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  1. Thomas F. Green (1971). The Activities of Teaching. New York,Mcgraw-Hill.
  2. Jacques Ricard (1999). Biological Complexity and the Dynamics of Life Processes. Elsevier.
    The aim of this book is to show how supramolecular complexity of cell organization can dramatically alter the functions of individual macromolecules within a cell. The emergence of new functions which appear as a consequence of supramolecular complexity, is explained in terms of physical chemistry. The book is interdisciplinary, at the border between cell biochemistry, physics and physical chemistry. This interdisciplinarity does not result in the use of physical techniques but from the use of physical concepts to study biological problems. (...)
  3. Kim Sterelny (1990/1991). The Representational Theory of Mind. Blackwell.
  4. J. E. J. Altham (1971). The Logic of Plurality. London,Methuen.
  5. Tom W. Goff (1980). Marx and Mead: Contributions to a Sociology of Knowledge. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
  6. Mario Augusto Bunge (1973). Philosophy of Physics. Boston,Reidel.
    PHILOSOPHY: BEACON OR TRAP* There was a time when everyone expected almost everything from philosophy. It was the time when philosophers drew confidently ...
  7. Masao Itō, Y. Miyashita & Edmund T. Rolls (eds.) (1997). Cognition, Computation, and Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
    Understanding consciousness is a truly multidisciplinary project, attracting intense interest from researchers and theorists from diverse backgrounds. Thus, we now have computational scientists, neuroscientists, and philosophers all engaged in the same effort. This book draws together the work of leading researchers around the world, providing insights from these three general perspectives. The work is highlighted by a rare look at work being conducted by Japanese researchers.
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  8. P. M. Harman (1982). Metaphysics and Natural Philosophy: The Problem of Substance in Classical Physics. Barnes & Noble Books.
  9. Paul Weingartner & Gerhard Zecha (eds.) (1970). Induction, Physics, and Ethics. Dordrecht,Reidel.
  10. Alice F. Healy & Robert W. Proctor (eds.) (2003). Handbook of Psychology: Experimental Psychology. John Wiley & Sons.
    Includes established theories and cutting-edge developments. Presents the work of an international group of experts. Presents the nature, origin, implications, and future course of major unresolved issues in the area.
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  11. John P. Wright (1983). The Sceptical Realism of David Hume. Manchester Up.
    Introduction A brief look at the competing present-day interpretations of Hume's philosophy will leave the uninitiated reader completely baffled. On the one hand , Hume is seen as a philosopher who attempted to analyse concepts with ...
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  12. E. M. Barth (1974). The Logic of the Articles in Traditional Philosophy: A Contribution to the Study of Conceptual Structures. D. Reidel Pub. Co..
  13. David Harvey (1969). Explanation in Geography. London, Edward Arnold.
  14. M. Ito, Y. Miyashita & Edmund T. Rolls (eds.) (1997). Cognition, Computation, and Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
  15. P. B. Medawar (1977). The Life Science: Current Ideas of Biology. Wildwood House.
  16. Ronald Edmund Doel & Thomas Söderqvist (eds.) (2006). The Historiography of Contemporary Science, Technology, and Medicine: Writing Recent Science. Routledge.
    As historians of science increasingly turn to work on recent (post 1945) science, the historiographical and methodological problems associated with the history of contemporary science are debated with growing frequency and urgency. This book brings together authorities on the history, historiography and methodology of recent and contemporary science to review the problems facing historians of contemporary science, technology and medicine and to explore new ways forward. The chapters explore topics which will be of ever increasing interest to historians of postwar (...)
