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1 — 50 / 2058
  1. P. B. Medawar (1977). The Life Science: Current Ideas of Biology. Wildwood House.
  2. Norman Malcolm (1972). Problems of Mind: Descartes to Wittgenstein. London,Allen and Unwin.
  3. M. Ito, Y. Miyashita & Edmund T. Rolls (eds.) (1997). Cognition, Computation, and Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
  4. Jonathan D. Moreno (1982). Discourse in the Social Sciences: Strategies for Translating Models of Mental Illness. Greenwood Press.
  5. John Arthur Passmore (1978). Science and its Critics. Duckworth.
  6. Masao Itō, Y. Miyashita & Edmund T. Rolls (eds.) (1997). Cognition, Computation, and Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
    Understanding consciousness is a truly multidisciplinary project, attracting intense interest from researchers and theorists from diverse backgrounds. Thus, we now have computational scientists, neuroscientists, and philosophers all engaged in the same effort. This book draws together the work of leading researchers around the world, providing insights from these three general perspectives. The work is highlighted by a rare look at work being conducted by Japanese researchers.
  7. Richard Spilsbury (1974). Providence Lost: A Critique of Darwinism. Oxford University Press.
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  8. Paul Weingartner & Gerhard Zecha (eds.) (1970). Induction, Physics, and Ethics. Dordrecht,Reidel.
    INITIAL PROBABILITIES: A PREREQUISITE FOR ANY VALID INDUCTION* * I. INDUCTIVE REASONING AND ITS UNDERLYING ASSUMPTIONS Experience does not tell us anything ...
  9. Evert Willem Beth (1970). Aspects of Modern Logic. Dordrecht,Reidel.
  10. Craig Dilworth (1994/1986). Scientific Progress: A Study Concerning the Nature of the Relation Between Successive Scientific Theories. Kluwer Academic.
    In this way Dilworth succeeds in providing a conception of science in which scientific progress is based on both rational and empirical considerations.
  11. Yūichi Shionoya & Kiichirō Yagi (eds.) (2001). Competition, Trust, and Cooperation: A Comparative Study. Springer.
    This book is the result of the first SEEP (Studies in Economic Ethics and Philosophy) conference that was held in Asia. First, the Western tradition is reinterpreted and restated by the two editors with their diversified perspective of virtue ethics and communicative ethics. Then, new approaches such as "critical realism", "reciprocal delivery", "evolutionary thought" and "cultural studies" are applied to understand ethical problems in economics. Further, in contrast to the reassessment of Scottish moral philosophy and German Romanticism, Chinese, Japanese, and (...)
  12. Christopher D. Green (2003). Early Psychological Thought: Ancient Accounts of Mind and Soul. Praeger.
  13. Mary Maxwell (1984). Human Evolution: A Philosophical Anthropology. Columbia University Press.
    ... Nosce te ipsum -Carolus Linnaeus We, however, want to become those we are — human beings who are new, unique, incomparable, who give themselves laws, ...
  14. Richard D. Wright (ed.) (1998). Visual Attention. Oxford University Press.
    This book contains a rich, interdisciplinary collection of articles by some of the pioneers of contemporary research on attention.
  15. Peter Kosso (1992). Reading the Book of Nature: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science. Cambridge University Press.
    This is an introductory survey to the philosophy of science suitable for beginners and nonspecialists. Its point of departure is the question: why should we believe what science tells us about the world? In this attempt to justify the claims of science the book treats such topics as observation data, confirmation of theories, and the explanation of phenomena. The writing is clear and concrete with detailed examples drawn from contemporary science: solar neutrinos, the gravitational bending of light, and the creation/evolution (...)
  16. E. B. Goldstein (ed.) (2001). Blackwell Handbook of Perception. Blackwell.
    "The Blackwell Handbook of Perception" is ideal for upper level students looking for succinct overviews and for researchers wanting to know more about current ...
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  17. Maria A. Ron & Trevor W. Robbins (eds.) (2003). Disorders of Brain and Mind 2. Cambridge University Press.
    This authoritative new book details the most recent advances in clinical neuroscience, from neurogenetics to the study of consciousness.
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  18. R. S. Cohen & Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.) (1974). Methodological and Historical Essays in the Natural and Social Sciences. Boston,Reidel.
  19. H. Jerome Keisler (1971). Model Theory for Infinitary Logic. Amsterdam,North-Holland Pub. Co..
    Provability, Computability and Reflection.
