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1 — 50 / 378
  1. George Yancy (ed.) (2010). The Center Must Not Hold: White Women Philosophers on the Whiteness of Philosophy. Lexington Books.
  2. Nancy Cavender (1978/2010). Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life. Wadsworth Pub. Co..
    This logic book puts critical-thinking skills into a context that you'll remember and use throughout your life.
  3. John M. Capps (2009). You've Got to Be Kidding!: How Jokes Can Help You Think. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Preface -- The importance of critical thinking -- Fallacies of relevance -- Fallacies of evidence -- Fallacies of assumption -- Thinking together.
  4. Tibor R. Machan (2003). Objectivity: Recovering Determinate Reality in Philosophy, Science, and Everyday Life. Ashgate.
    This book considers and responds to these and similar challenges to objectivity.
  5. Husain Sarkar (2007). Group Rationality in Scientific Research. Cambridge University Press.
  6. Tamara Horowitz (2006). The Epistemology of a Priori Knowledge. Oxford University Press.
    This volume collects four published articles by the late Tamara Horowitz and two unpublished papers on decision theory: "Making Rational Decisions When Preferences Cycle" and the monograph-length "The Backtracking Fallacy." An introduction is provided by editor Joseph Camp. Horowitz preferred to recognize the diversity of rationality, both practical and theoretical rationality. She resisted the temptation to accept simple theories of rationality that are quick to characterize ordinary reasoning as fallacious. This broadly humanist approach to philosophy is exemplified by the articles (...)
  7. Lewis Vaughn (2008). The Power of Critical Thinking: Effective Reasoning About Ordinary and Extraordinary Claims. Oxford Univeristy Press.
    Enhanced by many innovative exercises, examples, and pedagogical features, The Power of Critical Thinking: Effective Reasoning About Ordinary and Extraordinary Claims, Second Edition, explores the essentials of critical reasoning, argumentation, logic, and argumentative essay writing while also incorporating material on important topics that most other texts leave out. Author Lewis Vaughn offers comprehensive treatments of core topics, including an introduction to claims and arguments, discussions of propositional and categorical logic, and full coverage of the basics of inductive reasoning. Building on (...)
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  8. Barbara Herrnstein Smith (2006). Scandalous Knowledge: Science, Truth and the Human. Duke University Press.
    Introduction: Scandals of Knowledge -- Pre-Post-Modern Relativism -- Netting Truth: Ludwik Fleck's Constructivist Genealogy -- Cutting-Edge Equivocation: Conceptual Moves and Rhetorical Strategies in Contemporary Anti-Epistemology -- Disciplinary Cultures and Tribal Warfare: The Sciences and the Humanities Today -- Super Natural Science: The Claims of Evolutionary Psychology -- Animal Relatives, Difficult Relations.
  9. Larry Wright (2001). Critical Thinking: An Introduction to Analytical Reading and Reasoning. Oxford University Press.
    Extensively classroom-tested, Critical Thinking: An Introduction to Analytical Reading and Reasoning provides a non-technical vocabulary and analytic apparatus that guide students in identifying and articulating the central patterns found in reasoning and in expository writing more generally. Understanding these patterns of reasoning helps students to better analyze, evaluate, and construct arguments and to more easily comprehend the full range of everyday arguments found in ordinary journalism. Critical Thinking distinguishes itself from other texts in the field by emphasizing analytical reading as (...)
  10. Lester Faigley (2000). Good Reasons. Allyn and Bacon.
  11. George Sotiros Pappas & Marshall Swain (eds.) (1978). Essays on Knowledge and Justification. Cornell University Press.
  12. Elizabeth Kamarck Minnich (1990). Transforming Knowledge. Temple University Press.
  13. Steven Anthony Gerencser (2000). The Skeptic's Oakeshott. St. Martin's Press.
    The Skeptic’s Oakeshott poses the thesis that Michael Oakeshott’s political philosophy is best understood from the vantage point of his skepticism and his intellectual affinity to Hobbes. Margaret Thatcher based much of her political philosophy on Oakeshott’s theories, but Gerencser shows how she widely misinterpreted his work. He argues persuasively against those who understand Oakeshott in terms of the influence of British idealism. Instead, Gerencser argues that Oakeshott adopts and softens Hobbes' idea of consent as the basis of political authority. (...)
