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1 — 50 / 198
  1. H. Jerome Keisler (1971). Model Theory for Infinitary Logic. Amsterdam,North-Holland Pub. Co..
    Provability, Computability and Reflection.
  2. Evert Willem Beth (1970). Aspects of Modern Logic. Dordrecht,Reidel.
  3. Leigh S. Cauman (1998). First-Order Logic: An Introduction. Walter De Gruyter.
    Introduction This is an elementary logic book designed for people who have no technical familiarity with modern logic but who have been reasoning, ...
  4. Philippe Smets (ed.) (1988). Non-Standard Logics for Automated Reasoning. Academic Press.
  5. Alessandro Andretta, Keith Kearnes & Domenico Zambella (eds.) (2008). Logic Colloquium 2004: Proceedings of the Annual European Summer Meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic, Held in Torino, Italy, July 25-31, 2004. [REVIEW] Cambridge University Press.
    Highlights of this volume from the 2004 Annual European Meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic (ASL) include a tutorial survey of the recent highpoints of universal algebra, written by a leading expert; explorations of foundational questions; a quartet of model theory papers giving an excellent reflection of current work in model theory, from the most abstract aspect "abstract elementary classes" to issues around p-adic integration.
  6. Dave Barker-Plummer (2011). Language, Proof, and Logic. Csli Publications.
  7. Roy Dowsing (1986). A First Course in Formal Logic and its Applications in Computer Science. Blackwell Scientific Publications.
  8. R. Carnap & R. Jeffrey (eds.) (1971). Studies in Inductive Logic and Probability. University of California Press.
    Introduction Much delayed, here is the second, final volume of Studies in Inductive Logic and Probability. Carnap projected the series ca. as a ...
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  9. Stephen Read (1994). Thinking About Logic: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Logic. Oxford University Press.
    In this book, Stephen Read sets out to rescue logic from its undeserved reputation as an inflexible, dogmatic discipline by demonstrating that its technicalities and processes are founded on assumptions which are themselves amenable to philosophical investigation. He examines the fundamental principles of consequence, logical truth and correct inference within the context of logic, and shows that the principles by which we delineate consequences are themselves not guaranteed free from error. Central to the notion of truth is the beguiling issue (...)
  10. Brian Skyrms (1975). Choice and Chance: An Introduction to Inductive Logic. Dickenson Pub. Co..
  11. C.-T. Chong & M. J. Wicks (eds.) (1983). Southeast Asian Conference on Logic: Proceedings of the Logic Conference, Singapore, 1981. Sole Distributors for the U.S.A. And Canada, Elsevier Science Pub. Co..
  12. S. B. Cooper, Benedikt Löwe & Andrea Sorbi (eds.) (2007). New Computational Paradigms: Changing Conceptions of What is Computable. Springer.
    Logicians and theoretical physicists will also benefit from this book.
  13. Donald Davidson (1975). The Logic of Grammar. Dickenson Pub. Co..
  14. J. E. J. Altham (1971). The Logic of Plurality. London,Methuen.
  15. Stan Baronett (2008). Logic. Pearson Prentice Hall.
    Logic and truth -- Inferences : assessment, recognition, and reconstruction -- Categorical statements and inferences -- Truth-functional statements -- Truth tables and proofs -- Natural deduction -- The logic of quantifiers -- Logic and language -- Applied inductive analysis.
  16. Ian Hacking & Casimir Lewy (eds.) (1985). Exercises in Analysis: Essays by Students of Casimir Lewy. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a volume of specially commissioned essays of analytical philosophy, on topics of current interest in ethics and the philosophy of logic and language. Among the topics discussed are the making of wicked promises, G. E. Moore's early ethical views, as well as indexicals, tense, indeterminism, conventionalism in mathematics, and identity and necessity. The essays are all by former students of Casimir Lewy, until recently Reader in Philosophy at the University of Cambridge and an exponent of a particularly thoroughgoing (...)
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  17. Robert J. Fogelin (1991). Understanding Arguments: An Introduction to Informal Logic. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.
  18. Aladdin Mahmūd Yaqūb (1993). The Liar Speaks the Truth: A Defense of the Revision Theory of Truth. Oxford University Press.
