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1 — 50 / 2541
  1. Jacques Ricard (1999). Biological Complexity and the Dynamics of Life Processes. Elsevier.
    The aim of this book is to show how supramolecular complexity of cell organization can dramatically alter the functions of individual macromolecules within a cell. The emergence of new functions which appear as a consequence of supramolecular complexity, is explained in terms of physical chemistry. The book is interdisciplinary, at the border between cell biochemistry, physics and physical chemistry. This interdisciplinarity does not result in the use of physical techniques but from the use of physical concepts to study biological problems. (...)
  2. Ronald N. Giere & Richard S. Westfall (eds.) (1973). Foundations of Scientific Method: The Nineteenth Century. Bloomington,Indiana University Press.
  3. Tom W. Goff (1980). Marx and Mead: Contributions to a Sociology of Knowledge. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
  4. René von Schomberg (ed.) (1993). Science, Politics, and Morality: Scientific Uncertainty and Decision Making. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Current environmental problems and technological risks are a challenge for a new institutional arrangement of the value spheres of Science, Politics and Morality. Distinguished authors from different European countries and America provide a cross-disciplinary perspective on the problems of political decision making under the conditions of scientific uncertainty. cases from biotechnology and the environmental sciences are discussed. The papers collected for this volume address the following themes: (i) controversies about risks and political decision making; (ii) concepts of science for policy; (...)
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  5. R. L. Goodstein (1971). Development of Mathematical Logic. London,Logos Press.
  6. James E. Curtis (1970). The Sociology of Knowledge: A Reader. London,Duckworth.
  7. M. Ito, Y. Miyashita & Edmund T. Rolls (eds.) (1997). Cognition, Computation, and Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
  8. Irving M. Copi (2008). Introduction to Logic. Pearson/Prentice Hall.
  9. Henry Ely Kyburg (1990). Science & Reason. Oxford University Press.
    In this work Henry Kyburg presents his views on a wide range of philosophical problems associated with the study and practice of science and mathematics. The main structure of the book consists of a presentation of Kyburg's notions of epistemic probability and its use in the scientific enterprise i.e., the effort to modify previously adopted beliefs in the light of experience. Intended for cognitive scientists and people in artificial intelligence as well as for technically oriented philosophers, the book also provides (...)
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  10. P. B. Medawar (1977). The Life Science: Current Ideas of Biology. Wildwood House.
  11. Norman Stockman (1983). Antipositivist Theories of the Sciences: Critical Rationalism, Critical Theory, and Scientific Realism. Sold and Distributed in the U.S.A. And Canada by Kluwer.
  12. Kathleen V. Wilkes (1973). Physicalism. Routledge and Kegan Paul.
    The primary aim of this study is to dissolve the mind-body problem. It shows how the ‘problem’ separates into two distinct sets of issues, concerning ontology on the one hand, and explanation on the other, and argues that explanation – whether or not human behaviour can be explained in physical terms – is the more crucial. The author contends that a functionalist methodology in psychology and neurophysiology will prove adequate to explain human behaviour. Defence of this thesis requires: an examination (...)
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  13. Masao Itō, Y. Miyashita & Edmund T. Rolls (eds.) (1997). Cognition, Computation, and Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
    Understanding consciousness is a truly multidisciplinary project, attracting intense interest from researchers and theorists from diverse backgrounds. Thus, we now have computational scientists, neuroscientists, and philosophers all engaged in the same effort. This book draws together the work of leading researchers around the world, providing insights from these three general perspectives. The work is highlighted by a rare look at work being conducted by Japanese researchers.
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  14. John Arthur Passmore (1978). Science and its Critics. Duckworth.
  15. Arto Salomaa (1985). Computation and Automata. Cambridge University Press.
    This introduction to certain mathematical topics central to theoretical computer science treats computability and recursive functions, formal languages and automata, computational complexity, and cruptography. The presentation is essentially self-contained with detailed proofs of all statements provided. Although it begins with the basics, it proceeds to some of the most important recent developments in theoretical computer science.
  16. John David North, John J. Roche & A. C. Crombie (eds.) (1985). The Light of Nature: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science Presented to A.C. Crombie. Distributors for the United States and Canada Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    INTRODUCTION This volume of essays is meant as a tribute to Alistair Crombie by some of those who have studied with him. The occasion of its publication is ...
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  17. Norman Malcolm (1972). Problems of Mind: Descartes to Wittgenstein. London,Allen and Unwin.