  14. John Koethe (2005). Scepticism, Knowledge, and Forms of Reasoning. Cornell University Press.
    Scepticism, Knowledge, and Forms of Reasoning is an attempt to resolve how best to respond to such vexing arguments, a matter on which there is no consensus ...
  15. Nancy C. M. Hartsock (1998). The Feminist Standpoint Revisited and Other Essays. Westview Press.
    For over twenty years Nancy Hartsock has been a powerful voice in the effort to forge a feminism sophisticated and strong enough to make a difference in the real world of powerful political and economic forces. This volume collects her most important writings, offering her current thinking about this period in the development of feminist political economy and presenting an important new paper, “The Feminist Standpoint Revisited.”Central themes recur throughout the volume: in particular, the relationships between theory and activism, between (...)
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  16. William F. Harms (2004). Information and Meaning in Evolutionary Processes. Cambridge University Press.
    The most significant legacy of philosophical skepticism is the realization that our concepts, beliefs and theories are social constructs. This belief has led to epistemological relativism, or the thesis that since there is no ultimate truth about the world, theory preferences are only a matter of opinion. In this book, William Harms seeks to develop the conceptual foundations and tools for a science of knowledge through the application of evolutionary theory, thus allowing us to acknowledge the legacy of skepticism while (...)
  17. Roderick M. Chisholm & Keith Lehrer (eds.) (1975). Analysis and Metaphysics: Essays in Honor of R. M. Chisholm. D. Reidel Pub. Co..
    Taylor, R. A tribute.--Epistemology: Cornman, J. W. Chisholm on sensing and perceiving. Ross, J. F. Testimonial evidence. Lehrer, K. Reason and consistency. Keim, R. Epistemic values and epistemic viewpoints. Hanen, M. Confirmation, explanation, and acceptance. Canfield, J. V. "I know that I am in pain" is senseless. Steel, T. J. Knowledge and the self-presenting.--Metaphysics: Cartwright, R. Scattered objects. Duggan, T. J. Hume on causation. Arnaud, R. B. Brentanist relations. Johnson, M. L., Jr. Events as recurrables.--Ethics: Stevenson, J. T. On doxastic (...)
  18. Jeanette Edwards, Penelope Harvey & Peter Wade (eds.) (2007). Anthropology and Science: Epistemologies in Practice. Berg.
    What does it mean to know something - scientifically, anthropologically, socially? What is the relationship between different forms of knowledge and ways of knowing? How is knowledge mobilised in society and to what ends? Drawing on ethnographic examples from across the world, and from the virtual and global "places" created by new information technologies, Anthropology and Science presents examples of living and dynamic epistemologies and practices, and of how scientific ways of knowing operate in the world. Authors address the nature (...)
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  19. Johannes Gadner, Renate Buber & Lyn Richards (eds.) (2003). Organising Knowledge: Methods and Case Studies. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The organization, processing and representation of knowledge becomes increasingly important in all scientific and business contexts. This book focuses on qualitative methods for knowledge organization and their contributions to knowledge-based issues of marketing management research. Besides theoretical discussions of different approaches to and definitions of knowledge, as well as methods for knowledge organization, several case studies in the field of marketing management are presented. Questions of research design, adequate choice of methodologies and practical relevance of the results are addressed.
  20. Oliver A. Johnson (1974). The Problem of Knowledge: Prolegomena to an Epistemology. Martinus Nijhoff.
  21. Marshall Swain (1981). Reasons and Knowledge. Cornell University Press.
  22. Susana Nuccetelli (ed.) (2003). New Essays on Semantic Externalism and Self-Knowledge. MIT Press.
  23. Peter Baumann & Monika Betzler (eds.) (2004). Practical Conflicts: New Philosophical Essays. Cambridge.
    Practical conflicts pervade human life. Agents have many different desires, goals, and commitments, all of which can come into conflict with each other. How can practical reasoning help to resolve these practical conflicts? In this collection of new essays a distinguished roster of philosophers analyze the diverse forms of practical conflict. Their aim is to establish an understanding of the sources of these conflicts, to investigate the challenge they pose to an adequate conception of practical reasoning, and to assess the (...)
