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1 — 50 / 394
  1. Frederick Ferré (1977). Language, Logic, and God. Greenwood Press.
  2. Michael J. Loux (ed.) (1970/1976). Universals and Particulars: Readings in Ontology. University of Notre Dame Press.
    Universals: Loux, M. J. The existence of universals. Russell, B. The world of universals. Quine, W. V. O. On what there is. Pears, D. F. Universals. Strawson, P. F. Particular and general. Wolterstorff, N. Qualities. Bambrough, R. Universals and family resemblances. Donagan, A. Universals and metaphysical realism. Sellars, W. Abstract entities. Wolterstorff, N. On the nature of universals.--Particulars: Loux, M. J. Particulars and their individuation. Black. M. The identity of indiscernibles. Ayer, A. J. The identity of indiscernibles. O'Connor, D. J. (...)
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  3. Sebastiano Timpanaro (1975). On Materialism. Humanities Press.
  4. Arkadiusz Chrudzimski (2007). Gegenstandstheorie und Theorie der Intentionalität bei Alexius Meinong. Springer.
    The thought of Alexius Meinong (1853–1920) has a distinguished position within the conceptual space of ontology. He was the first philosopher who tried systematically to develop a quasi-ontological discipline which was intended to be much more general than the metaphysics in the traditional sense. Metaphysics investigates being qua being; and this constitutes only a small part of the domain of the theory of objects (Gegenstandstheorie) as Meinong conceived of it. For – so reads one of Meinong’s most frequently cited theses (...)
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  5. Quentin Crisp (1981). Doing It with Style. Watts.
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  6. J. T. Fraser (1990). Of Time, Passion, and Knowledge: Reflections on the Strategy of Existence. Princeton University Press.
    "Only a wayfarer born under unruly stars would attempt to put into practice in our epoch of proliferating knowledge the Heraclitean dictum that `men who love wisdom must be inquirers into very many things indeed.'" Thus begins this remarkable interdisciplinary study of time by a master of the subject. And while developing a theory of "time as conflict," J. T. Fraser does offer "many things indeed"--an enormous range of ideas about matter, life, death, evolution, and value.
  7. Michael F. Goodman (ed.) (1988). What is a Person. Clifton: Humana Press.
    Introduction There has been philosophical discussion for centuries on the nature and scope of human life. Lucretius, for example, contends that human life ...
  8. Hilary Putnam (1992). Renewing Philosophy. Harvard University Press.
    A renewal of philosophy is precisely the point of this book, drawn from the 1989 Gifford Lectures by one of America's most distinguished philosophers.
  9. Raymond Flood & Michael Lockwood (eds.) (1986). The Nature of Time. B. Blackwell.
  10. F. F. Centore (1979). Persons: A Comparative Account Of The Six Possible Theories. Westport: Greenwood Press.
  11. J. R. Lucas (1990). Spacetime and Electromagnetism: An Essay on the Philosophy of the Special Theory of Relativity. Oxford University Press.
    That space and time should be integrated into a single entity, spacetime, is the great insight of Einstein's special theory of relativity, and leads us to regard spacetime as a fundamental context in which to make sense of the world around us. But it is not the only one. Causality is equally important and at least as far as the special theory goes, it cannot be subsumed under a fundamentally geometrical form of explanation. In fact, the agent of propagation of (...)
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  12. Christopher J. Berry (1982). Hume, Hegel, and Human Nature. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Boston.
  13. Owen J. Flanagan (1996). Self Expressions: Mind, Morals, and the Meaning of Life. Oxford University Press.
    Human beings have the unique ability to consciously reflect on the nature of the self. But reflection has its costs. We can ask what the self is, but as David Hume pointed out, the self, once reflected upon, may be nowhere to be found. The favored view is that we are material beings living in the material world. But if so, a host of destabilizing questions surface. If persons are just a sophisticated sort of animal, then what sense is there (...)
