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1 — 50 / 679
  1. Stanley Hauerwas (1988). Against the Nations: War and Survival in a Liberal Society. Harper & Row.
  2. Marcia Baron (1997). Three Methods of Ethics: A Debate. Blackwell.
    Written in the form of a debate, this volume presents a clear survey and assessment of the main arguments, both for and against each of these three central ...
  3. Rosalyn Diprose (1994). The Bodies of Women: Ethics, Embodiment, and Sexual Difference. Routledge.
    In The Bodies of Women , Rosalyn Diprose argues that traditional approaches to ethics both perpetuate and remain blind to the mechanisms of the subordination of women. She shows that injustice against women begins in the ways that social discourses and practices place women's embodied existence as improper and secondary to men. She intervenes into debates about sexual difference, ethics, philosophies of the body and theories of self in order to develop a new ethics which places sexual difference at the (...)
  4. Sandra Kemp & Judith Squires (eds.) (1998). Feminisms. Oxford University Press.
    Spanning nearly two decades, from 1980 to 1996, this Reader investigates the debates which have best characterized feminist theory. Including such articles as Pornography and Fantasy, The Body and Cinema, Nature as Female, and A Manifesto for Cyborgs, the extracts examine thoughts on sexualtiy as a domain of exploration, the visual representation of women, what being a feminist means, and why feminists are increasingly involved in political struggles to negotiate the context and meaning of technological development. With writings by bell (...)
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  5. Ignace Feuerlicht (1978). Alienation: From the Past to the Future. Greenwood Press.
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  6. Alison Assiter (1996). Enlightened Women: Modernist Feminism in a Postmodern Age. Routledge.
    This is a bold and controversial feminist, philosophical critique of postmodernism. While providing a brief and accessible introduction to postmodernist feminist thought, Enlightened Women is also a unique defence of realism and enlightenment philosophy. The first half of the book covers an analysis of some of the most influential postmodernist theorists, such as Luce Irigaray and Judith Butler. In the second half Alison Assiter advocates a return to modernism in feminism. She argues, against the current orthodoxy, that there can be (...)
  7. Catherine Wilson (2004). Moral Animals: Ideals and Constraints in Moral Theory. Oxford University Press.
    In Moral Animals, Catherine Wilson develops a theory of morality based on two fundamental premises: first that moral progress implies the evolution of moral ideals involving restraint and sacrifice; second that human beings are outfitted by nature with selfish motivations, intentions, and ambitions that place constraints on what morality can demand of them. Normative claims, she goes on to show, can be understood as projective hypotheses concerning the conduct of realistically-described nonideal agents in preferred fictional worlds. Such claims differ from (...)
  8. John Horton & Susan Mendus (eds.) (1985). Aspects of Toleration: Philosophical Studies. Methuen.
    Introduction JOHN HORTON AND SUSAN MENDUS The essays in this volume are concerned with the theoretical and conceptual issues involved in the idea of ...
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  9. Michael C. Banner (1999). Christian Ethics and Contemporary Moral Problems. Cambridge University Press.
    This book addresses such key ethical issues as euthanasia, the environment, biotechnology, abortion, the family, sexual ethics, and the distribution of health care resources. Michael Banner argues that the task of Christian ethics is to understand the world and humankind in the light of the credal affirmations of the Christian faith, and to explicate this understanding in its significance for human action through a critical engagement with the concerns, claims and problems of other ethics. He illustrates both the (...)
  10. Jonathan Sacks (1997). The Politics of Hope. Jonathan Cape.
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  11. Helen Watt (2000). Life and Death in Health Care Ethics: A Short Introduction. Routledge.
    In a world of rapid technological advances, the moral issues raised by life and death choices in healthcare remain obscure. Life and Death in Healthcare Ethics provides a concise, thoughtful and extremely accessible guide to these moral issues. Helen Watt examines, using real-life cases, the range of choices taken by healthcare professionals, patients and clients which lead to the shortening of life. The topics looked at include: euthanasia and withdrawal of treatment; the persistent vegetative state; abortion; IVF and cloning; (...)
  12. Michael A. Slote (2001). Morals From Motives. Oxford University Press.
    Morals from Motives develops a virtue ethics inspired more by Hume and Hutcheson's moral sentimentalism than by recently-influential Aristotelianism. It argues that a reconfigured and expanded "morality of caring" can offer a general account of right and wrong action as well as social justice. Expanding the frontiers of ethics, it goes on to show how a motive-based "pure" virtue theory can also help us to understand the nature of human well-being and practical reason.
  13. Robert L. Cunningham (1970). Situationism and the New Morality. New York,Appleton-Century-Crofts.
  14. Elliot N. Dorff & Louis E. Newman (eds.) (1995). Contemporary Jewish Ethics and Morality: A Reader. Oxford University Press.