  24. James H. Fetzer (ed.) (1984). Principles of Philosophical Reasoning. Rowman & Allanheld.
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  25. Malcolm Clark (1972). Perplexity and Knowledge. The Hague,Nijhoff.
  26. K. Helmut Reich (2002). Developing the Horizons of the Mind: Relational and Contextual Reasoning and the Resolution of Cognitive Conflict. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is about Relational and Contextual Reasoning (RCR), a new theory of the human mind that addresses key areas of human conflict, such as the ideological conflict between nations, in close relationships and between science and religion. K. Helmut Reich provides a clear and accessible introduction to the RCR way of thinking that encourages an inclusive rather than oppositional approach to conflict and problem-solving.
  27. Erik J. Olsson (2005). Against Coherence: Truth, Probability, and Justification. Oxford University Press.
    It is tempting to think that, if a person's beliefs are coherent, they are also likely to be true. This truth conduciveness claim is the cornerstone of the popular coherence theory of knowledge and justification. Erik Olsson's new book is the most extensive and detailed study of coherence and probable truth to date. Setting new standards of precision and clarity, Olsson argues that the value of coherence has been widely overestimated. Provocative and readable, Against Coherence will make stimulating reading for (...)
  28. Martin Hollis (1987). The Cunning of Reason. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, the author is attempting to make sense, as a philosopher, of the ideas of rationality put forward by economists, sociologists, and political theorists. The book intervenes in intense current debates within and among several disciplines. Its concern is with the true nature of social actors and the proper character of social science. Its arguments are the more challenging for being presented in simple, incisive, and lucid prose.
  29. F. C. Benenson (1984). Probability, Objectivity, and Evidence. Routledge & K. Paul.
    INTRODUCTION I should begin by warning the reader that many of the views presented in this book are decidedly unfashionable; the theory of probability I ...
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  30. John L. Pollock (1995). Cognitive Carpentry. Mit Press.
    "A sequel to Pollock's How to Build a Person, this volume builds upon that theoretical groundwork for the implementation of rationality through artificial ...
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  31. Maurice A. Finocchiaro (2005). Arguments About Arguments: Systematic, Critical, and Historical Essays in Logical Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    Following an approach that is empirical but not psychological, and dialectical but not dialogical, Maurice Finocchiaro defines concepts such as reasoning, argument, argument analysis, critical reasoning, methodological reflection, judgment, critical thinking, and informal logic. Including extended critiques of the views of many contemporary scholars, he also integrates into the discussion Arnauld's Port-Royal Logic, Gramsci's theory of intellectuals, and case studies from the history of science, particularly the work of Galileo, Newton, Huygens, and Lavoisier.
  32. Douglas N. Walton (2008). Witness Testimony Evidence: Argumentation, Artificial Intelligence, and Law. Cambridge University Press.
    Recent work in artificial intelligence has increasingly turned to argumentation as a rich, interdisciplinary area of research that can provide new methods related to evidence and reasoning in the area of law. Douglas Walton provides an introduction to basic concepts, tools and methods in argumentation theory and artificial intelligence as applied to the analysis and evaluation of witness testimony. He shows how witness testimony is by its nature inherently fallible and sometimes subject to disastrous failures. At the same time such (...)
  33. Marcus G. Raskin (1987). New Ways of Knowing: The Sciences, Society, and Reconstructive Knowledge. Rowman & Littlefield.
  34. Leslie Forster Stevenson (1982). The Metaphysics of Experience. Oxford University Press.
    This book is not aimed at exhuming Kant, but resurrecting him. It is inspired by the Critique of Pure Reason , yet is not about it: perhaps over-ambitiously, it tries to delineate not Kant's metaphysics of experience but the truth of the matter. The author shows rather than says where he agrees and disagrees with the first Critique , in so far as he understood that profound but obscure, over-systematic yet carelessly written, inspiring and infuriating, magnificent but flawed masterpiece. The (...)
  35. E. Doyle McCarthy (1996). Knowledge as Culture: The New Sociology of Knowledge. Routledge.
    Drawing upon Marxist, French structuralist and American pragmatist traditions, this lively and accessible introduction to the sociology of knowledge gives to its classic texts a fresh reading, arguing that various bodies of knowledge operate within culture to create powerful cultural dispositions, meanings, and categories. It looks at the cultural impact of the forms and images of mass media, the authority of science, medicine, and law as bodies of contemporary knowledge and practice. Finally, it considers the concept of "engendered knowledge" through (...)
