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1 — 50 / 603
  1. Owen J. Flanagan (1996). Self Expressions: Mind, Morals, and the Meaning of Life. Oxford University Press.
    Human beings have the unique ability to consciously reflect on the nature of the self. But reflection has its costs. We can ask what the self is, but as David Hume pointed out, the self, once reflected upon, may be nowhere to be found. The favored view is that we are material beings living in the material world. But if so, a host of destabilizing questions surface. If persons are just a sophisticated sort of animal, then what sense is there (...)
  2. George Rudebusch (1999). Socrates, Pleasure, and Value. Oxford University Press.
    In this study, George Rudebusch addresses whether Socrates was a hedonist--whether he believed pleasure to be the good. In attempting to locate Socrates' position on hedonism, Rudebusch examines the passages in Plato's early dialogues that are the most disputed on the topic. He maintains that Socrates identifies pleasant activity with virtuous activity, describing Socrates' hedonism as one of activity, not sensation. This analysis allows for Socrates to find both virtue and pleasure to be the good, thus solving the textual puzzle (...)
  3. Radu J. Bogdan (1994). Grounds for Cognition. Erlbaum.
    This is how guidance of behavior to goal grounds and explains cognition and the main forms in which it manages information.
  4. Robert Schwartz (ed.) (2004). Perception. Malden MA: Blackwell Publishing.
    This text presents essays on the conceptual and theoretical problems in the study of vision.
  5. Richard D. Wright (ed.) (1998). Visual Attention. Oxford University Press.
    This book contains a rich, interdisciplinary collection of articles by some of the pioneers of contemporary research on attention.
  6. Gerald James Holton (1978/1998). The Scientific Imagination: With a New Introduction. Harvard University Press.
    In this book Gerald Holton takes an opposing view, illuminating the ways in which the imagination of the scientist functions early in the formation of a new ...
  7. M. Ito, Y. Miyashita & Edmund T. Rolls (eds.) (1997). Cognition, Computation, and Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
  8. G. Marian Kinget (1999). On Being Human and Pleasure and Pain: Two Humanistic Works. University Press of America.
  9. John A. Foster (2000). The Nature of Perception. New York: Oxford University Press.
    John Foster addresses the question: what is it to perceive a physical object? He rejects the view that we perceive such objects directly, and argues for a new version of the traditional empiricist account, which locates the immediate objects of perception in the mind. But this account seems to imply that we do not perceive physical objects at all. Foster offers a surprising solution, which involves embracing an idealist view of the physical world.
  10. K. T. Maslin (2001). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind. Blackwell.
    An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind provides a lively and accessible introduction to all the main themes and arguments currently being debated in this area. The book examines and criticizes four major theories of mind: Dualism, Mind/Brain Identity, Behaviourism and Functionalism. It argues that while consciousness and our mental lives depend upon physical processes in the brain, they are not reducible to those processes. The differences between mental and physical states, mind/body causality, the problem of other minds, and personal (...)
  11. Gregory McCulloch (1995). The Mind and its World. Routledge.
    Since Descartes, the mind has been thought to be "in the head," separable from the world and even from the body it inhabits. In The Mind and its World , Gregory McCulloch considers the latest debates in philosophy and cognitive science about whether the thinking subject actually requires an environment in order to be able to think. McCulloch explores the mind/body duality from the Enlightenment to the 20th century. He examines such figures as Descartes, Frege, Locke, and Wittgenstein. His method (...)
  12. A. Phillips Griffiths (ed.) (1992). A. J. Ayer: Memorial Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    A memorial collection of essays by leading Western philosophers, with a postumous essay by Ayer himself.
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  13. Bede Rundle (1972). Perception, Sensation, and Verification. Oxford University Press.
  14. George Graham (1993). Philosophy of Mind: An Introduction. Blackwell.
    In this second edition, George Graham maintains the strengths, structure, and overall features of the first, but expands its scope, deepens the detail, and ...
  15. Karl R. Popper (ed.) (1994). Knowledge and the Body-Mind Problem: In Defence of Interaction. Routledge.
    One of the most influential thinkers of the 20th century, Sir Karl Popper here examines the problems connected with human freedom, creativity, rationality and the relationship between human beings and their actions. In this illuminating series of papers, Popper suggests a theory of mind-body interaction that relates to evolutionary emergence, human language and what he calls "the three worlds." Rene; Descartes first posited the existence of two worlds--the world of physical bodies and the world of mental states. Popper argues for (...)
