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1 — 50 / 308
  1. Raymond Martin (1998). Self-Concern: An Experiential Approach to What Matters in Survival. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a major contribution to the philosophical literature on the nature of the self, personal identity, and survival. Its distinctive methodology is one that is phenomenologically descriptive rather than metaphysical and normative. On the basis of this approach Raymond Martin shows that the distinction between self and other is not nearly as fundamental a feature of our so-called egoistic values as has been traditionally thought. He explains how the belief in a self as a fixed, continuous point of (...)
  2. Ross Harrison (1974). On What There Must Be. Clarendon Press.
    This book addresses the importance of space and time, of existence unperceived, of publicity and action, and of natural laws. These are examined in a single argument which extends from Chapter Three to Chapter Seven and in the course of which the essential features of any comprehensible world are either assumed or derived. In Chapter Two, before this argument begins, the book introduces and argues for the methods by which this general argument is developed. In Chapter One, the book attempts (...)
  3. Mrinal Miri (ed.) (2003). Identity and the Moral Life. Oxford University Press.
    In this collection of essays written over thirty years, Miri, drawing on both Western and Indian traditions, provides fresh insight into some fundamental philosophical concerns--morality, modernity, individual and group identity, rationality, and violence in politics.
  4. Owen J. Flanagan (1996). Self Expressions: Mind, Morals, and the Meaning of Life. Oxford University Press.
    Human beings have the unique ability to consciously reflect on the nature of the self. But reflection has its costs. We can ask what the self is, but as David Hume pointed out, the self, once reflected upon, may be nowhere to be found. The favored view is that we are material beings living in the material world. But if so, a host of destabilizing questions surface. If persons are just a sophisticated sort of animal, then what sense is there (...)
  5. S. L. Peters (1995). Emergent Materialism: A Proposed Solution to the Mind-Body Problem. University Press of America.
    This book is particularly appropriate for graduate seminars or upper division courses in philosophy of mind, and for metaphysics or introductory philosophy ...
  6. Morwenna Griffiths (1995). Feminisms and the Self: The Web of Identity. Routledge.
    Feminisms and the Self is both a critique and a construction of feminist philosophy, bringing an original contribution to the current debate surrounding identity and subjectivity. This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
  7. Eva Hoffman (2009). Time. Profile Books.
    Time and the body -- Time and the mind -- Time and culture -- Time in our time.
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  8. J. T. Fraser (ed.) (1981). The Voices of Time: A Cooperative Survey of Man's Views of Time as Expressed by the Sciences and by the Humanities. University of Massachusetts Press.
  9. L. Gregory Jones & Stephen E. Fowl (eds.) (1995). Rethinking Metaphysics. Blackwell Publishers.
  10. Roger Wertheimer (1972). The Significance of Sense. Ithaca [N.Y.]Cornell University Press.
    Univocalist analyses of the modal auxiliary verbs ('ought'/'must'/'can') and the adjective 'right'/'wrong'.
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  11. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.) (1976). The Identities of Persons. University of California Press.
    In this volume, thirteen philosophers contribute new essays analyzing the criteria for personal identity and their import on ethics and the theory of action: it ...
  12. Hilary Putnam (1983). Realism and Reason. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the third volume of Hilary Putnam's philosophical papers, published in paperback for the first time. The volume contains his major essays from 1975 to 1982, which reveal a large shift in emphasis in the 'realist'_position developed in his earlier work. While not renouncing those views, Professor Putnam has continued to explore their epistemological consequences and conceptual history. He now, crucially, sees theories of truth and of meaning that derive from a firm notion of reference as inadequate.
  13. David Cockburn (ed.) (1991). Human Beings. Cambridge University Press.
    The contributors to this collection have radically different approaches, some accepting and others denying its validity for a proper understanding of what a...
  14. Andrew A. Brennan (1988). Conditions of Identity: A Study of Identity and Survival. Oxford University Press.
    Addressing many topics in epistemology and metaphysics, this treatise sets out a new theory of the unity of objects, and discusses personal identity, the metaphysics of possible worlds, the continuity in space time, and the nature of philosophical theorizing.
