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1 — 50 / 471
  1. Nicholas Rescher (1979). Cognitive Systematization: A Systems-Theoretic Approach to a Coherentist Theory of Knowledge. Rowman and Littlefield.
  2. Terence Penelhum (1971). Religion and Rationality. New York,Random House.
  3. I. C. Jarvie (1987). Philosophy of the Film: Epistemology, Ontology, Aesthetics. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    Examines the overlap between film and philosophy in three distinct ways: epistemological issues in film-making and viewing; aesthetic theory and film; and film as a medium of philosophical expression. This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
  4. Carl Ginet (1975). Knowledge, Perception, and Memory. D. Reidel Pub. Co..
    INTRODUCTION . What is it to know that something is the case? What am I saying when I say, 'I know that the temperature outside is below freezing' or 'I ...
  5. John Mauk (2006). Inventing Arguments. Thomson/Wadsworth.
  6. Peter A. French, Theodore Edward Uehling & Howard K. Wettstein (eds.) (1980). Studies in Epistemology. University of Minnesota Press.
    This is Volume V in the series Midwest Studies in Philosophy In 1979 the University of Minnesota Press assumed publication of the annual Midwest Studies in ...
  7. Sean Sayers (1985). Reality and Reason: Dialectic and the Theory of Knowledge. Blackwell.
    Everything possible to be believed is an image of truth (The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, Blake) Introduction In this book I deal with some of the central ...
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  8. Larry Wright (2001). Critical Thinking: An Introduction to Analytical Reading and Reasoning. Oxford University Press.
    Extensively classroom-tested, Critical Thinking: An Introduction to Analytical Reading and Reasoning provides a non-technical vocabulary and analytic apparatus that guide students in identifying and articulating the central patterns found in reasoning and in expository writing more generally. Understanding these patterns of reasoning helps students to better analyze, evaluate, and construct arguments and to more easily comprehend the full range of everyday arguments found in ordinary journalism. Critical Thinking distinguishes itself from other texts in the field by emphasizing analytical reading as (...)
  9. Christopher Peacocke (2008). Truly Understood. Oxford University Press.
    A theory of understanding -- Truth's role in understanding -- Critique of justificationist and evidential accounts -- Do pragmatist views avoid this critique? -- A realistic account -- How evidence and truth are related -- Three grades of involvement of truth in theories of understanding -- Anchoring -- Next steps -- Reference and reasons -- The main thesis and its location -- Exposition and four argument-types -- Significance and consequences of the main thesis -- The first person as a case (...)
  10. Cristina Bicchieri, Dalla Chiara & Maria Luisa (eds.) (1992). Knowledge, Belief, and Strategic Interaction. Cambridge University Press.
    In recent years there has been a great deal of interaction among game theorists, philosophers, and logicians in certain foundational problems concerning rationality, the formalization of knowledge and practical reasoning, and models of learning and deliberation. This unique volume brings together the work of some of the preeminent figures in their respective disciplines, all of whom are engaged in research at the forefront of their fields. Together they offer a conspectus of the interaction of game theory, logic, and epistemology in (...)
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  11. Thomas Nagel (1997). The Last Word. OUP Usa.
    In this important new book Nagel, one of the most distinguished philosophers writing in English today, presents a sustained defence of reason against the attacks of subjectivism. He offers systematic rebuttals of relativistic claims with respect to language, logic, science, and ethics.
  12. K. Helmut Reich (2002). Developing the Horizons of the Mind: Relational and Contextual Reasoning and the Resolution of Cognitive Conflict. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is about Relational and Contextual Reasoning (RCR), a new theory of the human mind that addresses key areas of human conflict, such as the ideological conflict between nations, in close relationships and between science and religion. K. Helmut Reich provides a clear and accessible introduction to the RCR way of thinking that encourages an inclusive rather than oppositional approach to conflict and problem-solving.
  13. Georges Gurvitch (1971). The Social Frameworks of Knowledge. New York,Harper & Row.
  14. Leslie Forster Stevenson (1982). The Metaphysics of Experience. Oxford University Press.
    This book is not aimed at exhuming Kant, but resurrecting him. It is inspired by the Critique of Pure Reason , yet is not about it: perhaps over-ambitiously, it tries to delineate not Kant's metaphysics of experience but the truth of the matter. The author shows rather than says where he agrees and disagrees with the first Critique , in so far as he understood that profound but obscure, over-systematic yet carelessly written, inspiring and infuriating, magnificent but flawed masterpiece. The (...)
