Bargain finder

Use this tool to find book bargains on Amazon Marketplace. It works best on the "my areas of interest" setting, but you need to specify your areas of interest first. You might also want to change your shopping locale (currently the US locale).

Note: the best bargains on this page tend to go fast; the prices shown can be inaccurate because of this.

Settings


 Area(s)

 Offer type

 Sort by
($)
 Max price
% off
 Min discount

 Min year

 Added since

 Pro authors only

 

1 — 50 / 236
  1. E. M. Barth & J. L. Martens (eds.) (1982). Argumentation: Approaches to Theory Formation: Containing the Contributions to the Groningen Conference on the Theory of Argumentation, October 1978. Benjamins.
    The contributions in the first part Re-modelling logic of this volume take account of formal logic in the theory of rational argumentation.
  2. Alessandro Andretta, Keith Kearnes & Domenico Zambella (eds.) (2008). Logic Colloquium 2004: Proceedings of the Annual European Summer Meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic, Held in Torino, Italy, July 25-31, 2004. [REVIEW] Cambridge University Press.
    Highlights of this volume from the 2004 Annual European Meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic (ASL) include a tutorial survey of the recent highpoints of universal algebra, written by a leading expert; explorations of foundational questions; a quartet of model theory papers giving an excellent reflection of current work in model theory, from the most abstract aspect "abstract elementary classes" to issues around p-adic integration.
  3. Burnett Meyer (1974). An Introduction to Axiomatic Systems. Boston,Prindle, Weber & Schmidt.
  4. H. Jerome Keisler (1971). Model Theory for Infinitary Logic. Amsterdam,North-Holland Pub. Co..
    Provability, Computability and Reflection.
  5. Evert Willem Beth (1970). Aspects of Modern Logic. Dordrecht,Reidel.
  6. Harry J. Gensler (2002). Introduction to Logic. Routledge.
    Introduction to Logic offers one of the most clear, interesting and accessible introductions to what has long been considered one of the most challenging subjects in philosophy. Harry Gensler engages readers with the basics of logic through practical examples and important arguments in the history of philosophy and from contemporary philosophy. Using simpler and manageable methods for testing arguments, readers are led through in a careful step-by-step way to master the complexities of logic.
  7. Robert M. Martin (2004). Introducing Symbolic Logic. Broadview Press.
    This accessible, SHORT introduction to symbolic logic includes coverage of sentential and predicate logic, translations, truth tables, and derivations. The author's engaging style makes this the most informal of introductions to formal logic. Topics are explained in a conversational, easy-to-understand way for readers not familiar with mathematics or formal systems, and the author provides patient, reader-friendly explanations—even with the occasional bit of humour. The first half of the book deals with all the basic elements of Sentential Logic: the five truth-functional (...)
  8. Paul Tomassi (1999). Logic. Routledge.
    Logic brings elementary logic out of the academic darkness into the light of day. Paul Tomassi makes logic fully accessible for anyone trying to come to grips with the complexities of this challenging subject. This book is written in a patient and user-friendly way which makes both the nature and value of formal logic crystal clear. This textbook proceeds from a frank, informal introduction to fundamental logical notions to a system of formal logic rooted in the best of our natural (...)
  9. Dave Barker-Plummer (2011). Language, Proof, and Logic. Csli Publications.
  10. James B. Freeman (2005). Acceptable Premises: An Epistemic Approach to an Informal Logic Problem. Cambridge University Press.
    When, if ever, is one justified in accepting the premises of an argument? What is the proper criterion of premise acceptability? Providing a comprehensive theory of premise acceptability, this book answers these questions from an epistemological approach that the author calls "common sense foundationalism". His work will be of interest to specialists in informal logic, critical thinking and argumentation theory as well as to a broader range of philosophers and those teaching rhetoric.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Robert C. Trundle (1999). Medieval Modal Logic & Science: Augustine on Necessary Truth & Thomas on its Impossibility Without a First Cause. University Press of America.
  12. Donald Davidson (1975). The Logic of Grammar. Dickenson Pub. Co..
  13. Brian Skyrms (1975). Choice and Chance: An Introduction to Inductive Logic. Dickenson Pub. Co..
  14. J. E. J. Altham (1971). The Logic of Plurality. London,Methuen.
  15. C.-T. Chong & M. J. Wicks (eds.) (1983). Southeast Asian Conference on Logic: Proceedings of the Logic Conference, Singapore, 1981. Sole Distributors for the U.S.A. And Canada, Elsevier Science Pub. Co..
  16. Ian Hacking & Casimir Lewy (eds.) (1985). Exercises in Analysis: Essays by Students of Casimir Lewy. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a volume of specially commissioned essays of analytical philosophy, on topics of current interest in ethics and the philosophy of logic and language. Among the topics discussed are the making of wicked promises, G. E. Moore's early ethical views, as well as indexicals, tense, indeterminism, conventionalism in mathematics, and identity and necessity. The essays are all by former students of Casimir Lewy, until recently Reader in Philosophy at the University of Cambridge and an exponent of a particularly thoroughgoing (...)
