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1 — 50 / 581
  1. Stanley Hauerwas (1988). Against the Nations: War and Survival in a Liberal Society. Harper & Row.
  2. Jennifer Radden (1985). Madness and Reason. G. Allen & Unwin.
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  3. Yūichi Shionoya & Kiichirō Yagi (eds.) (2001). Competition, Trust, and Cooperation: A Comparative Study. Springer.
    This book is the result of the first SEEP (Studies in Economic Ethics and Philosophy) conference that was held in Asia. First, the Western tradition is reinterpreted and restated by the two editors with their diversified perspective of virtue ethics and communicative ethics. Then, new approaches such as "critical realism", "reciprocal delivery", "evolutionary thought" and "cultural studies" are applied to understand ethical problems in economics. Further, in contrast to the reassessment of Scottish moral philosophy and German Romanticism, Chinese, Japanese, and (...)
  4. Max L. Stackhouse, Peter J. Paris, Don S. Browning & Diane Burdette Obenchain (eds.) (2000). God and Globalization. Trinity Press International.
    v. 1. Religion and the powers of the common life -- v. 2. The spirit and the modern authorities -- v. 3. Christ and the dominions of civilization -- v. 4. Globalization and grace.
  5. Jeanette Kennett (2001). Agency and Responsibility: A Common-Sense Moral Psychology. Oxford University Press.
    Taking the problem of weakness of will as her starting point, Jeanette Kennett builds an admirably comprehensive and integrated account of moral agency which gives a central place to the capacity for self-control. Her account of the exercise and limits of self-control vindicates the common-sense distinction between weakness of will and compulsion and so underwrites our ordinary allocations of moral responsibility.
  6. S. Daniel Breslauer (1986). Modern Jewish Morality: A Bibliographical Survey. Greenwood Press.
  7. Carl F. H. Henry (ed.) (1973). Baker's Dictionary of Christian Ethics. Grand Rapids,Baker Book House.
  8. Anthony O'Hear (1997). Beyond Evolution: Human Nature and the Limits of Evolutionary Explanation. Oxford University Press.
    In this controversial new book O'Hear takes a stand against the fashion for explaining human behavior in terms of evolution. He contends that while the theory of evolution is successful in explaining the development of the natural world in general, it is of limited value when applied to the human world. Because of our reflectiveness and our rationality we take on goals and ideals which cannot be justified in terms of survival-promotion or reproductive advantage. O'Hear examines the nature of human (...)
  9. Ignace Feuerlicht (1978). Alienation: From the Past to the Future. Greenwood Press.
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  10. John H. Kultgen (1995). Autonomy and Intervention: Parentalism in the Caring Life. Oxford University Press.
    The basic relationship between people should be care, and the caring life is the highest which humans can live. Unfortunately, care that is not thoughtful slides into illegitimate intrusion on autonomy. Autonomy is a basic good, and we should not abridge it without good reason. On the other hand, it is not the only good. We must sometimes intervene in the lives of others to protect them from grave harms or provide them with important benefits. The reflective person, therefore, needs (...)
  11. Rosalyn Diprose (1994). The Bodies of Women: Ethics, Embodiment, and Sexual Difference. Routledge.
    In The Bodies of Women , Rosalyn Diprose argues that traditional approaches to ethics both perpetuate and remain blind to the mechanisms of the subordination of women. She shows that injustice against women begins in the ways that social discourses and practices place women's embodied existence as improper and secondary to men. She intervenes into debates about sexual difference, ethics, philosophies of the body and theories of self in order to develop a new ethics which places sexual difference at the (...)
  12. Edward Le Roy Long (1967/1982). A Survey of Christian Ethics. Oxford University Press.
  13. Ian S. Markham (1994). Plurality and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Too many parts of the world testify to the difficulties religions have in tolerating each other. It is often concluded that the only way tolerance and plurality can be protected is to keep religion out of the public sphere. Ian Markham challenges this secularist argument. In the first half of the book, he advances a careful critique of European culture which exposes the problem of plurality. His analysis of the Christendom Group is contrasted with the outlook found in the USA, (...)
  14. Peter Johnson (1993). Frames of Deceit: A Study of the Loss and Recovery of Public and Private Trust. Cambridge University Press.
