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1 — 50 / 663
  1. Major J. Jones (1974). Christian Ethics for Black Theology. Nashville,Abingdon Press.
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  2. D. Bannister (ed.) (1977). New Perspectives in Personal Construct Theory. Academic Press.
  3. Stanley Hauerwas (1988). Against the Nations: War and Survival in a Liberal Society. Harper & Row.
  4. Rosalyn Diprose (1994). The Bodies of Women: Ethics, Embodiment, and Sexual Difference. Routledge.
    In The Bodies of Women , Rosalyn Diprose argues that traditional approaches to ethics both perpetuate and remain blind to the mechanisms of the subordination of women. She shows that injustice against women begins in the ways that social discourses and practices place women's embodied existence as improper and secondary to men. She intervenes into debates about sexual difference, ethics, philosophies of the body and theories of self in order to develop a new ethics which places sexual difference at the (...)
  5. James E. Crimmins & Mark G. Spencer (eds.) (2005). Utilitarians and Their Critics in America, 1789-1914. Thoemmes Continuum.
  6. John H. Kultgen (1995). Autonomy and Intervention: Parentalism in the Caring Life. Oxford University Press.
    The basic relationship between people should be care, and the caring life is the highest which humans can live. Unfortunately, care that is not thoughtful slides into illegitimate intrusion on autonomy. Autonomy is a basic good, and we should not abridge it without good reason. On the other hand, it is not the only good. We must sometimes intervene in the lives of others to protect them from grave harms or provide them with important benefits. The reflective person, therefore, needs (...)
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  7. Peter Johnson (1993). Frames of Deceit: A Study of the Loss and Recovery of Public and Private Trust. Cambridge University Press.
    Frames of Deceit is a philosophical investigation of the nature of trust in public and private life. It examines how trust originates, how it is challenged, and how it is recovered when moral and political imperfections collide. In politics, rulers may be called upon to act badly for the sake of a political good, and in private life intimate attachments are formed in which the costs of betrayal are high. This book asks how trust is tested by human goods, moral (...)
  8. Sandra Kemp & Judith Squires (eds.) (1998). Feminisms. Oxford University Press.
    Spanning nearly two decades, from 1980 to 1996, this Reader investigates the debates which have best characterized feminist theory. Including such articles as Pornography and Fantasy, The Body and Cinema, Nature as Female, and A Manifesto for Cyborgs, the extracts examine thoughts on sexualtiy as a domain of exploration, the visual representation of women, what being a feminist means, and why feminists are increasingly involved in political struggles to negotiate the context and meaning of technological development. With writings by bell (...)
  9. Robert B. Louden (1992). Morality and Moral Theory: A Reappraisal and Reaffirmation. Oxford University Press.
    Contemporary philosophers have grown increasingly skeptical toward both morality and moral theory. Some argue that moral theory is a radically misguided enterprise that does not illuminate moral practice, while others simply deny the value of morality in human life. In this important new book, Louden responds to the arguments of both "anti-morality" and "anti-theory" skeptics. In Part One, he develops and defends an alternative conception of morality, which, he argues, captures more of the central features of both Aristotelian and Kantian (...)
  10. Kathryn Pyne Addelson (1991). Impure Thoughts: Essays on Philosophy, Feminism, & Ethics. Temple University Press.
  11. E. Clinton Gardner (1995). Justice and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Justice and Christian Ethics is a study in the meaning and foundations of justice in modern society. Written from a theological perspective, its focus is upon the interaction of religion and law in their common pursuit of justice. Consideration is given, first, to the historical roots of justice in the classical tradition of virtue (Aristotle and Aquinas) and in the biblical ideas of covenant and the righteousness of God. Subsequent chapters trace the relationships between justice, law, and virtue in Puritanism, (...)
  12. Paul Crittenden (1990). Learning to Be Moral: Philosophical Thoughts About Moral Development. Humanities Press International.
