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1 — 50 / 432
  1. Frederick Ferré (1977). Language, Logic, and God. Greenwood Press.
  2. P. M. Harman (1982). Metaphysics and Natural Philosophy: The Problem of Substance in Classical Physics. Barnes & Noble Books.
  3. Hud Hudson (2005). The Metaphysics of Hyperspace. Oxford University Press.
    Hud Hudson offers a fascinating examination of philosophical reasons to believe in hyperspace. He explores non-theistic reasons in the first chapter and theistic ones towards the end; in the intervening sections he inquires into a variety of puzzles in the metaphysics of material objects that are either generated by the hypothesis of hyperspace or else informed by it, with discussions of receptacles, boundaries, contact, occupation, and superluminal motion. Anyone engaged with contemporary metaphysics, and many philosophers of religion, will find (...)
  4. Tom L. Beauchamp (1974). Philosophical Problems of Causation. Encino, Calif.,Dickenson Pub. Co..
  5. Michael F. Goodman (ed.) (1988). What is a Person. Clifton: Humana Press.
    Introduction There has been philosophical discussion for centuries on the nature and scope of human life. Lucretius, for example, contends that human life ...
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  6. Ladislav Tondl (1973). Scientific Procedures. Boston,D. Reidel Pub. Co..
  7. Henry Vyverberg (1989). Human Nature, Cultural Diversity, and the French Enlightenment. Oxford University Press.
    In this work, Henry Vyverberg traces the evolution and consequences of a crucial idea in French Enlightenment thought--the idea of human nature. Human nature was commonly seen as a broadly universal, unchanging entity, though perhaps modifiable by geographical, social, and historical factors. Enlightenment empiricism suggested a degree of cultural diversity that has often been underestimated in studies of the age. Evidence here is drawn from Diderot's celebrated Encyclopedia and from a vast range of writing by such Enlightenment notables as Voltaire, (...)
  8. Edward M. Keating (1975). The Broken Bough: The Solution to the Riddle of Man. Atheneum.
  9. Rolf A. Eberle (1970). Nominalistic Systems. Dordrecht,Reidel.
  10. Carolyn Merchant (2003). Reinventing Eden: The Fate of Nature in Western Culture. Routledge.
    Visionary quests to return to the Garden of Eden have shaped Western culture from Columbus' voyages to today's tropical island retreats. Few narratives are so powerful - and, as Carolyn Merchant shows, so misguided and destructive - as the dream of recapturing a lost paradise. A sweeping account of these quixotic endeavors by one of America's leading environmentalists, Reinventing Eden traces the idea of rebuilding the primeval garden from its origins to its latest incarnations in shopping malls, theme parks and (...)
  11. Leonard William Doob (1971). Patterning of Time. Yale University Press.
  12. Anthony Appiah (1986). For Truth in Semantics. B. Blackwell.
  13. Peter Langford (1986). Modern Philosophies of Human Nature: Their Emergence From Christian Thought. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Academic.
    Chapter 1 : Introduction General Argument My aim is to survey some of the most influential philosophical writers on human nature from the time that ...
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  14. Edo Pivčević (1990). Change and Selves. Oxford University Press.
    Whenever a thing changes, however slightly, it becomes in some ways unlike what it was. But how it is possible for anything to be both like and unlike itself? The possibility of change is a typically philosophical puzzle to which naturalistic science has no answer. In this book, Pivcevic examines the conditions that make the idea of change intelligible--in particular the connection between the possibility of change and the existence of selves.
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  15. Harold H. Oliver (1981). A Relational Metaphysic. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Boston.
  16. Douglas Ehring (1997). Causation and Persistence: A Theory of Causation. Oxford University Press.
    Ehring shows the inadequacy of received theories of causation, and, introducing conceptual devices of his own, provides a wholly new account of causation as the persistence over time of individual properties, or "tropes.".
  17. Dennis M. Patterson (1996). Law and Truth. Oxford University Press.
    Are propositions of law true or false? If so, what does it mean to say that propositions of law are true and false? This book takes up these questions in the context of the wider philosophical debate over realism and anti-realism. Despite surface differences, Patterson argues that the leading contemporary jurisprudential theories all embrace a flawed conception of the nature of truth in law. Instead of locating that in virtue of which propositions of law are true, Patterson argues that lawyers (...)