    Frames of Deceit is a philosophical investigation of the nature of trust in public and private life. It examines how trust originates, how it is challenged, and how it is recovered when moral and political imperfections collide. In politics, rulers may be called upon to act badly for the sake of a political good, and in private life intimate attachments are formed in which the costs of betrayal are high. This book asks how trust is tested by human goods, moral (...)
  15. Moses L. Pava (2009). Jewish Ethics as Dialogue: Using Spiritual Language to Re-Imagine a Better World. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The case for dialogue -- Increasing moral capital through moral imagination -- The art of ethical dialogue -- Intelligent spirituality in business -- Spirituality in (and out) of the classroom -- Listening to the anxious atheists -- Beyond the flat world metaphor -- Dialogue as a restraint on wealth -- The limits of dialogue.
  16. Susan Frank Parsons (1996). Feminism and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Feminists are aware of the diversity of thinking within their own tradition, and of the different approaches to moral questions in which that is manifest. This book describes and analyses that diversity by distinguishing three distinct paradigms of moral reasoning to be found within feminism. Using the writings of feminists, the major strengths and weaknesses of each theory are considered, so that creative dialogue between them can be encouraged. Three common themes are drawn out - which are also on the (...)
  17. Howard Kahane (1995). Contract Ethics: Evolutionary Biology and the Moral Sentiments. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    An examination of moral obligations as contractual in nature. The text proposes that evolutionary theory can help to explain moral sentiments.
  18. Jean Curthoys (1997). Feminist Amnesia: The Wake of Women's Liberation. Routledge.
    Feminist Amnesia is an important challenge to contemporary academic feminism. Jean Curthoys argues that the intellectual decline of university arts education and the loss of a deep moral commitment in feminism are related phenomena. The contradiction set up by the radical ideas of the 1960s, and institutionalised life of many of its protagonists in the academy, has produced a special kind of intellectual distortion. This book criticizes current trends in feminist theory from the perspective of forgotten and allegedly outdated feminist (...)
  19. James B. Nelson (1971). Moral Nexus. Philadelphia,Westminster Press.
    Becoming More Conscious of Some "Unconscious Influences" The Question In his sermon "Unconscious Influence," written a century ago, Horace Bushnell had this ...
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  20. R. Murray Thomas (1997). An Integrated Theory of Moral Development. Greenwood Press.
  21. Stephen Wilkinson (2010). Choosing Tomorrow's Children: The Ethics of Selective Reproduction. OUP Oxford.
    To what extent should parents be allowed to use reproductive technologies to determine the characteristics of their future children? And is there something morally wrong with parents who wish to do this? Choosing Tomorrow's Children provides answers to these (and related) questions. In particular, the book looks at issues raised by selective reproduction, the practice of choosing between different possible future persons by selecting or deselecting (for example) embryos, eggs, and sperm. -/- Wilkinson offers answers to questions including the following. (...)
  22. Samuel K. Roberts (2001). African American Christian Ethics. Pilgrim Press.
  23. E. Clinton Gardner (1995). Justice and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Justice and Christian Ethics is a study in the meaning and foundations of justice in modern society. Written from a theological perspective, its focus is upon the interaction of religion and law in their common pursuit of justice. Consideration is given, first, to the historical roots of justice in the classical tradition of virtue (Aristotle and Aquinas) and in the biblical ideas of covenant and the righteousness of God. Subsequent chapters trace the relationships between justice, law, and virtue in Puritanism, (...)
  24. Terence Penelhum (2000). Christian Ethics and Human Nature. Trinity Press International.
  25. Elliott Sober (1994). From a Biological Point of View: Essays in Evolutionary Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Elliott Sober is one of the leading philosophers of science and is a former winner of the Lakatos Prize, the major award in the field. This new collection of essays will appeal to a readership that extends well beyond the frontiers of the philosophy of science. Sober shows how ideas in evolutionary biology bear in significant ways on traditional problems in philosophy of mind and language, epistemology, and metaphysics. Amongst the topics addressed are psychological egoism, solipsism, and the interpretation of (...)
  26. Elaine L. Graham & Esther D. Reed (eds.) (2004). The Future of Christian Social Ethics: Essays on the Work of Ronald H. Preston, 1913-2001. Continnum.
