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1 — 50 / 244
  1. M. J. Detmold (1984). The Unity of Law and Morality: A Refutation of Legal Positivism. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    I REASONS FOR ACTION.i Practical thought is concerned with action. Reasons for action are sometimes thought to be either conditional (conditional upon some ...
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  2. Mathieu Deflem (ed.) (1996). Habermas, Modernity, and Law. Sage Publications.
    The work of Jürgen Habermas has long been regarded as central to the development of social and political theory and philosophy in the late 20th century. With the publication of his latest book Between Facts and Norms, Habermas has signalled the importance of exploring modern legal theory to our understanding of democratic society. Habermas, Modernity, and Law brings together leading scholars from around the world to provide a clear introduction to this key development in Habermas's work. With chapters ranging from (...)
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  3. Peter Wahlgren (1992). Automation of Legal Reasoning: A Study on Artificial Intelligence and Law. Kluwer Law and Taxation Publishers.
  4. Jules L. Coleman & Anthony James Sebok (eds.) (1994). Jurisprudence. Garland Pub..
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  5. Brian Bix (ed.) (1998). Analyzing Law: New Essays in Legal Theory. Oxford University Press.
    Analyzing Law offers an important selection of the most influential and challenging work now being done in legal theory. A central focus of the essays in this work is the contribution of the well-known philosopher Jules Coleman to the various topics which are covered by the contributors.
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  6. Paul Smith (2008). Moral and Political Philosophy: Key Issues, Concepts and Theories. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Drug laws -- Justifications of punishment -- Civil disobedience : is there a duty to obey the law? -- Global poverty -- Liberty -- Liberty-limiting principles -- Rights -- Equality and social justice -- Moral relativism -- Utilitarianism -- Kantian moral philosophy -- John Rawls's theory of justice.
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  7. Ralf Müller-Terpitz (ed.) (2006). Das Recht der Biomedizin: Textsammlung Mit Einführung. Springer.
    Die Textsammlung bietet eine Zusammenstellung aller wichtigen Rechtstexte völkerrechtlicher, gemeinschaftsrechtlicher und nationaler Natur aus dem Bereich der humanen Biomedizin.
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  8. Patricia Smith (ed.) (1993). The Nature and Process of Law: An Introduction to Legal Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Unlike other works in philosophy of law, which focus on the nature of law in the abstract, this comprehensive anthology presents law as a "process," part and parcel of a system of government and defined constitutional procedures. Using the U.S. legal system as a model, it establishes the basis of law in political theory, then presents substantive issues in private and public law, illustrated throughout with important political documents and court cases and stimulating readings in history, law, and philosophy. The (...)
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  9. Jane C. Ginsburg (2004). Introduction to Law and Legal Reasoning. Thomson/West.
  10. Hyman Gross & Ross Harrison (eds.) (1992). Jurisprudence: Cambridge Essays. Oxford University Press.
    Each of the essays included in this volume illuminates an aspect of law, reflecting an unorthodox perception of jurisprudence which combines interests in philosophy, legal theory, criminology, legal history, political and constitutional theory and the history of ideas. This work will broaden the jurisprudential scope of practitioners' professional concerns, but help academics enhance their knowledge of the wealth of information for their own studies.
  11. Drucilla Cornell, Michel Rosenfeld & David Carlson (eds.) (1991). Hegel and Legal Theory. Routledge.
    The first collection of essays directed towards jurisprudence with a Hegelian theme. The editors are committed to the idea that Hegel is the future source of great energy and insight within the legal academy.
  12. Alan Hunt (1994). Foucault and Law: Towards a Sociology of Law as Governance. Pluto Press.
    The first work to introduce Foucault's ideas on law to both graduates and undergraduates.
  13. Hazel Biggs (2010). Healthcare Research Ethics and Law: Regulation, Review and Responsibility. Routledge-Cavendish.
    The book explores and explains the relationship between law and ethics in the context of medically related research in order to provide a practical guide to ...
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  14. Jules L. Coleman (2001). The Practice of Principle: In Defence of a Pragmatist Approach to Legal Theory. Oxford University Press.
    Jules Coleman, one of the world's leading philosophers of law, here presents his most mature work so far on substantive issues in legal theory and the appropriate methodology for legal theorizing. In doing so, he takes on the views of highly respected contemporaries such as Brian Leiter, Stephen Perry, and Ronald Dworkin.
