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1 — 50 / 2062
  1. Paul Weingartner & Gerhard Zecha (eds.) (1970). Induction, Physics, and Ethics. Dordrecht,Reidel.
    INITIAL PROBABILITIES: A PREREQUISITE FOR ANY VALID INDUCTION* * I. INDUCTIVE REASONING AND ITS UNDERLYING ASSUMPTIONS Experience does not tell us anything ...
  2. Robert W. Lundin (1972). Theories and Systems of Psychology. Lexington, Mass.,Heath.
  3. Alice F. Healy & Robert W. Proctor (eds.) (2003). Handbook of Psychology: Experimental Psychology. John Wiley & Sons.
    Includes established theories and cutting-edge developments. Presents the work of an international group of experts. Presents the nature, origin, implications, and future course of major unresolved issues in the area.
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  4. Bernhard Rensch (1971). Biophilosophy. New York,Columbia University Press.
  5. Ernest Keen (2000). Chemicals for the Mind: Psychopharmacology and Human Consciousness. Greenwood Publishing Group.
    Keen provides a critical appraisal of psychopharmacology, including its philosophical assumptions, its professional practice, and its practical results.
  6. Evert Willem Beth (1970). Aspects of Modern Logic. Dordrecht,Reidel.
  7. R. S. Peters (1977). Education and the Education of Teachers. Routledge & K. Paul.
    educated man1 Some further reflections 1 The comparison with 'reform' In reflecting, in the past, on the sort of term that 'education' is I have usually ...
  8. Owen J. Flanagan (1996). Self Expressions: Mind, Morals, and the Meaning of Life. Oxford University Press.
    Human beings have the unique ability to consciously reflect on the nature of the self. But reflection has its costs. We can ask what the self is, but as David Hume pointed out, the self, once reflected upon, may be nowhere to be found. The favored view is that we are material beings living in the material world. But if so, a host of destabilizing questions surface. If persons are just a sophisticated sort of animal, then what sense is there (...)
  9. Alessandro Andretta, Keith Kearnes & Domenico Zambella (eds.) (2008). Logic Colloquium 2004: Proceedings of the Annual European Summer Meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic, Held in Torino, Italy, July 25-31, 2004. [REVIEW] Cambridge University Press.
    Highlights of this volume from the 2004 Annual European Meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic (ASL) include a tutorial survey of the recent highpoints of universal algebra, written by a leading expert; explorations of foundational questions; a quartet of model theory papers giving an excellent reflection of current work in model theory, from the most abstract aspect "abstract elementary classes" to issues around p-adic integration.
  10. Donna Dickenson (2000). In Two Minds: A Casebook of Psychiatric Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    In Two Minds is a practical casebook of problem solving in psychiatric ethics. Written in a lively and accessible style, it builds on a series of detailed case histories to illustrate the central place of ethical reasoning as a key competency for clinical work and research in psychiatry. Topics include risk, dangerousness and confidentiality; judgements of responsibility; involuntary treatment and mental health legislation; consent to genetic screening; dual role issues in child and adolescent psychiatry; needs assessment; cross-cultural and gender issues; (...)
  11. John L. Pollock (1990). Nomic Probability and the Foundations of Induction. Oxford University Press.
    In this book Pollock deals with the subject of probabilistic reasoning, making general philosophical sense of objective probabilities and exploring their ...
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  12. Husain Sarkar (2007). Group Rationality in Scientific Research. Cambridge University Press.
  13. Jean-Arcady Meyer & Stewart W. Wilson (eds.) (1990). From Animals to Animats: Proceedings of The First International Conference on Simulation of Adaptive Behavior (Complex Adaptive Systems). Cambridge University Press.
  14. Rodney M. J. Cotterill (ed.) (1989). Models of Brain Function. Cambridge University Press.
  15. Robert Klee (1997). Introduction to the Philosophy of Science: Cutting Nature at its Seams. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction to the Philosophy of Science: Cutting Nature at Its Seams is a clear and lively explanation of key concepts and issues in the philosophy of science. It surveys the field from positivism to social constructivism, focusing on the metaphysical implications of science as a form of knowledge gathering that explains what the world is really like, while simultaneously arguing for the superiority of a holistic model of scientific theories over competing models. An innovative feature is the use of immunology (...)
  16. Eugénie Angèle Samier & Richard J. Bates (eds.) (2006). Aesthetic Dimensions of Educational Administration & Leadership. Routledge.
    The Aesthetic Dimensions of Educational Administration and Leadership provides an aesthetic critique of educational administration and leadership. It demonstrates the importance of aesthetics on all aspects of the administrative and leadership world: the ways ideas and ideals are created, how their expression is conveyed, the impact they have on interpersonal relationships and the organizational environment that carries and reinforces them, and the moral boundaries or limits that can be established or exceeded. The book is divided into three sections. · Section (...)