  14. Ross Harrison (1974). On What There Must Be. Clarendon Press.
  15. Tom L. Beauchamp (1974). Philosophical Problems of Causation. Encino, Calif.,Dickenson Pub. Co..
  16. Ladislav Tondl (1973). Scientific Procedures. Boston,D. Reidel Pub. Co..
  17. Michael J. Loux (1998). Metaphysics: A Contemporary Introduction. Routledge.
    In this fully revised and updated version of the highly successful first edition, Michael J. Loux provides a fresh look at the central topics in metaphysics rendering this essential reading for anyone interested in metaphysics. Wherever possible, the author relates contemporary views to their classical sources in the history of philosophy.Some of the topics addressed include: the problem of universals; the nature of abstract entities; the problem of individuation; the nature of modality; identity through time; the nature of time and (...)
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  18. Alan Watts (1975). The Nature of Man. Celestial Arts.
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  19. Morwenna Griffiths (1995). Feminisms and the Self: The Web of Identity. Routledge.
    Feminisms and the Self is both a critique and a construction of feminist philosophy, bringing an original contribution to the current debate surrounding identity and subjectivity. This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
  20. Ernest Sosa (ed.) (1975). Causation and Conditionals. Oxford University Press.
    Mackie, J. L. Causes and conditions.--Taylor, R. The metaphysics of causation.--Scriven, M. Defects of the necessary condition analysis of causation.--Kim, J. Causes and events: Mackie on causation.--Anscombe, G. E. M. Causality and determination.--Davidson, D. Causal relations.--Wright, G. H. von. On the logic and epistemology of the causal relation.--Ducasse, C. J. On the nature and the observability of the causal relation.--Sellars, W. S. Counterfactuals.--Chisholm, R. M. Law statements and counterfactual inference.--Rescher, N. Belief-contravening suppositions and the problem of contrary-to-fact conditionals.--Stalnaker, R. A (...)
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  21. Rolf A. Eberle (1970). Nominalistic Systems. Dordrecht,Reidel.
  22. S. L. Peters (1995). Emergent Materialism: A Proposed Solution to the Mind-Body Problem. University Press of America.
    This book is particularly appropriate for graduate seminars or upper division courses in philosophy of mind, and for metaphysics or introductory philosophy ...
  23. Robert Nozick (1981). Philosophical Explanations. Harvard University Press.
    Nozick analyzes fundamental issues, such as the identity of the self, knowledge and skepticism, free will, the foundations of ethics, and the meaning of life.
  24. Richard B. Braithwaite (1953). Scientific Explanation. Cambridge University Press.
  25. Jaegwon Kim & Ernest Sosa (eds.) (1999). Metaphysics: An Anthology. Blackwell Publishers.
    This "Anthology," intended to accompany "A Companion to Metaphysics" (Blackwell, 1995), brings together over 60 selections which represent the best and most ...
  26. Roland N. Stromberg (1968). Realism, Naturalism, and Symbolism. New York, Walker.
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  27. D. M. Armstrong (1983). What is a Law of Nature? Cambridge University Press.
    This is a study of a crucial and controversial topic in metaphysics and the philosophy of science: the status of the laws of nature. D. M. Armstrong works out clearly and in comprehensive detail a largely original view that laws are relations between properties or universals. The theory is continuous with the views on universals and more generally with the scientific realism that Professor Armstrong has advanced in earlier publications. He begins here by mounting an attack on the orthodox and (...)
  28. Steven Frederick Savitt (ed.) (1995). Time's Arrows Today: Recent Physical and Philosophical Work on the Direction of Time. Cambridge University Press.
    While experience tells us that time flows from the past to the present and into the future, a number of philosophical and physical objections exist to this commonsense view of dynamic time. In an attempt to make sense of this conundrum, philosophers and physicists are forced to confront fascinating questions, such as: Can effects precede causes? Can one travel in time? Can the expansion of the Universe or the process of measurement in quantum mechanics define a direction in time? In (...)