  15. Jörn Rüsen (ed.) (2007). Time and History: The Variety of Cultures. Berghahn Books.
    This series aims at bridging the gap between historical theory and the study of historical memory as well as western and non-western concepts, for which this ...
  16. Andrew B. Schoedinger (ed.) (1992). The Problem of Universals. Humanities Press.
  17. Kwasi Wiredu (1996). Cultural Universals and Particulars: An African Perspective. Indiana University Press.
    The eminent Ghanaian philosopher Kwasi Wiredu confronts the paradox that while Western cultures recoil from claims of universality, previously colonized peoples, seeking to redefine their identities, insist on cultural particularities.
  18. Peter K. Unger (1990). Identity, Consciousness, and Value. Oxford University Press.
    The topic of personal identity has prompted some of the liveliest and most interesting debates in recent philosophy. In a fascinating new contribution to the discussion, Peter Unger presents a psychologically aimed, but physically based, account of our identity over time. While supporting the account, he explains why many influential contemporary philosophers have underrated the importance of physical continuity to our survival, casting a new light on the work of Lewis, Nagel, Nozick, Parfit, Perry, Shoemaker, and others. Deriving from his (...)
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  19. Robert Nozick (1981). Philosophical Explanations. Harvard University Press.
    Nozick analyzes fundamental issues, such as the identity of the self, knowledge and skepticism, free will, the foundations of ethics, and the meaning of life.
  20. Hilary Putnam (1992). Renewing Philosophy. Harvard University Press.
    A renewal of philosophy is precisely the point of this book, drawn from the 1989 Gifford Lectures by one of America's most distinguished philosophers.
  21. Peter A. French, Theodore Edward Uehling & Howard K. Wettstein (eds.) (1979). Studies in Metaphysics. University of Minnesota Press.
    Rich with historical and cultural value, these works are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions.
  22. Barry Dainton (2001). Time and Space. Acumen Press.
    Is the passage of time a basic feature of reality or merely illusory?
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  23. Michael Jubien (1997). Contemporary Metaphysics: An Introduction. Blackwell Publishers.
    Exercises designed to stimulate further talking and to indicate further dimensions of the topics are posed throughout the book to encourage a more advanced ...
  24. Rolf A. Eberle (1970). Nominalistic Systems. Dordrecht,Reidel.
  25. Jonathan Benthall (ed.) (1973/1974). The Limits of Human Nature. New York,Dutton.
    Gomer and his stuffed dog, Little Gomer, are inseparable. When Gomer goes to the park to play with the other dogs, he holds on tight to his friend, even though he can't run as fast as he wants or romp the way the other dogs do. But when it's time to play fetch with the dog walker, Gomer sets Little Gomer down so that he can carry the fetch stick home-and leaves Little Gomer behind. How can Gomer survive without his (...)
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  26. Stephen P. Schwartz (ed.) (1977). Naming, Necessity, and Natural Kinds. Cornell University Press.
  27. Roger Bibace (ed.) (2005). Science and Medicine in Dialogue: Thinking Through Particulars and Universals. Praeger.
    Written by three experts in the field, this book explores the understanding of human wellness and disease as fostered through the collaborative contributions of ...
  28. Michael Morris (1992). The Good and the True. Oxford University Press.
    This book provides a radical alternative to naturalistic theories of content, and offers a new conception of the place of mind in the world. Confronting the scientific conception of the nature of reality that has dominated the Anglo-American philosophical tradition, Morris presents a detailed analysis of content and propositional attitudes based on the idea that truth is a value. He rejects the causal theory of the explanation of behavior and replaces it with an alternative that depends upon a rich conception (...)
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  29. Henry Vyverberg (1989). Human Nature, Cultural Diversity, and the French Enlightenment. Oxford University Press.
