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1 — 50 / 3823
  1. Lawrence C. Becker & Charlotte B. Becker (eds.) (2001). Encyclopedia of Ethics. Routledge.
    The editors, working with a team of 325 renowned authorities in the field of ethics, have revised, expanded, and updated this classic encyclopedia. Along with the addition of 150 new entries, all of the original articles have been newly peer-reviewed and revised, bibliographies have been updated throughout, and the overall design of the work has been enhanced for easier access to cross-references and other reference features. New entries include * Aristotelian Ethics * Avicenna * Bad Faith * Beneficence * Categorical (...)
  2. Alan Cribb (2005). Health and the Good Society: Setting Healthcare Ethics in Social Context. Oxford University Press.
    What is health policy for? In Health and the Good Society, Alan Cribb addresses this question in a way that cuts across disciplinary boundaries. His core argument is that biomedical ethics should draw upon public health values and ethics; specifically, he argues that everybody has some share of responsibility for health, including a responsibility for promoting greater health equality. In the process, Cribb argues for a major rethink of the whole project of health education.
  3. Henry Sidgwick (1902/1996). Lectures on the Ethics of T.H. Green, Mr. Herbert Spencer, and J. Martineau. Thoemmes Press.
  4. Richard F. Von Dohlen (1996). Culture War and Ethical Theory. University Press of America.
  5. William H. Simon (1998). The Practice of Justice: A Theory of Lawyers' Ethics. Harvard University Press.
    Citing the Lincoln Savings and Loan scandal, the Leo Frank murder trial, and other cases, author William Simon takes a fresh look at the ethics of lawyering.
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  6. Owen J. Flanagan (1996). Self Expressions: Mind, Morals, and the Meaning of Life. Oxford University Press.
    Human beings have the unique ability to consciously reflect on the nature of the self. But reflection has its costs. We can ask what the self is, but as David Hume pointed out, the self, once reflected upon, may be nowhere to be found. The favored view is that we are material beings living in the material world. But if so, a host of destabilizing questions surface. If persons are just a sophisticated sort of animal, then what sense is there (...)
  7. Jan T. J. Srzednicki (1976). Elements of Social and Political Philosophy. Martinus Nijhoff.
  8. Véronique Marion Fóti (ed.) (1996). Merleau-Ponty: Difference, Materiality, Painting. Humanities Press.
  9. Richard Wightman Fox & Robert B. Westbrook (eds.) (1998). In Face of the Facts: Moral Inquiry in American Scholarship. Press Syndicate of the University of Cambridge.
    Recently there has been a renewed interest in moral inquiry among American scholars in a variety of disciplines. This collection of accessible essays by scholars in philosophy, political theory, psychology, history, literary studies, sociology, religious studies, anthropology, and legal studies affords a view of the current state of moral inquiry in the American academy, and it offers fresh departures for ethically informed, interdisciplinary scholarship. Seeking neither to reduce values to facts nor facts to values, these essays aim to foster discussion (...)
  10. Jeffrey T. Nealon (1998). Alterity Politics: Ethics and Performative Subjectivity. Duke University Press.
    "In a new and stimulating manner, Jeffrey Nealon confronts precisely those questions that have been of the most central importance in literary studies and does ...
  11. Marshall B. Kapp (1998). Our Hands Are Tied: Legal Tensions and Medical Ethics. Auburn House.
    An in-depth investigation of the influence that apprehension about litigation and legal liability exerts on ethical medical practice today.
  12. Spyros Doxiadis (ed.) (1985). Ethical Issues in Preventive Medicine. Distributors for United States and Canada.
  13. Christopher Winch (2006). Education, Autonomy and Critical Thinking. Routledge.
    The concepts of autonomy and of critical thinking play a central role in many contemporary accounts of the aims of education. This book analyses their relationship to each other and to education, exploring their roles in mortality and politics before examining the role of critical thinking in fulfilling the educational aim of preparing young people for autonomy. The author analyses different senses of the terms 'autonomy' and 'critical thinking' and the implications for education. Implications of the discussion for contemporary practice (...)
  14. Moses L. Pava (1999). The Search for Meaning in Organizations: Seven Practical Questions for Ethical Managers. Quorum.
    This book is an engaging contribution to the literature on management, business and society, and the theory and practice of ethics.
