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1 — 50 / 301
  1. P. B. Medawar (1977). The Life Science: Current Ideas of Biology. Wildwood House.
  2. Richard Spilsbury (1974). Providence Lost: A Critique of Darwinism. Oxford University Press.
  3. Jacques Ricard (1999). Biological Complexity and the Dynamics of Life Processes. Elsevier.
    The aim of this book is to show how supramolecular complexity of cell organization can dramatically alter the functions of individual macromolecules within a cell. The emergence of new functions which appear as a consequence of supramolecular complexity, is explained in terms of physical chemistry. The book is interdisciplinary, at the border between cell biochemistry, physics and physical chemistry. This interdisciplinarity does not result in the use of physical techniques but from the use of physical concepts to study biological problems. (...)
  4. Mary Maxwell (1984). Human Evolution: A Philosophical Anthropology. Columbia University Press.
    ... Nosce te ipsum -Carolus Linnaeus We, however, want to become those we are — human beings who are new, unique, incomparable, who give themselves laws, ...
  5. Michael Ruse (2000/2001). The Evolution Wars: A Guide to the Debates. Rutgers University Press.
    This new series presents innovative titles pertaining to human origins, evolution, and behavior from a multi-disciplinary perspective.
  6. Keekok Lee (2003). Philosophy and Revolutions in Genetics: Deep Science and Deep Technology. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The last century saw two great revolutions in genetics the development of classic Mendelian theory and the discovery and investigation of DNA. Each fundamental scientific discovery in turn generated its own distinctive technology. These two case studies, examined in this text, enable the author to conduct a philosophical exploration of the relationship between fundamental scientific discoveries on the one hand, and the technologies that spring from them on the other. As such it is also an exercise in the philosophy of (...)
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  7. Susan James (1984). The Content of Social Explanation. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a study of the central questions of explanation in the social sciences, and a defence of 'holism' against 'individualism'. In the first half of the book Susan James sets out very clearly the philosophical background to this controversy. She locates its source not at the analytical level at which most of the debate is usually conducted but at a more fundamental, moral level, in different conceptions of the human individual. In the second half of the book she examines (...)
  8. Allen duPont Breck & Wolfgang Yourgrau (eds.) (1972/1974). Biology, History, and Natural Philosophy. [New York,Plenum Press.
  9. Verena Andermatt Conley (1997). Ecopolitics: The Environment in Poststructuralist Thought. Routledge.
    Ecopolitics is a study of environmental awareness--or non-awareness--in contemporary French theory. Arguing that it is now impossible not to think in an ecological way, Verena Andermatt Conley traces the roots of today's concern for the environment back to the intellectual climate of the late '50s and '60s. Major thinkers of 1968, the author argues, changed the way we think the world; this owes much to an ecological awareness that remains at the heart of issues concerning cultural theory in general. The (...)
  10. Richard Levins (1985). The Dialectical Biologist. Harvard University Press.
    Throughout, this book questions our accepted definitions and biases, showing the self-reflective nature of scientific activity within society.
  11. D. Levine & W. Elsberry (eds.) (1997). Optimality in Biological and Artificial Networks? Lawrence Erlbaum.
    This book is the third in a series based on conferences sponsored by the Metroplex Institute for Neural Dynamics, an interdisciplinary organization of neural ...
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  12. Douglas Torgerson (1999). The Promise of Green Politics: Environmentalism and the Public Sphere. Duke University Press.
    InThe Promise of Green PoliticsDouglas Torgerson offers a survey of different schools of ecological thought, discusses their implications for the larger ...
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  13. Carl R. Hausman (1993). Charles S. Peirce's Evolutionary Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In this systematic introduction to the philosophy of Charles S. Peirce, the author focuses on four of Peirce's fundamental conceptions: pragmatism and Peirce's development of it into what he called 'pragmaticism'; his theory of signs; his phenomenology; and his theory that continuity is of prime importance for philosophy. He argues that at the centre of Peirce's philosophical project is a unique form of metaphysical realism, whereby continuity and evolutionary change are both necessary for our understanding of experience. In his (...)
  14. David Young (2007). The Discovery of Evolution. Cambridge University Press, in Association with Natural History Museum, London.
    The Discovery of Evolution explains what the theory of evolution is all about by providing a historical narrative of discovery. Some of the major puzzles that confront anyone studying living things are discussed and it details how these were solved from an evolutionary perspective. Beginning with the emergence of the early naturalists in the seventeenth century, the scientific discoveries that led up to and then flowed from Darwin and Wallace's theory of evolution by natural selection are then discussed, and finally (...)
  15. Roger Brownsword, W. R. Cornish & Margaret Llewelyn (eds.) (1998). Law and Human Genetics: Regulating a Revolution. Hart Pub..
    This special issue of the Modern Law Review addresses a range of key issues - conceptual, ethical, political and practical - arising from the regulatory ...
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  16. Del Ratzsch (2001). Nature, Design, and Science: The Status of Design in Natural Science. State University of New York Press.
    Explores the question of whether or not concepts and principles involving supernatural intelligent design can occupy any legitimate place within science.