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  15. Paul K. Moser (ed.) (1998). The Theory of Knowledge: A Thematic Introduction. Oxford University Press.
    This book is an accessible introduction to contemporary epistemology, the theory of knowledge. It introduces traditional topics in epistemology within the context of contemporary debates about the definition, sources, and limits of human knowledge. Rich in examples and written in an engaging style, it explains the field while avoiding technical detail. It relates epistemology to work in cognitive science and defends a plausible version of explanationism regarding epistemological method.
  16. Sally E. Talbot (2000). Partial Reason: Critical and Constructive Transformations of Ethics and Epistemology. Greenwood Press.
    Proposes an original theory of the ethic of care, drawing insights from feminist and non-feminist critics of liberal moral theory, feminist ethics and ...
  17. Lester Faigley (2000). Good Reasons. Allyn and Bacon.
  18. Josefina Figueira-McDonough, Ann Nichols-Casebolt & F. Ellen Netting (eds.) (1998). The Role of Gender in Practice Knowledge: Claiming Half the Human Experience. Garland Pub..
    Feminist critiques of the social sciences are based on the assumption that because the social sciences were developed for the most part by white, middle-class, Western men, the perspectives of women were ignored. This book offers an approach for integrating gender-related content into the social work curriculum. The distinguished contributors discuss the shortcoming of dominant knowledge, address the pressing need for a gender-integrated curriculum, consider the pedagogies consistent with the implementation of an integrate curriculum, address specific areas in social work (...)
  19. Michael Novak (1965). Belief and Unbelief. New York, Macmillan.
    "Belief and Unbelief? I had to read it in college. Good book." Over the years, at receptions and chance encounters and by letter, many strangers have ...
  20. Nancy Cavender (1978/2010). Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life. Wadsworth Pub. Co..
    This logic book puts critical-thinking skills into a context that you'll remember and use throughout your life.
  21. Allan Megill (ed.) (1994). Rethinking Objectivity. Duke University Press.
  22. Henry Plotkin (2007). Necessary Knowledge. OUP Oxford.
    'Necessary knowledge' tackles one of the big questions - what knowledge do we possess at birth, and what do we learn along the way? It neither sides with those who believe in 'blank slate' theories, nor with those who believe all learning is innate. Instead, it proposes an original new solution to this enduring puzzle.
  23. Elizabeth Kamarck Minnich (1990). Transforming Knowledge. Temple University Press.
  24. Harold I. Brown (1988). Rationality. Routledge.
  25. Ruth Weintraub (1997). The Sceptical Challenge. Routledge.
    Skepticism gives a pessimistic reply to questions on whether we really know the things we think we know, and whether our beliefs are reasonable. The theoretical and practical difficulties presented by the skeptical challenge--in that the skeptical life cannot be lived, and the doctrine seems self-defeating--are in fact superficial, according to Ruth Weintraub. Her study looks at several famous skeptical arguments of Descartes, Hume, and the ancient Greek skeptic, Sextus Empiricus. She argues that by drawing on philosophy, rather than science, (...)
  26. Paul Artin Boghossian (2006). Fear of Knowledge: Against Relativism and Constructivism. Oxford University Press.
    Relativist and constructivist conceptions of truth and knowledge have become orthodoxy in vast stretches of the academic world in recent times. In his long-awaited first book, Paul Boghossian critically examines such views and exposes their fundamental flaws. Boghossian focuses on three different ways of reading the claim that knowledge is socially constructed--one as a thesis about truth and two about justification. And he rejects all three. The intuitive, common-sense view is that there is a way the world is that is (...)
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  27. Cheshire Calhoun (ed.) (2004). Setting the Moral Compass: Essays by Women Philosophers. Oxford University Press.
    Setting the Moral Compass brings together the (largely unpublished) work of nineteen women moral philosophers whose powerful and innovative work has contributed to the "re-setting of the compass" of moral philosophy over the past two decades. The contributors, who include many of the top names in this field, tackle several wide-ranging projects: they develop an ethics for ordinary life and vulnerable persons; they examine the question of what we ought to do for each other; they highlight the moral significance of (...)