    In this book, Yaqub describes a simple conception of truth and shows that it yields a semantical theory that accommodates the whole range of our seemingly conflicting intuitions about truth. This conception takes the Tarskian biconditionals (such as "The sentence 'Johannes loved Clara' is true if and only if Johannes loved Clara") as correctly and completely defining the notion of truth. The semantical theory, which is called the revision theory, that emerges from this conception paints a metaphysical picture of truth (...)
  19. R. E. Jennings (1994). The Genealogy of Disjunction. Oxford University Press.
    This is a comprehensive study of the English word 'or', and the logical operators variously proposed to present its meaning. Although there are indisputably disjunctive uses of or in English, it is a mistake to suppose that logical disjunction represents its core meaning. 'Or' is descended from the Anglo-Saxon word meaning second, a form which survives in such expressions as "every other day." Its disjunctive uses arise through metalinguistic applications of an intermediate adverbial meaning which is conjunctive rather than disjunctive (...)
  20. Aladdin M. Yaqub (1993). The Liar Speaks the Truth: A Defense of the Revision Theory of Truth. Oup Usa.
    In this book Yaqub describes a simple conception of truth and shows that it yields a semantical theory that accommodates the whole range of our seemingly conflicting intuitions about truth. This conception takes the Tarskian biconditionals as correctly and completely defining the notion of truth. He offers a comprehensive defense of the semantical theory by developing consistent and adequate formal semantics for languages in which all sorts of problematic sentences can be constructed. Yaqub concludes by introducing a logic of truth (...)
  21. Richard B. Angell (2002). A-Logic. University Press of America.
    A-LOGIC is a full-length book (600+ pg). It functions as a system of logic designed to: 1) solve the standard paradoxes and major problems of standard mathematical logic; 2) minimize that logic's anomalies with respect to ordinary language, yet; 3) prove that all theorems in mathematical logic are tautologies. It covers lst order logic the logic of the words "and", "or", "not", "all" and "some". But it also has a non truth functional "if...then" and differs in its definition of validity, (...)
  22. E. M. Barth & J. L. Martens (eds.) (1982). Argumentation: Approaches to Theory Formation: Containing the Contributions to the Groningen Conference on the Theory of Argumentation, October 1978. Benjamins.
    The contributions in the first part Re-modelling logic of this volume take account of formal logic in the theory of rational argumentation.
  23. Irving M. Copi (1973/1968). Symbolic Logic. New York,Macmillan.
  24. Aleksandr Zinoviev (1973). Foundations of the Logical Theory of Scientific Knowledge (Complex Logic). Dordrecht,Reidel.
  25. Benson Mates (1972). Elementary Logic. New York,Oxford University Press.
  26. M. Ben-Ari (1993/2003). Mathematical Logic for Computer Science. Prentice Hall.
    Mathematical Logic for Computer Science is a mathematics textbook with theorems and proofs, but the choice of topics has been guided by the needs of computer science students. The method of semantic tableaux provides an elegant way to teach logic that is both theoretically sound and yet sufficiently elementary for undergraduates. To provide a balanced treatment of logic, tableaux are related to deductive proof systems.The logical systems presented are:- Propositional calculus (including binary decision diagrams);- Predicate calculus;- Resolution;- Hoare logic;- Z;- (...)
  27. Crispin Wright (1992). Truth and Objectivity. Harvard University Press.
    Recasting important questions about truth and objectivity in new and helpful terms, his book will become a focus in the contemporary debates over realism, and ...
  28. Harry J. Gensler (2002). Introduction to Logic. Routledge.
    Introduction to Logic offers one of the most clear, interesting and accessible introductions to what has long been considered one of the most challenging subjects in philosophy. Harry Gensler engages readers with the basics of logic through practical examples and important arguments in the history of philosophy and from contemporary philosophy. Using simpler and manageable methods for testing arguments, readers are led through in a careful step-by-step way to master the complexities of logic.
