Dennis Vanden Auweele (2013). Metaxological 'Yes' and Existential 'No': William Desmond and Atheism. Sophia 52 (4):637-655.score: 96.0
    This article explores and critically assesses the metaxological account of a philosophy of God professed by William Desmond. Postmodern reflection on the philosophy of God has a tendency to focus on the 'signs' of God and urges for a passive acceptance of these signs. Desmond argues, contrary to this tendency, for a mindful togetherness of philosophical activity and religious passivity. After exploring Desmond's thought on this topic, I move to assess his 'metaxological yes' to God as the agapeic origin from (...)
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  27. Duk-Ho An (2007). On the Distribution of NPIs in Korean. Natural Language Semantics 15 (4):317-350.score: 96.0
    In this paper, I offer a novel solution to the well-known problem concerning two polarity items in Korean, amu-(N)-to and amu-(N)-rato, that show a complementary distribution within the set of typical NPI-licensing contexts. I present a uniform analysis of the distribution of these NPIs, where the complementary distribution follows from the opposite scope properties of the emphatic particles to and rato contained in the NPIs in question. As the- oretical background, I adopt Karttunen and Peters’s (1979, Syntax and Semantics (...)
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  28. Chung-Hye Han & Maribel Romero, Ellipsis and Movement in the Syntax of Whether/Q...Or Questions.score: 96.0
    In English, a non-wh-question may have a disjunctive phrase explicitly providing the choices that the question ranges over. For example, in (1), the disjunction or not indicates that the the choice is between the positive and the negative polarity for the relevant proposition, as spelled out in the yes/no (yn)-question reading (2) and in the answers (2a,b). Another example is (3). The disjunction in (3) can be understood as providing the choices that the question ranges over, (...)
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  29. Chung-Hye Han & Maribel Romero, Negation, Focus and Alternative Questions.score: 96.0
    This paper presents the observation that negative non-wh-questions with inverted negation do not have an alternative (alt-)question reading. In English, a simple question like (1) has two possible readings: a yes-no (yn-)question reading, paraphrased in (1a), and an alt-question reading, disambiguated in (1b). Under the yn-question reading, the question can be answered as in (2); under the alt-question reading, acceptable answers are (3).
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  30. Mandy Simons (2006). Foundational Issues in Presupposition. Philosophy Compass 1 (4):357–372.score: 90.0
    Unsurprisingly, the negation of sentence (1), shown in (3), does not share this entailment. Neither does the yes/no question formed from this sentence. Similarly, if we add a possibility modal to the sentence, or construct a conditional of which (1) is the antecedent, the resulting sentences do not share the entailment of the original, as we see from the examples below.
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  31. Martijn Caspers, Chris Heunen, Nicolaas P. Landsman & Bas Spitters (2009). Intuitionistic Quantum Logic of an N-Level System. Foundations of Physics 39 (7):731-759.score: 90.0
    A decade ago, Isham and Butterfield proposed a topos-theoretic approach to quantum mechanics, which meanwhile has been extended by Döring and Isham so as to provide a new mathematical foundation for all of physics. Last year, three of the present authors redeveloped and refined these ideas by combining the C*-algebraic approach to quantum theory with the so-called internal language of topos theory (Heunen et al. in arXiv:0709.4364). The goal of the present paper is to illustrate our abstract setup through the (...)
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  32. Jason Wyckoff (2011). Rousseau's General Will and the Condorcet Jury Theorem. History of Political Thought 32 (1):49-62.score: 90.0
    In The Social Contract, Rousseau asserts his infallibility thesis: that the general will can never err, and that one's position in the minority indicates that what one took the general will to be was not actually so. Several theorists have argued that the Condorcet Jury Theorem, which states that in a sufficiently large group the majority opinion on a yes/no question is highly likely to be correct, provides a way to interpret and justify Rousseau's bold claim. I argue that (...)
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  33. Stefan Wintein (2012). On the Behavior of True and False. Minds and Machines 22 (1):1-24.score: 88.0
    Uzquiano (Analysis 70:39–44, 2010 ) showed that the Hardest Logic Puzzle Ever ( HLPE ) [in its amended form due to Rabern and Rabern (Analysis 68:105–112, 2008 )] has a solution in only two questions. Uzquiano concludes his paper by noting that his solution strategy naturally suggests a harder variation of the puzzle which, as he remarks, he does not know how to solve in two questions. Wheeler and Barahona (J Philos Logic, to appear, 2011 ) formulated a three (...) solution to Uzquiano’s puzzle and gave an information theoretic argument to establish that a two question solution for Uzquiano’s puzzle does not exist. However, their argument crucially relies on a certain conception of what it means to answer self-referential yes–no questions truly and falsely . We propose an alternative such conception which, as we show, allows one to solve Uzquiano’s puzzle in two questions. The solution strategy adopted suggests an even harder variation of Uzquiano’s puzzle which, as we will show, can also be solved in two questions. Just as all previous solutions to versions of HLPE , our solution is presented informally. The second part of the paper investigates the prospects of formally representing solutions to HLPE by exploiting theories of truth. (shrink)
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  34. Andrzej Wiśniewski (1994). Erotetic Implications. Journal of Philosophical Logic 23 (2):173 - 195.score: 88.0
    Three semantic relations are analyzed: the relation of implication of a question by a question and a set of declarative sentences, the relation of implication of a question by a question, and the relation of strong implication of a question by a question and a set of declarative sentences. The connections between these concepts and the concepts of relative soundness, partial answerhood and presupposition are examined. The principal results are theorems about, to speak generally, (...)