  20. Bede Rundle (2004). Why There is Something Rather Than Nothing. Oxford University Press.
    The question, 'Why is there something rather than nothing?', has a strong claim to be philosophy's central, and most perplexing, question; it has a capacity to set the head spinning which few other philosophical problems can rival. Bede Rundle challenges the stalemate between theistic and naturalistic explanations with a rigorous, properly philosophical approach, and presents some startlingly novel conclusions.
  21. G. Toraldo di Francia (1981). The Investigation of the Physical World. Cambridge University Press.
  22. Richard Peet (1998). Modern Geographic Thought. Blackwell Publishers.
    After spending time with this book the reader should be able to tackle virtually any philosophical theme in contemporary geographic thought.
  23. Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.) (2000). The New Cognitive Neurosciences: 2nd Edition. MIT Press.
    The majority of the chapters in this edition of The Cognitive Neurosciences are new, and those from the first edition have been completely rewritten and updated ...
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  24. Richard Milton (1993). The Facts of Life: Shattering the Myths of Darwinism. Corgi Books.
  25. Philippe Smets (ed.) (1988). Non-Standard Logics for Automated Reasoning. Academic Press.
  26. Richard J. Brook (1973). Berkeley's Philosophy of Science. The Hague,M. Nijhoff.
    INTRODUCTION Philonous: You see, Hylas, the water of yonder fountain, how it is forced upwards, in a round column, to a certain height, at which it breaks ...
  27. Peter T. Manicas (1987). A History and Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Basil Blackwell.
  28. R. S. Peters (1977). Education and the Education of Teachers. Routledge & K. Paul.
    educated man1 Some further reflections 1 The comparison with 'reform' In reflecting, in the past, on the sort of term that 'education' is I have usually ...
  29. Ted Benton (2001). Philosophy of Social Science: The Philosophical Foundations of Social Thought. Palgrave.
    This is the first book in the new series, is a comprehensive introduction to philosophical problems in the social sciences, encompassing traditional and contemporary perspectives. It is readily accessible, with a firm emphasis on communicating difficult philosophical ideas clearly and effectively to those from outside this discipline. Ted Benton and Ian Craib move systematically through major topic areas, from positivism to post-structuralism, using a wide variety of examples and cases to illustrate key themes.
  30. Austen Clark (1980). Psychological Models and Neural Mechanisms: An Examination of Reductionism in Psychology. Oxford University Press.
  31. Jan Peil & Irene van Staveren (eds.) (2009). Handbook of Economics and Ethics. Edward Elgar.
    The Handbook of Economics and Ethics is a unique collection of 75 original entries on the intersections between economics and ethics.
  32. Alessandro Andretta, Keith Kearnes & Domenico Zambella (eds.) (2008). Logic Colloquium 2004: Proceedings of the Annual European Summer Meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic, Held in Torino, Italy, July 25-31, 2004. [REVIEW] Cambridge University Press.
    Highlights of this volume from the 2004 Annual European Meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic (ASL) include a tutorial survey of the recent highpoints of universal algebra, written by a leading expert; explorations of foundational questions; a quartet of model theory papers giving an excellent reflection of current work in model theory, from the most abstract aspect "abstract elementary classes" to issues around p-adic integration.
  33. Ralph D. Ellis (1995). Questioning Consciousness: The Interplay of Imagery, Cognition, and Emotion in the Human Brain. John Benjamins.
    ... Geoffrey Underwood (University of Nottingham) Francisco Varela (CREA, Ecole Polytechnique. Paris) Volume 2 Ralph D. Ellis Questioning Consciousness ...
  34. Margaret A. Boden (1988). Computer Models On Mind: Computational Approaches In Theoretical Psychology. Cambridge University Press.
    What is the mind? How does it work? How does it influence behavior? Some psychologists hope to answer such questions in terms of concepts drawn from computer science and artificial intelligence. They test their theories by modeling mental processes in computers. This book shows how computer models are used to study many psychological phenomena--including vision, language, reasoning, and learning. It also shows that computer modeling involves differing theoretical approaches. Computational psychologists disagree about some basic questions. For instance, should the mind (...)
  35. Arto Salomaa (1985). Computation and Automata. Cambridge University Press.
    This introduction to certain mathematical topics central to theoretical computer science treats computability and recursive functions, formal languages and automata, computational complexity, and cruptography. The presentation is essentially self-contained with detailed proofs of all statements provided. Although it begins with the basics, it proceeds to some of the most important recent developments in theoretical computer science.