  18. John Heil (1992). The Nature of True Minds. Cambridge University Press.
    This book aims at reconciling the emerging conceptions of mind and their contents that have, in recent years, come to seem irreconcilable. Post-Cartesian philosophers face the challenge of comprehending minds as natural objects possessing apparently non-natural powers of thought. The difficulty is to understand how our mental capacities, no less than our biological or chemical characteristics, might ultimately be products of our fundamental physical constituents, and to do so in a way that preserves the phenomena. Externalists argue that (...)
  19. Mary E. Clark (2002). In Search of Human Nature. Routledge.
    Human Nature offers a wide-ranging and holistic view of human nature from all perspectives: scientific, historical, and sociological. Mary Clark takes the most recent data from a dozen or more fields, and works it together with clarifying anecdotes and thought-provoking images to challenge conventional Western beliefs with hopeful new insights. Balancing the theories of cutting-edge neuroscience with the insights of primitive mythologies, Mary Clark provides down-to-earth suggestions for peacefully resolving global problems. Human Nature builds up a coherent, and above all (...)
  20. Howard Sankey (ed.) (1999). Causation and Laws of Nature. Kluwer.
    Because the book represents a good cross-section of authors currently working on these themes in the Australasian region, it conveys something of the interest ...
  21. Hugh LaFollette (1996). Personal Relationships: Love, Identity and Morality. Blackwell.
    "This admirably clear and engaging work ... is broadly accessible... and is informed by social science research. Yet it is also thoroughly philosophical, delving into problems in ethics, epistemology, the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language.... Let us hope that LaFollette continues to tackle these problems with the clarify and rigor he shows here.".
  22. David Owens (1992). Causes and Coincidences. Cambridge University Press.
    In an important departure from current theories of causation, David Owens proposes that coincidences have no causes, and that a cause is something that ensures that its effects are no coincidence. He elucidates the idea of a coincidence as an event that can be divided into constituent events, the nomological antecedents of which are independent of each other. He also suggests that causal facts can be analyzed in terms of non-causal facts, including relations of necessity. Thus, causation is defined in (...)
  23. Heidrun Friese (ed.) (2001). The Moment: Time and Rupture in Modern Thought. Liverpool University Press.
    Modern philosophical thought has a manifold tradition of emphasizing "the moment". "The moment" demands questioning all-too-common notions of time, of past, present and future, uniqueness and repetition, rupture and continuity. This collection addresses the key questions posed by "the moment", considering writers such as Nietzsche, Husserl, Benjamin and Badiou, and elucidates the connections between social theory, philosophy, literary theory and history that are opened up by this notion.
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  24. Jimmy H. Davis & Harry L. Poe (2008). Chance or Dance: An Evaluation of Design. Templeton Press.
    Chance or Dance is ideal for students and general readers interested in understanding how modern science gives evidence for the creation of nature by the God of the Bible.
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  25. Peter A. French, Theodore Edward Uehling & Howard K. Wettstein (eds.) (1979). Studies in Metaphysics. University of Minnesota Press.
    Rich with historical and cultural value, these works are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions.
  26. F. F. Centore (1979). Persons: A Comparative Account Of The Six Possible Theories. Westport: Greenwood Press.
  27. Roland N. Stromberg (1968). Realism, Naturalism, and Symbolism. New York, Walker.
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  28. Glenn Pearce & Patrick Maynard (eds.) (1973). Conceptual Change. Boston,D. Reidel.
  29. D. H. M. Brooks (1995). The Unity of the Mind. St Martin's Press.
  30. Desiree Park (1973). Person: Theories And Perceptions. The Hague: Nijhoff.
  31. Nathan Rotenstreich (1974). From Substance to Subject: Studies in Hegel. Nijhoff.
  32. Frederick A. Olafson (1995). What is a Human Being?: A Heideggerian View. Cambridge University Press.
    This broad, ambitious study is about human nature, but human nature treated in a way quite different from the scientific account that influences so much of contemporary philosophy. Drawing on certain basic ideas of Heidegger the author presents an alternative to the debate waged between dualists and materialists in the philosophy of mind that involves reconceiving the way we usually think about 'mental' life. Olafson argues that familiar contrasts between the 'physical' and the 'psychological' break down under closer scrutiny. They (...)
  33. Arda Denkel (1996). Object and Property. Cambridge University Press.
    Professor Arda Denkel argues here that objects are nothing more than bundles of properties. From this point of view he tackles some central questions of ontology: how is an object distinct from others; how does it remain the same while it changes through time? A second contention is that properties are particular entities restricted to the objects they inhabit. The appearance that they exist generally, in a multitude of things, is due to the way we conceptualise them. Other problems dealt (...)