  29. Ayda I. Arruda, R. Chuaqui & Newton C. A. Costdaa (eds.) (1980). Mathematical Logic in Latin America: Proceedings of the Iv Latin American Symposium on Mathematical Logic Held in Santiago, December 1978. Sole Distributors for the U.S.A. And Canada, Elsevier North-Holland.
    (or not oveA-complete.) . Let * be a unary operator defined on the set F of formulas of the language £ (ie, if A is a formula of £, then *A is also a ...
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  30. Alfred Tarski (1994). Introduction to Logic and to the Methodology of the Deductive Sciences. Oxford University Press.
    Now in its fourth edition, this classic work clearly and concisely introduces the subject of logic and its applications. The first part of the book explains the basic concepts and principles which make up the elements of logic. The author demonstrates that these ideas are found in all branches of mathematics, and that logical laws are constantly applied in mathematical reasoning. The second part of the book shows the applications of logic in mathematical theory building with concrete examples that draw (...)
  31. Christopher S. Hill (2002). Thought and World: An Austere Portrayal of Truth, Reference, and Semantic Correspondence. Cambridge University Press.
    There is an important family of semantic notions that are applied to thoughts and to the conceptual constituents of thoughts--as when one says that the thought that the Universe is expanding is true. Christopher Hill presents a theory of the content of such notions. That theory is largely deflationary in spirit. It represents a broad range of semantic notions free from substantive metaphysical and empirical presuppositions. He also explains the relationship of mirroring or semantic correspondence linking thoughts to reality.
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  32. J. C. Beall & B. Armour-Garb (eds.) (2006). Deflationism and Paradox. Oxford University Press.
    In this volume of fourteen original essays, a distinguished team of contributors explore the extent to which, if at all, deflationism can accommodate paradox.
  33. Sybil Wolfram (1989). Philosophical Logic: An Introduction. Routledge.
    A basic introduction to the subject which addresses questions of truth and meaning, providing a basis for much of what is discussed elsewhere in philosophy. Up-to-date and comprehensive.
  34. Peter Aczel, Harold Simmons & S. S. Wainer (eds.) (1992). Proof Theory: A Selection of Papers From the Leeds Proof Theory Programme, 1990. Cambridge University Press.
    This work is derived from the SERC "Logic for IT" Summer School Conference on Proof Theory held at Leeds University. The contributions come from acknowledged experts and comprise expository and research articles which form an invaluable introduction to proof theory aimed at both mathematicians and computer scientists.
  35. Harwood Fisher (2008). Self, Logic, and Figurative Thinking. Columbia University Press.
    Introduction: Major terms, their classification, and their relation to the book's objective -- The problem of analogous forms -- Natural logic, categories, and the individual -- Shift to individual categories, dynamics, and a psychological look at identity form versus function -- What is the difference between the logic governing a figure of speech and the logic that is immature or unconscious? -- What are the role and function of the self vis-à-vis consciousness? -- Development in the logic from immature to (...)
  36. Robert C. Koons (1992). Paradoxes of Belief and Strategic Rationality. Cambridge University Press.
    The purpose of this book is to develop a framework for analyzing strategic rationality, a notion central to contemporary game theory, which is the formal study of the interaction of rational agents, and which has proved extremely fruitful in economics, political theory, and business management. The author argues that a logical paradox (known since antiquity as "the Liar paradox") lies at the root of a number of persistent puzzles in game theory, in particular those concerning rational agents who seek to (...)
  37. J. Väänänen (2007). Dependence Logic: A New Approach to Independence Friendly Logic. Cambridge University Press.
    Dependence is a common phenomenon, wherever one looks: ecological systems, astronomy, human history, stock markets - but what is the logic of dependence? This book is the first to carry out a systematic logical study of this important concept, giving on the way a precise mathematical treatment of Hintikka’s independence friendly logic. Dependence logic adds the concept of dependence to first order logic. Here the syntax and semantics of dependence logic are studied, dependence logic is given an alternative game theoretic (...)
  38. Colin McGinn (2000). Logical Properties: Identity, Existence, Predication, Necessity, Truth. Oxford University Press.