  17. Richard Spilsbury (1974). Providence Lost: A Critique of Darwinism. Oxford University Press.
  18. Jaakko Hintikka (1970). Information and Inference. D. Reidel.
  19. Maurice S. Friedman (1978). To Deny Our Nothingness: Contemporary Images of Man. University of Chicago Press.
  20. Harry R. Lewis (1979). Unsolvable Classes of Quantificational Formulas. Addison-Wesley Pub. Co..
  21. Norman Malcolm (1972). Problems of Mind: Descartes to Wittgenstein. London,Allen and Unwin.
  22. Erwin Chargaff (1977). Voices in the Labyrinth: Nature, Man, and Science. Seabury Press.
  23. John Arthur Passmore (1978). Science and its Critics. Duckworth.
  24. Norman Stockman (1983). Antipositivist Theories of the Sciences: Critical Rationalism, Critical Theory, and Scientific Realism. Sold and Distributed in the U.S.A. And Canada by Kluwer.
  25. Peter J. Vorzimmer (1970). Charles Darwin: The Years of Controversy. Philadelphia,Temple University Press.
  26. Jens Erik Fenstad & Peter G. Hinman (eds.) (1974). Generalized Recursion Theory. New York,American Elsevier Pub. Co..
    Provability, Computability and Reflection.
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  27. Edward Stein (1996). Without Good Reason: The Rationality Debate in Philosophy and Cognitive Science. Oxford University Press.
    In this book, Edward Stein offers a clear critical account of the debate about rationality in philosophy and cognitive science. He discusses concepts of rationality--the pictures of rationality on which the debate centers--and assesses the empirical evidence used to argue that humans are irrational. He concludes that the question of human rationality must be answered not conceptually but empirically, using the full resources of an advanced cognitive science. Furthermore, he extends this conclusion to argue that empirical considerations are also relevant (...)
  28. Henry Ely Kyburg (1990). Science & Reason. Oxford University Press.
    In this work Henry Kyburg presents his views on a wide range of philosophical problems associated with the study and practice of science and mathematics. The main structure of the book consists of a presentation of Kyburg's notions of epistemic probability and its use in the scientific enterprise i.e., the effort to modify previously adopted beliefs in the light of experience. Intended for cognitive scientists and people in artificial intelligence as well as for technically oriented philosophers, the book also provides (...)
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  29. K. S. Shrader-Frechette (1993). Method in Ecology: Strategies for Conservation. Cambridge University Press.
    In this volume, the authors discuss what practical contributions ecology can and can't make in applied science and environmental problem solving. In the first section, they discuss conceptual problems that have often prevented the formulation and evaluation of powerful, precise, general theories, explain why island biogeography is still beset with controversy and examine the ways that science is value laden. In the second section, they describe how ecology can give us specific answers to practical environmental questions posed in individual case (...)
  30. James Calderhead & Peter Gates (eds.) (1993). Conceptualizing Reflection in Teacher Development. London ;Falmer Press.
  31. Stephen Cole (1992). Making Science: Between Nature and Society. Harvard University Press.
    In Making Science, Cole shows how social variables and cognitive variables interact in the evaluation of frontier knowledge.
  32. K. Kirsner & G. Speelman (eds.) (1998). Implicit and Explicit Mental Processes. Lawrence Erlbaum.
    The need for synthesis in the domain of implicit processes was the motivation behind this book.
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  33. Ralph D. Ellis (1986). An Ontology of Consciousness. Kluwer.
  34. Burnett Meyer (1974). An Introduction to Axiomatic Systems. Boston,Prindle, Weber & Schmidt.
  35. Andrew Light & Eric Katz (eds.) (1996). Environmental Pragmatism. Routledge.
    Environmental pragmatism is a new strategy in environmental thought: it argues that theoretical debates are hindering the ability of the environmental movement to forge agreement on basic policy imperatives. This new direction in environmental philosophy moves beyond theory, advocating a serious inquiry into the practical merits of moral pluralism. Environmental pragmatism, as a coherent philosophical position, connects the methodology of classical American pragmatist thought to the explanation, solution and discussion of real issues.
  36. Stuart C. Brown (ed.) (1975). Philosophers Discuss Education. Macmillan Press.
  37. James Logue (1995). Projective Probability. Oxford University Press.
    This book presents a novel theory of probability applicable to general reasoning, science, and the courts. Based on a strongly subjective starting-point, with probabilities viewed simply as the guarded beliefs one can reasonably hold, the theory shows how such beliefs are legitimately "projected" outwards as if they existed in the world independent of our judgements.