  36. Tamar Szabó Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.) (2007). Oxford Studies in Epistemology 2. Oxford.
    Oxford Studies in Epistemology is a biennial publicaton which offers a regular snapshot of state-of-the-art work in this important field. Under the guidance of a distinguished editorial board composed of leading philosophers in North America, Europe and Australasia, it will publish exemplary papers in epistemology, broadly construed. Topics within its purview include: *traditional epistemological questions concerning the nature of belief, justification, and knowledge, the status of scepticism, the nature of the a priori, etc; *new developments in epistemology, including movements such (...)
  37. Tamar Szabo Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.) (2005). Oxford Studies in Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
    Oxford Studies in Epistemology is a biennial publicaton which offers a regular snapshot of state-of-the-art work in this important field.
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  38. James R. Wible (1998). The Economics of Science: Methodology and Epistemology as If Economics Really Mattered. Routledge.
    This book explores aspects of science from an economic point of view. The author begins with economic models of misconduct in science, moving on to discuss other important issues, including market failure and the market place of ideas.
  39. Patricia H. Werhane (1992). Skepticism, Rules and Private Languages. Humanities Press.
  40. Adam Morton (2003). A Guide Through the Theory of Knowledge. Blackwell Pub..
    The third edition of this highly acclaimed text is ideal for introductory courses in epistemology.
  41. Martin Tamny & K. D. Irani (eds.) (1986). Rationality in Thought and Action. Greenwood Press.
  42. Doan Travann (2001). Reason, Rationality, and Reasonableness. Council for Research in Values and Philosophy.
    INTRODUCTION AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT Reason, Rationality and Reasonableness is intended as a critical reflection on the nature of reason. It aims to show that, ...
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  43. Dario Antiseri (1996). The Weak Thought and its Strength. Avebury.
  44. Robert Nozick (1981). Philosophical Explanations. Harvard University Press.
    Nozick analyzes fundamental issues, such as the identity of the self, knowledge and skepticism, free will, the foundations of ethics, and the meaning of life.
  45. Douglas N. Walton (2007). Media Argumentation: Dialectic, Persuasion, and Rhetoric. Cambridge University Press.
    Media argumentation is a powerful force in our lives. From political speeches to television commercials to war propaganda, it can effectively mobilize political action, influence the public, and market products. This book presents a new and systematic way of thinking about the influence of mass media in our lives, showing the intersection of media sources with argumentation theory, informal logic, computational theory, and theories of persuasion. Using a variety of case studies that represent arguments that typically occur in the mass (...)
  46. Carl Mitcham & Alois Huning (eds.) (1985). Philosophy and Technology II: Information Technology and Computers in Theory and Practice. Reidel.
    INTRODUCTION: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND COMPUTERS AS THEMES IN THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY Philosophical interest in computers and information technology ...
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  47. S. I. Benn & G. W. Mortimore (eds.) (1976). Rationality and the Social Sciences: Contributions to the Philosophy and Methodology of the Social Sciences. Routledge and Kegan Paul.
  48. James H. Fetzer (ed.) (2000). Science, Explanation, and Rationality: Aspects of the Philosophy of Carl G. Hempel. Oxford University Press.
    Carl G. Hempel exerted greater influence upon philosophers of science than any other figure during the 20th century. In this far-reaching collection, distinguished philosophers contribute valuable studies that illuminate and clarify the central problems to which Hempel was devoted. The essays enhance our understanding of the development of logical empiricism as the major intellectual influence for scientifically-oriented philosophers and philosophically-minded scientists of the 20th century.
  49. Edward F. McClennen (1990). Rationality and Dynamic Choice: Foundational Explorations. Cambridge University Press.
    In this major contribution to the theory of rational choice the author sets out the foundations of rational choice, and then sketches a dynamic choice framework in which principles of ordering and independence follow from a number of apparently plausible conditions. However there is potential conflict among these conditions, and when they are weakened to avoid it, the usual foundations of rational choice no longer prevail. The thrust of the argument is to suggest that the theory of rational choice is (...)
  50. A. J. Meadows (ed.) (1991). Knowledge and Communication: Essays on the Information Chain. Library Association Pub..
  51. 1 — 50 / 378