  15. Henry Sidgwick (1908/1996). The Elements of Politics. Thoemmes Press.
  16. Ian Jones & Michael G. Pollitt (eds.) (2002). Understanding How Issues in Business Ethics Develop. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Business ethics is currently a significant and widely debated global issue, and one that no business can afford to ignore. In this book, the authors bring together a diverse range of views on the subject, arising from an international conference on business ethics.Chapters on highly topical issues such as GM foods, child labor and bribery will make this an important tool for many businesses.
  17. Martin L. Davies & Marsha Meskimmon (eds.) (2003). Breaking the Disciplines: Reconceptions in Knowledge, Art, and Culture. I.B. Tauris.
    In this pioneering book, noted international scholars explore the limits and definitions of knowing, thinking, and communicating meaning as we move into the 21st century. Coming from disciplines as diverse as anthropology, philosophy, literature, aesthetics, and art practice, together they work towards reconceiving the boundaries between entrenched domains of knowledge to great effect.
  18. Mary E. Guy (1990). Ethical Decision Making in Everyday Work Situations. Quorum Books.
    This book takes a new approach to ethics by focusing on the kinds of dilemmas that confront people almost daily on the job.
  19. C. M. Fisher (2009). Business Ethics and Values: Individual, Corporate and International Perspectives. Prentice Hall/Financial Times.
    This third edition offers increased coverage of sustainability and more chances for illustration and discussion of ethics in the messy day to day practicalities ...
  20. Donna Dickenson (2000). In Two Minds: A Casebook of Psychiatric Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    In Two Minds is a practical casebook of problem solving in psychiatric ethics. Written in a lively and accessible style, it builds on a series of detailed case histories to illustrate the central place of ethical reasoning as a key competency for clinical work and research in psychiatry. Topics include risk, dangerousness and confidentiality; judgements of responsibility; involuntary treatment and mental health legislation; consent to genetic screening; dual role issues in child and adolescent psychiatry; needs assessment; cross-cultural and gender issues; (...)
  21. W. Michael Hoffman (ed.) (1994). Emerging Global Business Ethics. Quorum Books.
  22. H. L. A. Hart (1994). The Concept of Law. Oxford University Press.
    The Concept of Law is the most important and original work of legal philosophy written this century. First published in 1961, it is considered the masterpiece of H.L.A. Hart's enormous contribution to the study of jurisprudence and legal philosophy. Its elegant language and balanced arguments have sparked wide debate and unprecedented growth in the quantity and quality of scholarship in this area--much of it devoted to attacking or defending Hart's theories. Principal among Hart's critics is renowned lawyer and political philosopher (...)
  23. Rüdiger Bittner (1989). What Reason Demands. Cambridge University Press.
    Why should we act morally? What justification is to be found in moral demands? This lucid, pithy, and eminently readable book examines the arguments in favor of the claims of moral demands to be found in contemporary ethical theory, arguments deriving from Kant's attempt to provide a foundation for morality.
  24. Lewis Vaughn (2010). Bioethics: Principles, Issues, and Cases. Oxford University Press.
    Moral reasoning in bioethics -- Bioethics and moral theories -- Paternalism and patient autonomy -- Truth-telling and confidentiality -- Informed consent -- Human research -- Abortion -- Reproductive technology -- Genetic choices -- Euthanasia and physician assisted suicide -- Dividing up health care resources.
  25. Katy Láng-Pickvance, Nick P. Manning & C. G. Pickvance (eds.) (1997). Environmental and Housing Movements: Grassroots Experience in Hungary, Russia and Estonia. Avebury.
  26. Bernard Berofsky (1995). Liberation From Self: A Theory of Personal Autonomy. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the most detailed, sophisticated and comprehensive treatment of autonomy currently available. Moreover it argues for a quite different conception of autonomy from that found in the philosophical literature. Professor Berofsky claims that the idea of autonomy originating in the self is a seductive but ultimately illusory one. The only serious way of approaching the subject is to pay due attention to psychology, and to view autonomy as the liberation from the disabling effects of physiological and psychological afflictions. A (...)
  27. Bob Brecher (2010). The New Order of War. Rodopi.
    That much goes without saying. What is controversial, however, is how we might understand and respond to these new wars. This book offers a new approach.
