Bargain finder

Use this tool to find book bargains on Amazon Marketplace. It works best on the "my areas of interest" setting, but you need to specify your areas of interest first. You might also want to change your shopping locale (currently the US locale).

Note: the best bargains on this page tend to go fast; the prices shown can be inaccurate because of this.

Settings


 Area(s)

 Offer type

 Sort by
($)
 Max price
% off
 Min discount

 Min year

 Added since

 Pro authors only

 

1 — 50 / 243
  1. Ofer Raban (2003). Modern Legal Theory and Judicial Impartiality. Glasshouse Press.
    This new book argues that at the core of legal philosophy’s principal debates there is essentially one issue judicial impartiality. Keeping this issue to the forefront,Raban’s approach sheds much light on many difficult and seemingly perplexing jurisprudential debates. Modern Legal Theory and Judicial Impartiality.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Paul Smith (2008). Moral and Political Philosophy: Key Issues, Concepts and Theories. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Drug laws -- Justifications of punishment -- Civil disobedience : is there a duty to obey the law? -- Global poverty -- Liberty -- Liberty-limiting principles -- Rights -- Equality and social justice -- Moral relativism -- Utilitarianism -- Kantian moral philosophy -- John Rawls's theory of justice.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Wolfgang Friedmann (1967). Legal Theory. Columbia University Press.
  4. H. L. A. Hart (1994). The Concept of Law. Oxford University Press.
    The Concept of Law is the most important and original work of legal philosophy written this century. First published in 1961, it is considered the masterpiece of H.L.A. Hart's enormous contribution to the study of jurisprudence and legal philosophy. Its elegant language and balanced arguments have sparked wide debate and unprecedented growth in the quantity and quality of scholarship in this area--much of it devoted to attacking or defending Hart's theories. Principal among Hart's critics is renowned lawyer and political philosopher (...)
  5. Wolfgang Friedmann (1944). Legal Theory. London, Stevens & Sons, Limited.
  6. S. C. Coval (1986). Law and its Presuppositions: Actions, Agents, and Rules. Routledge & K. Paul.
    I THE CONCEPT OF ACTION Among the most basic of legal concepts of concern to the practitioners of law at all levels we find those of defence, culpability, ...
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7. Peter Morton (1998). An Institutional Theory of Law: Keeping Law in its Place. Oxford University Press.
    Peter Morton provides in these pages a fundamental critique of the assumptions of positivist jurisprudence and also puts forth an attack on the foundationalism of contemporary legal philosophy. His prime concern is to distinguish between the different fields of law--penal, civil, and public--taking as his starting point a careful analysis of those institutions in a democracy wherein legal language and norms are in fact generated. Offering an original, coherent, and systematic exposition of law in today's society, Morton sheds new light (...)
  8. Helen Reece (ed.) (1998). Law and Science. Oxford University Press.
    This book is the first volume in the series and explores the relationship of law and science, with a particular focus on the role of science as evidence.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. R. G. Frey & Christopher W. Morris (eds.) (1991). Liability and Responsibility: Essays in Law and Morals. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of contemporary essays by a group of well-known philosophers and legal theorists covers various topics in the philosophy of law, focusing on issues concerning liability in contract, tort, and criminal law. The book is divided into four sections. The first provides a conceptual overview of the issues at stake in a philosophical discussion of liability and responsibility. The second, third, and fourth sections present, in turn, more detailed explorations of the roles of notions of liability and responsibility in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Joel Feinberg & Hyman Gross (eds.) (1975). Philosophy of Law. Dickenson Pub. Co..
  11. Jules L. Coleman & Anthony James Sebok (eds.) (1994). Jurisprudence. Garland Pub..
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Joel Feinberg (1975/1974). Reason and Responsibility: Readings in Some Basic Problems of Philosophy. Dickenson Pub. Co..
  13. Ronald Dworkin (ed.) (1977). The Philosophy of Law. Oxford University Press.
    Echoing the debate about the nature of law that has dominated legal philosophy for several decades, this volume includes essays on the nature of law and on law not as it is but as it should be. Wherever possible, essays have been chosen that have provoked direct responses from other legal philosophers, and in two cases these responses are included. Contributors include H.L.A. Hart, R.M. Dworkin, Lord Patrick Devlin, John Rawls, J.J. Thomson, J. Finnis, and T.M. Scanlon.