  13. David Kyuman Kim (2007). Melancholic Freedom: Agency and the Spirit of Politics. Oxford University Press.
    Why does agency--the capacity to make choices and to act in the world--matter to us? Why is it meaningful that our intentions have effects in the world, that they reflect our sense of identity, that they embody what we value? What kinds of motivations are available for political agency and judgment in an age that lacks the enthusiasm associated with the great emancipatory movements for civil rights and gender equality? What are the conditions for the possibility of being an effective (...)
  14. Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (1973). On Happiness. London,Collins.
  15. Thomas E. Hill (1991). Autonomy and Self-Respect. Cambridge University Press.
    This stimulating collection of essays in ethics eschews the simple exposition and refinement of abstract theories. Rather, the author focuses on everyday moral issues, often neglected by philosophers, and explores the deeper theoretical questions which they raise. Such issues are: Is it wrong to tell a lie to protect someone from a painful truth? Should one commit a lesser evil to prevent another from doing something worse? Can one be both autonomous and compassionate? Other topics discussed are servility, weakness of (...)
  16. William F. Felice (2009). How Do I Save My Honor?: War, Moral Integrity, and Principled Resignation. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    How Do I Save My Honor? is a powerful exploration of individual moral responsibility in a time of war. When individuals conclude that their leaders have violated fundamental ethical principles, what are they to do? Through the compelling personal stories of those in the U.S. and British government and military who struggled with these thorny issues during the war in Iraq, William F. Felice analyzes the degrees of moral responsibility that public officials, soldiers, and private citizens bear for the actions (...)
  17. Walter George Muelder (1966). Moral Law in Christian Social Ethics. Richmond, John Knox Press.
  18. Moses L. Pava (2009). Jewish Ethics as Dialogue: Using Spiritual Language to Re-Imagine a Better World. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The case for dialogue -- Increasing moral capital through moral imagination -- The art of ethical dialogue -- Intelligent spirituality in business -- Spirituality in (and out) of the classroom -- Listening to the anxious atheists -- Beyond the flat world metaphor -- Dialogue as a restraint on wealth -- The limits of dialogue.
  19. S. Daniel Breslauer (1986). Modern Jewish Morality: A Bibliographical Survey. Greenwood Press.
  20. Peter Singer (ed.) (1991). A Companion to Ethics. Blackwell Reference.
    The origin of ethics MARY MIDGLEY i The search for justification WHERE does ethics come from? Two very different questions are combined here, ...
  21. Hugh LaFollette (ed.) (2000/2001). The Blackwell Guide to Ethical Theory. Blackwell.
    This volume is arguably the most ambitious and authoritative survey of ethical theory available today.
  22. Carl F. H. Henry (ed.) (1973). Baker's Dictionary of Christian Ethics. Grand Rapids,Baker Book House.
  23. Stanlie M. James & Abena P. A. Busia (eds.) (1993). Theorizing Black Feminisms: The Visionary Pragmatism of Black Women. Routledge.
    Theorizing Black Feminisms outlines some of the crucial debates going on among Black feminists today. In doing so it brings together a collection of some of the most exciting work by Black women scholars. The book encompasses a wide range of diverse subjects and refuses to be limited by notions of disciplinary boundaries or divisions between theory and practice. Theorizing Black Feminisms combines essays on literature, sociology, history, political science, anthropology, and art. As such it will be vital reading for (...)
  24. Fred Feldman (1986). Doing the Best We Can: An Essay in Informal Deontic Logic. D. Reidel Publishing Company.
    However, if we take a more generous view about possibility, then more alternatives present themselves. The best of these may be something that we formerly took to be impossible, and which is better than the best of the earlier possibilities.
  25. Alison Assiter (1996). Enlightened Women: Modernist Feminism in a Postmodern Age. Routledge.
    This is a bold and controversial feminist, philosophical critique of postmodernism. While providing a brief and accessible introduction to postmodernist feminist thought, Enlightened Women is also a unique defence of realism and enlightenment philosophy. The first half of the book covers an analysis of some of the most influential postmodernist theorists, such as Luce Irigaray and Judith Butler. In the second half Alison Assiter advocates a return to modernism in feminism. She argues, against the current orthodoxy, that there can be (...)