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  27. S. Daniel Breslauer (1985). Contemporary Jewish Ethics: A Bibliographical Survey. Greenwood Press.
  28. Diana T. Meyers (ed.) (1997). Feminists Rethink the Self. Westview Press.
    How is women’s conception of self affected by the caregiving responsibilities traditionally assigned to them and by the personal vulnerabilities imposed on them? If institutions of male dominance profoundly influence women’s lives and minds, how can women form judgments about their own best interests and overcome oppression? Can feminist politics survive in face of the diversity of women’s experience, which is shaped by race, class, ethnicity, and sexual orientation, as well as by gender? Exploring such questions, leading feminist thinkers have (...)
  29. Paul Ramsey (1967). Deeds and Rules in Christian Ethics. New York, Scribner.
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  30. Muel Kaptein (2002). The Balanced Company: A Theory of Corporate Integrity. Oxford University Press.
    This book contains a cohesive overview of the most important theories and insights in the field of business ethics. At the same time, it further tailors these theories to the situation in which organizations function, presenting criteria that can be used to measure, assess, improve and report on corporate integrity.
  31. Susan E. Babbitt (1996). Impossible Dreams: Rationality, Integrity, and Moral Imagination. Westview Press.
    Conventional wisdom and commonsense morality tend to take the integrity of persons for granted. But for people in systematically unjust societies, self-respect and human dignity may prove to be impossible dreams.Susan Babbitt explores the implications of this insight, arguing that in the face of systemic injustice, individual and social rationality may require the transformation rather than the realization of deep-seated aims, interests, and values. In particular, under such conditions, she argues, the cultivation and ongoing exercise of moral imagination is necessary (...)
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  32. D. Bannister (ed.) (1977). New Perspectives in Personal Construct Theory. Academic Press.
  33. Patricia Springborg (2005). Mary Astell: Theorist of Freedom From Domination. Cambridge University Press.
    Philosopher, theologian, educational theorist, feminist and political pamphleteer, Mary Astell was an important figure in the history of ideas of the early modern period. Among the first systematic critics of John Locke's entire corpus, she is best known for the famous question which prefaces her Reflections on Marriage: 'If all men are born free, how is it that all women are born slaves?' She is claimed by modern Republican theorists and feminists alike but, as a Royalist High Church Tory, the (...)
  34. Michael Keeling (1990). The Foundation of Christian Ethics. T&t Clark.
  35. David Novak (1992). Jewish Social Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Leading contemporary Jewish thinker David Novak has here compiled ten of his essays on a variety of issues in Jewish ethics. Drawing constantly on classical Jewish tradition, Novak also looks at a wide range of modern critical scholarship on the ancient sources. He aims to point out certain common features of Jewish and Christian ethics and the normative implications of this overlapping of traditions; he assumes the reality of a "Judeo-Christian ethic," while refusing to minimize the doctrinal differences between the (...)
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  36. Jean Hampton (2007). The Intrinsic Worth of Persons: Contractarianism in Moral and Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Contractarianism in some form has been at the center of recent debates in moral and political philosophy. Jean Hampton was one of the most gifted philosophers involved in these debates and provided both important criticisms of prominent contractarian theories plus powerful defenses and applications of the core ideas of contractarianism. In these essays, she brought her distinctive approach, animated by concern for the intrinsic worth of persons, to bear on topics such as guilt, punishment, self-respect, family relations, and the maintenance (...)
  37. Bruce Macfarlane (2004). Teaching with Integrity: The Ethics of Higher Education Practice. Routledgefalmer.
    While many books focus on the broader socially ethical topics of widening participation and promoting equal opportunities, this unique book concentrates specifically on the lecturer's professional responsibilities. Bruce Macfarlane analyzes the pros and cons of prescriptive professional codes of practice employed by many universities and proposes the active development of professional virtues over bureaucratic recommendations. The material is presented in a scholarly yet accessible style and case examples are used throughout to encourage a practical, reflective approach.
  38. Elaine L. Graham & Esther D. Reed (eds.) (2004). The Future of Christian Social Ethics: Essays on the Work of Ronald H. Continnum.
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  39. John Wilkinson (1988). Christian Ethics in Health Care: A Source Book for Christian Doctors, Nurses and Other Health Care Professionals. Handsel Press.