  34. Nikolaĭ Berdi͡aev (1952/1976). The Beginning and the End. Greenwood Press.
  35. Lynne Spellman (1995). Substance and Separation in Aristotle. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a study of Aristotle's metaphysics in which the central argument is that Aristotle's views on substance are a direct response to Plato's Theory of Forms. The claim is that Aristotle believes that many of Plato's views are tenable once one has rejected Plato's notion of separation. There have been many recent books on Aristotle's theory of substance. This one is distinct from previous books in several ways: firstly, it offers a completely new, coherent interpretation of (...)
  36. Alan Watts (1975). The Nature of Man. Celestial Arts.
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  37. Morwenna Griffiths (1995). Feminisms and the Self: The Web of Identity. Routledge.
    Feminisms and the Self is both a critique and a construction of feminist philosophy, bringing an original contribution to the current debate surrounding identity and subjectivity. This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at:
  38. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.) (1976). The Identities of Persons. University of California Press.
    In this volume, thirteen philosophers contribute new essays analyzing the criteria for personal identity and their import on ethics and the theory of action: it ...
  39. Elias E. Savellos & Ümit D. Yalçin (eds.) (1995). Supervenience: New Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    Supervenience is one of the 'hot discoveries' of recent analytic philosophy, and this collection of new essays on the topic represents a 'state of the art' examination of it and its application to major areas of philosophy. The interest in supervenience has much to do with the flexibility of the concept. To say that x supervenes on y indicates a degree of dependence without committing one to the view that x can be reduced to y. Thus supervenience is a relationship (...)
  40. J. R. Lucas (1990). Spacetime and Electromagnetism: An Essay on the Philosophy of the Special Theory of Relativity. Oxford University Press.
    That space and time should be integrated into a single entity, spacetime, is the great insight of Einstein's special theory of relativity, and leads us to regard spacetime as a fundamental context in which to make sense of the world around us. But it is not the only one. Causality is equally important and at least as far as the special theory goes, it cannot be subsumed under a fundamentally geometrical form of explanation. In fact, the agent of propagation of (...)
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  41. Robert Cummings Neville (ed.) (1986). New Essays in Metaphysics. State University of New York Press.
    This volume displays fifteen of the many lively options in the field of metaphysics.
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  42. Steven Frederick Savitt (ed.) (1995). Time's Arrows Today: Recent Physical and Philosophical Work on the Direction of Time. Cambridge University Press.
    While experience tells us that time flows from the past to the present and into the future, a number of philosophical and physical objections exist to this commonsense view of dynamic time. In an attempt to make sense of this conundrum, philosophers and physicists are forced to confront fascinating questions, such as: Can effects precede causes? Can one travel in time? Can the expansion of the Universe or the process of measurement in quantum mechanics define a direction in time? In (...)
  43. J. K. Swindler (1991). Weaving: An Analysis of the Constitution of Objects. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this moderate realist account of the whole range of issues facing contemporary analytic philosophy, J. K. Swindler aims to fill the gap in the literature between extreme realism and extreme nominalism. He discusses such fundamental concepts as existence, property, universality, individual, and necessity; analyzes the paradoxes of negative existentials and the substitutivity of co-referential terms; and defends objectivity in philosophy. The study moves through three phases: first, an argument that objective philosophical truth is attainable; second, an extended realist analysis (...)
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  44. Herbert Wallace Schneider (1974). Ways of Being. Westport, Conn.,Greenwood Press.
  45. David Wiggins (1967). Identity and Spatio-Temporal Continuity. Oxford, Blackwell.
  46. Alan Watts (1975). Time. Celestial Arts.
  47. Sydney Shoemaker (1963). Self-Knowledge and Self-Identity. Cornell University Press.
  48. Benjamin Humphrey Smart (1842/2004). Beginnings of a New School of Metaphysics: A Facsimile Reproduction with an Introduction by Dino Buzzetti ; with Early Reviews of the Book and B.H. Smart's 'a Letter to Dr. Whately'. [REVIEW] Scholars' Fasimiles & Reprints.
  49. M. Brand & Douglas N. Walton (eds.) (1976). Action Theory. Reidel.
    INTRODUCTION BY THE EDITORS Gilbert Ryle, in his Concept of Mind (1949), attacked volitional theories of human actions; JL Austin, in his "If and Cans" ...
  50. Keith Campbell (1976). Metaphysics: An Introduction. Dickenson.
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