Bargain finder

Use this tool to find book bargains on Amazon Marketplace. It works best on the "my areas of interest" setting, but you need to specify your areas of interest first. You might also want to change your shopping locale (currently the US locale).

Note: the best bargains on this page tend to go fast; the prices shown can be inaccurate because of this.

Settings


 Area(s)

 Offer type

 Sort by
($)
 Max price
% off
 Min discount

 Min year

 Added since

 Pro authors only

 

1 — 50 / 382
  1. Jerzy Pelc (1971). Studies in Functional Logical Semiotics of Natural Language. The Hague,Mouton.
  2. Isaac Levi (1996). For the Sake of the Argument: Ramsey Test Conditionals, Inductive Inference, and Nonmonotonic Reasoning. Cambridge University Press.
    This book by one of the world's foremost philosophers in the fields of epistemology and logic offers an account of suppositional reasoning relevant to practical deliberation, explanation, prediction and hypothesis testing. Suppositions made 'for the sake of argument' sometimes conflict with our beliefs, and when they do, some beliefs are rejected and others retained. Thanks to such belief contravention, adding content to a supposition can undermine conclusions reached without it. Subversion can also arise because suppositional reasoning is ampliative. These two (...)
  3. James Tomberlin (ed.) (2002). Metaphysics. Blackwell.
    Externalism, Naturalism, Mathematics, Ontology, Personal Identity, Time and Tense, The Metaphysics of Reference, The Metaphysics of Properties, Conceivability, ...
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Th R. Hofmann (1993). Realms of Meaning: An Introduction to Semantics. Longman.
  5. Julian Dodd (2000). An Identity Theory of Truth. St. Martin's Press.
    This book argues that correspondence theories of truth fail because the relation that holds between a true thought and a fact is that of identity, not correspondence. Facts are not complexes of worldly entities which make thoughts true they are merely true thoughts. According to Julian Dodd, the resulting modest identity theory , while not defining truth, correctly diagnoses the failure of correspondence theories, and thereby prepares the ground for a defensible deflation of the concept of truth.
  6. Daniel Jurafsky & James H. Martin (2000). Speech and Language Processing: An Introduction to Natural Language Processing, Computational Linguistics, and Speech Recognition. Prentice Hall.
    The first of its kind to thoroughly cover language technology at all levels and with all modern technologies this book takes an empirical approach to the ...
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Brigitte L. M. Bauer (1995). The Emergence and Development of Svo Patterning in Latin and French: Diachronic and Psycholinguistic Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
    This book analyzes--in terms of branching--the pervasive reorganization of Latin syntactic and morphological structures: in the development from Latin to French, a shift can be observed from the archaic, left-branching structures (which Latin inherited from Proto-Indo-European) to modern right-branching equivalents. Brigitte Bauer presents a detailed analysis of this development based on the theoretical discussion and definition of "branching" and "head." Subsequently she relates the diachronic shift to psycholinguistic evidence, arguing that the difficuly of LB complex structures as reflected in their (...)
  8. Andrew Ortony, Jon Slack & Oliviero Stock (eds.) (1992). Communication From an Artificial Intelligence Perspective: Theoretical and Applied Issues. Springer.
    Theoretical and Applied Issues Edited by Andrew Ortony Jon Slack Oliviero Stock NATO ASI Series Series F: Computer and Systems Sciences, Vol. 100 Communication from an Artificial Intelligence Perspective NATO ASI Series Advanced ...
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Jonathan Francis Bennett (1976). Linguistic Behaviour. Cambridge University Press.
    First published in 1976, this book presents a view of language as a matter of systematic communicative behaviour.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Herbert H. Clark (1976). Semantics and Comprehension. Mouton.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Ian Hacking & Casimir Lewy (eds.) (1985). Exercises in Analysis: Essays by Students of Casimir Lewy. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a volume of specially commissioned essays of analytical philosophy, on topics of current interest in ethics and the philosophy of logic and language. Among the topics discussed are the making of wicked promises, G. E. Moore's early ethical views, as well as indexicals, tense, indeterminism, conventionalism in mathematics, and identity and necessity. The essays are all by former students of Casimir Lewy, until recently Reader in Philosophy at the University of Cambridge and an exponent of a particularly thoroughgoing (...)
  12. Lisa A. Reed (1996). Toward Logical Form: An Exploration of the Role of Syntax in Semantics. Garland Pub..
