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1 — 50 / 2447
  1. Lawrence C. Becker & Charlotte B. Becker (eds.) (2001). Encyclopedia of Ethics. Routledge.
    The editors, working with a team of 325 renowned authorities in the field of ethics, have revised, expanded, and updated this classic encyclopedia. Along with the addition of 150 new entries, all of the original articles have been newly peer-reviewed and revised, bibliographies have been updated throughout, and the overall design of the work has been enhanced for easier access to cross-references and other reference features. New entries include * Aristotelian Ethics * Avicenna * Bad Faith * Beneficence * Categorical (...)
  2. George Rudebusch (1999). Socrates, Pleasure, and Value. Oxford University Press.
    In this study, George Rudebusch addresses whether Socrates was a hedonist--whether he believed pleasure to be the good. In attempting to locate Socrates' position on hedonism, Rudebusch examines the passages in Plato's early dialogues that are the most disputed on the topic. He maintains that Socrates identifies pleasant activity with virtuous activity, describing Socrates' hedonism as one of activity, not sensation. This analysis allows for Socrates to find both virtue and pleasure to be the good, thus solving the textual puzzle (...)
  3. Jerzy Pelc (1971). Studies in Functional Logical Semiotics of Natural Language. The Hague,Mouton.
  4. Radu J. Bogdan (1994). Grounds for Cognition. Erlbaum.
    This is how guidance of behavior to goal grounds and explains cognition and the main forms in which it manages information.
  5. C. Stephen Layman (2006). Letters to Doubting Thomas: A Case for the Existence of God. OUP USA.
    Letters to Doubting Thomas is an exchange of letters between two characters on the existence of God; it provides a cumulative case for Theism (the belief that God exists). Chapter by chapter, theism is compared with Naturalism (roughly, the view that there is no God and that ultimate reality is physical reality), concluding that Theism (on balance) provides a better explanation of the world and human life than does Naturalism.
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  6. Husain Sarkar (2007). Group Rationality in Scientific Research. Cambridge University Press.
  7. Isaac Levi (1996). For the Sake of the Argument: Ramsey Test Conditionals, Inductive Inference, and Nonmonotonic Reasoning. Cambridge University Press.
    This book by one of the world's foremost philosophers in the fields of epistemology and logic offers an account of suppositional reasoning relevant to practical deliberation, explanation, prediction and hypothesis testing. Suppositions made 'for the sake of argument' sometimes conflict with our beliefs, and when they do, some beliefs are rejected and others retained. Thanks to such belief contravention, adding content to a supposition can undermine conclusions reached without it. Subversion can also arise because suppositional reasoning is ampliative. These two (...)
  8. Frank G. Kirkpatrick (1994). Together Bound: God, History, and the Religious Community. Oxford University Press.
    Challenging the assumption that the concept of divine action is necessarily paradoxical, on the grounds that God is radically transcendent of finitude, or can perform only a master act of creating and sustaining the universe, Frank Kirkpatrick defends as philosophically credible the Christian conviction that God is a personal Agent who also acts in particular historical moments to further the divine intention of fostering universal community. Kirkpatrick claims that God and the world are distinct realities "together bound" in a mutual (...)
  9. Judith Rodin, Carmi Schooler & K. Warner Schaie (eds.) (1990). Self-Directedness: Cause and Effects Throughout the Life Course. L. Erlbaum Associates.
    This book, the third in a series on the life course, has significance in today's world of research, professional practice, and public policy because it symbolizes the gradual reemergence of power in the social sciences. Focusing on "self-directedness and efficacy" over the life course, this text addresses the following issues: * the causes of change * how changes affect the individual, the family system, social groups, and society at large * how various disciplines--anthropology, sociology, psychology, epidemiology--approach this field of study, (...)
  10. Owen J. Flanagan (1996). Self Expressions: Mind, Morals, and the Meaning of Life. Oxford University Press.
    Human beings have the unique ability to consciously reflect on the nature of the self. But reflection has its costs. We can ask what the self is, but as David Hume pointed out, the self, once reflected upon, may be nowhere to be found. The favored view is that we are material beings living in the material world. But if so, a host of destabilizing questions surface. If persons are just a sophisticated sort of animal, then what sense is there (...)
  11. Joseph L. Blau & Maurice Wohlgelernter (eds.) (1980). History, Religion, and Spiritual Democracy: Essays in Honor of Joseph L. Blau. Columbia University Press.