  15. R. G. Frey & Christopher W. Morris (eds.) (1991). Liability and Responsibility: Essays in Law and Morals. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of contemporary essays by a group of well-known philosophers and legal theorists covers various topics in the philosophy of law, focusing on issues concerning liability in contract, tort, and criminal law. The book is divided into four sections. The first provides a conceptual overview of the issues at stake in a philosophical discussion of liability and responsibility. The second, third, and fourth sections present, in turn, more detailed explorations of the roles of notions of liability and responsibility in (...)
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  16. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1984). The Philosophy of Law: An Introduction to Jurisprudence. Rowman & Allanheld.
  17. H. L. A. Hart (1994). The Concept of Law. Oxford University Press.
    The Concept of Law is the most important and original work of legal philosophy written this century. First published in 1961, it is considered the masterpiece of H.L.A. Hart's enormous contribution to the study of jurisprudence and legal philosophy. Its elegant language and balanced arguments have sparked wide debate and unprecedented growth in the quantity and quality of scholarship in this area--much of it devoted to attacking or defending Hart's theories. Principal among Hart's critics is renowned lawyer and political philosopher (...)
  18. Thomas Morawetz (ed.) (1991). Criminal Law. New York University Press.
    This Major Reference series brings together a wide range of key international articles in law and legal theory. Many of these essays are not readily accessible, and their presentation in these volumes will provide a vital new resource for both research and teaching. Each volume is edited by leading international authorities who explain the significance and context of articles in an informative and complete introduction.
  19. Joel Feinberg (1975). Reason and Responsibility: Readings in Some Basic Problems of Philosophy. Dickenson Pub. Co..
  20. Eric Rakowski (1991). Equal Justice. Oxford University Press.
    The core of this book is a novel theory of distributive justice premised on the fundamental moral equality of persons. In the light of this theory, Rakowski considers three types of problems which urgently require solutions-- the distribution of resources, property rights, and the saving of life--and provides challenging and unconventional answers. Further, he criticizes the economic analysis of law as a normative theory, and develops an alternative account of tort and property law.
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  21. Stephen Shute, John Gardner & Jeremy Horder (eds.) (1993). Action and Value in Criminal Law. Oxford University Press.
    In this challenging collection of new essays, leading philosophers and criminal lawyers from the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada break with the tradition of treating the philosophical foundations of criminal law as an adjunct to the study of punishment. Focusing clearly on the central issues of moral luck, mistake, and mental illness, this volume aims to reorient the study of criminal law. In the process of retrieving valuable material from traditional law classifications, the contributors break down false associations, (...)
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  22. Costas Douzinas, Peter Goodrich & Yifat Hachamovitch (eds.) (1994). Politics, Postmodernity, and Critical Legal Studies: The Legality of the Contingent. Routledge.
    Laws of Postmodernity is the first work of legal scholarship to apply postmodern jurisprudence to an analysis of a number of substantive areas of law. In analyzing the cultural significance of law, the contributors show how critical jurisprudential analysis undermines positivistic attempts to support a normative viewpoint of the legal order. In addition, they criticize contextual, sociological accounts of legal phenomena. The contributors explore blasphemy laws in the wake of the Salman Rushdie affair, and French critical legal theory-- particularly the (...)
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  23. Gerald J. Postema (ed.) (2001). Philosophy and the Law of Torts. Cambridge University Press.
    When accidents occur and people suffer injuries, who ought to bear the loss? Tort law offers a complex set of rules to answer this question, but up to now philosophers have offered little by way of analysis of these rules. In eight essays commissioned for this volume, leading legal theorists examine the philosophical foundations of tort law. Amongst the questions they address are the following: how are the notions at the core of tort practice (such as responsibility, fault, negligence, due (...)
  24. William L. Twining (2006). Rethinking Evidence: Exploratory Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    The Law of Evidence has traditionally been perceived as a dry, highly technical, and mysterious subject. This book argues that problems of evidence in law are closely related to the handling of evidence in other kinds of practical decision-making and other academic disciplines, that it is closely related to common sense and that it is an interesting, lively and accessible subject. These essays develop a readable, coherent historical and theoretical perspective about problems of proof, evidence, and inferential reasoning in law. (...)