  14. Antony N. Allott (1980). The Limits of Law. Butterworth.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15. Penny Green & Andrew Rutherford (eds.) (2000). Criminal Policy Transition. Hart Pub..
    In this sense the collection offers a model of how international collaborative work should proceed. The book is the product of a workshop held at the International Institute for the Sociology of Law (IISL) in Onati, Spain.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. George C. Christie (1995). Jurisprudence: Text and Readings on the Philosophy of Law. West Pub. Co..
  17. Nicola Lacey (1994). State Punishment. Routledge.
    Nicola Lacey presents a new approach to the question of the moral justification of punishment by the State. She focuses on the theory of punishments in context of other political questions, such as the nature of political obligation and the function and scope of criminal law. Arguing that no convincing set of justifying reasons has so far been produced, she puts forward a theory of punishments which places the values of the community at its centre.
  18. David W. Meyers (1990). The Human Body and the Law. Stanford University Press.
    Mother and Fetus: Rights in Conflict A. INTRODUCTION After fertilization of the female egg (ovum) with male sperm the resulting zygote may implant ...
  19. Mark Kelman (1987). A Guide to Critical Legal Studies. Harvard University Press.
    This book outlines and evaluates the principal strands of critical legal studies, and achieves much more as well.
  20. Rodney Bruce Hall & Thomas J. Biersteker (eds.) (2002). The Emergence of Private Authority in Global Governance. Cambridge University Press.
    The emergence of private authority has become a feature of the post-Cold War world. The contributors to this volume examine the implications of this erosion of the power of the state for global governance. They analyse actors as diverse as financial institutions, multinational corporations, religious terrorists and organised criminals. The themes of the book relate directly to debates concerning globalization and the role of international law, and will be of interest to scholars and students of international relations, politics, sociology and (...)
  21. Scott Veitch, Emilios A. Christodoulidis & Lindsay Farmer (eds.) (2007). Jurisprudence: Themes and Concepts. Routledge-Cavendish.
    This new book takes an innovative and novel approach to the study of jurisprudence. Drawing together a range of specialists, making original contributions, it provides a summary, analysis, and critique of basic themes in, and major contributions to, the study of jurisprudence. The book explores issues and ideas in jurisprudence in a way that integrates them with legal study more broadly, avoiding the tendency in recent years for the subject to become overly inward-looking, specialist and technical, leaving students and the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Raymond Wacks (2009). Understanding Jurisprudence: An Introduction to Legal Theory. Oxford University Press.
    What is law? Does it have a purpose? What is its relationship with justice? Do we have a moral duty to obey the law? These sorts of questions lie at the heart of jurisprudence. Moreover, every substantive or 'black letter' branch of the law raises questions about its own meaning and function. The law of contract cannot be properly understood without an appreciation of the concepts of rights and duties. The law of tort is directly related to several economic theories (...)
  23. Allen E. Buchanan (2004). Justice, Legitimacy, and Self-Determination: Moral Foundations for International Law. Oxford University Press.
    This book articulates a systematic vision of an international legal system grounded in the commitment to justice for all persons. It provides a probing exploration of the moral issues involved in disputes about secession, ethno-national conflict, "the right of self-determination of peoples," human rights, and the legitimacy of the international legal system itself. Buchanan advances vigorous criticisms of the central dogmas of international relations and international law, arguing that the international legal system should make justice, not simply peace among states, (...)
  24. J. Roland Pennock & John William Chapman (eds.) (1982). Ethics, Economics, and the Law. New York University Press.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  25. Carl Wellman (1985). A Theory of Rights: Persons Under Laws, Institutions, and Morals. Rowman & Allanheld.
  26. Harold J. Berman & Howard O. Hunter (eds.) (1996). The Integrative Jurisprudence of Harold J. Berman. Westviewpress.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Richard A. Posner (2001). Frontiers of Legal Theory. Harvard University Press.
    The book carries on Posner's project of analyzing the law as an institution of social governance.
