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1 — 50 / 283
  1. Raymond L. Bryant (1997). Third World Political Ecology. Routledge.
    The authors review the historical development of the field, explain what is distinctive about Third World political ecology, and suggest areas for future ...
  2. Jacques Ricard (1999). Biological Complexity and the Dynamics of Life Processes. Elsevier.
    The aim of this book is to show how supramolecular complexity of cell organization can dramatically alter the functions of individual macromolecules within a cell. The emergence of new functions which appear as a consequence of supramolecular complexity, is explained in terms of physical chemistry. The book is interdisciplinary, at the border between cell biochemistry, physics and physical chemistry. This interdisciplinarity does not result in the use of physical techniques but from the use of physical concepts to study biological problems. (...)
  3. Richard Levins (1985). The Dialectical Biologist. Harvard University Press.
    Throughout, this book questions our accepted definitions and biases, showing the self-reflective nature of scientific activity within society.
  4. Ernest Nagel (1979). Teleology Revisited and Other Essays in the Philosophy and History of Science. Columbia University Press.
  5. Michael Ruse (1989). The Darwinian Paradigm: Essays on its History, Philosophy, and Religious Implications. Routledge.
    INTRODUCTION I first read Charles Darwin's masterpiece, On the Origin of Species , some twenty years ago. At once I fell under its spell - an emotion which ...
  6. Bernhard Rensch (1971). Biophilosophy. New York,Columbia University Press.
  7. Catherine Roberts (1980). Science, Animals, and Evolution: Reflections on Some Unrealized Potentials of Biology and Medicine. Greenwood Press.
  8. Rolf Edberg (1974). At the Foot of the Tree. University, Ala.,University of Alabama Press.
  9. David Young (2007). The Discovery of Evolution. Cambridge University Press, in Association with Natural History Museum, London.
    The Discovery of Evolution explains what the theory of evolution is all about by providing a historical narrative of discovery. Some of the major puzzles that confront anyone studying living things are discussed and it details how these were solved from an evolutionary perspective. Beginning with the emergence of the early naturalists in the seventeenth century, the scientific discoveries that led up to and then flowed from Darwin and Wallace's theory of evolution by natural selection are then discussed, and finally (...)
  10. David Pepper (1993). Eco-Socialism: From Deep Ecology to Social Justice. Routledge.
    Presents a provocatively anthropocentric analysis of the way forward for green politics and environmental movements, exposing the deficiencies and contradictions of green approaches to post-modern politics and deep ecology. This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
  11. H. Carel & D. Gamez (eds.) (2004). What Philosophy Is. Ccontinuum.
    This book addresses the question "What is Philosophy?" by gathering together responses from philosophers working in a variety of areas.
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  12. Sean Esbjörn-Hargens (2009). Integral Ecology: Uniting Multiple Perspectives on the Natural World. Integral Books.
    In response to this pressing need, Integral Ecology unites valuable insights from multiple perspectives into a comprehensive theoretical framework-one that can ...
  13. Verena Andermatt Conley (1997). Ecopolitics: The Environment in Poststructuralist Thought. Routledge.
    Ecopolitics is a study of environmental awareness--or non-awareness--in contemporary French theory. Arguing that it is now impossible not to think in an ecological way, Verena Andermatt Conley traces the roots of today's concern for the environment back to the intellectual climate of the late '50s and '60s. Major thinkers of 1968, the author argues, changed the way we think the world; this owes much to an ecological awareness that remains at the heart of issues concerning cultural theory in general. The (...)
  14. Roger Brownsword, W. R. Cornish & Margaret Llewelyn (eds.) (1998). Law and Human Genetics: Regulating a Revolution. Hart Pub..
    This special issue of the Modern Law Review addresses a range of key issues - conceptual, ethical, political and practical - arising from the regulatory ...
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  15. D. R. Brooks (1988). Evolution as Entropy: Toward a Unified Theory of Biology. University of Chicago Press.