    Over the past decade much significant new work has appeared in the field of Jewish ethics. While much of this work has been devoted to issues in applied ethics, a number of important essays have explored central themes within the tradition and clarified the theoretical foundations of Jewish ethics. This important text grew out of the need for a single work which accurately and conveniently reflects these developments within the field. The first text of its kind in almost two decades, (...)
  15. Elliott Sober (1994). From a Biological Point of View: Essays in Evolutionary Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Elliott Sober is one of the leading philosophers of science and is a former winner of the Lakatos Prize, the major award in the field. This new collection of essays will appeal to a readership that extends well beyond the frontiers of the philosophy of science. Sober shows how ideas in evolutionary biology bear in significant ways on traditional problems in philosophy of mind and language, epistemology, and metaphysics. Amongst the topics addressed are psychological egoism, solipsism, and the interpretation of (...)
  16. Peter Johnson (1993). Frames of Deceit: A Study of the Loss and Recovery of Public and Private Trust. Cambridge University Press.
    Frames of Deceit is a philosophical investigation of the nature of trust in public and private life. It examines how trust originates, how it is challenged, and how it is recovered when moral and political imperfections collide. In politics, rulers may be called upon to act badly for the sake of a political good, and in private life intimate attachments are formed in which the costs of betrayal are high. This book asks how trust is tested by human goods, moral (...)
  17. Lawrence A. Blum (1980). Friendship, Altruism, and Morality. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    Good,No Highlights,No Markup,all pages are intact, Slight Shelfwear,may have the corners slightly dented, may have slight color changes/slightly damaged spine.
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  18. Annette Barnes (1997). Seeing Through Self-Deception. New York: Cambridge University Press.
    What is it to deceive someone? And how is it possible to deceive oneself? Does self-deception require that people be taken in by a deceitful strategy that they know is deceitful? The literature is divided between those who argue that self-deception is intentional and those who argue that it is non-intentional. In this study, Annette Barnes offers a challenge to both the standard characterisation of other-deception and current characterizations of self-deception, examining the available explanations and exploring such questions as the (...)
  19. Hugh LaFollette (1996). Personal Relationships: Love, Identity and Morality. Blackwell.
    "This admirably clear and engaging work ... is broadly accessible... and is informed by social science research. Yet it is also thoroughly philosophical, delving into problems in ethics, epistemology, the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language.... Let us hope that LaFollette continues to tackle these problems with the clarify and rigor he shows here.".
  20. Josefina Figueira-McDonough, Ann Nichols-Casebolt & F. Ellen Netting (eds.) (1998). The Role of Gender in Practice Knowledge: Claiming Half the Human Experience. Garland Pub..
    Feminist critiques of the social sciences are based on the assumption that because the social sciences were developed for the most part by white, middle-class, Western men, the perspectives of women were ignored. This book offers an approach for integrating gender-related content into the social work curriculum. The distinguished contributors discuss the shortcoming of dominant knowledge, address the pressing need for a gender-integrated curriculum, consider the pedagogies consistent with the implementation of an integrate curriculum, address specific areas in social work (...)
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  21. Marvin Fox (ed.) (1975). Modern Jewish Ethics, Theory and Practice. Ohio State University Press.
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  22. David Kyuman Kim (2007). Melancholic Freedom: Agency and the Spirit of Politics. Oxford University Press.
    Why does agency--the capacity to make choices and to act in the world--matter to us? Why is it meaningful that our intentions have effects in the (...) world, that they reflect our sense of identity, that they embody what we value? What kinds of motivations are available for political agency and judgment in an age that lacks the enthusiasm associated with the great emancipatory movements for civil rights and gender equality? What are the conditions for the possibility of being an effective agent when the meaning of democracy has become less transparent? David Kyuman Kim addresses these crucial questions by uncovering the political, moral, philosophical, and religious dimensions of human agency. Kim treats agency as a form of religious experience that reflects implicit and explicit notions of the good. Of particular concern are the moral, political, and religious motivations that underpin an understanding of agency as meaningful action. Through a critical engagement with the work of theorists such as Judith Butler, Charles Taylor, and Stanley Cavell, Kim argues that late modern and postmodern agency is found most effectively at work in what he calls "projects of regenerating agency" or critical and strategic responses to loss. Agency as melancholic freedom begins and endures, Kim maintains, through the moral and psychic losses associated with a broad range of experiences, including the moral identities shaped by secularized modernity and the multifold forms of alienation experienced by those who suffer the indignities of racial, gender, class, and sexuality discrimination and oppression. Kim calls for renewing the sense of urgency in our political and moral engagements by seeing agency as a vocation, where the aspiration for self-transformation and the human need for hope are fundamental concerns. (shrink)
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  23. John H. Kultgen (1995). Autonomy and Intervention: Parentalism in the Caring Life. Oxford University Press.