  18. J. E. J. Altham (1971). The Logic of Plurality. London,Methuen.
  19. Rodney M. J. Cotterill (ed.) (1989). Models of Brain Function. Cambridge University Press.
  20. Burnett Meyer (1974). An Introduction to Axiomatic Systems. Boston,Prindle, Weber & Schmidt.
  21. Paul Weingartner & Gerhard Zecha (eds.) (1970). Induction, Physics, and Ethics. Dordrecht,Reidel.
    INITIAL PROBABILITIES: A PREREQUISITE FOR ANY VALID INDUCTION* * I. INDUCTIVE REASONING AND ITS UNDERLYING ASSUMPTIONS Experience does not tell us anything ...
  22. Patrick J. Hurley (2000). A Concise Introduction to Logic. Wadsworth Pub..
    Preface The most immediate benefit derived from the study of logic is the skill needed to construct sound arguments of one's own and to evaluate the ...
  23. Thomas O. Buford (1969). Toward a Philosophy of Education. New York, Holt, Rinehart and Winston.
  24. Paul Heywood Hirst, Robin Barrow & Patricia White (eds.) (1993). Beyond Liberal Education: Essays in Honour of Paul H. Hirst. Routledge.
    This collection of essays by philosophers and educationalists of international reputation, all published here for the first time, celebrates Paul Hirst's professional career. The introductory essay by Robin Barrow and Patricia White outlines Paul Hirst's career and maps the shifts in his thought about education, showing how his views on teacher education, the curriculum and educational aims are interrelated. Contributions from leading names in British and American philosophy of education cover themes ranging from the nature of good teaching to Wittgensteinian (...)
  25. Richard Spilsbury (1974). Providence Lost: A Critique of Darwinism. Oxford University Press.
  26. Michael Ruse (2000/2001). The Evolution Wars: A Guide to the Debates. Rutgers University Press.
    This new series presents innovative titles pertaining to human origins, evolution, and behavior from a multi-disciplinary perspective.
  27. Jennifer Trusted (1987). Inquiry and Understanding: An Introduction to Explanation in the Physical and Human Sciences. Macmillan Education.
  28. R. R. Rockingham Gill (1990). Deducibility and Decidability. Routledge.
    The classic results obtained by Gödel, Tarski, Kleene, and Church in the early thirties are the finest flowers of symbolic logic. They are of fundamental importance to those investigations of the foundations of mathematics via the concept of a formal system that were inaugurated by Frege, and of obvious significance to the mathematical disciplines, such as computability theory, that developed from them. Derived from courses taught by the author over several years, this new exposition presents all of the results with (...)
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  29. Charles Cooper (ed.) (1972/1973). Science, Technology and Development. London,F. Cass.
    Science, Technology and Production in the Underdeveloped Countries: An Introduction By Charles Cooper* The uncritical notion that it would be easy to orient ...
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  30. Owen J. Flanagan (1996). Self Expressions: Mind, Morals, and the Meaning of Life. Oxford University Press.
    Human beings have the unique ability to consciously reflect on the nature of the self. But reflection has its costs. We can ask what the self is, but as David Hume pointed out, the self, once reflected upon, may be nowhere to be found. The favored view is that we are material beings living in the material world. But if so, a host of destabilizing questions surface. If persons are just a sophisticated sort of animal, then what sense is there (...)
  31. Carl R. Kordig (1971). The Justification of Scientific Change. Dordrecht,Reidel.
    Based on author's dissertation--Yale University.
  32. Dick Taverne (2005). The March of Unreason: Science, Democracy, and the New Fundamentalism. Oxford University Press.
    In The March of Unreason, Dick Taverne expresses his concern that irrationality is on the rise in Western society, and argues that public opinion is increasingly dominated by unreflecting prejudice and an unwillingness to engage with factual evidence. Discussing topics such as genetically modified crops and foods, organic farming, the MMR vaccine, environmentalism, the precautionary principle, and the new anti-capitalist and anti-globalization movements, he argues that the rejection of the evidence-based approach nurtures a culture of suspicion, distrust, and cynicism, and (...)
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  33. A. Russon, Kim A. Bard & S. Parkers (eds.) (1996). Reaching Into Thought: The Minds of the Great Apes. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, field and laboratory researchers show that the Great Apes are capable of thinking at symbolic levels, traditionally considered uniquely human.
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  34. Austen Clark (1980). Psychological Models and Neural Mechanisms: An Examination of Reductionism in Psychology. Oxford University Press.