    Introduction 1.1 GOALS This book is devoted to an in-depth investigation of some of the properties of Logical Form (LF). In particular, the primary aim of ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Emanuel Vasiliu (1972). Outline of a Semantic Theory of Kernel Sentences. The Hague,Mouton.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Edward L. Keenan (ed.) (1975). Formal Semantics of Natural Language: Papers From a Colloquium Sponsored by the King's College Research Centre, Cambridge. Cambridge University Press.
  15. Noam Chomsky (2000). New Horizons in the Study of Language and Mind. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is an outstanding contribution to the philosophical study of language and mind, by one of the most influential thinkers of our time. In a series of penetrating essays, Chomsky cuts through the confusion and prejudice which has infected the study of language and mind, bringing new solutions to traditional philosophical puzzles and fresh perspectives on issues of general interest, ranging from the mind-body problem to the unification of science. Using a range of imaginative and deceptively simple linguistic analyses, (...)
  16. Uriel Weinreich (1972). Explorations in Semantic Theory. Paris,Mouton.
  17. Jeanette K. Gundel & Nancy Ann Hedberg (eds.) (2008). Reference: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
    The ability to produce and understand referring expressions is basic to human language use and human cognition. Reference comprises the ability to think of and represent objects (both real and imagined/fictional), to indicate to others which of these objects we are talking about, and to determine what others are talking about when they use a nominal expression. The articles in this volume are concerned with some of the central themes and challenges in research on reference within the cognitive sciences - (...)
  18. Ruth M. Kempson (1977). Semantic Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    Semantics is a bridge discipline between linguistics and philosophy; but linguistics student are rarely able to reach that bridge, let alone cross it to inspect and assess the activity on the other side. Professor Kempson's textbook seeks particularly to encourage such exchanges. She deals with the standard linguistic topics like componential analysis, semantic universals and the syntax-semantics controversy. But she also provides for students with no training in philosophy or logic an introduction to such central topics in the philosophy of (...)
  19. Kurt Baldinger (1980). Semantic Theory: Towards a Modern Semantics. St. Martin's Press.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Waltraud Brennenstuhl (1982). Control and Ability: Towards a Biocybernetics of Language. J. Benjamins Pub. Co..
    This is the first of the two volumes the second volume being Thomas Ballmer s Biological Foundations of Linguistic Communication (P&B III:7) treating ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. David B. Kronenfeld (1996). Plastic Glasses and Church Fathers: Semantic Extension From the Ethnoscience Tradition. Oxford University Press.
    Meaning seems to shift from context to context; how do we know when someone says "grab a chair" that an ottoman or orange crate will do, but when someone says "let's buy a chair," they won't? In Plastic Glasses and Church Fathers, Kronenfeld offers a theory that explains both the usefulness of language's variability of reference and the mechanisms which enable us to understand each other in spite of the variability. Kronenfeld's theory, rooted in the tradition of ethnoscience (or cognitive (...)
  22. Charles Travis (1989). The Uses of Sense: Wittgenstein's Philosophy of Language. Oxford University Press.
    This book provides a novel interpretation of the ideas about language in Ludwig Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations. Travis places the "private language argument" in the context of wider themes in the Investigations, and thereby develops a picture of what it is for words to bear the meaning they do. He elaborates two versions of a private language argument, and shows the consequences of these for current trends in the philosophical theory of meaning.
  23. Simon Blackburn (2005). Truth: A Guide. Oxford University Press.
    The author of the highly popular book Think, which Time magazine hailed as "the one book every smart person should read to understand, and even enjoy, the key questions of philosophy," Simon Blackburn is that rara avis--an eminent thinker who is able to explain philosophy to the general reader. Now Blackburn offers a tour de force exploration of what he calls "the most exciting and engaging issue in the whole of philosophy"--the age-old war over truth. The front lines of this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Israel Scheffler (1979). Beyond the Letter: A Philosophical Inquiry Into Ambiguity, Vagueness, and Metaphor in Language. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    Ambiguity, vagueness and metaphor are pervasive features of language, deserving of systematic study in their own right. Yet they have frequently been considered mere deviations from ideal language or obstacles to be avoided in the construction of scientific systems. First published in 1979, Beyond the Letter offers a consecutive study of these features from a philosphical point of view, providing analyses of each and treating their relations to one another. Addressed to the fundamental task of logical and semantic explanation, the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. John Heintz (1973). Subjects and Predicables. The Hague,Mouton.
