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1 — 50 / 596
  1. Israel Scheffler (1997). Symbolic Worlds: Art, Science, Language, Ritual. Cambridge University Press.
    Symbolism is a primary characteristic of the mind, deployed and displayed in every aspect of our thought and culture. In this important and broad-ranging book, Israel Scheffler explores the various ways in which the mind functions symbolically. This involves considering not only the world of science and the arts, but also such activities as religious ritual and child's play. The book offers an integrated treatment of ambiguity and metaphor, analyses of play and ritual, and an extended discussion of the relations (...)
  2. George Yancy (ed.) (2010). The Center Must Not Hold: White Women Philosophers on the Whiteness of Philosophy. Lexington Books.
  3. Eric Dietrich (ed.) (1994). Thinking Computers and Virtual Persons. Academic Press.
  4. J. McGaugh, Jerry Weinberger & G. Lynch (eds.) (1990). Brain Organization and Memory. Guilford Press.
    The book will be an invaluable source for cognitive psychologists, neuroscientists, and students interested in this active and exciting area of research. This volume is the third in a series.
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  5. Radu J. Bogdan (1994). Grounds for Cognition. Erlbaum.
    This is how guidance of behavior to goal grounds and explains cognition and the main forms in which it manages information.
  6. Sabine Maasen, Wolfgang Prinz & Gerhard Roth (eds.) (2003). Voluntary Action: Brains, Minds, and Sociality. Oxford University Press.
    We all know what a voluntary action is - we all think we know when an action is voluntary, and when it is not. Yet, performing and action and defining it are different matters. What counts as an action? When does it begin? Does the conscious desire to perform an action always precede the act? If not, is it really a voluntary action? This is a debate that crosses the boundaries of Philosophy, Neuroscience, Psychology, and Social Science. This book brings (...)
  7. Richard D. Wright (ed.) (1998). Visual Attention. Oxford University Press.
    This book contains a rich, interdisciplinary collection of articles by some of the pioneers of contemporary research on attention.
  8. Peter Smith & Jones O. R. (1986). The Philosophy of Mind. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a straightforward, elementary textbook for beginning students of philosophy. The general aim is to provide a clear introduction to the main issues arising in the philosophy of mind. Part I discusses the Cartesian dualist view which many find initially appealing, and contains a careful examination of arguments for and against. Part II introduces the broadly functionalist type of physicalism which has Aristotelian roots. This approach is developed to yield accounts of perception, action, belief and desire, and the emerging (...)
  9. M. Ito, Y. Miyashita & Edmund T. Rolls (eds.) (1997). Cognition, Computation, and Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
  10. Peter Smith & O. R. Jones (1986). The Philosophy of Mind: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a straightforward, elementary textbook for beginning students of philosophy. The general aim is to provide a clear introduction to the main issues arising in the philosophy of mind. Part I discusses the Cartesian dualist view which many find initially appealing, and contains a careful examination of arguments for and against. Part II introduces the broadly functionalist type of physicalism which has Aristotelian roots. This approach is developed to yield accounts of perception, action, belief and desire, and the emerging (...)
  11. Robert A. Wilson & Frank C. Keil (1999). MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences. MIT Press.
  12. Owen J. Flanagan (1996). Self Expressions: Mind, Morals, and the Meaning of Life. Oxford University Press.
    Human beings have the unique ability to consciously reflect on the nature of the self. But reflection has its costs. We can ask what the self is, but as David Hume pointed out, the self, once reflected upon, may be nowhere to be found. The favored view is that we are material beings living in the material world. But if so, a host of destabilizing questions surface. If persons are just a sophisticated sort of animal, then what sense is there (...)
  13. Ullin T. Place (ed.) (2003). Identifying the Mind: Selected Papers of U. T. Place. Oxford University Press.
    This is the one and only book by the pioneer of the identity theory of mind. The collection focuses on Place's philosophy of mind and his contributions to neighboring issues in metaphysics and epistemology. It includes an autobiographical essay as well as a recent paper on the function and neural location of consciousness.
  14. John O. Wisdom (1963). Problems Of Mind And Matter. Cambridge University Press.
    Reprint of the first paperback ed. of 1963.
  15. Eric P. Polten (1973). Critique Of The Psycho-Physical Identity Theory. The Hague: Mouton.
  16. George Rudebusch (1999). Socrates, Pleasure, and Value. Oxford University Press.
    In this study, George Rudebusch addresses whether Socrates was a hedonist--whether he believed pleasure to be the good. In attempting to locate Socrates' position on hedonism, Rudebusch examines the passages in Plato's early dialogues that are the most disputed on the topic. He maintains that Socrates identifies pleasant activity with virtuous activity, describing Socrates' hedonism as one of activity, not sensation. This analysis allows for Socrates to find both virtue and pleasure to be the good, thus solving the textual puzzle (...)