  25. Wade Mansell (2004). A Critical Introduction to Law. Cavendish Pub..
    This book challenges the usual introductions to the study of law. It argues that law is inherently political and reflects the interests of the few even while presenting itself as neutral. It considers law as ideology and as politics, and critically assesses its contribution to the creation and maintenance of a globalised and capitalist world. The clarity of the arguments is admirably suited to provoking discussions of the role of law in our contemporary world. The third edition provides contemporary examples (...)
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  26. Dennis M. Patterson (1996). Law and Truth. Oxford University Press.
    Are propositions of law true or false? If so, what does it mean to say that propositions of law are true and false? This book takes up these questions in the context of the wider philosophical debate over realism and anti-realism. Despite surface differences, Patterson argues that the leading contemporary jurisprudential theories all embrace a flawed conception of the nature of truth in law. Instead of locating that in virtue of which propositions of law are true, Patterson argues that lawyers (...)
  27. Kevin Crotty (2001). Law's Interior: Legal and Literary Constructions of the Self. Cornell University Press.
    The quest for autonomy : modern jurisprudence and the Oresteia -- Dilemmas of the self : law and confession -- Rationality and imagination in the law : Jürgen Habermas and Wallace Stevens.
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  28. Alan S. Rosenbaum (ed.) (1988). Constitutionalism: The Philosophical Dimension. Greenwood Press.
  29. Francis J. Mootz (ed.) (2009). On Philosophy in American Law. Cambridge University Press.
    Karl Llewellyn and the course of philosophy in American law -- Philosophical perspectives on law -- Areas of philosophy and their relationship to law -- Philosophical examinations of legal issues -- Law, rhetoric, and practice theory -- Commentaries-- Questioning the relationship between philosophy and American Law.
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  30. Margaret Gilbert (2006). A Theory of Political Obligation: Membership, Commitment, and the Bonds of Society. OUP Oxford.
    Margaret Gilbert offers an incisive new approach to a classic problem of political philosophy: when and why should I do what the law tells me to do? Do I have special obligations to conform to the laws of my own country and if so, why? In what sense, if any, must I fight in wars in which my country is engaged, if ordered to do so, or suffer the penalty for law-breaking the law imposes - including the death penalty? Gilbert's (...)
  31. Robert S. Summers (2006). Form and Function in a Legal System: A General Study. Cambridge University Press.
    This book addresses three major questions about law and legal systems: (1) What are the defining and organizing forms of legal institutions, legal rules, interpretive methodologies, and other legal phenomena? (2) How does frontal and systematic focus on these forms advance understanding of such phenomena? (3) What credit should the functions of forms have when such phenomena serve policy and related purposes, rule of law values, and fundamental political values such as democracy, liberty, and justice? This is the first book (...)
  32. Nancy L. Rosenblum (1978). Bentham's Theory of the Modern State. Harvard University Press.
  33. Chaim Gans (1992). Philosophical Anarchism and Political Disobedience. Cambridge University Press.
    This book examines the central questions concerning the duty to obey the law: the meaning of this duty; whether and where it should be acknowledged; and whether and when it should be disregarded. Many contemporary philosophers deny the very existence of this duty, but take a cautious stance toward political disobedience. This 'toothless anarchism', Professor Gans argues, should be discarded in favour of a converse position confirming the existence of a duty to obey the law which can be outweighed by (...)
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  34. Peter Morton (1998). An Institutional Theory of Law: Keeping Law in its Place. Oxford University Press.
    Peter Morton provides in these pages a fundamental critique of the assumptions of positivist jurisprudence and also puts forth an attack on the foundationalism of contemporary legal philosophy. His prime concern is to distinguish between the different fields of law--penal, civil, and public--taking as his starting point a careful analysis of those institutions in a democracy wherein legal language and norms are in fact generated. Offering an original, coherent, and systematic exposition of law in today's society, Morton sheds new light (...)
  35. Jules L. Coleman (1988). Markets, Morals, and the Law. Oxford University Press.
    This collection of essays by one of America's leading legal theorists is unique in its scope: it shows how traditional problems of philosophy can be understood more clearly when considered in terms of law, economics, and political science.
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  36. Julie C. Inness (1992). Privacy, Intimacy, and Isolation. OUP Usa.
    This book undermines privacy scepticism, proving a strong theoretical foundation for many of our everyday and legal privacy claims. Inness argues that intimacy is the core of privacy, including privacy appeals in tort and constitutional law. She explores the myriad of debates and puts forth an intimacy and control-based account of privacy which escapes these criticisms.