  17. Melvin Joseph Adler (1980). A Pragmatic Logic for Commands. J. Benjamins.
    The purpose of this essay is to both discuss commands as a species of speech act and to discuss commands within the broader framework of how they are used and ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Merrie Bergmann (2003). The Logic Book. Mcgraw-Hill.
    This outstanding book is a leading text for symbolic or formal logic courses. All techniques and concepts are presented with clear, comprehensive explanations and numerous, carefully constructed examples. Its flexible organization (all chapters are complete and self-contained) allows instructors the freedom to cover the topics they want in the order they choose.
  19. Leigh S. Cauman (1998). First-Order Logic: An Introduction. Walter De Gruyter.
    Introduction This is an elementary logic book designed for people who have no technical familiarity with modern logic but who have been reasoning, ...
  20. Aladdin Mahmūd Yaqūb (1993). The Liar Speaks the Truth: A Defense of the Revision Theory of Truth. Oxford University Press.
    In this book, Yaqub describes a simple conception of truth and shows that it yields a semantical theory that accommodates the whole range of our seemingly conflicting intuitions about truth. This conception takes the Tarskian biconditionals (such as "The sentence 'Johannes loved Clara' is true if and only if Johannes loved Clara") as correctly and completely defining the notion of truth. The semantical theory, which is called the revision theory, that emerges from this conception paints a metaphysical picture of truth (...)
  21. M. Ben-Ari (1993/2003). Mathematical Logic for Computer Science. Prentice Hall.
    Mathematical Logic for Computer Science is a mathematics textbook with theorems and proofs, but the choice of topics has been guided by the needs of computer science students. The method of semantic tableaux provides an elegant way to teach logic that is both theoretically sound and yet sufficiently elementary for undergraduates. To provide a balanced treatment of logic, tableaux are related to deductive proof systems.The logical systems presented are:- Propositional calculus (including binary decision diagrams);- Predicate calculus;- Resolution;- Hoare logic;- Z;- (...)
  22. Aladdin M. Yaqub (1993). The Liar Speaks the Truth: A Defense of the Revision Theory of Truth. Oup Usa.
    In this book Yaqub describes a simple conception of truth and shows that it yields a semantical theory that accommodates the whole range of our seemingly conflicting intuitions about truth. This conception takes the Tarskian biconditionals as correctly and completely defining the notion of truth. He offers a comprehensive defense of the semantical theory by developing consistent and adequate formal semantics for languages in which all sorts of problematic sentences can be constructed. Yaqub concludes by introducing a logic of truth (...)
  23. Irving M. Copi (1973/1968). Symbolic Logic. New York,Macmillan.
  24. Richard B. Angell (2002). A-Logic. University Press of America.
    A-LOGIC is a full-length book (600+ pg). It functions as a system of logic designed to: 1) solve the standard paradoxes and major problems of standard mathematical logic; 2) minimize that logic's anomalies with respect to ordinary language, yet; 3) prove that all theorems in mathematical logic are tautologies. It covers lst order logic the logic of the words "and", "or", "not", "all" and "some". But it also has a non truth functional "if...then" and differs in its definition of validity, (...)
  25. Susan Haack (1974). Deviant Logic: Some Philosophical Issues. Cambridge University Press.
    PART ONE I 'Alternative' in 'Alternative logic There are many systems of logic — many-valued systems and modal systems for instance - which are non-standard ...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Aleksandr Zinoviev (1973). Foundations of the Logical Theory of Scientific Knowledge (Complex Logic). Dordrecht,Reidel.
  27. Richard C. Jeffrey (2004). Formal Logic: Its Scope and Limits. Hackett Pub..
    This brief paperback is designed for symbolic/formal logic courses. It features the tree method proof system developed by Jeffrey. The new edition contains many more examples and exercises and is reorganized for greater accessibility.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Bruce R. Reichenbach (2001). Introduction to Critical Thinking. Mcgraw Hill Higher Education.
    This text uses the educational objectives of Benjamin Bloom as six steps to critical thinking (namely: knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation). The book starts with the absolute basics (for example, how to find the topic, issue, and thesis) vs. the usual "explaining and evaluating arguments" and fine distinctions that easily can lose students.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Ayda I. Arruda, R. Chuaqui & Newton C. A. Costa (eds.) (1980). Mathematical Logic in Latin America: Proceedings of the IV Latin American Symposium on Mathematical Logic Held in Santiago, December 1978. Sole Distributors for the U.S.A. And Canada, Elsevier North-Holland.