    "By combining recent advances in the physical sciences with some of the novel ideas, techniques, and data of modern biology, this book attempts to achieve a new and different kind of evolutionary synthesis. I found it to be challenging, fascinating, infuriating, and provocative, but certainly not dull."--James H, Brown, University of New Mexico "This book is unquestionably mandatory reading not only for every living biologist but for generations of biologists to come."--Jack P. Hailman, Animal Behaviour , review of the first (...)
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  16. der Steen & J. Wim (2000). Evolution as Natural History: A Philosophical Analysis. Praeger.
  17. Evandro Agazzi & Alberto Cordero (eds.) (1991). Philosophy and the Origin and Evolution of the Universe. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  18. Elliott Sober (1994). From a Biological Point of View: Essays in Evolutionary Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Elliott Sober is one of the leading philosophers of science and is a former winner of the Lakatos Prize, the major award in the field. This new collection of essays will appeal to a readership that extends well beyond the frontiers of the philosophy of science. Sober shows how ideas in evolutionary biology bear in significant ways on traditional problems in philosophy of mind and language, epistemology, and metaphysics. Amongst the topics addressed are psychological egoism, solipsism, and the interpretation of (...)
  19. Michael Ruse (1988). Philosophy of Biology Today. State University of New York Press.
    This short and highly accessible volume opens up the subject of the philosophy of biology to professionals and to students in both disciplines. The text covers briefly and clearly all of the pertinent topics in the subject, dealing with both human and non-human issues, and quite uniquely surveying not only scholars in the English-speaking world but others elsewhere, including the Eastern block. As molecular biologists peer ever more deeply into life’s mysteries, there are those who fear that such ‘reductionism’ conceals (...)
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  20. Paul H. Barrett (ed.) (1987). A Concordance to Darwin's the Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex. Cornell University Press.
  21. David Takacs (1996). The Idea of Biodiversity: Philosophies of Paradise. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    "At places distant from where you are, but also uncomfortably close," writes David Takacs, "a holocaust is under way. People are slashing, hacking, bulldozing, burning, poisoning, and otherwise destroying huge swaths of life on Earth at a furious pace." And a cadre of ecologists and conservation biologists has responded, vigorously promoting a new definition of nature: biodiversity --advocating it in Congress and on the Tonight Show; whispering it into the ears of foreign leaders redefining the boundaries of science and politics, (...)
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  22. Denis Charles Phillips (1976). Holistic Thought in Social Science. Stanford University Press.
    Introduction In ancient rome, legend has it, a plebeian revolt was once quelled when the tribune Menenius Agrippa argued ...
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  23. Lindley Darden (1991). Theory Change in Science: Strategies From Mendelian Genetics. Oxford University Press.
    This innovative book focuses on the development of the gene theory as a case study in scientific creativity.
  24. Paul F. Boller (1969). American Thought in Transition: The Impact of Evolutionary Naturalism, 1865-1900. Chicago, Rand Mcnally.
  25. Fred Wilson (1991). Empiricism and Darwin's Science. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  26. David Liittschwager, E. O. Wilson, W. S. DiPiero, Alan Huffman, August Kleinzahler, Elizabeth Kolbert, Nalini M. Nadkarni, Jasper Slingsby & Peter Slingsby (2012). A World in One Cubic Foot: Portraits of Biodiversity. University of Chicago Press.
    After encountering this book, you will never look at the tiniest sliver of your own backyard or neighborhood park the same way; instead, you will be stunned by the unexpected variety of species found in an area so small.
  27. Tama Leaver (2011). Artificial Culture: Identity, Technology and Bodies. Routledge.
  28. Marc Ereshefsky (2000). The Poverty of the Linnaean Hierarchy: A Philosophical Study of Biological Taxonomy. Cambridge University Press.
    The question of whether biologists should continue to use the Linnaean hierarchy is a hotly debated issue. Invented before the introduction of evolutionary theory, Linnaeus's system of classifying organisms is based on outdated theoretical assumptions, and is thought to be unable to provide accurate biological classifications. Marc Ereshefsky argues that biologists should abandon the Linnaean system and adopt an alternative that is more in line with evolutionary theory. He traces the evolution of the Linnaean hierarchy from its introduction to the (...)