  36. Jennifer Trusted (1987). Inquiry and Understanding: An Introduction to Explanation in the Physical and Human Sciences. Macmillan Education.
  37. A. G. Cohn & J. R. Thomas (eds.) (1986). Artificial Intelligence and Its Applications. John Wiley and Sons.
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  38. Randolph M. Nesse (1996). Evolution and Healing: The New Science of Darwinian Medicine. Phoenix.
    The first ever description of how evolutionary principles can be applied to questions of health and sickness.
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  39. Jody Azzouni (2010). Talking About Nothing: Numbers, Hallucinations, and Fictions. Oxford University Press.
    Numbers -- Hallucinations -- Fictions -- Scientific languages, ontology, and truth -- Truth conditions and semantics.
  40. Jonathan Aldred (2009). The Skeptical Economist: Revealing the Ethics Inside Economics. Earthscan.
    Introduction : ethical economics? -- The sovereign consumer -- Two myths about economic growth -- The politics of pay -- Happiness -- Pricing life and nature -- New worlds of money : public services and beyond -- Conclusion.
  41. Wendy Kohli (ed.) (1995). Critical Conversations in Philosophy of Education. Routledge.
    Critical Conversations in Philosophy of Education presents a series of conversations expressing many of the multiple voices that currently constitute the field of philosophy of education. Philosophy of education as a discipline has undergone several turns--the once marginal perspectives of the various feminisms, critical Marxism, and poststructuralist, postmodernist and cultural theory have gained ground alongside those of Anglo-analytic and pragmatic thought. Just as western philosophers in general are coming to terms with the "end of philosophy" pronouncement implicit in postmodernism, so (...)
  42. Dave Barker-Plummer (2011). Language, Proof, and Logic. Csli Publications.
  43. Barry Gholson (ed.) (1989). Psychology of Science: Contributions to Metascience. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first comprehensive view of the work of scholars in several different disciplines contributing to the development of the psychology of science. This new field of inquiry is a systematic elaboration and application of psychological concepts and methods to clarify the nature of the scientific enterprise. While the psychology of science overlaps the philosophy, history, and sociology of science in important ways, its predominant focus is on individuals and small groups, rather than broad social institutions and concepts. The (...)
  44. Robert Miller (1981). Meaning and Purpose in the Intact Brain: A Philosophical, Psychological, and Biological Account of Conscious Processes. Oxford University Press.
  45. H. Kirchner & Christophe Ringeissen (eds.) (2000). Frontiers of Combining Systems: Third International Workshop, Frocos 2000, Nancy, France, March 22-24, 2000: Proceedings. [REVIEW] Springer.
    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Third International Workshop on Frontiers of Combining Systems, FroCoS 2000, held in Nancy, France, in March 2000.The 14 revised full papers presented together with four invited papers were carefully reviewed and selected from a total of 31 submissions. Among the topics covered are constraint processing, interval narrowing, rewriting systems, proof planning, sequent calculus, type systems, model checking, theorem proving, declarative programming, logic programming, and equational theories.
  46. Samuel Sambursky (ed.) (1974/1975). Physical Thought From the Presocratics to the Quantum Physicists: An Anthology. Distributed by Universe Books.
  47. Sidney Morgenbesser (1967). Philosophy of Science Today. New York, Basic Books.
    The nature and aim of science, by E. Nagel.--Truth and provability, by L. Henkin.--Completeness, by L. Henkin.--Computability, by S. C. Kleene.--Necessary truth, by W. V. Quine.--What is a scientific theory? By P. Suppes.--Science and simplicity, by N. Goodman.--Scientific explanation, by C. G. Hempel.--Observation and interpretation, by N. R. Hanson.--Probability and confirmation, by H. Putnam.--Utility and acceptance of hypotheses, by I. Levi.--Space and time, by A. Grünbaum.--Problems of microphysics, by P. Feyerabend.--Aspects of explanation in biological theory, by M. Beckner.--Psychologism and methodological (...)
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  48. Paul Kurtz & Tim Madigan (eds.) (1994). Challenges to the Enlightenment: In Defense of Reason and Science. Prometheus Books.
  49. Carl R. Kordig (1971). The Justification of Scientific Change. Dordrecht,Reidel.
    Based on author's dissertation--Yale University.
  50. Paul Marcus (2003). Ancient Religious Wisdom, Spirituality, and Psychoanalysis. Praeger.
    Unlike most books on psychoanalysis and religion, where psychoanalysis is regarded as a superior mode of understanding, this work explains how psychoanalysis ...
  51. 1 — 50 / 2058