    The basic relationship between people should be care, and the caring life is the highest which humans can live. Unfortunately, care that is not thoughtful slides into illegitimate intrusion on autonomy. Autonomy is a basic good, and we should not abridge it without good reason. On the other hand, it is not the only good. We must sometimes intervene in the lives of others to protect them from grave harms or provide them with important benefits. The reflective person, therefore, (...)
  24. Herant Katchadourian (2009). Guilt: The Bite of Conscience. Stanford General Books.
    The author, an experienced psychiatrist and professor, examines the feeling of guilt in different times, places, cultures, religions, and contexts.
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  25. Susan Mendus & David Edwards (eds.) (1987). On Toleration. Oxford University Press.
    Is toleration a requirement of morality or a dictate of prudence? What limits are there to toleration? What is required of us if we are to promote a truly tolerant society? These themes--the grounds, limits, and requirements of toleration--are central to this book, which presents the W.B. Morrell Memorial Lectures on Toleration, given in 1986 at the University of York. Covering a wide range of practical and theoretical issues, the contributors--including F.A. Hayek, Maurice Cranston, and Karl Popper--consider the philosophical difficulties (...)
  26. Robert P. George (ed.) (1998). Natural Law and Moral Inquiry: Ethics, Metaphysics, and Politics in the Work of Germain Grisez. Georgetown University Press.
  27. Bat-Ami Bar On & Ann Ferguson (eds.) (1998). Daring to Be Good: Essays in Feminist Ethico-Politics. Routledge.
    The essays in Daring to Be Good challenge the private/public split that assumes ethics is a private, individual concern and politics is a public, group concern. This collection addresses philosophical issues and controversies of interest to feminists, including prostitution, the ethics of the Human Genome research project as it impacts Native Americans, and reproductive technology. Contributors include:Bat-Ami Bar On, Sandra Lee Bartky, Chris Cuomo, Ann Ferguson, Jane Flax, Lori Gruen and Maria Lugones.
  28. D. Bannister (ed.) (1977). New Perspectives in Personal Construct Theory. Academic Press.
  29. William F. Felice (2009). How Do I Save My Honor?: War, Moral Integrity, and Principled Resignation. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    How Do I Save My Honor? is a powerful exploration of individual moral responsibility in a time of war. When individuals conclude that their leaders have violated fundamental ethical principles, what are they to do? Through the compelling personal stories of those in the U.S. and British government and military who struggled with these thorny issues during the war in Iraq, William F. Felice analyzes the degrees of moral responsibility that public officials, soldiers, and private citizens bear for the actions (...)
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  30. Conrad D. Johnson (1991). Moral Legislation: A Legal-Political Model for Indirect Consequentialist Reasoning. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a book about moral reasoning: how we actually reason and how we ought to reason. It defends a form of "rule" utilitarianism whereby we must sometimes judge and act in moral questions in accordance with generally accepted rules, so long as the existence of those rules is justified by the good they bring about. The author opposes the currently more fashionable view that it is always right for the individual to do that which produces the most good. Among (...)
  31. Kathy Davis, Monique Leijenaar & Jantine Oldersma (eds.) (1991). The Gender of Power. Sage Publications.
    "This book does serve a very useful purpose in returning power to the centre of the feminist stage. . . . This book makes clear the ways in which the machinations of power are more subtle, widespread, and multiform than it sometimes appears. Further, the clarity of presentation means that it is also a text that can usefully be included on student bibliographies." --Women's Philosophy Review "The Gender of Power, which announces itself in the first line of its Preface as (...)
  32. Lindsay Dewar (1968). An Outline of Anglican Moral Theology. London, Mowbray.
  33. David J. Wellman (2004). Sustainable Diplomacy: Ecology, Religion, and Ethics in Muslim-Christian Relations. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Drawing on the disciplines of Islamic and Christian Ethics, International Affairs, Environmental Science, History and Anthropology, Sustainable Diplomacy: Ecology, Religion and Ethics in Muslim-Christian Relations is a highly constructive work. Set in the context of modern Moroccan-Spanish relations, this text is a direct critique of realism as it is practiced in modern diplomacy. Proposing a new eco-centric approach to relations between nation-states and bioregions, Wellman presents the case for Ecological Realism, an undergirding philosophy for conducting a diplomacy that values the (...)
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  34. William Schweiker (2004). Theological Ethics and Global Dynamics: In the Time of Many Worlds. Blackwell Pub..