  17. Susana Nuccetelli (ed.) (2003). New Essays on Semantic Externalism and Self-Knowledge. MIT Press.
  18. Jerome Neu (2007). Sticks and Stones: The Philosophy of Insults. Oxford University Press.
    In Sticks and Stones, philosopher Jerome Neu probes the nature, purpose, and effects of insults, exploring how and why they humiliate, embarrass, infuriate,...
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  19. Gerald James Holton (1978/1998). The Scientific Imagination: With a New Introduction. Harvard University Press.
    In this book Gerald Holton takes an opposing view, illuminating the ways in which the imagination of the scientist functions early in the formation of a new ...
  20. Craig DeLancey (2001). Passionate Engines: What Emotions Reveal About the Mind and Artificial Intelligence. Oxford University Press.
    The emotions have been one of the most fertile areas of study in psychology, neuroscience, and other cognitive disciplines. Yet as influential as the work in those fields is, it has not yet made its way to the desks of philosophers who study the nature of mind. Passionate Engines unites the two for the first time, providing both a survey of what emotions can tell us about the mind, and an argument for how work in the cognitive disciplines can help (...)
  21. John Deigh (2008). Emotions, Values, and the Law. Oxford University Press.
    Emotions, Values, and the Law brings together ten of John Deigh's essays written over the past fifteen years. In the first five essays, Deigh ask questions about the nature of emotions and the relation of evaluative judgment to the intentionality of emotions, and critically examines the cognitivist theories of emotion that have dominated philosophy and psychology over the past thirty years. A central criticism of these theories is that they do not satisfactorily account for the emotions of babies or animals (...)
  22. Bede Rundle (1972). Perception, Sensation, and Verification. Oxford University Press.
  23. Michael Pearson (1990). Millennial Dreams and Moral Dilemmas: Seventh-Day Adventism and Contemporary Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Recent and rapid technological developments on many fronts have created in our society some extremely difficult moral predicaments. Previous generations have not had to face the dilemmas posed by, for example, the availability of safe abortions, sperm banks and prostoglandins. They have not had to come to terms with an unchecked exploitation of natural resources heralding imminent ecological crisis, or, worst of all, with the recognition that only in this current generation have people the capacity to destroy themselves and their (...)
  24. Michael E. Levin (1979). Metaphysics and the Mind-Body Problem. Oxford University Press.
  25. João Branquinho (ed.) (2001). The Foundations of Cognitive Science. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  26. Michael Novak (1965/1986). Belief and Unbelief: A Philosophy of Self-Knowledge: With a New Preface. University Press of America.
  27. S. Lewandowsky, J. M. Dunn & K. Kirsner (eds.) (1989). Implicit Memory: Theoretical Issues. Lawrence Erlbaum.
    The first to focus exclusively on implicit memory research, this book documents the proceedings of a meeting held in Perth, Australia where leading researchers ...
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  28. Colin McGinn (1997). Minds and Bodies: Philosophers and Their Ideas. Oxford University Press.
    In Minds and Bodies, one of philosophy's most dynamic and versatile thinkers gathers nearly forty review essays written over the past twenty years for publications of a nonspecialized kind. They cover biography, particularly of Russell and Wittgenstein; philosophy of mind, especially consciousness; and ethics, with an emphasis on applied ethics. Lucid and accessible, these essays together form a vivid picture of contemporary philosophy for the general reader, and will be welcomed by those within the philosophical community for their crisp critical (...)
  29. K. T. Maslin (2001). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind. Blackwell.
    An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind provides a lively and accessible introduction to all the main themes and arguments currently being debated in this area. The book examines and criticizes four major theories of mind: Dualism, Mind/Brain Identity, Behaviourism and Functionalism. It argues that while consciousness and our mental lives depend upon physical processes in the brain, they are not reducible to those processes. The differences between mental and physical states, mind/body causality, the problem of other minds, and personal (...)
  30. David G. Stern (1995). Wittgenstein on Mind and Language. Oxford University Press.
    Drawing on ten years of research on the unpublished Wittgenstein papers, Stern investigates what motivated Wittgenstein's philosophical writing and casts new light on the Tractatus and Philosophical Investigations. The book is an exposition of Wittgenstein's early conception of the nature of representation and how his later revision and criticism of that work led to a radically different way of looking at mind and language. It also explains how the unpublished manuscripts and typescripts were put together and why they often provide (...)
  31. Karl R. Popper (ed.) (1994). Knowledge and the Body-Mind Problem: In Defence of Interaction. Routledge.
    One of the most influential thinkers of the 20th century, Sir Karl Popper here examines the problems connected with human freedom, creativity, rationality and the relationship between human beings and their actions. In this illuminating series of papers, Popper suggests a theory of mind-body interaction that relates to evolutionary emergence, human language and what he calls "the three worlds." Rene; Descartes first posited the existence of two worlds--the world of physical bodies and the world of mental states. Popper argues for (...)
  32. A. Russon, Kim A. Bard & S. Parkers (eds.) (1996). Reaching Into Thought: The Minds of the Great Apes. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, field and laboratory researchers show that the Great Apes are capable of thinking at symbolic levels, traditionally considered uniquely human.