  29. Roger J. Faber (1986). Clockwork Garden: On the Mechanistic Reduction of Living Things. University of Massachusetts Press.
    ONE Wholes and Parts: Introductory Survey COMMON WISDOM ABOUT THE WORLD GUIDES us WELL in daily living, but getting along practically is not enough; ...
  30. Christopher Hookway (ed.) (1984). Minds, Machines And Evolution. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    This is a volume of original essays written by philosophers and scientists and dealing with philosophical questions arising from work in evolutionary biology and artificial intelligence. In recent years both of these areas have been the focus for attempts to provide a scientific, model of a wide range of human capacities - most prominently perhaps in sociobiology and cognitive psychology. The book therefore examines a number of issues related to the search for a 'naturalistic' or scientific account of human experience (...)
  31. Richard Swinburne (1996). Is There a God? Oxford University Press.
    At least since Darwin's Origin of Species was published in 1859, it has increasingly become accepted that the existence of God is, intellectually, a lost cause, and that religious faith is an entirely non-rational matter--the province of those who willingly refuse to accept the dramatic advances of modern cosmology. Are belief in God and belief in science really mutually exclusive? Or, as noted philosopher of science and religion Richard Swinburne puts forth, can the very same criteria which scientists use to (...)
  32. Thomas F. Glick (ed.) (1988). The Comparative Reception of Darwinism. University of Chicago Press.
    The reaction to Darwin's Origin of Species varied in many countries according to the roles played by national scientific institutions and traditions and the attitudes of religious and political groups. The contributors to this volume, including M. J. S. Hodge, David Hull, and Roberto Moreno, gathered in 1972 at an international conference on the comparative reception of Darwinism. Their essays look at early pro- and anti-Darwinism arguments, and three additional comparative essays and appendices add a larger perspective. For this paperback (...)
  33. Stephen R. L. Clark (1994). How to Think About the Earth. Mowbray.
  34. John Bigelow & Robert Pargetter (1990). Science and Necessity. Cambridge University Press.
    This book espouses an innovative theory of scientific realism in which due weight is given to mathematics and logic. The authors argue that mathematics can be understood realistically if it is seen to be the study of universals, of properties and relations, of patterns and structures, the kinds of things which can be in several places at once. Taking this kind of scientific platonism as their point of departure, they show how the theory of universals can account for probability, laws (...)
  35. Bryan G. Norton (2002). Searching for Sustainability: Interdisciplinary Essays in the Philosophy of Conservation Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    This book examines from a multidisciplinary viewpoint the question of what we mean - what we should mean - by setting sustainability as a goal for environmental management. The author, trained as a philosopher of science and language, explores ways to break down the disciplinary barriers to communication and deliberation about environment policy, and to integrate science and evaluations into a more comprehensive environmental policy. Choosing sustainability as the keystone concept of environmental policy, the author explores what we can learn (...)
  36. Charles Birch (1981). The Liberation of Life: From the Cell to the Community. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is about the liberation of the concept of life from the bondage fashioned by the interpreters of life ever since biology began, and about the liberation of the life of humans and non-humans alike from the bondage of social structures and behaviour, which now threatens the fullness of life's possibilities if not survival itself. It falls into a tradition of writings about human problems from a perspective informed by biology. It rejects the mechanistic model of life dominant in (...)
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  37. Keekok Lee (2003). Philosophy and Revolutions in Genetics: Deep Science and Deep Technology. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The last century saw two great revolutions in genetics the development of classic Mendelian theory and the discovery and investigation of DNA. Each fundamental scientific discovery in turn generated its own distinctive technology. These two case studies, examined in this text, enable the author to conduct a philosophical exploration of the relationship between fundamental scientific discoveries on the one hand, and the technologies that spring from them on the other. As such it is also an exercise in the philosophy of (...)