  12. Gerald James Holton (1978/1998). The Scientific Imagination: With a New Introduction. Harvard University Press.
    In this book Gerald Holton takes an opposing view, illuminating the ways in which the imagination of the scientist functions early in the formation of a new ...
  13. Julian Dodd (2000). An Identity Theory of Truth. St. Martin's Press.
    This book argues that correspondence theories of truth fail because the relation that holds between a true thought and a fact is that of identity, not correspondence. Facts are not complexes of worldly entities which make thoughts true they are merely true thoughts. According to Julian Dodd, the resulting modest identity theory , while not defining truth, correctly diagnoses the failure of correspondence theories, and thereby prepares the ground for a defensible deflation of the concept of truth.
  14. Robert Schwartz (ed.) (2004). Perception. Malden MA: Blackwell Publishing.
    This text presents essays on the conceptual and theoretical problems in the study of vision.
  15. Bernard Berofsky (1995). Liberation From Self: A Theory of Personal Autonomy. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the most detailed, sophisticated and comprehensive treatment of autonomy currently available. Moreover it argues for a quite different conception of autonomy from that found in the philosophical literature. Professor Berofsky claims that the idea of autonomy originating in the self is a seductive but ultimately illusory one. The only serious way of approaching the subject is to pay due attention to psychology, and to view autonomy as the liberation from the disabling effects of physiological and psychological afflictions. A (...)
  16. T. Edward Damer (2009). Attacking Faulty Reasoning: A Practical Guide to Fallacy-Free Arguments. Wadsworth/Cengage Laerning.
    This text is designed to help students construct and evaluate arguments.
  17. Carolyn Merchant (2003). Reinventing Eden: The Fate of Nature in Western Culture. Routledge.
    Visionary quests to return to the Garden of Eden have shaped Western culture from Columbus' voyages to today's tropical island retreats. Few narratives are so powerful - and, as Carolyn Merchant shows, so misguided and destructive - as the dream of recapturing a lost paradise. A sweeping account of these quixotic endeavors by one of America's leading environmentalists, Reinventing Eden traces the idea of rebuilding the primeval garden from its origins to its latest incarnations in shopping malls, theme parks and (...)
  18. Mark Vorobej (2006). A Theory of Argument. Cambridge University Press.
    Mark Vorobej develops a novel approach to argument interpretation and evaluation that synthesizes subjective concerns about the personal points of view of individual arguers, with objective concerns about the structural properties of arguments. One of the key themes of the book is that we cannot succeed in distinguishing good arguments from bad arguments until we learn to listen carefully to others. Part I develops a relativistic account of argument cogency that allows for rational disagreement. Part II offers a comprehensive and (...)
  19. David Cockburn (ed.) (1991). Human Beings. Cambridge University Press.
    The contributors to this collection have radically different approaches, some accepting and others denying its validity for a proper understanding of what a...
  20. Daniel Jurafsky & James H. Martin (2000). Speech and Language Processing: An Introduction to Natural Language Processing, Computational Linguistics, and Speech Recognition. Prentice Hall.
    The first of its kind to thoroughly cover language technology at all levels and with all modern technologies this book takes an empirical approach to the ...
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  21. G. Marian Kinget (1999). On Being Human and Pleasure and Pain: Two Humanistic Works. University Press of America.
  22. Karel Lambert (1980/1987). The Nature of Argument. University Press of America.
  23. Ross Harrison (1974). On What There Must Be. Clarendon Press.
    This book addresses the importance of space and time, of existence unperceived, of publicity and action, and of natural laws. These are examined in a single argument which extends from Chapter Three to Chapter Seven and in the course of which the essential features of any comprehensible world are either assumed or derived. In Chapter Two, before this argument begins, the book introduces and argues for the methods by which this general argument is developed. In Chapter One, the book attempts (...)
  24. Basil Mitchell (1994). Faith and Criticism: The Sarum Lectures 1992. Oxford University Press.
    Faith and Criticism addresses a central problem in the church today--the tension between traditionalists and progressives. Traditionalists want above all to hold fast to traditional foundations in belief and ensure that nothing of value is lost, even at the risk of a clash with "modern knowledge." Progressives are concerned above all to proclaim a faith that is credible today, even at the risk of sacrificing some elements of traditional doctrine. They are often locked in uncomprehending conflict. Basil Mitchell argues that, (...)