    (or not oveA-complete.) . Let * be a unary operator defined on the set F of formulas of the language £ (ie, if A is a formula of £, then *A is also a ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. R. E. Jennings (1994). The Genealogy of Disjunction. Oxford University Press.
    This is a comprehensive study of the English word 'or', and the logical operators variously proposed to present its meaning. Although there are indisputably disjunctive uses of or in English, it is a mistake to suppose that logical disjunction represents its core meaning. 'Or' is descended from the Anglo-Saxon word meaning second, a form which survives in such expressions as "every other day." Its disjunctive uses arise through metalinguistic applications of an intermediate adverbial meaning which is conjunctive rather than disjunctive (...)
  31. Peter Aczel, Harold Simmons & S. S. Wainer (eds.) (1992). Proof Theory: A Selection of Papers From the Leeds Proof Theory Programme, 1990. Cambridge University Press.
    This work is derived from the SERC "Logic for IT" Summer School Conference on Proof Theory held at Leeds University. The contributions come from acknowledged experts and comprise expository and research articles which form an invaluable introduction to proof theory aimed at both mathematicians and computer scientists.
  32. Alfred Tarski (1994). Introduction to Logic and to the Methodology of the Deductive Sciences. Oxford University Press.
    Now in its fourth edition, this classic work clearly and concisely introduces the subject of logic and its applications. The first part of the book explains the basic concepts and principles which make up the elements of logic. The author demonstrates that these ideas are found in all branches of mathematics, and that logical laws are constantly applied in mathematical reasoning. The second part of the book shows the applications of logic in mathematical theory building with concrete examples that draw (...)
  33. Dale Jacquette (ed.) (2002). Philosophy of Logic: An Anthology. Blackwell Publishers.
    The papers presented in this volume examine topics of central interest in contemporary philosophy of logic. They include reflections on the nature of logic and its relevance for philosophy today, and explore in depth developments in informal logic and the relation of informal to symbolic logic, mathematical metatheory and the limiting metatheorems, modal logic, many-valued logic, relevance and paraconsistent logic, free logics, extensional v. intensional logics, the logic of fiction, epistemic logic, formal logical and semantic paradoxes, the concept of truth, (...)
  34. Karel Lambert (2003). Free Logic: Selected Essays. New Yorkcambridge University Press.
    Free logic is an important field of philosophical logic that first appeared in the 1950s. J. Karel Lambert was one of its founders and coined the term itself. The essays in this collection (written over a period of 40 years) explore the philosophical foundations of free logic and its application to areas as diverse as the philosophy of religion and computer science. Amongst the applications on offer are those to the analysis of existence statements, to definite descriptions and to partial (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Avron Polakow (ed.) (1981). Tense and Performance: An Essay on the Uses of Tensed and Tenseless Language. Rodopi.
    PREFACE This essay developed from ideas in my doctoral thesis submitted to the Hebrew University in 1977. Chapter three has been amended as regards one of ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Alessandro Armando (ed.) (2002). Frontiers of Combining Systems: 4th International Workshop, Frocos 2002, Santa Margherita Ligure, Italy, April 8-10, 2002: Proceedings. [REVIEW] Springer.
    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Frontiers of Combining Systems, FroCoS 2002, held in Santa Margherita Ligure, Italy, in April 2002.The 14 revised full papers presented together with 3 invited papers were carefully reviewed and selected from 35 submissions. Among the topics covered are combination of logics, combination of constraint solving techniques, combination of decision procedures, combination problems in verification, modular problems of theorem proving, and the integration of decision procedures and other solving processes (...)
  37. Gregory Landini (1998). Russell's Hidden Substitutional Theory. Oxford University Press.
    This book explores an important central thread that unifies Russell's thoughts on logic in two works previously considered at odds with each other, the Principles of Mathematics and the later Principia Mathematica. This thread is Russell's doctrine that logic is an absolutely general science and that any calculus for it must embrace wholly unrestricted variables. The heart of Landini's book is a careful analysis of Russell's largely unpublished "substitutional" theory. On Landini's showing, the substitutional theory reveals the unity of Russell's (...)
  38. Stephen Read (1994). Thinking About Logic: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Logic. Oxford University Press.