  26. Edward D. Zinbarg (2001). Faith, Morals, and Money: What the World's Religions Tell Us About Money in the Marketplace. Continuum.
    This is a book grounded in the real ethical challenges of modern business practice, with a world-religious perspective so necessary in an era of globalization.
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  27. Nancey C. Murphy, Brad J. Kallenberg & Mark Nation (eds.) (1997/2003). Virtues & Practices in the Christian Tradition: Christian Ethics After Macintyre. University of Notre Dame Press.
  28. Bernard Hoose (ed.) (1998). Christian Ethics: An Introduction. Liturgical Press.
    This book is about the state of moral theology today.
  29. James B. Nelson (1971). Moral Nexus. Philadelphia,Westminster Press.
    Becoming More Conscious of Some "Unconscious Influences" The Question In his sermon "Unconscious Influence," written a century ago, Horace Bushnell had this ...
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  30. Max L. Stackhouse, Peter J. Paris, Don S. Browning & Diane Burdette Obenchain (eds.) (2000). God and Globalization. Trinity Press International.
    v. 1. Religion and the powers of the common life -- v. 2. The spirit and the modern authorities -- v. 3. Christ and the dominions of civilization -- v. 4. Globalization and grace.
  31. Dawne McCance (ed.) (1998). Life Ethics in World Religions. Scholars Press.
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  32. Richard Amesbury (2005). Morality and Social Criticism : The Force of Reasons in Discursive Practice. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book brings recent developments in Anglo-American philosophy into engagement with dominant currents in contemporary European social theory in order to articulate a pragmatic account of moral criticism. Presented in a lively and accessible style that avoids technical jargon, Morality and Social Criticism argues that the objectivity of moral discourse can be preserved without recourse to the overweening philosophical ambitions of the Enlightenment.
  33. Fred Feldman (1997). Utilitarianism, Hedonism, and Desert: Essays in Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Fred Feldman is an important philosopher, who has made a substantial contribution to utilitarian moral philosophy. This collection of ten previously published essays plus a new introductory essay reveal the striking originality and unity of his views. Feldman's version of utilitarianism differs from traditional forms in that it evaluates behaviour by appeal to the values of accessible worlds. These worlds are in turn evaluated in terms of the amounts of pleasure they contain, but the conception of pleasure involved is a (...)
  34. Ronald L. Sandler (2007). Character and Environment: A Virtue-Oriented Approach to Environmental Ethics. Columbia University Press.
    In Character and Environment, Ronald L. Sandler brings together contemporary work on virtue ethics with contemporary work on environmental ethics.
  35. Michael A. Slote (2001). Morals From Motives. Oxford University Press.
    Morals from Motives develops a virtue ethics inspired more by Hume and Hutcheson's moral sentimentalism than by recently-influential Aristotelianism. It argues that a reconfigured and expanded "morality of caring" can offer a general account of right and wrong action as well as social justice. Expanding the frontiers of ethics, it goes on to show how a motive-based "pure" virtue theory can also help us to understand the nature of human well-being and practical reason.
  36. Conrad D. Johnson (1991). Moral Legislation: A Legal-Political Model for Indirect Consequentialist Reasoning. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a book about moral reasoning: how we actually reason and how we ought to reason. It defends a form of "rule" utilitarianism whereby we must sometimes judge and act in moral questions in accordance with generally accepted rules, so long as the existence of those rules is justified by the good they bring about. The author opposes the currently more fashionable view that it is always right for the individual to do that which produces the most good. Among (...)