  17. Terence E. Horgan & John L. Tienson (eds.) (1991). Connectionism and the Philosophy of Mind. Kluwer.
    "A third of the papers in this volume originated at the 1987 Spindel Conference ... at Memphis State University"--Pref.
  18. G. Toraldo di Francia (1981). The Investigation of the Physical World. Cambridge University Press.
  19. Raymond John Seeger & R. S. Cohen (eds.) (1974). Philosophical Foundations of Science: Proceedings of Section L, 1969, American Association for the Advancement of Science. Reidel.
  20. Israel Scheffler (1985). Of Human Potential: An Essay in the Philosophy of Education. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
  21. Dan J. Stein & J. Ludick (eds.) (1998). Neural Networks and Psychopathology. Cambridge University Press.
    Reviews the contribution of neural network models in psychiatry and psychopathology, including diagnosis, pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy.
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  22. P. Vinken & G. Bruyn (eds.) (1969). Handbook of Clinical Neurology. North Holland.
    It is the impression of neurologists who deal with cancer patients that the incidence of neurologic complications of cancer is increasing (Posner 1995). ...
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  23. Isaac Levi (1996). For the Sake of the Argument: Ramsey Test Conditionals, Inductive Inference, and Nonmonotonic Reasoning. Cambridge University Press.
    This book by one of the world's foremost philosophers in the fields of epistemology and logic offers an account of suppositional reasoning relevant to practical deliberation, explanation, prediction and hypothesis testing. Suppositions made 'for the sake of argument' sometimes conflict with our beliefs, and when they do, some beliefs are rejected and others retained. Thanks to such belief contravention, adding content to a supposition can undermine conclusions reached without it. Subversion can also arise because suppositional reasoning is ampliative. These two (...)
  24. Christopher Winch (2006). Education, Autonomy and Critical Thinking. Routledge.
    The concepts of autonomy and of critical thinking play a central role in many contemporary accounts of the aims of education. This book analyses their relationship to each other and to education, exploring their roles in mortality and politics before examining the role of critical thinking in fulfilling the educational aim of preparing young people for autonomy. The author analyses different senses of the terms 'autonomy' and 'critical thinking' and the implications for education. Implications of the discussion for contemporary practice (...)
  25. Richard J. Blackwell (1983). A Bibliography of the Philosophy of Science, 1945-1981. Greenwood Press.
  26. Masao Itō, Y. Miyashita & Edmund T. Rolls (eds.) (1997). Cognition, Computation, and Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
    Understanding consciousness is a truly multidisciplinary project, attracting intense interest from researchers and theorists from diverse backgrounds. Thus, we now have computational scientists, neuroscientists, and philosophers all engaged in the same effort. This book draws together the work of leading researchers around the world, providing insights from these three general perspectives. The work is highlighted by a rare look at work being conducted by Japanese researchers.
  27. Derek Partridge & Y. Wilks (eds.) (1990). The Foundations of Artificial Intelligence: A Sourcebook. Cambridge University Press.
    This outstanding collection is designed to address the fundamental issues and principles underlying the task of Artificial Intelligence.
  28. A. G. Cohn & J. R. Thomas (eds.) (1986). Artificial Intelligence and Its Applications. John Wiley and Sons.
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  29. Robert Borger (ed.) (1970). Explanation In The Behavioural Sciences. Cambridge University Press.
    A confrontation of views written by distinguished figures concerned with the behavioural and social sciences.
  30. G. Greenberg & E. Tobach (eds.) (1987). Cognition, Language, and Consciousness: Integrative Levels. Lawrence Erlbaum.
    "Each animal in its own psychological setting . . / 1 Gerard Piel Scientific American, New York TC Schneirla was more interested in questions than in ...
  31. David M. Buss (1999). Evolutionary Psychology: The New Science of the Mind. Allyn and Bacon.
  32. François Penz, Gregory Radick & Robert Howell (eds.) (2004). Space: In Science, Art, and Society. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of essays explores different perceptions of space, taking the reader on a journey from the inner space of the mind to the vacuum beyond Earth. Eight leading researchers span a broad range of fields, from the arts and humanities to the natural sciences. They consider topics ranging from human consciousness to virtual reality, architecture and politics. The essays are written in an accessible style for a general audience.
  33. Thomas S. Dickinson (ed.) (2001). Reinventing the Middle School. Routledgefalmer.
    Many contemporary American middle schools are stuck in a state of "arrested development," failing to implement the original concept of middle schools to varying, though equally corruptive degrees. The individual chapters of the book outline in detail how to counter this dangerous trend, offering guidance to those who seek immediate, significant, internal reforms before we lose the unique value of middle schools for our nation's adolescents.