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  35. William H. Batchelder & Louis Narens (1977). A Critical Examination of the Analysis of Dichotomous Data. Philosophy of Science 44 (1):113-135.score: 88.0
    This paper takes a critical look at theory-free, statistical methodologies for processing and interpreting data taken from respondents answering a set of dichotomous (yes-no) questions. The basic issue concerns to what extent theoretical conclusions based on such analyses are invariant under a class of "informationally equivalent" question transformations. First the notion of Boolean equivalence of two question sets is discussed. Then Lazarsfeld's latent structure analysis is considered in detail. It is discovered that the best fitting latent model (...)
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  36. Daniel M. Wegner & Betsy Sparrow, Unpriming: The Deactivation of Thoughts Through Expression.score: 88.0
    Unpriming is a decrease in the influence of primed knowledge following a behavior expressing that knowledge. The authors investigated strategies for unpriming the knowledge of an answer that is activated when people are asked to consider a simple question. Experiment 1 found that prior correct answering eliminated the bias people normally show toward correct responding when asked to answer yes–no questions randomly. Experiment 2 revealed that prior answering intended to be random did not unprime knowledge on subsequent attempts to (...)
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  37. Luciano Floridi (2011). Semantic Information and the Correctness Theory of Truth. Erkenntnis 74 (2):147-175.score: 87.0
    Semantic information is usually supposed to satisfy the veridicality thesis: p qualifies as semantic information only if p is true. However, what it means for semantic information to be true is often left implicit, with correspondentist interpretations representing the most popular, default option. The article develops an alternative approach, namely a correctness theory of truth (CTT) for semantic information. This is meant as a contribution not only to the philosophy of information but also to the philosophical debate on the nature (...)
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  38. Graham Harman (2011). The Road to Objects. Continent 3 (1):171-179.score: 87.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 171-179. Since 2007 there has been a great deal of interest in speculative realism, launched in the spring of that year at a well-attended workshop in London. It was always a loose arrangement of people who shared few explicit doctrines and no intellectual heroes except the horror writer H.P. Lovecraft, an improbable patron saint for a school of metaphysics. Lovecraft serves as a sort of mascot for the “speculative” part of speculative realism, since his grotesque semi-Euclidean monsters (...)
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  39. Alexandru Baltag & Sonja Smets (2011). Quantum Logic as a Dynamic Logic. Synthese 179 (2):285 - 306.score: 87.0
    We address the old question whether a logical understanding of Quantum Mechanics requires abandoning some of the principles of classical logic. Against Putnam and others (Among whom we may count or not E. W. Beth, depending on how we interpret some of his statements), our answer is a clear "no". Philosophically, our argument is based on combining a formal semantic approach, in the spirit of E. W. Beth's proposal of applying Tarski's semantical methods to the analysis of physical theories, (...)
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  40. Michel Grabisch & Agnieszka Rusinowska (2010). A Model of Influence with an Ordered Set of Possible Actions. Theory and Decision 69 (4):635-656.score: 87.0
    In the article, a yes–no model of influence is generalized to a multi-choice framework. We introduce and study the weighted influence indices of a coalition on a player in a social network where the players have an ordered set of possible actions. Each player has an inclination to choose one of the actions. Due to the mutual influence among players, the final decision of each player may be different from his original inclination. In a particular case, the decision of the (...)
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  41. F. J. McGuigan & G. V. Pavek (1972). On the Psychophysiological Identification of Covert Nonoral Language Processes. Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (2):237.score: 86.0
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  42. Michael Dummett (2002). ‘Yes’, ‘No’ and ‘Can't Say’. Mind 111 (442):289-296.score: 84.0
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  43. E. G. Beltrametti & G. Cassinelli (1977). On State Transformations Induced by Yes-No Experiments, in the Context of Quantum Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 6 (1):369 - 379.score: 84.0
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  44. Bert Baumgaertner (2014). Yes, No, Maybe So: A Veritistic Approach to Echo Chambers Using a Trichotomous Belief Model. Synthese 191 (11):2549-2569.score: 84.0
    I approach the study of echo chambers from the perspective of veritistic social epistemology. A trichotomous belief model is developed featuring a mechanism by which agents will have a tendency to form agreement in the community. The model is implemented as an agent-based model in NetLogo and then used to investigate a social practice called Impartiality, which is a plausible means for resisting or dismantling echo chambers. The implementation exposes additional factors that need close consideration in an evaluation of Impartiality. (...)
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  45. Megan Stern (2008). 'Yes:—No:—I Have Been Sleeping—and Now—Now—I Am Dead': Undeath, the Body and Medicine. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 39 (3):347-354.score: 84.0
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  46. Øistein Bjørnestad (1974). A Note on the so-Called Yes-No Experiments and the Foundations of Quantum Mechanics. Synthese 29 (1-4):243 - 253.score: 84.0
  47. Craig R. M. McKenzie, John T. Wixted, David C. Noelle & Gohar Gyurjyan (2001). Relation Between Confidence in Yes–No and Forced-Choice Tasks. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (1):140.score: 84.0
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  48. Tim Crane & D. H. Mellor (1995). Postscript to There is No Question of Physicalism. In P. Moser & J. D. Trout (eds.), Contemporary Materialism: a Reader. Routledge. 85-89.score: 84.0
     
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  49. Sol L. Garfield (1983). Does Psychotherapy Work? Yes, No, Maybe. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (2):292.score: 84.0
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  50. Christy Sylvest (forthcoming). CS2315-F08 December 7, 2008 Ethics and Therac-25 Some May Question Whether Software Engineering or Computer Programming Are Just Careers or If They Are Real Professions. But There is No Question That They Have the Ability to Affect the Public Either Through Good or Through Harm. Software Engineers Do Not Have to Have a License to Practice, but They Still Need to Abide by a Code of Ethics. Without This Code or a Set of Moral Rules to Guide Them They Cannot Be Expected to Feel Accountable for Their Actions. [REVIEW] Ethics.score: 84.0
     
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