  29. Robert Cummings Neville (ed.) (1986). New Essays in Metaphysics. State University of New York Press.
    This volume displays fifteen of the many lively options in the field of metaphysics.
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  30. Richard Taylor (1974). Metaphysics. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.,Prentice-Hall.
  31. John Heil (1992). The Nature of True Minds. Cambridge University Press.
    This book aims at reconciling the emerging conceptions of mind and their contents that have, in recent years, come to seem irreconcilable. Post-Cartesian philosophers face the challenge of comprehending minds as natural objects possessing apparently non-natural powers of thought. The difficulty is to understand how our mental capacities, no less than our biological or chemical characteristics, might ultimately be products of our fundamental physical constituents, and to do so in a way that preserves the phenomena. Externalists argue that the significance (...)
  32. Keith Campbell (1976). Metaphysics: An Introduction. Dickenson.
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  33. Dennis M. Patterson (1996). Law and Truth. Oxford University Press.
    Are propositions of law true or false? If so, what does it mean to say that propositions of law are true and false? This book takes up these questions in the context of the wider philosophical debate over realism and anti-realism. Despite surface differences, Patterson argues that the leading contemporary jurisprudential theories all embrace a flawed conception of the nature of truth in law. Instead of locating that in virtue of which propositions of law are true, Patterson argues that lawyers (...)
  34. Heimir Geirsson & Michael Losonsky (eds.) (1998). Beginning Metaphysics: An Introductory Text with Readings. Blackwell Publishers.
  35. Jörn Rüsen (ed.) (2007). Time and History: The Variety of Cultures. Berghahn Books.
    This series aims at bridging the gap between historical theory and the study of historical memory as well as western and non-western concepts, for which this ...
  36. Peter A. French, Theodore Edward Uehling & Howard K. Wettstein (eds.) (1979). Studies in Metaphysics. University of Minnesota Press.
    Rich with historical and cultural value, these works are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions.
  37. Raymond Martin & John Barresi (2006). The Rise and Fall of Soul and Self: An Intellectual History of Personal Identity. Columbia University Press.
    Raymond Martin and John Barresi trace the development of Western ideas about personal identity and reveal the larger intellectual trends, controversies, and ideas that have revolutionized the way we think about ourselves.
  38. J. K. Swindler (1991). Weaving: An Analysis of the Constitution of Objects. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Weaving: An Analysis of the Constitution of Objects will be of interest to all philosophers working in contemporary philosophy, philosophy of language, logic, and metaphysics, and will serve as an excellent text for advanced undergraduate ...
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  39. Raymond Martin & John Barresi (eds.) (2003). Personal Identity. Blackwell.
    These are the very scholars that were involved in initiating the revolution in personal identity theory.
  40. Wolfgang Achtner (2002). Dimensions of Time: The Structures of the Time of Humans, of the World, and of God. W.B. Eerdmans Pub..
  41. Neil Badmington (ed.) (2000). Posthumanism. Palgrave.
    What is posthumanism and why does it matter? This book offers an introduction to the ways in which humanism's belief in the natural supremacy of the Family of Man has been called into question at different moments and from different theoretical positions. What is the relationship between posthumanism and technology? Can posthumanism have a politics—postcolonial or feminist? Are postmodernism and poststructuralism posthumanist? What happens when critical theory meets Hollywood cinema? What links posthumanism to science fiction. Posthumanism addresses these and other (...)
  42. Henry Vyverberg (1989). Human Nature, Cultural Diversity, and the French Enlightenment. Oxford University Press.
    In this work, Henry Vyverberg traces the evolution and consequences of a crucial idea in French Enlightenment thought--the idea of human nature. Human nature was commonly seen as a broadly universal, unchanging entity, though perhaps modifiable by geographical, social, and historical factors. Enlightenment empiricism suggested a degree of cultural diversity that has often been underestimated in studies of the age. Evidence here is drawn from Diderot's celebrated Encyclopedia and from a vast range of writing by such Enlightenment notables as Voltaire, (...)