  40. Naomi Zack (ed.) (2000). Women of Color and Philosophy: A Critical Reader. Blackwell Publishers.
  41. Peter Goldie (2004). On Personality. Routledge.
    Warm, sensitive, creative, outgoing, cheeky, creepy. Scan any personal ads page and it's clear that to get a life you need a personality first. It is also a notion with a long and often bizarre history: in early Greece and medieval Europe, it was thought to depend on the balance of bile in the body. On Personality is a thoughtful and stimulating look under the skin of this widely-used but little understood phenomenon. Peter Goldie points out that we rely on (...)
  42. Marilyn Friedman (ed.) (2005). Women and Citizenship. OUP USA.
    The notion of citizenship is complex; it can be at once an identity; a set of rights, privileges, and responsibilities; an elevated and exclusionary status, a relationship between individual and state, and more. In recent decades citizenship has attracted interdisciplinary attention, particularly with the transnational growth of Western capitalism. Yet citizenship's relationship to gender has gone relatively unexplored--despite that throughout much of human history, women have been and continue to be denied citizenship, sometimes at even the lowest rank. This highly (...)
  43. Alessandro Ferrara (1993). Modernity and Authenticity: A Study of the Social and Ethical Thought of Jean-Jacques Rousseau. State University of New York Press.
    Translated from the 1989 Italian edition, Ferrara (sociology, U. of Rome) intertwines an exploration of the ethical and social thought of 17th-century French philosopher Rousseau, with an analysis of contemporary culture through those ...
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  44. James Earl Gilman (2001). Fidelity of Heart: An Ethic of Christian Virtue. Oxford University Press.
    What does it take to follow and not merely admire Jesus? How do religious affections reshape the practice of Christian values like love, peace, justice, and compassion? How can they possess both universal truth and local meaning? What role can they play in public life? In Fidelity of Heart Gilman answers these questions, while showing, in an innovative and provocative approach, how Christians can practice these values in ways continuous with the life of Jesus.
  45. Ann Garry & Marilyn Pearsall (eds.) (1996). Women, Knowledge, and Reality: Explorations in Feminist Philosophy, 2nd Ed. Routledge.
    This second edition of Women, Knowledge and Reality continues to exhibit the ways in which feminist philosophers enrich and challenge philosophy. Essays by twenty-five feminist philosophers, seventeen of them new to the second edition, address fundamental issues in philosophical and feminist methods, metaphysics, epistemology, and the philosophies of science, language, religion and mind/body. This second edition expands the perspectives of women of color, of postmodernism and French feminism, and focuses on the most recent controversies in feminist theory and philosophy. The (...)
  46. Richard Amesbury (2005). Morality and Social Criticism : The Force of Reasons in Discursive Practice. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book brings recent developments in Anglo-American philosophy into engagement with dominant currents in contemporary European social theory in order to articulate a pragmatic account of moral criticism. Presented in a lively and accessible style that avoids technical jargon, Morality and Social Criticism argues that the objectivity of moral discourse can be preserved without recourse to the overweening philosophical ambitions of the Enlightenment.
  47. Sandrine Berges (2009). Plato on Virtue and the Law. Continuum.
    This important monograph examines Plato's contribution to virtue ethics and shows how his dialogues contain interesting and plausible insights into current philosophical concerns.
  48. Mitchell Aboulafia (2001). The Cosmopolitan Self: George Herbert Mead and Continental Philosophy. Illinois University Press.
  49. Philip LeMasters (1997). Discipleship Between Creation and Redemption: Toward a Believers' Church Social Ethic. University Press of America.
  50. Herta Nagl-Docekal (2004). Feminist Philosophy. Westview Press.
    Are we in a post-feminist era? Has the term, feminist, grown out of its resisted stance? What from today's standpoint is an appropriate concept of feminist philosophy? And is it not the case that all people thinking democratically must share its central concern? In Feminist Philosophy , internationally acclaimed philosopher Herta Nagl-Docekal discusses and critiques the theories of today. Her study ranges across philosophical anthropology, aesthetics, philosophy of science, the critique of reason, political theory, and philosophy of law. Feminist Philosophy (...)
  51. 1 — 50 / 581