  25. M. Ito, Y. Miyashita & Edmund T. Rolls (eds.) (1997). Cognition, Computation, and Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
  26. Ken Wilber (2000). Sex, Ecology, Spirituality: The Spirit of Evolution. Shambhala.
    In a tour de force of scholarship and vision, Ken Wilber traces the course of evolution from matter to life to mind. In each case evolution has a "direction," a tendency to produce more highly organized patterns. The "spirit of evolution" lies in its directionality: order out of chaos. After arriving at the emergence of mind, Wilber traces the evolution of human consciousness through its major stages of development, pointing out that at each stage there is the "dialectic of progress"--every (...)
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  27. Richard D. Wright (ed.) (1998). Visual Attention. Oxford University Press.
    This book contains a rich, interdisciplinary collection of articles by some of the pioneers of contemporary research on attention.
  28. Tamara Horowitz (2006). The Epistemology of a Priori Knowledge. Oxford University Press.
    This volume collects four published articles by the late Tamara Horowitz and two unpublished papers on decision theory: "Making Rational Decisions When Preferences Cycle" and the monograph-length "The Backtracking Fallacy." An introduction is provided by editor Joseph Camp. Horowitz preferred to recognize the diversity of rationality, both practical and theoretical rationality. She resisted the temptation to accept simple theories of rationality that are quick to characterize ordinary reasoning as fallacious. This broadly humanist approach to philosophy is exemplified by the articles (...)
  29. Mark Vernon (2007). Science, Religion, and the Meaning of Life. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Have evolution, science and the trappings of the modern world killed off God irrevocably? And what do we lose if we choose not to believe in him? From Newton and Descartes to Darwin and the discovery of the genome, religion has been pushed back further and further while science has gained ground. But what fills the void that religion leaves behind? This book is an attempt to look at these questions and to suggest a third way between the easy consolations (...)
  30. Chetan Bhatt (1997). Liberation and Purity: Race, New Religious Movements, and the Ethics of Postmodernity. Ucl Press.
    First published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
  31. Th R. Hofmann (1993). Realms of Meaning: An Introduction to Semantics. Longman.
  32. Larry Wright (2001). Critical Thinking: An Introduction to Analytical Reading and Reasoning. Oxford University Press.
    Extensively classroom-tested, Critical Thinking: An Introduction to Analytical Reading and Reasoning provides a non-technical vocabulary and analytic apparatus that guide students in identifying and articulating the central patterns found in reasoning and in expository writing more generally. Understanding these patterns of reasoning helps students to better analyze, evaluate, and construct arguments and to more easily comprehend the full range of everyday arguments found in ordinary journalism. Critical Thinking distinguishes itself from other texts in the field by emphasizing analytical reading as (...)
  33. James Tomberlin (ed.) (2002). Metaphysics. Blackwell.
    Externalism, Naturalism, Mathematics, Ontology, Personal Identity, Time and Tense, The Metaphysics of Reference, The Metaphysics of Properties, Conceivability, ...
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  34. Peter K. Unger (2006). All the Power in the World. Oxford University Press.
    This bold and original work of philosophy presents an exciting new picture of concrete reality. Peter Unger provocatively breaks with what he terms the conservatism of present-day philosophy, and returns to central themes from Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume and Russell. Wiping the slate clean, Unger works, from the ground up, to formulate a new metaphysic capable of accommodating our distinctly human perspective. He proposes a world with inherently powerful particulars of two basic sorts: one mental but not physical, the other (...)
  35. K. T. Maslin (2001). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind. Blackwell.
    An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind provides a lively and accessible introduction to all the main themes and arguments currently being debated in this area. The book examines and criticizes four major theories of mind: Dualism, Mind/Brain Identity, Behaviourism and Functionalism. It argues that while consciousness and our mental lives depend upon physical processes in the brain, they are not reducible to those processes. The differences between mental and physical states, mind/body causality, the problem of other minds, and personal (...)