  37. Mike W. Martin (2012). Happiness and the Good Life. Oup Usa.
    What is happiness? How is it related to morality and virtue? Does living with illusion promote or diminish happiness? Is it better to pursue happiness with a partner than alone? Philosopher Mike W. Martin addresses these and other questions as he connects the meaning of happiness with the philosophical notion of "the good life." Defining happiness as loving one's life and valuing it in ways manifested by ample enjoyment and a deep sense of meaning, Martin explores the ways in which (...)
  38. S. Daniel Breslauer (1985). Contemporary Jewish Ethics: A Bibliographical Survey. Greenwood Press.
  39. Jonathan Sacks (1997). The Politics of Hope. Jonathan Cape.
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  40. John Wilkinson (1988). Christian Ethics in Health Care: A Source Book for Christian Doctors, Nurses and Other Health Care Professionals. Handsel Press.
  41. Elizabeth L. Willems (1990). Adult Commitment: An Ethics of Trust. Upa.
    This interdisciplinary study of commitment draws on the disciplines of theology, philosophy, and psychology to demonstrate the importance of trust in midlife adulthood. It gives particular attention to the place of trust in resolving tensions surrounding commitments. Taking a relational perspective, this text addresses the various aspects of commitment as they affect the self, the community, and God. Several midlife people serve as test cases to illustrate the crucial role of trust for those who are called to reassess interpersonal commitments (...)
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  42. James Earl Gilman (2001). Fidelity of Heart: An Ethic of Christian Virtue. Oxford University Press.
    What does it take to follow and not merely admire Jesus? How do religious affections reshape the practice of Christian values like love, peace, justice, and compassion? How can they possess both universal truth and local meaning? What role can they play in public life? In Fidelity of Heart Gilman answers these questions, while showing, in an innovative and provocative approach, how Christians can practice these values in ways continuous with the life of Jesus.
  43. Joel Kupperman (1991). Character. Oxford University Press.
    We often speak of a person's character--good or bad, strong or weak--and think of it as a guide to how that person will behave in a given situation. Oddly, however, philosophers writing about ethics have had virtually nothing to say about the role of character in ethical behavior. What is character? How does it relate to having a self, or to the process of moral decision? Are we responsible for our characters? Character answers these questions, and goes on to examine (...)
  44. Stacey Young (1997). Changing the Wor(L)D: Discourse, Politics, and the Feminist Movement. Routledge.
    Changing the Wor(l)d draws on feminist publishing, postmodern theory and feminist autobiography to powerfully critique both liberal feminism and scholarship on the women's movement, arguing that both ignore feminism's unique contributions to social analysis and politics. These contributions recognize the power of discourse, the diversity of women's experiences, and the importance of changing the world through changing consciousness. Young critiques social movement theory and five key studies of the women's movement, arguing that gender oppression can be understood only in relation (...)
  45. Thomas Langan (1992). Tradition and Authenticity in the Search for Ecumenic Wisdom. University of Missouri.
    Langan argues that we must struggle toward a unity of discourse respectful of genuine experiences of varying civilizations if we are to live peacefully on one planet.
  46. Michael J. Harris (2003). Divine Command Ethics: Jewish and Christian Perspectives. Routledgecurzon.
    This book analyses the response of the classic texts of Jewish tradition to Plato's 'Euthyphro dilemma': does God freely determine morality, or is morality independent of God?
  47. Stephanie Athey (ed.) (2003). Sharpened Edge: Women of Color, Resistance, and Writing. Praeger.
  48. Luce Irigaray (1993). Je, Tu, Nous: Toward a Culture of Difference. New York ;Routledge.
    Irigaray offers the clearest available introduction to her own work. Focusing on power, women, gender and patriarchal mythologies, she lays out what for her has become the central problem for women in the modern world.
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  49. Samuel Wells (2010). Introducing Christian Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Written by two well-known theologians, the book encompasses Christian ethics in its entirety, but also offers a new way of viewing this subject.
  50. R. Murray Thomas (1997). An Integrated Theory of Moral Development. Greenwood Press.
  51. 1 — 50 / 663