  37. Charles P. Nemeth (2001). Aquinas in the Courtroom: Lawyers, Judges, and Judicial Conduct. Greenwood Press.
  38. Thomas D. Perry (1976). Moral Reasoning and Truth: An Essay in Philosophy and Jurisprudence. Clarendon Press.
  39. Andrew Halpin (1997). Rights and Law: Analysis and Theory. Distributed in North America by Northwestern University Press.
    Rights have become,in recent years, a significant concern of legal theorists, as well as of those involved in moral and political philosophy. This new book seeks to move a number of debates forward by developing the analysis of rights and focusing upon more general theoretical considerations relating to rights. The book is divided into five parts. The first includes an explanation of the part played by conceptual analysis within jurisprudence, while the second conducts a re-examination of Hohfeld’s analysis of rights. (...)
  40. Max Hamburger (1942). The Awakening of Western Legal Thought. Westport, Conn.,Greenwood Press.
    What the ancients have to tell us: the history of dogmatics.--What the ancients have to teach us: its application to the present time.
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  41. Allan C. Hutchinson (2008). The Province of Jurisprudence Democratized. Oxford University Press.
    The province of jurisprudence compromised -- The province of jurisprudence revisited -- The provinciality of jurisprudence determined -- The morality of jurisprudence determined -- The province of jurisprudence pre-determined -- The province of jurisprudence moralised -- The province of jurisprudence re-generated -- The province of the judiciary democratised -- The experimental province of democracy determined.
  42. Jean D' Aspremont (2011). Formalism and the Sources of International Law: A Theory of the Ascertainment of Legal Rules. Oxford University Press.
    This book revisits the theory of the sources of international law from the perspective of formalism.
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  43. Antony N. Allott (1980). The Limits of Law. Butterworth.
  44. Ian Ward (2004). Introduction to Critical Legal Theory. Cavendish Pub..
    Introduction to Critical Legal Theory provides an accessible introduction to the study of law and legal theory. It covers all the seminal movements in classical, modern and postmodern legal thought, engaging the reader with the ideas of jurists as diverse as Aristotle, Hobbes and Kant, Marx, Foucault and Dworkin. At the same time, it impresses the interdisciplinary nature of critical legal thought, introducing the reader to the philosophy, the economics and the politics of law. This new edition focuses even more (...)
  45. Ross Cranston (2006). How Law Works: The Machinery and Impact of Civil Justice. Oxford University Press.
    This book looks at the civil justice system - the courts and what they do; legal aid and other methods of providing access to justice; lawyers and their conduct; and the role of legal procedure. It also looks at the impact the civil justice system has on wider society, and its relationship with economics and commercial development. The book is largely focussed on Britain, but includes material from the USA, the Indian sub-continent, south-east Asia, and Aboriginal society in Australia.
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  46. Larry Alexander (ed.) (1998). Constitutionalism: Philosophical Foundations. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the second volume in a sub-series of specially commissioned collaborative volumes on key topics at the heart of contemporary philosophy of law that will be appearing regularly within Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Law. A distinguished international team of legal theorists examine the issue of constitutionalism and pose such foundational questions as: why have a constitution? How do we know what the constitution of a country really is? How should a constitution be interpreted? Why should one generation feel (...)
  47. Richard A. Posner (1995). Overcoming Law. Harvard University Press.
    Throughout, the book is unified by Posner's distinctive stance, which is pragmatist in philosophy, economic in methodology, and liberal (in the sense of John ...
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  48. Philip Soper (2002). The Ethics of Deference: Learning From Law's Morals. Cambridge University Press.
    Do citizens have an obligation to obey the law? This book differs from standard approaches by shifting from the language of obedience (orders) to that of deference (normative judgments). The popular view that law claims authority but does not have it is here reversed on both counts: Law does not claim authority but has it. Though the focus is on political obligation, the author approaches that issue indirectly by first developing a more general account of when deference is due to (...)
  49. Richard K. Sherwin (2011). Visualizing Law in the Age of the Digital Baroque: Arabesques and Entanglements. Routledge.
    law's oscillation between power and meaning -- Law's screen life : visualizing law in practice -- Images run riot : law on the landscape of the neo-baroque -- Theorizing the visual sublime : law's legitimation reconsidered -- The digital challenge : command and control culture and the ethical sublime -- Conclusion : visualizing law as integral rhetoric : harmonizing the ethical and the aesthetic.
  50. Jan M. Broekman (1999). A Philosophy of European Union Law. Peeters.
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