  28. Christopher Hookway (1990). Scepticism. Routledge.
    Scepticism is a subject which has preoccupied philosophers for two thousand years. This book presents an historical perspective on scepticism by considering contrasting views, such as those of Sextus Empiricus, Descartes and Hume, on why scepticism is important. With its historical perspective and analysis of contemporary discussions, Scepticism provides a broad focus on the subject, differing from other discussions of the topic in the importance it attaches to scepticism both in Greek thought and in pre-twentieth century views generally.
  29. Jane Duran (2001). Worlds of Knowing: Global Feminist Epistemologies. Routledge.
    Jane Duran's Worlds of Knowing begins to fill an enormous gap in the literature of feminist epistemology: a wide-ranging, cross-cultural primer on worldviews and epistemologies of various cultures and their appropriations by indigenous feminist movements in those cultures. It is the much needed epistemological counterpart to work on cross-cultural feminist social and political philosophy. This project is absolutely breath-taking in scope, yet a manageable read for anyone with some background in feminist theory, history, or anthropology. Duran draws many comparisons and (...)
  30. Husain Sarkar (2007). Group Rationality in Scientific Research. Cambridge University Press.
  31. Frederic Schick (2003). Ambiguity and Logic. Cambridge University Press.
    In his book Frederic Schick develops his challenge to standard decision theory. He argues that talk of the beliefs and desires of an agent is not sufficient to explain choices. To account for a given choice we need to take into consideration how the agent understands the problem, how he sees in a selective way the options open to him. The author applies his new logic to a host of common human predicaments. Why do people in choice experiments act so (...)
  32. Robert Nozick (2001). Invariances: The Structure of the Objective World. Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
    Excerpts from Robert Nozick's "Invariances" Necessary truths are invariant across all possible worlds, contingent ones across only some.
  33. Israel Scheffler (1965). Conditions of Knowledge. Chicago, Scott, Foresman.
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  34. Newton Garver & Peter H. Hare (eds.) (1986). Naturalism and Rationality. Prometheus Books.
  35. Terence Cuneo & René van Woudenberg (eds.) (2004). The Cambridge Companion to Thomas Reid. Cambridge University Press.
    Widely acknowledged as the principal architect of Scottish common sense philosophy, Thomas Reid is increasingly recognized today as one of the finest philosophers of the eighteenth century. Combining a sophisticated response to the skeptical and idealist views of his day, Reid's thought represents an important alternative to Humean skepticism, Kantian idealism and Cartesian rationalism. This work covers not only his philosophy but his scientific research and extensive historical influence.
  36. Susana Nuccetelli (ed.) (2003). New Essays on Semantic Externalism and Self-Knowledge. MIT Press.
  37. Andrew Dawson, Jennifer Lorna Hockey & Andrew H. Dawson (eds.) (1997). After Writing Culture: Epistemology and Praxis in Contemporary Anthropology. Routledge.
    Anthropologists now openly acknowledge that social anthropology can no longer fulfill its traditional aim of providing holistic, objective representations of people of "exotic" cultures. After Writing Culture asks what theoretical and practical role contemporary anthropology can play in our increasingly unpredictable and complex world. With fourteen articles written by well-known anthropologists, the work explores some of the directions in which contemporary anthropology is moving, following the questions raised by the "writing culture" debates of the 1980s. Some of the chapters cover: (...)
  38. Susan J. Hekman (1986). Hermeneutics and the Sociology of Knowledge. University of Notre Dame Press.
  39. Jane Duran (1989). Epistemics: Epistemic Justification Theory Naturalized and the Computational Model of Mind. Upa.
    This author explores the intersection between cognitive science, as exemplified by the computational model of mind, and epistemologyó specifically, epistemic justification theory. Her analysis leads to the conclusion that some very specific and somewhat technical issues in epistemic justification theory can be at least partially resolved, if not entirely cleared up, by the use of the computational model. The third and fourth chapters of this work are devoted directly to that effort. Chapter one examines in detail epistemology and cognitive sciences, (...)
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  40. Johannes Gadner, Renate Buber & Lyn Richards (eds.) (2003). Organising Knowledge: Methods and Case Studies. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The organization, processing and representation of knowledge becomes increasingly important in all scientific and business contexts. This book focuses on qualitative methods for knowledge organization and their contributions to knowledge-based issues of marketing management research. Besides theoretical discussions of different approaches to and definitions of knowledge, as well as methods for knowledge organization, several case studies in the field of marketing management are presented. Questions of research design, adequate choice of methodologies and practical relevance of the results are addressed.