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  34. Richard D. Wright (ed.) (1998). Visual Attention. Oxford University Press.
    This book contains a rich, interdisciplinary collection of articles by some of the pioneers of contemporary research on attention.
  35. Margaret A. Boden (1981). Minds And Mechanisms: Philosophical Psychology And Computational Models. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
  36. Gerald James Holton (1978/1998). The Scientific Imagination: With a New Introduction. Harvard University Press.
    In this book Gerald Holton takes an opposing view, illuminating the ways in which the imagination of the scientist functions early in the formation of a new ...
  37. Rem Blanchard Edwards (ed.) (1982). Psychiatry and Ethics: Insanity, Rational Autonomy, and Mental Health Care. Prometheus Books.
  38. Jody Azzouni (2004). Deflating Existential Commitment: A Case for Nominalism. OUP USA.
    If we must take mathematical statements to be true, must we also believe in the existence of abstract invisible mathematical objects accessible only by the power of pure thought? Jody Azzouni says no, and he claims that the way to escape such commitments is to accept (as an essential part of scientific doctrine) true statements which are about objects that don't exist in any sense at all. Azzouni illustrates what the metaphysical landscape looks like once we avoid a militant Realism (...)
  39. Joseph Petraglia (1998). Reality by Design: The Rhetoric and Technology of Authenticity in Education. L. Erlbaum Associates.
    An essential resource for understanding cutting edge developments in contemporary education. Using real life examples of educational technology, it explains why rhetorical relations must replace cognitive process as the central focus of education.
  40. Austen Clark (1980). Psychological Models and Neural Mechanisms: An Examination of Reductionism in Psychology. Oxford University Press.
  41. H. Hendriks-Jansen (1996). Catching Ourselves in the Act: Situated Activity, Interactive Emergence, Evolution, and Human Thought. MIT Press.
    ""Catching Ourselves in the Act" is no less than an attempt to explain intelligence. Delightful how the author dismantles traditional views in.
  42. Dave Barker-Plummer (2011). Language, Proof, and Logic. Csli Publications.
  43. Julian Dodd (2000). An Identity Theory of Truth. St. Martin's Press.
    This book argues that correspondence theories of truth fail because the relation that holds between a true thought and a fact is that of identity, not correspondence. Facts are not complexes of worldly entities which make thoughts true they are merely true thoughts. According to Julian Dodd, the resulting modest identity theory , while not defining truth, correctly diagnoses the failure of correspondence theories, and thereby prepares the ground for a defensible deflation of the concept of truth.
  44. Victor J. Seidler (1994). Recovering the Self: Morality and Social Theory. Routledge.
    Recovering the Self seeks to place issues of morality and justice at the heart of social theory. Because of the breakdown of traditional forms of authority, respect for authorities can no longer be taken for granted. Increasingly people believe that respect has to be earned and people have to discover sources of authority within themselves. Victor Seidler seeks to establish a framework to rethink the relation between self and society, identities and power. Through exploring the works of Marx, Weber, and (...)
  45. Nathan Rotenstreich (1976). Philosophy, History and Politics: Studies in Contemporary English Philosophy of History. Martinus Nijhoff.
  46. Yehoshua Bar-Hillel (ed.) (1970). Mathematical Logic and Foundations of Set Theory. Amsterdam,North-Holland Pub. Co..
    LN , so f lies in the elementary submodel M'. Clearly co 9 M' . It follows that 6 = {f(n): n em} is included in M'. Hence the ordinals of M' form an initial ...
  47. Richard Peet (1998). Modern Geographic Thought. Blackwell Publishers.
    After spending time with this book the reader should be able to tackle virtually any philosophical theme in contemporary geographic thought.
  48. M. Ito, Y. Miyashita & Edmund T. Rolls (eds.) (1997). Cognition, Computation, and Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
  49. Ken Wilber (2000). Sex, Ecology, Spirituality: The Spirit of Evolution. Shambhala.
    In a tour de force of scholarship and vision, Ken Wilber traces the course of evolution from matter to life to mind. In each case evolution has a "direction," a tendency to produce more highly organized patterns. The "spirit of evolution" lies in its directionality: order out of chaos. After arriving at the emergence of mind, Wilber traces the evolution of human consciousness through its major stages of development, pointing out that at each stage there is the "dialectic of progress"--every (...)
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  50. Paul Kurtz & Tim Madigan (eds.) (1994). Challenges to the Enlightenment: In Defense of Reason and Science. Prometheus Books.
  51. 1 — 50 / 2062