    Global dynamics and the integrity of life -- Pluralism in creation -- Reconsidering greed -- Timing moral cosmologies -- Love in the end times -- From toleration to political forgiveness -- Sacred texts and the social imaginary -- Comparing religions, comparing lives -- On moral madness -- Presenting theological humanism.
  35. Josiah Royce (1924/1971). The Philosophy of Loyalty. New York,Hafner Pub. Co..
    Josiah Royce was born in California where he began his teaching career.
  36. Jonathan Clatworthy (1997). Good God: Green Theology and the Value of Creation. Jon Carpenter.
  37. Jean Hampton (2007). The Intrinsic Worth of Persons: Contractarianism in Moral and Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Contractarianism in some form has been at the center of recent debates in moral and political philosophy. Jean Hampton was one of the most gifted philosophers involved in these debates and provided both important criticisms of prominent contractarian theories plus powerful defenses and applications of the core ideas of contractarianism. In these essays, she brought her distinctive approach, animated by concern for the intrinsic worth of persons, to bear on topics such as guilt, punishment, self-respect, family relations, and the maintenance (...)
  38. Michael H. Robins (1984). Promising, Intending, and Moral Autonomy. Cambridge University Press.
    Introduction Promising seems to be an act of intentionally creating an obligation where none existed before, but how is such a thing accomplished? ...
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  39. Bernard P. Dauenhauer (1986). The Politics of Hope. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    Initial demarcations i This study is an exercise in political philosophy. Though no concise, comprehensive definition of political philosophy is readily ...
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  40. David S. Oderberg (2000). Moral Theory: A Non-Consequentialist Approach. Blackwell.
    While this is a welcome development, it is also true that the discipline has been dominated by one particular ethical theory, namely consequentialism.
  41. Kathryn Pyne Addelson (1994). Moral Passages: Toward a Collectivist Moral Theory. Routledge.
    In Moral Passages, Kathryn Pyne Addelson presents an original moral theory suited for contemporary life and its moral problems. Her basic principle is that knowledge and morality are generated in collective action, and she develops it through a critical examination of theories in philosophy, sociology and women's studies, most of which hide the collective nature and as a result hide the lives and knowledge of many people. At issue are the questions of what morality is, and how moral theories (whether (...)
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  42. S. Daniel Breslauer (1986). Modern Jewish Morality: A Bibliographical Survey. Greenwood Press.
  43. Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (1973). On Happiness. London,Collins.
  44. John Hanwell Riker (1991). Human Excellence and an Ecological Conception of the Psyche. State University of New York Press.
    Riker bases his concept on recent work in psychoanalytic theory, emotion theory, sociobiology, ethnogenic social psychology, and feminism, as well as on the insights of such philosophers as Aristotle, Nietzsche, Whitehead, Heidegger, and ...
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  45. Frank G. Kirkpatrick (2001). The Ethics of Community. Blackwell.
  46. Stephen R. L. Clark (2000). Biology and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    This stimulating and wide-ranging book mounts a profound enquiry into some of the most pressing questions of our age, by examining the relationship between biological science and Christianity. The history of biological discovery is explored from the point of view of a leading philosopher and ethicist. What effect should modern biological theory and practice have on Christian understanding of ethics? How much of that theory and practice should Christians endorse? Can Christians, for example, agree that biological changes are not governed (...)
  47. Dominique Roger, André Parinaud & Claudine Parinaud (eds.) (1996). Tolerance. Unesco Pub..
    Machine generated contents note: 1. -- War on war, by Lewis Thomas -- 2. -- Silent genocide, by Abdus Salam -- 3. -- Error: a stage of knowledge, by Paulo Freire -- 4. -- Doing without a revolution?, by Tahar Ben Jelloun -- 5. -- Stop torture, by Manfred Nowak -- 6. -- Truth, force and law, by Rabindranath Tagore -- 7. -- Violence is an insult to the human being, by Federico Mayor -- 8. -- Totalitarianism banishes politics, by (...)
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  48. Helga Kuhse (1997). Caring: Nurses, Women, and Ethics. Blackwell Publishers.
  49. Steven G. Smith (2004). Worth Doing. State University of New York Press.
    A comprehensive look at how we rely on ideals of worthy action in the pursuit of moral happiness.
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  50. David Copp (ed.) (2006). The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory. Oxford University Press.
    The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory is a major new reference work in ethical theory consisting of commissioned essays by leading moral philosophers. Ethical theories have always been of central importance to philosophy, and remain so; ethical theory is one of the most active areas of philosophical research and teaching today. Courses in ethics are taught in colleges and universities at all levels, and ethical theory is the organizing principle for all of them. The Handbook is divided into two parts, (...)
  51. 1 — 50 / 679