    Identity, existence, predication, necessity, and truth are vital concepts at the center of philosophy. Yet Colin McGinn believes that orthodox views of these topics are misguided in important ways. Philosophers and logicians have often distorted the nature of these concepts in an attempt to define them according to preconceived ideas. Logical Properties aims to respect the ordinary ways we talk and think when we employ these concepts, while at the same time showing that they are far more interesting and peculiar (...)
  39. Vladimir V. Rybakov (1997). Admissibility of Logical Inference Rules. Elsevier.
    The aim of this book is to present the fundamental theoretical results concerning inference rules in deductive formal systems. Primary attention is focused on: admissible or permissible inference rules the derivability of the admissible inference rules the structural completeness of logics the bases for admissible and valid inference rules. There is particular emphasis on propositional non-standard logics (primary, superintuitionistic and modal logics) but general logical consequence relations and classical first-order theories are also considered. The book is basically self-contained and special (...)
  40. Jerry Seligman & Dag Westerståhl (eds.) (1996). Logic, Language and Computation. Csli Publications, Stanford.
  41. Palle Yourgrau (ed.) (1990). Demonstratives. Oxford University Press.
  42. Wolfgang Rautenberg (2006). A Concise Introduction to Mathematical Logic. Springer.
    Traditional logic as a part of philosophy is one of the oldest scientific disciplines. Mathematical logic, however, is a relatively young discipline and arose from the endeavors of Peano, Frege, Russell and others to create a logistic foundation for mathematics. It steadily developed during the 20th century into a broad discipline with several sub-areas and numerous applications in mathematics, informatics, linguistics and philosophy. While there are already several well-known textbooks on mathematical logic, this book is unique in that it is (...)
  43. Jon Barwise (1987). The Liar: An Essay on Truth and Circularity. Oxford University Press.
    Bringing together powerful new tools from set theory and the philosophy of language, this book proposes a solution to one of the few unresolved paradoxes from antiquity, the Paradox of the Liar. Treating truth as a property of propositions, not sentences, the authors model two distinct conceptions of propositions: one based on the standard notion used by Bertrand Russell, among others, and the other based on J.L. Austin's work on truth. Comparing these two accounts, the authors show that while the (...)
  44. David J. Pym (2004). Reductive Logic and Proof-Search: Proof Theory, Semantics, and Control. Oxford University Press.
    This book is a specialized monograph on the development of the mathematical and computational metatheory of reductive logic and proof-search including proof-theoretic, semantic/model-theoretic and algorithmic aspects. The scope ranges from the conceptual background to reductive logic, through its mathematical metatheory, to its modern applications in the computational sciences.
  45. Moshe Kroy (1975). Moral Competence: An Application of Modal Logic to Rationalistic Psychology. Mouton.
  46. J. C. Beall (ed.) (2007). Revenge of the Liar: New Essays on the Paradox. Oxford University Press.
    The Liar paradox raises foundational questions about logic, language, and truth (and semantic notions in general). A simple Liar sentence like 'This sentence is false' appears to be both true and false if it is either true or false. For if the sentence is true, then what it says is the case; but what it says is that it is false, hence it must be false. On the other hand, if the statement is false, then it is true, since it (...)
  47. Douglas N. Walton (1996). Argumentation Schemes for Presumptive Reasoning. L. Erlbaum Associates.
    This book identifies 25 argumentation schemes for presumptive reasoning and matches a set of critical questions to each.
  48. Karel Lambert (2003). Free Logic: Selected Essays. New Yorkcambridge University Press.
    Free logic is an important field of philosophical logic that first appeared in the 1950s. J. Karel Lambert was one of its founders and coined the term itself. The essays in this collection (written over a period of 40 years) explore the philosophical foundations of free logic and its application to areas as diverse as the philosophy of religion and computer science. Amongst the applications on offer are those to the analysis of existence statements, to definite descriptions and to partial (...)
  49. Charles S. Chihara (1973). Ontology and the Vicious-Circle Principle. Ithaca [N.Y.]Cornell University Press.
  50. Samuel D. Guttenplan (1997). The Languages of Logic: An Introduction to Formal Logic. Blackwell Publishers.
    Other new material includes a discussion of the truth tree method for both Sentential and Predicate logics, an account of alternative notations and the ...
  51. 1 — 50 / 198