  28. Stefan N. Willich & Susanna Elm (eds.) (2001). Medical Challenges for the New Millennium: An Interdisciplinary Task. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Today the medical community faces a number of pressing issues. Molecular and high-tech medicine, despite their tremendous successes, also burden us with new ethical dilemmas: when and how to die, whose life to preserve, whether to modify genes and to create life, and how to pay for it all. Furthermore, alternative methods appear to work at least for certain disorders. They are popular and definitely cost less, while the spiraling costs of conventional medicine have led to the development of managed (...)
  29. Andrew Halpin (1997). Rights and Law: Analysis and Theory. Distributed in North America by Northwestern University Press.
    Rights have become,in recent years, a significant concern of legal theorists, as well as of those involved in moral and political philosophy. This new book seeks to move a number of debates forward by developing the analysis of rights and focusing upon more general theoretical considerations relating to rights. The book is divided into five parts. The first includes an explanation of the part played by conceptual analysis within jurisprudence, while the second conducts a re-examination of Hohfeld’s analysis of rights. (...)
  30. Mark Vernon (2007). Science, Religion, and the Meaning of Life. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Have evolution, science and the trappings of the modern world killed off God irrevocably? And what do we lose if we choose not to believe in him? From Newton and Descartes to Darwin and the discovery of the genome, religion has been pushed back further and further while science has gained ground. But what fills the void that religion leaves behind? This book is an attempt to look at these questions and to suggest a third way between the easy consolations (...)
  31. Mica Nava (1992). Changing Cultures: Feminism, Youth and Consumerism. Sage.
    Linked by the connection of feminism, sociology, and cultural studies, Changing Cultures assesses feminist theory, its transformations, and its ability to highlight issues and practices. This controversial yet stimulating volume explores the complex relationship between these three subjects, conceptual approaches, their political implications and their historical context. Nava analyzes utopianism of feminist thought on the family; sexuality and sexual differences in youth service provision; and the symbolic resonance of the urban and domestic education of girls. She also investigates the relationship (...)
  32. Bernard Gert (2006). Bioethics: A Systematic Approach. Oxford University Press.
    This book is the result of over 30 years of collaboration among its authors. It uses the systematic account of our common morality developed by one of its authors to provide a useful foundation for dealing with the moral problems and disputes that occur in the practice of medicine. The analyses of impartiality, rationality, and of morality as a public system not only explain why some bioethical questions, such as the moral acceptability of abortion, cannot be resolved, but also provide (...)
  33. David Miller (1976/1979). Social Justice. Oxford University Press.
    This book explores the various aspects of social justice--to each according to his rights, to each acording to his desert, and to each according to his need--comparing the writings of Hume, Spencer, and Kropotkin. Miller demonstrates that there are radical differences in outlook on social justice between societies, and that these differences can be explained by reference to features of the social structure.
  34. Daniel Steel (2008). Across the Boundaries: Extrapolation in Biology and Social Science. Oxford University Press.
    Inferences like these are known as extrapolations.
  35. Patrick Riley (ed.) (1941/1992). Essays on Political Philosophy. University of Rochester Press.
  36. Peter Murphy (2001). Civic Justice: From Greek Antiquity to the Modern World. Humanity Books.
  37. Robert S. Summers (1971). More Essays in Legal Philosophy. Berkeley,University of California Press.
    Notes on Criticism in Legal Philosophy ROBERT S. SUMMERS I. INTRODUCTION Legal philosophers criticize and evaluate as well as originate and expound. ...
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  38. Scott Gordon (1980). Welfare, Justice, and Freedom. Columbia University Press.
  39. Lincoln Allison (ed.) (1990). The Utilitarian Response: The Contemporary Viability of Utilitarian Political Philosophy. Sage Publications.
    "Nearly all the essays are theoretically informed, argumentative, and exceptionally interesting; nearly all try to paint the merits (and demerits) of utilitarianism as a political philosophy in the light of attempted solutions to theoretical problems that are explored in some detail. The result is a searching, thoughtful volume." --Ethics "The Utilitarian Response is unique in the breadth of problems and questions in utilitarian theory covered. It is more suggestive of strategies by which contemporary utilitarianism could be improved than a comprehensive (...)
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  40. Jean Hampton (1997). Political Philosophy. Westview Press.