  41. Roderick M. Chisholm & Keith Lehrer (eds.) (1975). Analysis and Metaphysics: Essays in Honor of R. M. Chisholm. D. Reidel Pub. Co..
    Taylor, R. A tribute.--Epistemology: Cornman, J. W. Chisholm on sensing and perceiving. Ross, J. F. Testimonial evidence. Lehrer, K. Reason and consistency. Keim, R. Epistemic values and epistemic viewpoints. Hanen, M. Confirmation, explanation, and acceptance. Canfield, J. V. "I know that I am in pain" is senseless. Steel, T. J. Knowledge and the self-presenting.--Metaphysics: Cartwright, R. Scattered objects. Duggan, T. J. Hume on causation. Arnaud, R. B. Brentanist relations. Johnson, M. L., Jr. Events as recurrables.--Ethics: Stevenson, J. T. On doxastic (...)
  42. Nicholas Rescher (1977). Methodological Pragmatism: A Systems-Theoretic Approach to the Theory of Knowledge. Blackwell.
  43. Karel Lambert (1980/1987). The Nature of Argument. University Press of America.
    The authors contend that most contemporary logic textbooks fail the average student because they emphasize the evaluation of arguments over their clarification, assuming that the student already understands what motivations underlie logic.
  44. Oliver A. Johnson (1974). The Problem of Knowledge: Prolegomena to an Epistemology. Martinus Nijhoff.
  45. Raymond S. Nickerson (1986). Reflections on Reasoning. L. Erlbaum Associates.
    Introduction This book is about reasoning. It is not a textbook in the conventional sense. Nor does it provide a prescription for how to reason effectively. ...
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  46. Jeanette Edwards, Penelope Harvey & Peter Wade (eds.) (2007). Anthropology and Science: Epistemologies in Practice. Berg.
    What does it mean to know something - scientifically, anthropologically, socially? What is the relationship between different forms of knowledge and ways of knowing? How is knowledge mobilised in society and to what ends? Drawing on ethnographic examples from across the world, and from the virtual and global "places" created by new information technologies, Anthropology and Science presents examples of living and dynamic epistemologies and practices, and of how scientific ways of knowing operate in the world. Authors address the nature (...)
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  47. Richard Gott (2003). Understanding and Using Scientific Evidence: How to Critically Evaluate Data. Sage.
    The basic understanding which underlies scientific evidence - ideas such as the structure of experiments, causality, repeatability, validity and reliability- is not straightforward. But these ideas are needed to judge evidence in school science, in physics or chemistry or biology or psychology, in undergraduate science, and in understanding everyday issues to do with science. It is essential to be able to be critical of scientific evidence. The authors clearly set out the principles of investigation so that the reader will be (...)
  48. Michael Fischer (1989). Stanley Cavell and Literary Skepticism. University of Chicago Press.
    Stanley Cavell's work is distinctive not only in its importance to philosophy but also for its remarkable interdisciplinary range. Cavell is read avidly by students of film, photography, painting, and music, but especially by students of literature, for whom Cavell offers major readings of Thoreau, Emerson, Shakespeare, and others. In this first book-length study of Cavell's writings, Michael Fischer examines Cavell's relevance to the controversies surrounding poststructuralist literary theory, particularly works by Jacques Derrida, J. Hillis Miller, Paul de Man, and (...)
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  49. Rita Vuyk (1981). Overview and Critique of Piaget's Genetic Epistemology, 1965-1980. Academic Press.
    v. 1. Piaget's genetic epistemology, 1965-1980.--v. 2. Critique of Piaget's genetic epistemology, 1965-1980.
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  50. Nicholas Maxwell (1984). From Knowledge to Wisdom: A Revolution in the Aims and Methods of Science. Basil Blackwell.
    This book argues for the need to put into practice a profound and comprehensive intellectual revolution, affecting to a greater or lesser extent all branches of scientific and technological research, scholarship and education. This intellectual revolution differs, however, from the now familiar kind of scientific revolution described by Kuhn. It does not primarily involve a radical change in what we take to be knowledge about some aspect of the world, a change of paradigm. Rather it involves a radical change in (...)
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