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  1. Henry Sidgwick (1908/1996). The Elements of Politics. Thoemmes Press.
  2. M. S. Lane (1998). Method and Politics in Plato's Statesman. Cambridge University Press.
    Among Plato's works, the Statesman is usually seen as transitional between the Republic and the Laws. This book argues that the dialogue deserves a special place of its own. Whereas Plato is usually thought of as defending unchanging knowledge, Dr Lane demonstrates for the first time how, by placing change at the heart of political affairs, Plato reconceives the link between knowledge and authority. The statesman is shown to master the timing of affairs of state, and to use this expertise (...)
  3. Ivo Aertsen (ed.) (2008). Restoring Justice After Large-Scale Violent Conflicts: Kosovo, Dr Congo and the Israeli-Palestinian Case. Willan.
    The Kosovo conflict -- The Israeli-Palestinian conflict -- The conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
  4. Raimond Gaita (1999/2000). A Common Humanity: Thinking About Love and Truth and Justice. Routledge.
    Powerful and timely, A Common Humanity asks why the language of morality has failed us. Drawing on examples of the Holocaust, the David Irving affair, the case of Mary Bell and the treatment of the Aborigines in Australia, Raimond Gaita challenges our received thinking about evil in this provocative exploration of what makes an ethical society.
  5. Peter Murphy (2001). Civic Justice: From Greek Antiquity to the Modern World. Humanity Books.
  6. Adrian Little (1996). The Political Thought of André Gorz. Routledge.
    Andre Gorz is one of the most important contemporary socialist thinkers, acquiring the reputation of an iconoclastic theorist who poses radical questions about the future of the Left. This full length assessment of his work is the first to critically evaluate all of his writings from the 1950s to the '90s. Highlighting the eclectic nature of Gorz's intellectual heritage beginning with his existentialist-Marxist roots in post-war France, Adrian Little creates a unique perspective, arguing that Gorz is primarily a theorist of (...)
  7. Marcelo Dascal & Ora Gruengard (eds.) (1989). Knowledge and Politics: Case Studies in the Relationship Between Epistemology and Political Philosophy. Westview Press.
  8. Wilfrid E. Rumble (2004). Doing Austin Justice: The Reception of John Austin's Philosophy of Law in Nineteenth-Century England. Continuum.
  9. Jan T. J. Srzednicki (1976). Elements of Social and Political Philosophy. Martinus Nijhoff.
  10. A. J. Tebble (2010). F. A. Hayek. Continuum.
    Volume 13 in the Major Conservative and Libertarian thinkers series focuses on F.A. Hayek, The influential member of the Austrian School of Economics.
  11. Howard L. Parsons & John Somerville (eds.) (1977). Marxism, Revolution, and Peace: From the Proceedings of the Society for the Philosophical Study of Dialectical Materialism. Grüner.
  12. Alan Cribb (2005). Health and the Good Society: Setting Healthcare Ethics in Social Context. Oxford University Press.
    What is health policy for? In Health and the Good Society, Alan Cribb addresses this question in a way that cuts across disciplinary boundaries. His core argument is that biomedical ethics should draw upon public health values and ethics; specifically, he argues that everybody has some share of responsibility for health, including a responsibility for promoting greater health equality. In the process, Cribb argues for a major rethink of the whole project of health education.
  13. Jean-Claude Lamberti (1989). Tocqueville and the Two Democracies. Harvard University Press.
  14. C. H. Sisson (1992). English Perspectives: Essays on Liberty and Government. Carcanet.
  15. Chaim Gans (1992). Philosophical Anarchism and Political Disobedience. Cambridge University Press.
    This book examines the central questions concerning the duty to obey the law: the meaning of this duty; whether and where it should be acknowledged; and whether and when it should be disregarded. Many contemporary philosophers deny the very existence of this duty, but take a cautious stance toward political disobedience. This 'toothless anarchism', Professor Gans argues, should be discarded in favour of a converse position confirming the existence of a duty to obey the law which can be outweighed by (...)
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  16. Geoffrey Cupit (1996). Justice as Fittingness. Oxford University Press.
    This book offers a new approach to a fundamental question: What is justice? In building his theory, Cupit maintains that injustice should be understood as a form of unfitting treatment--typically the treatment of people as less than they are. Justice is therefore closely related to unjustified contempt and disrespect, and ultimately to desert.
  17. Antoine Barnave (1971). Power, Property, and History. New York,Harper & Row.
  18. Gordon J. Schochet (1971). Life, Liberty, and Property. Belmont, Calif.,Wadsworth Pub. Co..
  19. James S. Bowman & Frederick Elliston (eds.) (1988). Ethics, Government, and Public Policy: A Reference Guide. Greenwood Press.