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  33. Thomas Hadjistavropoulos & Kenneth D. Craig (eds.) (2004). Pain: Psychological Perspectives.
  34. George Graham (1993). Philosophy of Mind: An Introduction. Blackwell.
    In this second edition, George Graham maintains the strengths, structure, and overall features of the first, but expands its scope, deepens the detail, and ...
  35. Antonio R. Damasio (1994). Descartes' Error: Emotion, Reason, and the Human Brain. Putnam.
  36. Mark Rowlands (2001). The Nature of Consciousness. Cambridge University Press.
    In The Nature of Consciousness, Mark Rowlands develops an innovative and radical account of the nature of phenomenal consciousness, one that has significant consequences for attempts to find a place for it in the natural order. The most significant feature of consciousness is its dual nature: consciousness can be both the directing of awareness and that upon which awareness is directed. Rowlands offers a clear and philosophically insightful discussion of the main positions in this fast-moving debate, and argues that the (...)
  37. Jane Heal (2003). Mind, Reason, and Imagination: Selected Essays in Philosophy of Mind and Language. Cambridge University Press.
    Recent philosophy of mind has had a mistaken conception of the nature of psychological concepts. It has assumed too much similarity between psychological judgments and those of natural science and has thus overlooked the fact that other people are not just objects whose thoughts we may try to predict and control but fellow creatures with whom we talk and co-operate. In this collection of essays, Jane Heal argues that central to our ability to arrive at views about others' thoughts is (...)
  38. David Sander & Klaus R. Scherer (eds.) (2009). The Oxford Companion to Emotion and the Affective Sciences. Oxford University Press.
    Comprehensive, authoritative, up-to-date, & easy-to-use, this companion is an indispensable resource for all who wish to find out about theories, concepts, ...
  39. Harvie Ferguson (1990). The Science of Pleasure: Cosmos and Psyche in the Bourgeois World View. Routledge.
    Examines the formation, structure and collapse of the bourgeois world view, exploring the concepts of fun, happiness, pleasure, and excitement.
  40. David Sander & Klaus R. Scherer (eds.) (2009). Oxford Companion to Emotion & the Affective Sciences. Oxford UP.
    Comprehensive, authoritative, up-to-date, & easy-to-use, this companion is an indispensable resource for all who wish to find out about theories, concepts, ...
  41. Jean-Paul Sartre (2004). The Imaginary: A Phenomenological Psychology of the Imagination. Routledge.
    Webber's perceptive new introduction helps to decipher this challenging, seminal work, placing it in the context of the author's work and the history of ...
  42. J. H. van'T. Hoff (1967). Imagination in Science. [New York]Springer-Verlag New York.
  43. Edward E. Smith & L. Douglas (1981). Categories and Concepts. Harvard University Press.
  44. Michael I. Posner (ed.) (1989). Foundations of Cognitive Science. MIT Press.
    All of the chapters have been written especially for the book by the leading scholars in the field.Michael I. Posner is Professor of Psychology at the ...
  45. E. D. Klemke (2000). A Defense of Realism: Reflections on the Metaphysics of G.E. Moore. Humanity Books.
  46. Antti Revonsuo & Matti Kamppinen (eds.) (1994). Consciousness in Philosophy and Cognitive Neuroscience. Lawrence Erlbaum.
    Consciousness seems to be an enigmatic phenomenon: it is difficult to imagine how our perceptions of the world and our inner thoughts, sensations and feelings could be related to the immensely complicated biological organ we call the brain. This volume presents the thoughts of some of the leading philosophers and cognitive scientists who have recently participated in the discussion of the status of consciousness in science. The focus of inquiry is the question: "Is it possible to incorporate consciousness into science?" (...)
  47. Gregory McCulloch (1995). The Mind and its World. Routledge.
    Since Descartes, the mind has been thought to be "in the head," separable from the world and even from the body it inhabits. In The Mind and its World , Gregory McCulloch considers the latest debates in philosophy and cognitive science about whether the thinking subject actually requires an environment in order to be able to think. McCulloch explores the mind/body duality from the Enlightenment to the 20th century. He examines such figures as Descartes, Frege, Locke, and Wittgenstein. His method (...)
  48. Adèle Olivia Gladwell (1995). Catamania: The Dissonance of Female Pleasure and Dissent. Distributors to the Us Book Trade, Subterranean Company.
  49. Joseph Chiari (1970/1961). Realism and Imagination. New York,Gordian Press.
  50. Gabriel Riera (2006). Intrigues: From Being to the Other. Fordham University Press.
    Intrigues: From Being to the Other examines the possibility of writing the other, explores whether an ethical writing that preserves the other as such is possible, and discusses what the implications are for an ethically inflected criticism. Emmanuel Levinas and Maurice Blanchot, whose works constitute the most thorough contemporary exploration of the question of the other and of its relation to writing, are the main focus of this study. The book's horizon is ethics in the Levinasian sense: the question of (...)
  51. 1 — 50 / 596