    Political philosophy, perhaps even more than other branches of philosophy, calls for constant renewal to reflect not just re-readings of the tradition but also the demands of current events. In this lively and readable survey, Jean Hampton has created a text for our time that does justice both to the great traditions of the field and to the newest developments. In a marvelous feat of synthesis, she links the classical tradition, the giants of the modern period, the dominant topics of (...)
  41. Katherine Smits (2009). Applying Political Theory. Palgrave Macmillan.
  42. Mark Sydney Cladis (2003). Public Vision, Private Lives: Rousseau, Religion, and 21st-Century Democracy. Oxford University Press.
    Listening closely to the religious pitch in Rousseau's voice, Cladis convincingly shows that Rousseau, when attempting to portray the most characteristic aspects of the public and private, reached for a religious vocabulary. Honoring both love of self and love of that which is larger than the self--these twin poles, with all the tension between them--mark Rousseau's work, vision and challenge--the challenge of 21st-century democracy.
  43. David E. Cooper (ed.) (1992). A Companion to Aesthetics. Blackwell Reference.
  44. Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.) (2010). Cognitive Disability and its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Through a series of essays contributed by clinicians, medical historians, and prominent moral philosophers, Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral ...
  45. Ken Wilber (2000). Sex, Ecology, Spirituality: The Spirit of Evolution. Shambhala.
    In a tour de force of scholarship and vision, Ken Wilber traces the course of evolution from matter to life to mind. In each case evolution has a "direction," a tendency to produce more highly organized patterns. The "spirit of evolution" lies in its directionality: order out of chaos. After arriving at the emergence of mind, Wilber traces the evolution of human consciousness through its major stages of development, pointing out that at each stage there is the "dialectic of progress"--every (...)
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  46. Carolyn Merchant (2003). Reinventing Eden: The Fate of Nature in Western Culture. Routledge.
    Visionary quests to return to the Garden of Eden have shaped Western culture from Columbus' voyages to today's tropical island retreats. Few narratives are so powerful - and, as Carolyn Merchant shows, so misguided and destructive - as the dream of recapturing a lost paradise. A sweeping account of these quixotic endeavors by one of America's leading environmentalists, Reinventing Eden traces the idea of rebuilding the primeval garden from its origins to its latest incarnations in shopping malls, theme parks and (...)
  47. Jessica Pierce (2004). The Ethics of Environmentally Responsible Health Care. Oxford University Press.
    This book shows how environmental decline relates to human health and to health care practices in the U.S. and other industrialized countries. It outlines the environmental trends that will strongly affect health, and challenges us to see the connections between ways of practicing medicine and the very environmental problems that damage ecosystems and make people sick. In addition to philosophical analysis of the converging values of bioethics and envrionmental ethics, the book offers case studies as well as a number of (...)
  48. Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.) (2007). Ethical Theory: An Anthology. Blackwell Pub..
    Ethical Theory: An Anthology is an authoritative collection of key essays by top scholars in the field, addressing core issues including consequentialism, deontology, and virtue ethics, as well as traditionally underrepresented topics such as moral knowledge and moral responsibility. Brings together seventy-six classic and contemporary pieces by renowned philosophers, from classic writing by Hume and Kant to contemporary writing by Derek Parfit, Susan Wolf, and Judith Jarvis Thomson Guides students through key areas in the field, among them consequentialism, deontology, contractarianism, (...)
  49. Peta Bowden (1997). Caring: Gender-Sensitive Ethics. Routledge.
    Caring extends and challenges recent debates over feminist ethics by taking issue with accounts of the ethics of care which try to pin down the "principles" of caring, rather than understanding the practice of caring. It explores four main caring practices: mothering, friendship, nursing and citizenship. Bowden's consideration of the differences and similarities in these working practices reveals the complexity of the ethics of caring.
  50. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1990). Philosophy of Law: An Introduction to Jurisprudence. Westview Press.
    In this revised edition, two distinguished philosophers have extended and strengthened the most authoritative text available on the philosophy of law and jurisprudence. While retaining their comprehensive coverage of classical and modern theory, Murphy and Coleman have added new discussions of the Critical Legal Studies movement and feminist jurisprudence, and they have strengthened their treatment of natural law theory, criminalization, and the law of torts. The chapter on law and economics remains the best short introduction to that difficult, controversial, and (...)
  51. 1 — 50 / 3823