  36. Elizabeth Kamarck Minnich (1990). Transforming Knowledge. Temple University Press.
  37. Patrick Bresnan (2010). Awakening: An Introduction to the History of Eastern Thought. Prentice Hall.
  38. Brigitte L. M. Bauer (1995). The Emergence and Development of Svo Patterning in Latin and French: Diachronic and Psycholinguistic Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
    This book analyzes--in terms of branching--the pervasive reorganization of Latin syntactic and morphological structures: in the development from Latin to French, a shift can be observed from the archaic, left-branching structures (which Latin inherited from Proto-Indo-European) to modern right-branching equivalents. Brigitte Bauer presents a detailed analysis of this development based on the theoretical discussion and definition of "branching" and "head." Subsequently she relates the diachronic shift to psycholinguistic evidence, arguing that the difficuly of LB complex structures as reflected in their (...)
  39. Morwenna Griffiths (1995). Feminisms and the Self: The Web of Identity. Routledge.
    Feminisms and the Self is both a critique and a construction of feminist philosophy, bringing an original contribution to the current debate surrounding identity and subjectivity. This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
  40. B. Keith Putt (ed.) (2009). Gazing Through a Prism Darkly: Reflections on Merold Westphal's Hermeneutical Epistemology. Fordham University Press.
    The present volume focuses on this wisdom of humility that characterizes Westphals thought and explores how that wisdom, expressed through the redemptive ...
  41. William J. Wainwright (ed.) (2009). Philosophy of Religion. Routledge.
    The past forty years or so have witnessed a renaissance in the philosophy of religion. New tools (modal logic, probability theory, and so on) and new historical research have prompted many thinkers to take a fresh look at old topics (God’s existence, the problem of evil, faith and reason, and the like). Moreover, sophisticated examinations of contentious new issues, such as the problem of religious diversity or the role of emotions and other non-evidential factors in shaping rationally held religious beliefs, (...)
  42. Nancy Cavender (1978/2010). Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life. Wadsworth Pub. Co..
    This logic book puts critical-thinking skills into a context that you'll remember and use throughout your life.
  43. Keith E. Yandell (1993). The Epistemology of Religious Experience. Cambridge University.
    This book addresses a fundamental question in the philosophy of religion. Can religious experience provide evidence for religious belief? If so, how? Keith Yandell argues against the notion that religious experience is ineffable, while advocating the view that strong numinous experience provides some evidence that God exists. An attractive feature of the book is that it does not confine its attention to any one religious cultural tradition, but tracks the nature of religious experience across different traditions in both the East (...)
  44. Robert Nozick (1981). Philosophical Explanations. Harvard University Press.
    Nozick analyzes fundamental issues, such as the identity of the self, knowledge and skepticism, free will, the foundations of ethics, and the meaning of life.
  45. Andrew Ortony, Jon Slack & Oliviero Stock (eds.) (1992). Communication From an Artificial Intelligence Perspective: Theoretical and Applied Issues. Springer.
    Theoretical and Applied Issues Edited by Andrew Ortony Jon Slack Oliviero Stock NATO ASI Series Series F: Computer and Systems Sciences, Vol. 100 Communication from an Artificial Intelligence Perspective NATO ASI Series Advanced ...
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  46. Richard Swinburne (1996). Is There a God? Oxford University Press.
    At least since Darwin's Origin of Species was published in 1859, it has increasingly become accepted that the existence of God is, intellectually, a lost cause, and that religious faith is an entirely non-rational matter--the province of those who willingly refuse to accept the dramatic advances of modern cosmology. Are belief in God and belief in science really mutually exclusive? Or, as noted philosopher of science and religion Richard Swinburne puts forth, can the very same criteria which scientists use to (...)
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  47. Jonathan Francis Bennett (1976). Linguistic Behaviour. Cambridge University Press.
    First published in 1976, this book presents a view of language as a matter of systematic communicative behaviour.
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  48. Herbert H. Clark (1976). Semantics and Comprehension. Mouton.
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  49. Hilary Putnam (1992). Renewing Philosophy. Harvard University Press.
    A renewal of philosophy is precisely the point of this book, drawn from the 1989 Gifford Lectures by one of America's most distinguished philosophers.
  50. Gregory McCulloch (1995). The Mind and its World. Routledge.
    Since Descartes, the mind has been thought to be "in the head," separable from the world and even from the body it inhabits. In The Mind and its World , Gregory McCulloch considers the latest debates in philosophy and cognitive science about whether the thinking subject actually requires an environment in order to be able to think. McCulloch explores the mind/body duality from the Enlightenment to the 20th century. He examines such figures as Descartes, Frege, Locke, and Wittgenstein. His method (...)
  51. 1 — 50 / 2447