    In this book, Stephen Read sets out to rescue logic from its undeserved reputation as an inflexible, dogmatic discipline by demonstrating that its technicalities and processes are founded on assumptions which are themselves amenable to philosophical investigation. He examines the fundamental principles of consequence, logical truth and correct inference within the context of logic, and shows that the principles by which we delineate consequences are themselves not guaranteed free from error. Central to the notion of truth is the beguiling issue (...)
  39. Uwe Schöning (1989). Logic for Computer Scientists. Birkhäuser.
    This book introduces the notions and methods of formal logic from a computer science standpoint, covering propositional logic, predicate logic, and foundations ...
  40. Peter Gibbins (1987). Particles and Paradoxes: The Limits of Quantum Logic. Cambridge University Press.
    Quantum theory is our deepest theory of the nature of matter. It is a theory that, notoriously, produces results which challenge the laws of classical logic and suggests that the physical world is illogical. This book gives a critical review of work on the foundations of quantum mechanics at a level accessible to non-experts. Assuming his readers have some background in mathematics and physics, Peter Gibbins focuses on the questions of whether the results of quantum theory require us to abandon (...)
  41. J. Väänänen (2007). Dependence Logic: A New Approach to Independence Friendly Logic. Cambridge University Press.
    Dependence is a common phenomenon, wherever one looks: ecological systems, astronomy, human history, stock markets - but what is the logic of dependence? This book is the first to carry out a systematic logical study of this important concept, giving on the way a precise mathematical treatment of Hintikka’s independence friendly logic. Dependence logic adds the concept of dependence to first order logic. Here the syntax and semantics of dependence logic are studied, dependence logic is given an alternative game theoretic (...)
  42. Palle Yourgrau (ed.) (1990). Demonstratives. Oxford University Press.
  43. John Woods (2003). Paradox and Paraconsistency: Conflict Resolution in the Abstract Sciences. Cambridge University Press.
    In a world plagued by disagreement and conflict one might expect that the exact sciences of logic and mathematics would provide a safe harbor. In fact these disciplines are rife with internal divisions between different, often incompatible, systems. Do these disagreements admit of resolution? Can such resolution be achieved without disturbing assumptions that the theorems of logic and mathematics state objective truths about the real world? In this original and historically rich book John Woods explores apparently intractable disagreements in logic (...)
  44. R. Carnap & R. Jeffrey (eds.) (1971). Studies in Inductive Logic and Probability. University of California Press.
    Introduction Much delayed, here is the second, final volume of Studies in Inductive Logic and Probability. Carnap projected the series ca. as a ...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. J. C. Beall & B. Armour-Garb (eds.) (2006). Deflationism and Paradox. Oxford University Press.
    In this volume of fourteen original essays, a distinguished team of contributors explore the extent to which, if at all, deflationism can accommodate paradox.
  46. J. C. Beall & B. Amour-Garb (eds.) (2005). Deflation and Paradox. Oxford University Press.
    In this volume of fourteen original essays, a distinguished team of contributors explore the extent to which, if at all, deflationism can accommodate paradox.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Mannis Charosh (1974). Number Ideas Through Pictures. New York,T. Y. Crowell.
  48. Stig Kanger & Sören Stenlund (eds.) (1974). Logical Theory and Semantic Analysis: Essays Dedicated to Stig Kanger on His Fiftieth Birthday. Reidel.
    Lewis, D. Semantic analyses for dyadic deontic logic.--Salomaa, A. Some remarks concerning many-valued propositional logics.--Chellas, B. F. Conditional obligation.--Jeffrey, R.C. Remarks on interpersonal utility theory.--Hintikka, J. On the proper treatment of quantifiers in Montague semantics.--Mayoh, B.H. Extracting information from logical proofs.--Åqvist, L. A new approach to the logical theory of actions and causality.--Pörn, I. Some basic concepts of action.--Bouvère, K. de. Some remarks concerning logical and ontological theories.--Hacking, I. Combined evidence.--Äberg, C. Solution to a problem raised by Stig Kanger and (...)
  49. Robert C. Koons (1992). Paradoxes of Belief and Strategic Rationality. Cambridge University Press.
    The purpose of this book is to develop a framework for analyzing strategic rationality, a notion central to contemporary game theory, which is the formal study of the interaction of rational agents, and which has proved extremely fruitful in economics, political theory, and business management. The author argues that a logical paradox (known since antiquity as "the Liar paradox") lies at the root of a number of persistent puzzles in game theory, in particular those concerning rational agents who seek to (...)
  50. Elliot D. Cohen (2009). Critical Thinking Unleashed. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Socrates, Aristotle, Epictetus, Hume, Kant, Mill, Sartre, and Nietzsche), Critical Thinking Unleashed presents a practical, non-technical, and comprehensive approach to critical thinking.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  51. 1 — 50 / 236