  43. Nils Holtug (2010). Persons, Interests, and Justice. Oxford University Press.
    In our lives, we aim to achieve welfare for ourselves, that is, to live good lives. But we also have another, more impartial perspective, where we aim to balance our concern for our own welfare against a concern for the welfare of others. This is a perspective of justice. Nils Holtug examines these two perspectives and the relations between them.
  44. John T. Roberts (2008). The Law-Governed Universe. Oxford University Press.
    The law-governed world-picture -- A remarkable idea about the way the universe is cosmos and compulsion -- The laws as the cosmic order : the best-system approach -- The three ways : no-laws, non-governing-laws, governing-laws -- Work that laws do in science -- An important difference between the laws of nature and the cosmic order -- The picture in four theses -- The strategy of this book -- The meta-theoretic conception of laws -- The measurability approach to laws -- What (...)
  45. D. H. Mellor & Alex Oliver (eds.) (1997). Properties. Oxford University Press.
    When we say a certain rose is red, we seem to be attributing a property, redness, to it. But are there really such properties? If so, what are they like, how do we know about them, and how are they related to the objects which have them and the linguistic devices which we use to talk about them? This collection presents these ancient problems in a modern light. In particular, it makes accessible for the first time the most important contributions (...)
  46. Shimon Malin (2001). Nature Loves to Hide: Quantum Physics and Reality, a Western Perspective. Oxford University Press.
    The strangeness of modern physics has sparked several popular books--such as The Tao of Physics--that explore its affinity with Eastern mysticism. But the founders of quantum mechanics were educated in the classical traditions of Western civilization and Western philosophy. In Nature Loves to Hide, physicist Shimon Malin takes readers on a fascinating tour of quantum theory--one that turns to Western philosophical thought to clarify this strange yet inescapable explanation of reality. Malin translates quantum mechanics into plain English, explaining its origins (...)
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  47. José A. Benardete (1989). Metaphysics: The Logical Approach. Oxford University Press.
    This survey of metaphysics covers the historical or classical aspects of the subject as well as those currently in the post-Wittgensteinian limelight--principally materialism, platonism, essentialism, and anti-realism. Benardete sees contemporary metaphysical preoccupations as more or less thinly disguised revisitings of those of the past, and explains how metaphysics and mathematical logic are interrelated and how metaphysical studies can illuminate both scinece and the humanities.
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  48. Roger Bibace (ed.) (2005). Science and Medicine in Dialogue: Thinking Through Particulars and Universals. Praeger.
    Written by three experts in the field, this book explores the understanding of human wellness and disease as fostered through the collaborative contributions of ...
  49. Christopher A. Dustin (2005). Practicing Mortality: Art, Philosophy, and Contemplative Seeing. Palgrave Macmillan.
    A collaborative undertaking between an artist and a philosopher, this monograph attempts to deepen our understanding of "contemplative seeing" by addressing the works of Plato, Thoreau, Heidegger, and more. The authors explore what it means to "see" reality and contemplate how viewing reality philosophically and artfully is a form of spirituality. In this way, by developing a new conception of active visual engagement, the authors propose a way of seeing that unites both critical scrutiny and spiritual involvement, as opposed to (...)
  50. Heidrun Friese (ed.) (2001). The Moment: Time and Rupture in Modern Thought. Liverpool University Press.
    Modern philosophical thought has a manifold tradition of emphasizing "the moment". "The moment" demands questioning all-too-common notions of time, of past, present and future, uniqueness and repetition, rupture and continuity. This collection addresses the key questions posed by "the moment", considering writers such as Nietzsche, Husserl, Benjamin and Badiou, and elucidates the connections between social theory, philosophy, literary theory and history that are opened up by this notion.
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