    In this work, Henry Vyverberg traces the evolution and consequences of a crucial idea in French Enlightenment thought--the idea of human nature. Human nature was commonly seen as a broadly universal, unchanging entity, though perhaps modifiable by geographical, social, and historical factors. Enlightenment empiricism suggested a degree of cultural diversity that has often been underestimated in studies of the age. Evidence here is drawn from Diderot's celebrated Encyclopedia and from a vast range of writing by such Enlightenment notables as Voltaire, (...)
  30. Espen Hammer (2011). Philosophy and Temporality From Kant to Critical Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. The historicity of time; 2. Modern temporality; 3. Two responses to the time of modernity; 4. Hegel's temporalization of the absolute; 5. Schopenhauer and transcendence; 6. Time and myth in early Nietzsche; 7. Recurrence and authenticity: the later Nietzsche; 8. Heidegger on boredom and modernity; 9. A modernist critique of postmodern temporality; Conclusion.
  31. Frederick Ferré (1961/1981). Language, Logic, & God. University of Chicago Press.
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  32. Pierre-Marie Emonet (1999). The Dearest Freshness Deep Down Things: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Being. Crossroad Pub..
  33. Crawford L. Elder (2011). Familiar Objects and Their Shadows. Cambridge University Press.
    Most contemporary metaphysicians are sceptical about the reality of familiar objects such as dogs and trees, people and desks, cells and stars. They prefer an ontology of the spatially tiny or temporally tiny. Tiny microparticles 'dog-wise arranged' explain the appearance, they say, that there are dogs; microparticles obeying microphysics collectively cause anything that a baseball appears to cause; temporal stages collectively sustain the illusion of enduring objects that persist across changes. Crawford L. Elder argues that all such attempts to 'explain (...)
  34. J. Radcliffe Richards (2000). Human Nature After Darwin: A Philosophical Introduction. Routledge.
    The lucid presentation makes the book an ideal introduction to both philosophy and Darwinism, as well as a substantive contribution to topics of intense current ...
  35. Michael J. Loux (1998). Metaphysics: A Contemporary Introduction. Routledge.
    In this fully revised and updated version of the highly successful first edition, Michael J. Loux provides a fresh look at the central topics in metaphysics rendering this essential reading for anyone interested in metaphysics. Wherever possible, the author relates contemporary views to their classical sources in the history of philosophy.Some of the topics addressed include: the problem of universals; the nature of abstract entities; the problem of individuation; the nature of modality; identity through time; the nature of time and (...)
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  36. Linda Alcoff (ed.) (2006). Identity Politics Reconsidered. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Based on the ongoing work of the agenda-setting Future of Minority Studies national research project, Identity Politics Reconsidered reconceptualizes the scholarly and political significance of social identity. It focuses on the deployment of “identity” within ethnic-, women’s-, disability-, and gay and lesbian studies in order to stimulate discussion about issues that are simultaneously theoretical and practical, ranging from ethics and epistemology to political theory and pedagogical practice. This collection of powerful essays by both well-known and emerging scholars offers original answers (...)
  37. John T. Roberts (2008). The Law-Governed Universe. Oxford University Press.
    The law-governed world-picture -- A remarkable idea about the way the universe is cosmos and compulsion -- The laws as the cosmic order : the best-system approach -- The three ways : no-laws, non-governing-laws, governing-laws -- Work that laws do in science -- An important difference between the laws of nature and the cosmic order -- The picture in four theses -- The strategy of this book -- The meta-theoretic conception of laws -- The measurability approach to laws -- What (...)
  38. Hilary Putnam (1981). Reason, Truth, and History. Cambridge University Press.
    Hilary Putnam deals in this book with some of the most fundamental persistent problems in philosophy: the nature of truth, knowledge and rationality. His aim is to break down the fixed categories of thought which have always appeared to define and constrain the permissible solutions to these problems.