  28. Alan Hunt (1994). Foucault and Law: Towards a Sociology of Law as Governance. Pluto Press.
    The first work to introduce Foucault's ideas on law to both graduates and undergraduates.
  29. Margaret Gilbert (2006). A Theory of Political Obligation: Membership, Commitment, and the Bonds of Society. OUP Oxford.
    Margaret Gilbert offers an incisive new approach to a classic problem of political philosophy: when and why should I do what the law tells me to do? Do I have special obligations to conform to the laws of my own country and if so, why? In what sense, if any, must I fight in wars in which my country is engaged, if ordered to do so, or suffer the penalty for law-breaking the law imposes - including the death penalty? Gilbert's (...)
  30. S. Prakash Sinha (1993). Jurisprudence, Legal Philosophy, in a Nutshell. West Pub. Co..
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1984). The Philosophy of Law: An Introduction to Jurisprudence. Rowman & Allanheld.
  32. Allan C. Hutchinson (2008). The Province of Jurisprudence Democratized. Oxford University Press.
    The province of jurisprudence compromised -- The province of jurisprudence revisited -- The provinciality of jurisprudence determined -- The morality of jurisprudence determined -- The province of jurisprudence pre-determined -- The province of jurisprudence moralised -- The province of jurisprudence re-generated -- The province of the judiciary democratised -- The experimental province of democracy determined.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Gerald J. Postema (ed.) (2001). Philosophy and the Law of Torts. Cambridge University Press.
    When accidents occur and people suffer injuries, who ought to bear the loss? Tort law offers a complex set of rules to answer this question, but up to now philosophers have offered little by way of analysis of these rules. In eight essays commissioned for this volume, leading legal theorists examine the philosophical foundations of tort law. Amongst the questions they address are the following: how are the notions at the core of tort practice (such as responsibility, fault, negligence, due (...)
  34. Stephen Guest (1991). Ronald Dworkin. Stanford University Press.
    This is a lucid and comprehensive introduction to, and critical assessment of, Ronald Dworkin's seminal contributions to legal and political philosophy. His theories have a complexity, originality, and moral power that have excited a wide range of academic and political thinkers, and even those who disagree with him acknowledge that his ideas must be confronted and given serious consideration. His enormous output of books and papers and his formidable profusion of lectures and seminars throughout the world, in addition to his (...)
  35. Robert S. Summers (2006). Form and Function in a Legal System: A General Study. Cambridge University Press.
    This book addresses three major questions about law and legal systems: (1) What are the defining and organizing forms of legal institutions, legal rules, interpretive methodologies, and other legal phenomena? (2) How does frontal and systematic focus on these forms advance understanding of such phenomena? (3) What credit should the functions of forms have when such phenomena serve policy and related purposes, rule of law values, and fundamental political values such as democracy, liberty, and justice? This is the first book (...)
  36. Julie C. Inness (1996). Privacy, Intimacy, and Isolation. OUP Usa.
    This book undermines privacy scepticism, proving a strong theoretical foundation for many of our everyday and legal privacy claims. Inness argues that intimacy is the core of privacy, including privacy appeals in tort and constitutional law. She explores the myriad of debates and puts forth an intimacy and control-based account of privacy which escapes these criticisms.
  37. W. L. Morison (1982). John Austin. Stanford University Press.
    Introduction: The argument of this book John Austin believed that the first ' moral' (now it would be called social) science to be established was political ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38. Wilfrid E. Rumble (1985). The Thought of John Austin: Jurisprudence, Colonial Reform, and the British Constitution. Athlone Press.
  39. Philip Soper (2002). The Ethics of Deference: Learning From Law's Morals. Cambridge University Press.
    Do citizens have an obligation to obey the law? This book differs from standard approaches by shifting from the language of obedience (orders) to that of deference (normative judgments). The popular view that law claims authority but does not have it is here reversed on both counts: Law does not claim authority but has it. Though the focus is on political obligation, the author approaches that issue indirectly by first developing a more general account of when deference is due to (...)