  35. Gordon Graham (1999). The Internet: A Philosophical Inquiry. Routledge.
    The Internet: A Philosophical Inquiry explores the tensions between the warnings of the Neo-Luddites and the bright optimism of the Technophiles, Graham offers the first concise and accessible exploration of the issues which arise as we enter further into the world of Cyberspace. This original and fascinating study takes us to the heart of questions that none of us can afford to ignore: how does the Internet affect our concepts of identity, moral anarchy, censorship, community, democracy, virtual reality and imagination? (...)
  36. Raymond E. Wanner (1975). Claude Fleury, 1640-1723, as an Educational Historiographer and Thinker. Nijhoff.
    CHAPTER I CLAUDE FLEURY AND HIS CAREER Claude Fleury (-), an educator, historian , jurist, cleric, royal tutor, and immortel of the ...
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  37. James Calderhead & Peter Gates (eds.) (1993). Conceptualizing Reflection in Teacher Development. London ;Falmer Press.
  38. A. G. Cohn & J. R. Thomas (eds.) (1986). Artificial Intelligence and Its Applications. John Wiley and Sons.
  39. M. R. Haight (1999). The Snake and the Fox: An Introduction to Logic. Routledge.
    The Snake and the Fox offers students a new and exciting way to look at and understand logic. Mary Haight uses graphics to tell the story of how logic works, and why it works the way it does. This introductory text uses easy to understand language for the student who has no prior understanding of logic or philosophy. The author includes some discussion on the philosophical theory underlying the logic: not just how to do it, but why it takes the (...)
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  40. Jerome L. Singer, Jefferson A. Singer & Peter Salovey (eds.) (1999). At Play in the Fields of Consciousness: Essays in Honor of Jerome L. Singer. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
    This collection of articles pays homage to the creativity and scientific rigor Jerome Singer has brought to the study of consciousness and play. It will interest personality, social, clinical and developmental psychologists alike.
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  41. Arie L. Molendijk & Peter Pels (eds.) (1998). Religion in the Making: The Emergence of the Sciences of Religion. Brill.
    This volume explores the ways in which religion became the object of scientific research in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
  42. Nicholas Maxwell (1998). The Comprehensibility of the Universe: A New Conception of Science. Oxford University Press.
    This book puts forth a radically new conception of science. Maxwell argues that the prevailing view of the relation between scientific theory and evidence is untenable; he calls for a new orthodoxy that sees science as making a hierarchy of assumptions about the comprehensibility of the universe. This new conception has significant implications for both philosophy and science, promises to heal the rift between the two, and will be essential reading for people working in both fields.
  43. Stephan Körner (1970). Categorial Frameworks. Oxford,Blackwell.
  44. Nathan Rotenstreich (1976). Philosophy, History and Politics: Studies in Contemporary English Philosophy of History. Martinus Nijhoff.
  45. John White (1997). Education and the End of Work: A New Philosophy of Work and Learning. Cassell.
    This book engages with widespread current anxieties about the future of work and its place in a fulfilled human life.
  46. Marcel Kinsbourne & W. Smith (eds.) (1974). Hemispheric Disconnection and Cerebral Function. Charles C.
  47. Wayne Edward Oates (1955). Anxiety in Christian Experience. Philadelphia, Westminster Press.
  48. Mary Maxwell (1984). Human Evolution: A Philosophical Anthropology. Columbia University Press.
    ... Nosce te ipsum -Carolus Linnaeus We, however, want to become those we are — human beings who are new, unique, incomparable, who give themselves laws, ...
  49. François Penz, Gregory Radick & Robert Howell (eds.) (2004). Space: In Science, Art, and Society. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of essays explores different perceptions of space, taking the reader on a journey from the inner space of the mind to the vacuum beyond Earth. Eight leading researchers span a broad range of fields, from the arts and humanities to the natural sciences. They consider topics ranging from human consciousness to virtual reality, architecture and politics. The essays are written in an accessible style for a general audience.
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  50. Shimon Malin (2001). Nature Loves to Hide: Quantum Physics and Reality, a Western Perspective. Oxford University Press.
    The strangeness of modern physics has sparked several popular books--such as The Tao of Physics--that explore its affinity with Eastern mysticism. But the founders of quantum mechanics were educated in the classical traditions of Western civilization and Western philosophy. In Nature Loves to Hide, physicist Shimon Malin takes readers on a fascinating tour of quantum theory--one that turns to Western philosophical thought to clarify this strange yet inescapable explanation of reality. Malin translates quantum mechanics into plain English, explaining its origins (...)
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  51. 1 — 50 / 2541