  16. Michael Pearson (1990). Millennial Dreams and Moral Dilemmas: Seventh-Day Adventism and Contemporary Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Recent and rapid technological developments on many fronts have created in our society some extremely difficult moral predicaments. Previous generations have not had to face the dilemmas posed by, for example, the availability of safe abortions, sperm banks and prostoglandins. They have not had to come to terms with an unchecked exploitation of natural resources heralding imminent ecological crisis, or, worst of all, with the recognition that only in this current generation have people the capacity to destroy themselves and their (...)
  17. Michael I. Posner (ed.) (1989). Foundations of Cognitive Science. MIT Press.
    All of the chapters have been written especially for the book by the leading scholars in the field.Michael I. Posner is Professor of Psychology at the ...
  18. U. Neisser (ed.) (1981). Concepts and Conceptual Development. Cambridge University Press.
    Concepts and Conceptual Development draws together theorists from a wide range of theoretical orientations to consider many different aspects of 'the psychology ...
  19. Jerome Neu (2007). Sticks and Stones: The Philosophy of Insults. Oxford University Press.
    In Sticks and Stones, philosopher Jerome Neu probes the nature, purpose, and effects of insults, exploring how and why they humiliate, embarrass, infuriate,...
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  20. João Branquinho (ed.) (2001). The Foundations of Cognitive Science. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  21. William T. O'Donohue & Richard F. Kitchener (eds.) (1996). The Philosophy of Psychology. Sage Publications.
    This essential book provides a comprehensive explanation of the key topics and debates arising in the philosophy of psychology. In editors William O'Donohue and Richard Kitchener's thoughtful examination, philosophy and psychology converge on several themes of great importance such as the foundations of knowledge, the nature of science, rationality, behaviorism, cognitive science, folk psychology, neuropsychology, psychoanalysis, professionalism, and research ethics. The Philosophy of Psychology also provides an in-depth discussion of ethics in counseling and psychiatry while exploring the diverse topics listed (...)
  22. John O. Wisdom (1963). Problems Of Mind And Matter. Cambridge University Press.
    Reprint of the first paperback ed. of 1963.
  23. A. Russon, Kim A. Bard & S. Parkers (eds.) (1996). Reaching Into Thought: The Minds of the Great Apes. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, field and laboratory researchers show that the Great Apes are capable of thinking at symbolic levels, traditionally considered uniquely human.
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  24. L. R. Squire & N. Butters (eds.) (1992). Neuropsychology of Memory. Guilford Press.
    The third edition gives particular attention to neuroimaging, which has emerged in the past decade as one of the most active areas of research in the field.
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  25. Michael E. Levin (1979). Metaphysics and the Mind-Body Problem. Oxford University Press.
  26. Michael Novak (1965/1986). Belief and Unbelief: A Philosophy of Self-Knowledge: With a New Preface. University Press of America.
  27. Eric Dietrich (ed.) (1994). Thinking Computers and Virtual Persons. Academic Press.
  28. Ned Block (2007). Consciousness, Function, and Representation: Collected Papers, Volume. Oxford University Press.
    The first of a planned two-volume collection of Ned Block's writings on philosophy of mind; this volume treats consciousness, functionalism, and representation ...
  29. Antonio R. Damasio (1994). Descartes' Error: Emotion, Reason, and the Human Brain. Putnam.
  30. J. L. Mackie (1976). Problems From Locke. Clarendon Press.
    Annotation In this book Mr. Mackie selects for critical discussion six related topic which are prominent in John Locke's Essay concerning Human Understanding: ...
  31. Colin McGinn (1997). Minds and Bodies: Philosophers and Their Ideas. Oxford University Press.
    In Minds and Bodies, one of philosophy's most dynamic and versatile thinkers gathers nearly forty review essays written over the past twenty years for publications of a nonspecialized kind. They cover biography, particularly of Russell and Wittgenstein; philosophy of mind, especially consciousness; and ethics, with an emphasis on applied ethics. Lucid and accessible, these essays together form a vivid picture of contemporary philosophy for the general reader, and will be welcomed by those within the philosophical community for their crisp critical (...)
  32. S. Lewandowsky, J. M. Dunn & K. Kirsner (eds.) (1989). Implicit Memory: Theoretical Issues. Lawrence Erlbaum.
    The first to focus exclusively on implicit memory research, this book documents the proceedings of a meeting held in Perth, Australia where leading researchers ...
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  33. J. McGaugh, Jerry Weinberger & G. Lynch (eds.) (1990). Brain Organization and Memory. Guilford Press.
    The book will be an invaluable source for cognitive psychologists, neuroscientists, and students interested in this active and exciting area of research. This volume is the third in a series.
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  34. Robert Trappl (ed.) (2002). Emotions in Humans and Artifacts. Bradford Book/MIT Press.
    This interdisciplinary book presents recent work on emotions in neuroscience, cognitive science, philosophy, computer science, artificial intelligence, and...