  20. Max L. Stackhouse, Peter J. Paris, Don S. Browning & Diane Burdette Obenchain (eds.) (2000). God and Globalization. Trinity Press International.
    v. 1. Religion and the powers of the common life -- v. 2. The spirit and the modern authorities -- v. 3. Christ and the dominions of civilization -- v. 4. Globalization and grace.
  21. Ernest Gellner (1974). Contemporary Thought and Politics. Boston,Routledge & K. Paul.
    Gellner's political philosophy in these volumes combines the down-to-earth realism of political sociology with a rational treatment of the normative issues of traditional political thought. In these essays Gellner strives to understand the religions of nationalism, communism and democracy, returning again and again to the basic values of the liberal: social tolerance, rational criticism, human decency and justice.
  22. Fred M. Frohock (1999). Public Reason: Mediated Authority in the Liberal State. Cornell University Press.
    What resources do we have, Frohock asks, to develop a version of public reason which can succed even in the deep pluralism anticipated in democratic practices ...
  23. David Miller (1976/1979). Social Justice. Oxford University Press.
    This book explores the various aspects of social justice--to each according to his rights, to each acording to his desert, and to each according to his need--comparing the writings of Hume, Spencer, and Kropotkin. Miller demonstrates that there are radical differences in outlook on social justice between societies, and that these differences can be explained by reference to features of the social structure.
  24. Ian S. Markham (1994). Plurality and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Too many parts of the world testify to the difficulties religions have in tolerating each other. It is often concluded that the only way tolerance and plurality can be protected is to keep religion out of the public sphere. Ian Markham challenges this secularist argument. In the first half of the book, he advances a careful critique of European culture which exposes the problem of plurality. His analysis of the Christendom Group is contrasted with the outlook found in the USA, (...)
  25. Roger S. Gottlieb (ed.) (1993). Radical Philosophy: Tradition, Counter-Tradition, Politics. Temple University Press.
  26. Katy Láng-Pickvance, Nick P. Manning & C. G. Pickvance (eds.) (1997). Environmental and Housing Movements: Grassroots Experience in Hungary, Russia and Estonia. Avebury.
  27. C. G. Prado (2008). Choosing to Die: Elective Death and Multiculturalism. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, C. G. Prado addresses the difficult question of when and whether it is rational to end one’s life in order to escape devastating terminal illness. He specifically considers this question in light of the impact of multiculturalism on perceptions and judgments about what is right and wrong, permissible and impermissible. Prado introduces the idea of a “coincidental culture” to clarify the variety of values and commitments that influence decision. He also introduces the idea of a “proxy premise” (...)
  28. Sebastian De Grazia (1989). Machiavelli in Hell. Princeton University Press.
  29. Barbara Mehl Rowland (1987). Ordered Liberty and the Constitutional Framework: The Political Thought of Friedrich A. Hayek. Greenwood Press.
  30. Philip Kitcher (2001). Science, Truth, and Democracy. Oxford University Press.
    Striving to boldly redirect the philosophy of science, this book by renowned philosopher Philip Kitcher examines the heated debate surrounding the role of science in shaping our lives. Kitcher explores the sharp divide between those who believe that the pursuit of scientific knowledge is always valuable and necessary--the purists--and those who believe that it invariably serves the interests of people in positions of power. In a daring turn, he rejects both perspectives, working out a more realistic image of the (...)
  31. Virginia Held (2008). How Terrorism Is Wrong: Morality and Political Violence. OUP USA.
    What is terrorism? How is it different from other kinds of political violence? Why exactly is it wrong? Why is war often thought capable of being justified? On what grounds should we judge when the use of violence to be morally acceptable? It is often thought that using violence to uphold and enforce the rule of law can be justified, that violence used in self-defense is acceptable, and that some liberation movements can be excused for using violence--but that terrorism is (...)
  32. James W. Heisig & John C. Maraldo (eds.) (1995). Rude Awakenings: Zen, the Kyoto School, & the Question of Nationalism. University of Hawai'i Press.
    Zen Buddhist Attitudes to War HIRATA Seiko IN ORDER FULLY TO UNDERSTAND the standpoint of Zen on the question of nationalism, one must first consider the ...
  33. John A. Vasquez (1993). The War Puzzle. Cambridge University Press.
    This book constructs a new scientific explanation of the causes of war. The author describes systematically those factors common to wars between equal states to see if there is a pattern that suggests why war occurs and delineates the typical path by which relatively equal states have become embroiled in wars with one another in the modern global system. The book differs from others in that it employs the large number of empirical findings generated in the past twenty-five years to (...)
  34. Robert Paul Churchill (ed.) (1994). The Ethics of Liberal Democracy: Morality and Democracy in Theory and Practice. Berg.