  26. Cliff Goddard (1998/2011). Semantic Analysis: A Practical Introduction. Oxford University Press.
    Semantic Analysis is a lively and clearly written introduction to the study of meaning in language and to the language-culture connection. Goddard covers traditional and contemporary issues and approaches with the relationship between semantics, conceptualization, and culture as a key theme. He also details a number of case studies that draw on a wide range of material from non-Indo-European languages, particularly Australian Aboriginal languages and Malay, on which the author is an authority.
  27. Roger Wertheimer (1972). The Significance of Sense. Ithaca [N.Y.]Cornell University Press.
    Univocalist analyses of the modal auxiliary verbs ('ought'/'must'/'can') and the adjective 'right'/'wrong'.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Charles Travis (2008). Occasion-Sensitivity: Selected Essays. Oxford University Press.
    Charles Travis presents a series of essays in which he has developed his distinctive view of the relation of thought to language. The key idea is "occasion-sensitivity": what it is for words to express a given concept is for them to be apt for contributing to any of many different conditions of correctness (notably truth conditions). Since words mean what they do by expressing a given concept, it follows that meaning does not determine truth conditions. This view ties thoughts less (...)
  29. N. J. Enfield & Tanya Stivers (eds.) (2007). Person Reference in Interaction: Linguistic, Cultural, and Social Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.
    How do we refer to people in everyday conversation? No matter the language or culture, we must choose from a range of options: full name ('Robert Smith'), reduced name ('Bob'), description ('tall guy'), kin term ('my son') etc. Our choices reflect how we know that person in context, and allow us to take a particular perspective on them. This book brings together a team of leading linguists, sociologists and anthropologists to show that there is more to person reference than meets (...)
  30. Christopher S. Hill (2002). Thought and World: An Austere Portrayal of Truth, Reference, and Semantic Correspondence. Cambridge University Press.
    There is an important family of semantic notions that are applied to thoughts and to the conceptual constituents of thoughts--as when one says that the thought that the Universe is expanding is true. Christopher Hill presents a theory of the content of such notions. That theory is largely deflationary in spirit. It represents a broad range of semantic notions free from substantive metaphysical and empirical presuppositions. He also explains the relationship of mirroring or semantic correspondence linking thoughts to reality.
  31. Mary Daly (2006). Amazon Grace: Re-Calling the Courage to Sin Big. Palgrave Macmillan.
    In her signature style, revolutionary Mary Daly takes you on a Quantum leap into a joyous future of victory for women. Daly, the groundbreaking author of such classics as Beyond God the Father and The Church and the Second Sex , explores the visions of Matilda Joslyn Gage, the great nineteenth-century philosopher, and reveals that her insights are stunningly helpful to twenty-first-century Voyagers seeking to overcome the fascism and life-hating fundamentalism that has infused current power structures. Daly shows us once (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Patricia H. Werhane (1992). Skepticism, Rules and Private Languages. Humanities Press.
  33. Susan Haack (1974). Deviant Logic: Some Philosophical Issues. Cambridge University Press.
    PART ONE I 'Alternative' in 'Alternative logic There are many systems of logic — many-valued systems and modal systems for instance - which are non-standard ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Palle Yourgrau (ed.) (1990). Demonstratives. Oxford University Press.
  35. John Lyons (1977). Semantics. Cambridge University Press.
    This book, which can be read independently, deals with more specifically linguistic problems in semantics and contains substantial original material.
  36. Hilary Putnam (1975). Mind, Language, and Reality. Cambridge University Press.