  40. Jan Klabbers & Touko Piiparinen (eds.) (2013). Normative Pluralism and International Law: Exploring Global Governance. Cambridge University Press.
    This book addresses conflicts involving how law relates normative orders. The assumption behind the book is that law no longer automatically claims supremacy, but that actors can pick and choose which code to follow.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Thomas D. Perry (1976). Moral Reasoning and Truth: An Essay in Philosophy and Jurisprudence. Clarendon Press.
  42. Stephen Shute, John Gardner & Jeremy Horder (eds.) (1993). Action and Value in Criminal Law. Oxford University Press.
    In this challenging collection of new essays, leading philosophers and criminal lawyers from the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada break with the tradition of treating the philosophical foundations of criminal law as an adjunct to the study of punishment. Focusing clearly on the central issues of moral luck, mistake, and mental illness, this volume aims to reorient the study of criminal law. In the process of retrieving valuable material from traditional law classifications, the contributors break down false associations, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Margaret Davies (1996). Delimiting the Law: 'Postmodernism' and the Politics of Law. Pluto Press.
  44. Kim Lane Scheppele (1988). Legal Secrets: Equality and Efficiency in the Common Law. University of Chicago Press.
    Does the seller of a house have to tell the buyer that the water is turned off twelve hours a day? Does the buyer of a great quantity of tobacco have to inform the seller that the military blockade of the local port, which had depressed tobacco sales and lowered prices, is about to end? Courts say yes in the first case, no in the second. How can we understand the difference in judgments? And what does it say about whether (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Wade Mansell (2004). A Critical Introduction to Law. Cavendish Pub..
    This book challenges the usual introductions to the study of law. It argues that law is inherently political and reflects the interests of the few even while presenting itself as neutral. It considers law as ideology and as politics, and critically assesses its contribution to the creation and maintenance of a globalised and capitalist world. The clarity of the arguments is admirably suited to provoking discussions of the role of law in our contemporary world. The third edition provides contemporary examples (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Eric Rakowski (1991). Equal Justice. Oxford University Press.
    The core of this book is a novel theory of distributive justice premised on the fundamental moral equality of persons. In the light of this theory, Rakowski considers three types of problems which urgently require solutions-- the distribution of resources, property rights, and the saving of life--and provides challenging and unconventional answers. Further, he criticizes the economic analysis of law as a normative theory, and develops an alternative account of tort and property law.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   22 citations  
  47. J. Roland Pennock (1974). The Limits of Law. New York,Lieber-Atherton.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Thomas Morawetz (ed.) (1991). Criminal Law. New York University Press.
    This Major Reference series brings together a wide range of key international articles in law and legal theory. Many of these essays are not readily accessible, and their presentation in these volumes will provide a vital new resource for both research and teaching. Each volume is edited by leading international authorities who explain the significance and context of articles in an informative and complete introduction.
  49. Dennis M. Patterson (1996). Law and Truth. Oxford University Press.
    Are propositions of law true or false? If so, what does it mean to say that propositions of law are true and false? This book takes up these questions in the context of the wider philosophical debate over realism and anti-realism. Despite surface differences, Patterson argues that the leading contemporary jurisprudential theories all embrace a flawed conception of the nature of truth in law. Instead of locating that in virtue of which propositions of law are true, Patterson argues that lawyers (...)
  50. Heidi M. Hurd (1999). Moral Combat. Cambridge University Press.
    This book explores the thesis that legal roles force people to engage in moral combat, an idea which is implicit in the assumption that citizens may be morally required to disobey unjust laws, while judges may be morally required to punish citizens for civil disobedience. Heidi Hurd advances the surprising argument that the law cannot require us to do what morality forbids. The 'role-relative' understanding of morality is shown to be incompatible with both consequentialist and deontological moral philosophies. In the (...)
  51. 1 — 50 / 243