  38. William S. Cooper (2001). The Evolution of Reason: Logic as a Branch of Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    The formal systems of logic have ordinarily been regarded as independent of biology, but recent developments in evolutionary theory suggest that biology and logic may be intimately interrelated. In this book, Cooper outlines a theory of rationality in which logical law emerges as an intrinsic aspect of evolutionary biology. This biological perspective on logic, though at present unorthodox, could change traditional ideas about the reasoning process. Cooper examines the connections between logic and evolutionary biology and illustrates how logical rules are (...)
  39. Suzanne Cunningham (1996). Philosophy and the Darwinian Legacy. University of Rochester Press.
  40. A. R. Peacocke (2004). Evolution: The Disguised Friend of Faith?: Selected Essays. Templeton Foundation Press.
    Arthur Peacocke, eminent priest-scientist, has collected thirteen of his essays for this volume, Previously published in various academic journals and edited ...
  41. Mathew Humphrey (2002). Preservation Versus the People?: Nature, Humanity, and Political Philosophy. OUP Oxford.
    This book looks anew at the question of nature preservation as public policy. The philosophy of nature preservation has to date focused on whether arguments for nature preservation should be centred on the value of nature itself or derived human benefits . This book argues that this way of thinking about the problem of preservation has been counter-productive for environmental ethics. Instead we need to unite both views around a concern for the irreplaceability of natural objects.
  42. Gregory John Cooper (2003). The Science of the Struggle for Existence: On the Foundations of Ecology. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the first examination in almost a decade of issues in the philosophy of ecology that have been a source of controversy since the existence of ecology as an explicit scientific discipline. The controversies revolve around the idea of a balance of nature, the possibility of general ecological knowledge and the role of model-building in ecology. The Science of the Struggle for Existence is also the first sustained treatment of these issues that incorporates both a comprehensive investigation of (...)
  43. Peter Achinstein (1983). The Nature of Explanation. Oxford University Press.
    Offering a new approach to scientific explanation, this book focuses initially on the explaining act itself.
  44. Philip W. Sutton (2004). Nature, Environment, and Society. Palgrave Macmillan.
    How have sociologists responded to the emergence of environmentalism? What has sociology to offer the study of environmental problems? This uniquely comprehensive guide traces the origins and development of environmental movements and environmental issues, providing a critical review of the most significant debates in the new field of environmental sociology. It covers environmental ideas, environmental movements, social constructionism, critical realism, "ecocentric" theory, environmental identities, risk society theory, sustainable development, Green consumerism, ecological modernization and debates around modernity and post- modernity. Philip (...)
  45. Jerry A. Fodor & Ernest Lepore (1992). Holism: A Shopper's Guide. Blackwell.
    The main question addressed in this book is whether individuation of the contents of thoughts and linguistic expressions is inherently holistic. The authors consider arguments that are alleged to show that the meaning of a scientific hypothesis depends on the entire theory that entails it, or that the content of a concept depends on the entire belief system of which it is part. If these arguments are sound then it would follow that the meanings of words, sentences, hypotheses, predictions, discourses, (...)
  46. Brian Baxter (2000). Ecologism: An Introduction. Georgetown University Press.
  47. Bentley Glass (1968). Forerunners of Darwin, 1745-1859. Baltimore, Johns Hopkins Press.
  48. Raymond Tallis (2010). Michelangelo's Finger: An Exploration of Everyday Transcendence. Yale University Press.
    How to point : a primer for Martians -- What it takes to be a pointer -- Do animals get the point? -- People who don't point -- Pinning language to the world -- Pointing and power -- Assisted pointing and pointing by proxy -- The transcendent animal : pointing and the beyond.
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  49. David Cayley (1991). The Age of Ecology: The Environment on Cbc Radio's Ideas. J. Lorimer.
    Based on interviews conducted for CBC Radio's Ideas, this book draws together an international selection of environmental experts, scientists, philosophers, and ...
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  50. Richard Swinburne (1986). The Evolution of the Soul. Oxford University Press.
    This is a revised and updated version of Swinburne's controversial treatment of the eternal philosophical problem of the relation between mind and body. He argues that we can only make sense of the interaction between the mental and the physical in terms of the soul, and that there is no scientific explanation of the evolution of the soul.
  51. 1 — 50 / 283