  35. Hilary Putnam (1975). Mind, Language, and Reality. Cambridge University Press.
    Professor Hilary Putnam has been one of the most influential and sharply original of recent American philosophers in a whole range of fields. His most important published work is collected here, together with several new and substantial studies, in two volumes. The first deals with the philosophy of mathematics and of science and the nature of philosophical and scientific enquiry; the second deals with the philosophy of language and mind. Volume one is now issued in a new edition, including an (...)
  36. Mark Rowlands (2001). The Nature of Consciousness. Cambridge University Press.
    In The Nature of Consciousness, Mark Rowlands develops an innovative and radical account of the nature of phenomenal consciousness, one that has significant consequences for attempts to find a place for it in the natural order. The most significant feature of consciousness is its dual nature: consciousness can be both the directing of awareness and that upon which awareness is directed. Rowlands offers a clear and philosophically insightful discussion of the main positions in this fast-moving debate, and argues that the (...)
  37. Isaac Levi (1991). The Fixation of Belief and its Undoing: Changing Beliefs Through Inquiry. Cambridge University Press.
    Isaac Levi's new book is concerned with how one can justify changing one's beliefs. The discussion is deeply informed by the belief-doubt model advocated by C. S. Peirce and John Dewey, of which the book provides a substantial analysis. Professor Levi then addresses the conceptual framework of potential changes available to an inquirer. A structural approach to propositional attitudes is proposed which rejects the conventional view that a propositional attitude involves a relation between an agent and either a linguistic entity (...)
  38. Jean-Paul Sartre (2004). The Imaginary: A Phenomenological Psychology of the Imagination. Routledge.
    Webber's perceptive new introduction helps to decipher this challenging, seminal work, placing it in the context of the author's work and the history of ...
  39. John Deigh (2008). Emotions, Values, and the Law. Oxford University Press.
    Emotions, Values, and the Law brings together ten of John Deigh's essays written over the past fifteen years. In the first five essays, Deigh ask questions about the nature of emotions and the relation of evaluative judgment to the intentionality of emotions, and critically examines the cognitivist theories of emotion that have dominated philosophy and psychology over the past thirty years. A central criticism of these theories is that they do not satisfactorily account for the emotions of babies or animals (...)
  40. Harvie Ferguson (1990). The Science of Pleasure: Cosmos and Psyche in the Bourgeois World View. Routledge.
    Examines the formation, structure and collapse of the bourgeois world view, exploring the concepts of fun, happiness, pleasure, and excitement.
  41. Colin McGinn (1991). The Problem of Consciousness: Essays Toward a Resolution. Blackwell.
    This book argues that we are not equipped to understand the workings of conciousness, despite its objective naturalness.
  42. J. H. van'T. Hoff (1967). Imagination in Science. [New York]Springer-Verlag New York.
  43. Jane Heal (2003). Mind, Reason, and Imagination: Selected Essays in Philosophy of Mind and Language. Cambridge University Press.
    Recent philosophy of mind has had a mistaken conception of the nature of psychological concepts. It has assumed too much similarity between psychological judgments and those of natural science and has thus overlooked the fact that other people are not just objects whose thoughts we may try to predict and control but fellow creatures with whom we talk and co-operate. In this collection of essays, Jane Heal argues that central to our ability to arrive at views about others' thoughts is (...)
  44. Thomas Hadjistavropoulos & Kenneth D. Craig (eds.) (2004). Pain: Psychological Perspectives.
  45. Ḥayim Gordon (2004). Maurice Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception: A Basis for Sharing the Earth. Praeger.
    Presents the basis of Merleau-Ponty's ontology, as presented in his book Phenomology of Perception, and shows how it can help provide humans with a foundation ...
  46. Eric P. Polten (1973). Critique Of The Psycho-Physical Identity Theory. The Hague: Mouton.
  47. Gabriel Riera (2006). Intrigues: From Being to the Other. Fordham University Press.
    Intrigues: From Being to the Other examines the possibility of writing the other, explores whether an ethical writing that preserves the other as such is possible, and discusses what the implications are for an ethically inflected criticism. Emmanuel Levinas and Maurice Blanchot, whose works constitute the most thorough contemporary exploration of the question of the other and of its relation to writing, are the main focus of this study. The book's horizon is ethics in the Levinasian sense: the question of (...)
  48. William G. Lycan (1987). Consciousness. MIT Press.
  49. Jay N. Eacker (1975). Problems Of Philosophy And Psychology. Chicago Il: Nelson-Hall.
  50. M. Weitz (1988). Theories of Concepts: A History of the Major Philosophical Traditions. Routledge.
  51. 1 — 50 / 603