    Professor Hilary Putnam has been one of the most influential and sharply original of recent American philosophers in a whole range of fields. His most important published work is collected here, together with several new and substantial studies, in two volumes. The first deals with the philosophy of mathematics and of science and the nature of philosophical and scientific enquiry; the second deals with the philosophy of language and mind. Volume one is now issued in a new edition, including an (...)
  37. Lawrence E. Johnson (1992). Focusing on Truth. Routledge.
    Focusing on Truth explores the question of what truth is, balancing historical with issue-orientated discussion. The book offers a comprehensive survey of all the major theories of truth. Lawrence Johnson investigates a number of closely related matters of truth in his inquiry, such as: What sorts of things are true or false? What is attributed to them when they are said to be true or false? What do facts have to do with truth? What can we learn from previous theories? (...)
  38. Tom Cohen (1994). Anti-Mimesis From Plato to Hitchcock. Cambridge University Press.
    The material elements of writing have long been undervalued, and have been dismissed by recent historicising trends of criticism; but analysis of these elements - sound, signature, letters - can transform our understanding of literary texts. In this book Tom Cohen shows how, in an era of representational criticism and cultural studies, the role of close reading has been overlooked. Arguing that much recent criticism has been caught in potentially regressive models of representation, Professor Cohen undertakes to counter this by (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. A. Clark & Ronald Lutz (eds.) (1992). Connectionism in Context. Springer-Verlag.
  40. Timothy Williamson (1994). Vagueness. Routledge.
    Vagueness provides the first comprehensive examination of a topic of increasing importance in metaphysics and the philosophy of logic and language. Timothy Williamson traces the history of this philosophical problem from discussions of the heap paradox in classical Greece to modern formal approaches such as fuzzy logic. He illustrates the problems with views which have taken the position that standard logic and formal semantics do not apply to vague language, and defends the controversial realistic view that vagueness is a kind (...)
  41. Jean Khalfa (ed.) (1994). What is Intelligence? Cambridge University Press.
  42. Pieter A. M. Seuren (1996). Semantic Syntax. Blackwell.
  43. John M. Preston (ed.) (1998). Thought and Language. Cambridge University Press.
    In this volume, several major twentieth-century philosophers of mind and language make further contributions to the debate.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Richard Larson & Gabriel Segal (1995). Knowledge of Meaning. The Mit Press.
  45. Jeremy Butterfield (ed.) (1986). Language, Mind and Logic. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a collection of eleven original essays in analytical philosophy by British and American philosophers, centering on the connection between mind and language. Two themes predominate: how it is that thoughts and sentences can represent the world; and what having a thought - a belief, for instance - involves. Developing from these themes are the questions: what does having a belief require of the believer, and of the way he or she relates to the environment? In particular, does having (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Susana Nuccetelli (ed.) (2003). New Essays on Semantic Externalism and Self-Knowledge. MIT Press.
  47. Alastair Butler (2004). The Syntax and Semantics of Split Constructions: A Comparative Study. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Split constructions are widespread in natural languages. The separation of the semantic restriction of a quantifier from that quantifier is a typical example of such a construction. This study addresses the problem that such discontinuous strings exhibit--namely, a number of locality constraints, including intervention effects. These are shown to follow from the interaction of a minimalist syntax with a semantics that directly assigns a model-theoretic interpretation to syntactic logical forms. The approach is shown to have wide empirical coverage and a (...)
  48. W. Terrence Gordon (1987). Semantics: A Bibliography, 1979-1985. Scarecrow Press.
  49. Ruth M. Kempson (1975). Presupposition and the Delimitation of Semantics. Cambridge University Press.
  50. Wolfgang Carl (1994). Frege's Theory of Sense and Reference: Its Origins and Scope. Cambridge University Press.
    Gottlob Frege has exerted an enormous influence on the evolution of twentieth-century philosophy, yet the real significance of that influence is still very much a matter of debate. This book provides a completely new and systematic account of Frege's philosophy by focusing on its cornerstone: the theory of sense and reference. Two features distinguish this study from other books on Frege. First, sense and reference are placed absolutely at the core of Frege's work; the author shows that no adequate account (...)
  51. 1 — 50 / 382