  38. Arie L. Molendijk & Peter Pels (eds.) (1998). Religion in the Making: The Emergence of the Sciences of Religion. Brill.
    This volume explores the ways in which religion became the object of scientific research in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
  39. Erwin Engeler (ed.) (1995). The Combinatory Programme. Birkhäuser.
  40. Sacha Bem (2006). Theoretical Issues in Psychology: An Introduction. Sage.
    `This is an exceptionally good textbook. It covers an unusually wide range of issues in an up-to-date and balanced fashion, and is clearly written. It would be invaluable for all students, both undergraduates and postgraduates, who take a genuine interest in the nature of psychology and the theoretical issues it faces' - Professor Graham Richards, Director, British Psychological Society History of Psychology Centre Psychology is understood by many as the `science of the mind', but what is `mind' and what have (...)
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  41. Karl R. Popper (1959/1992). The Logic of Scientific Discovery. Routledge.
    Described by the philosopher A.J. Ayer as a work of 'great originality and power', this book revolutionized contemporary thinking on science and knowledge. Ideas such as the now legendary doctrine of 'falsificationism' electrified the scientific community, influencing even working scientists, as well as post-war philosophy. This astonishing work ranks alongside The Open Society and Its Enemies as one of Popper's most enduring books and contains insights and arguments that demand to be read to this day.
  42. Salvator Cannavo (1974). Nomic Inference: An Introduction to the Logic of Scientific Inquiry. Martinus Nijhoff.
  43. Aleksandr Zinoviev (1973). Foundations of the Logical Theory of Scientific Knowledge (Complex Logic). Dordrecht,Reidel.
  44. Harold Kincaid (1996). Philosophical Foundations of the Social Sciences: Analyzing Controversies in Social Research. Cambridge University Press.
    This book defends the prospects for a science of society. It argues that behind the diverse methods of the natural sciences lies a common core of scientific rationality that the social sciences can and sometimes do achieve. It also argues that good social science must be in part about large-scale social structures and processes and thus that methodological individualism is misguided. These theses are supported by a detailed discussion of actual social research, including theories of agrarian revolution, organizational ecology, social (...)
  45. Nicholas Jardine (1986). The Fortunes of Inquiry. Oxford University Press.
    The belief that science shows an accumulation of a body of objective knowledge has been widely challenged by philosophers and historians in the latter half of this century. In this treatise, Dr. Jardine defends this belief with a careful appreciation of the complexities involved, drawing on many controversial issues concerning truth in science, interpretation of past theories, and grounds of scientific method.
  46. David E. Fenner (ed.) (1998). Ethics in Education. Routledge.
    First published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  47. Evert Willem Beth (1970). Aspects of Modern Logic. Dordrecht,Reidel.
  48. Peter Kosso (1992). Reading the Book of Nature: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science. Cambridge University Press.
    This is an introductory survey to the philosophy of science suitable for beginners and nonspecialists. Its point of departure is the question: why should we believe what science tells us about the world? In this attempt to justify the claims of science the book treats such topics as observation data, confirmation of theories, and the explanation of phenomena. The writing is clear and concrete with detailed examples drawn from contemporary science: solar neutrinos, the gravitational bending of light, and the creation/evolution (...)
  49. R. R. Rockingham Gill (1990). Deducibility and Decidability. Routledge.
    The classic results obtained by Gödel, Tarski, Kleene, and Church in the early thirties are the finest flowers of symbolic logic. They are of fundamental importance to those investigations of the foundations of mathematics via the concept of a formal system that were inaugurated by Frege, and of obvious significance to the mathematical disciplines, such as computability theory, that developed from them. Derived from courses taught by the author over several years, this new exposition presents all of the results with (...)
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  50. Derek Partridge & Y. Wilks (eds.) (1990). The Foundations of Artificial Intelligence: A Sourcebook. Cambridge University Press.
    This outstanding collection is designed to address the fundamental issues and principles underlying the task of Artificial Intelligence.
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