  39. Karen Sullivan (2003). Finding the Inner You: How Well Do You Know Yourself? Barrons Educational Series.
    A key to happiness lies in each person’s ability to know himself or herself. The consequences of going through life without self-knowledge are frequently self-obsession, false priorities, and unwarranted fears. This book explains the enlightening process of self-discovery and shows how it leads to self-sufficiency. The author offers guidance with inspiring true-life stories and practical advice that readers can apply to their own lives. Here is instruction on techniques for engaging in periods of solitude, with emphasis on making such times (...)
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  40. Barbara Bloom Lloyd & John Gay (eds.) (1981). Universals of Human Thought: Some African Evidence. Cambridge University Press.
    This book was originally published in 1981 and the theme of universals attracted a great deal of attention in the decade preceding publication.
  41. Dennis M. Patterson (1996). Law and Truth. Oxford University Press.
    Are propositions of law true or false? If so, what does it mean to say that propositions of law are true and false? This book takes up these questions in the context of the wider philosophical debate over realism and anti-realism. Despite surface differences, Patterson argues that the leading contemporary jurisprudential theories all embrace a flawed conception of the nature of truth in law. Instead of locating that in virtue of which propositions of law are true, Patterson argues that lawyers (...)
  42. Elias E. Savellos & Ümit D. Yalçin (eds.) (1995). Supervenience: New Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    Supervenience is one of the 'hot discoveries' of recent analytic philosophy, and this collection of new essays on the topic represents a 'state of the art' examination of it and its application to major areas of philosophy. The interest in supervenience has much to do with the flexibility of the concept. To say that x supervenes on y indicates a degree of dependence without committing one to the view that x can be reduced to y. Thus supervenience is a relationship (...)
  43. John Bigelow & Robert Pargetter (1990). Science and Necessity. Cambridge University Press.
    This book espouses an innovative theory of scientific realism in which due weight is given to mathematics and logic. The authors argue that mathematics can be understood realistically if it is seen to be the study of universals, of properties and relations, of patterns and structures, the kinds of things which can be in several places at once. Taking this kind of scientific platonism as their point of departure, they show how the theory of universals can account for probability, laws (...)
  44. Peter Smith (1998). Explaining Chaos. Cambridge University Press.
    A clear and accessible discussion of the ideas and issues behind chaotic dynamics.
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  45. Jaegwon Kim & Ernest Sosa (eds.) (1999). Metaphysics: An Anthology. Blackwell Publishers.
    This "Anthology," intended to accompany "A Companion to Metaphysics" (Blackwell, 1995), brings together over 60 selections which represent the best and most ...
  46. David Benatar (ed.) (2009). Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc..
    Introduction -- Part I: The meaning of life -- Richard Taylor, The meaning of life -- Thomas Nagel, The absurd -- Richard Hare, Nothing matters -- W.D. Joske, Philosophy and the meaning of life -- Robert Nozick, Philosophy and the meaning of life -- David Schmidtz, The meanings of life -- Part II: Creating people -- Derek Parfit, Whether causing someone to exist can benefit this person -- John Leslie, Why not let life ecome extinct? -- James Lenman, On becoming (...)
  47. Graham Dunstan Martin (2005). Does It Matter?: The Unsustainable World of the Materialists. Floris Books.
  48. H. O. Mounce (2007). Metaphysics and the End of Philosophy. Continuum.
    Metaphysics -- Bacon -- Locke -- Kant -- Comte -- Logical positivism -- Russell -- Analysis -- Quine and science -- Wittgenstein.
  49. Judith Jarvis Thomson (1977). Acts and Other Events. Cornell University Press.
  50. Francis Hutcheson (1993). On Human Nature. Cambridge University Press.
    Francis Hutcheson was the first major philosopher of the Scottish Enlightenment, and one of the great thinkers in the history of British moral philosophy. He firmly rejected the view, common then as now, that morality is nothing more than the prudent pursuit of self-interest, arguing in favor of a theory of a moral sense. The two previously inaccessible texts presented here are the most eloquent expressions of this theory. Thomas Mautner's introduction provides a mass of new information on the intellectual (...)
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