  35. Scott Gordon (1980). Welfare, Justice, and Freedom. Columbia University Press.
  36. William J. Wainwright (ed.) (2009). Philosophy of Religion. Routledge.
    The past forty years or so have witnessed a renaissance in the philosophy of religion. New tools (modal logic, probability theory, and so on) and new historical research have prompted many thinkers to take a fresh look at old topics (God’s existence, the problem of evil, faith and reason, and the like). Moreover, sophisticated examinations of contentious new issues, such as the problem of religious diversity or the role of emotions and other non-evidential factors in shaping rationally held religious beliefs, (...)
  37. Gary E. Varner (1998). In Nature's Interests?: Interests, Animal Rights, and Environmental Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This book offers a powerful response to what Varner calls the "two dogmas of environmental ethics"--the assumptions that animal rights philosophies and anthropocentric views are each antithetical to sound environmental policy. Allowing that every living organism has interests which ought, other things being equal, to be protected, Varner contends that some interests take priority over others. He defends both a sentientist principle giving priority to the lives of organisms with conscious desires and an anthropocentric principle giving priority to certain (...)
  38. David MacGregor (1992). Hegel, Marx, and the English State. Westview Press.
  39. Anne Herrmann & Abigail J. Stewart (eds.) (1994). Theorizing Feminism: Parallel Trends in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Westview Press.
    In the past two decades, feminist scholars have produced an abundance of theoretical writing in humanities and social science disciplines. The result is a body of work that is extraordinarily rich, hard to keep up with, and extremely difficult to teach.With the appearance of Theorizing Feminism: Parallel Trends in the Humanities and Social Sciences, the first genuinely interdisciplinary anthology of significant contributions to feminist theory, teachers will finally have a volume that does justice to their topic. Creatively edited, with insightful (...)
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  40. Christopher Norris (1996). Reclaiming Truth: Contribution to a Critique of Cultural Relativism. Duke University Press.
    "Reclaiming Truth "will be welcomed by readers concerned with the uses and abuses of theory at a time when such questions are in urgent need of sustained and serious debate. "These are brilliant and stimulating essays.
  41. Peter Augustine Lawler & Dale D. McConkey (eds.) (1998). Community and Political Thought Today. Praeger.
  42. Janice McLaughlin (2003). Feminist Social and Political Theory: Contemporary Debates and Dialogues. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This important text introduces students to both feminism and other social and political theories via an examination of the inter-relationship between different feminist positions and key contemporary debates. The book takes each debate in turn, outlines the main themes, discusses different feminist responses and evaluates the implications for real-life political and social issues. This user-friendly structure effectively redraws the map of contemporary feminist thought, offering a fresh and succinct summary of an extensive range of material and graphically demonstrating the ongoing (...)
  43. Paul Q. Hirst (1979). On Law and Ideology. Humanities Press.
  44. Joel Feinberg, Jules L. Coleman & Allen E. Buchanan (eds.) (1994). In Harm's Way: Essays in Honor of Joel Feinberg. Cambridge University Press.
    For several decades the work of Joel Feinberg has been the most influential in legal, political, and social philosophy in the English-speaking world. This volume honours that body of work by presenting fifteen original essays, many of them by leading legal and political philosophers, that explore the problems that have engaged Feinberg over the years. Amongst the topics covered are issues of autonomy, responsibility, and liability. It will be a collection of interest to anyone working in moral, legal, or political (...)
  45. Jeremy Bentham (1973). Bentham's Political Thought. Croom Helm.
    Preface Although Bentham wrote voluminously in the field of political philosophy , he did not write any one single work that, like Hobbes's Leviathan or ...
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  46. Neil MacCormick (1982/1984). Legal Right and Social Democracy: Essays in Legal and Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    This work is a controversial collection of interrelated papers investigating and arguing about issues of concern to lawyers and politicians today. MacCormick combines a scholarly concern with leading thinkers such as John Locke, Lord Stair, Adam Smith and David Hume, John Rawls, Ronald Dworkin, and Patrick Atiyah, and stringently argued view of questions of political obligation, civil liberty, and legal rights.
  47. Jeffrey T. Nealon (1998). Alterity Politics: Ethics and Performative Subjectivity. Duke University Press.
    "In a new and stimulating manner, Jeffrey Nealon confronts precisely those questions that have been of the most central importance in literary studies and does ...
  48. Lydia Morris (ed.) (2006). Rights: Sociological Perspectives. Routledge.
    This pioneering new book suggests how different traditions of sociological thought can contribute to an understanding of the theory and practice of rights. Rights: Sociological Perspectives provides a sociological treatment of a wide range of substantive issues but without losing sight of key theoretical questions. It considers some varied cases of public intervention, including welfare, caring, mental health provisions, pensions, justice and free speech, alongside the rights issues they raise. Similarly, it examines the question of rights from the point of (...)
  49. Henry M. Rosenthal (1989). The Consolations of Philosophy: Hobbes's Secret, Spinoza's Way. Temple University Press.
  50. David M. Estlund (ed.) (2001). Democracy. Blackwell Publishers.
  51. 1 — 50 / 1024