  17. David J. Wellman (2004). Sustainable Diplomacy: Ecology, Religion, and Ethics in Muslim-Christian Relations. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Drawing on the disciplines of Islamic and Christian Ethics, International Affairs, Environmental Science, History and Anthropology, Sustainable Diplomacy: Ecology, Religion and Ethics in Muslim-Christian Relations is a highly constructive work. Set in the context of modern Moroccan-Spanish relations, this text is a direct critique of realism as it is practiced in modern diplomacy. Proposing a new eco-centric approach to relations between nation-states and bioregions, Wellman presents the case for Ecological Realism, an undergirding philosophy for conducting a diplomacy that values the (...)
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  18. Catherine Roberts (1980). Science, Animals, and Evolution: Reflections on Some Unrealized Potentials of Biology and Medicine. Greenwood Press.
  19. David Pepper (1993). Eco-Socialism: From Deep Ecology to Social Justice. Routledge.
    Presents a provocatively anthropocentric analysis of the way forward for green politics and environmental movements, exposing the deficiencies and contradictions of green approaches to post-modern politics and deep ecology. This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
  20. Stephen R. L. Clark (2000). Biology and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    This stimulating and wide-ranging book mounts a profound enquiry into some of the most pressing questions of our age, by examining the relationship between biological science and Christianity. The history of biological discovery is explored from the point of view of a leading philosopher and ethicist. What effect should modern biological theory and practice have on Christian understanding of ethics? How much of that theory and practice should Christians endorse? Can Christians, for example, agree that biological changes are not governed (...)
  21. Holmes Rolston, Iii (1999). Genes, Genesis, and God: Values and Their Origins in Natural and Human History. Cambridge University Press.
    Holmes Rolston challenges the sociobiological orthodoxy that would naturalize science, ethics, and religion. The book argues that genetic processes are not blind, selfish, and contingent, and that nature is therefore not value-free. The author examines the emergence of complex biodiversity through evolutionary history. Especially remarkable in this narrative is the genesis of human beings with their capacities for science, ethics, and religion. A major conceptual task of the book is to relate cultural genesis to natural genesis. There is also a (...)
  22. Philip R. Loockvane (ed.) (1999). The Nature of Concepts: Evolution, Structure, and Representation. Routledge.
    The Nature of Concepts examines a central issue for all the main disciplines in cognitive science: how the human mind creates and passes on to other human minds a concept. An excellent cross-disciplinary collection with contributors including Steven Pinker, Andy Clarke and Henry Plotkin.
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  23. Paul Robbins (2004). Political Ecology: A Critical Introduction. Blackwell Pub..
    The hatchet and the seed -- A tree with deep roots -- The critical tools -- A field crystallizes -- Destruction of nature -- Construction of nature -- Degradation and marginalization -- Conservation and control -- Environmental conflict -- Environmental identity and social movement -- Where to now?
  24. Paul H. Barrett (ed.) (1987). A Concordance to Darwin's the Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex. Cornell University Press.
  25. Lindley Darden (2006). Reasoning in Biological Discoveries: Essays on Mechanisms, Interfield Relations, and Anomaly Resolution. Cambridge University Press.
    Reasoning in Biological Discoveries brings together a series of essays which focus on one of the most heavily debated topics of scientific discovery today. Collected together and richly illustrated for the first time in this edition, Darden's essays represent a ground-breaking foray into one of the major problems facing scientists and philosophers of science. Divided into three sections, the essays focus on broad themes, notably historical and philosophical issues at play in discussions of biological mechanism; and the problem of developing (...)
  26. Ernest Nagel (1979). Teleology Revisited and Other Essays in the Philosophy and History of Science. Columbia University Press.
  27. David L. Hull (1989). The Metaphysics of Evolution. State University of New York Press.
    Extreme variation in the meaning of the term “species” throughout the history of biology has often frustrated attempts of historians, philosophers and biologists to communicate with one another about the transition in biological thinking from the static species concept to the modern notion of evolving species. The most important change which has underlain all the other fluctuations in the meaning of the word “species” is the change from it denoting such metaphysical entities as essences, Forms or Natures to denoting classes (...)
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  28. D. R. Brooks (1988). Evolution as Entropy: Toward a Unified Theory of Biology. University of Chicago Press.
    "By combining recent advances in the physical sciences with some of the novel ideas, techniques, and data of modern biology, this book attempts to achieve a new and different kind of evolutionary synthesis. I found it to be challenging, fascinating, infuriating, and provocative, but certainly not dull."--James H, Brown, University of New Mexico "This book is unquestionably mandatory reading not only for every living biologist but for generations of biologists to come."--Jack P. Hailman, Animal Behaviour , review of the first (...)
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  29. Jozef Keulartz (1998). Struggle for Nature: A Critique of Radical Ecology. Routledge.
    The Struggle for Nature outlines and examines the main aspects of current environmental philosophy including deep ecology, social and political ecology, eco-feminism and eco-anarchism. It criticizes the dependency on science of these philosophies and the social problems engendered by them. Jozef Keulartz argues for a post-naturalistic turn in environmental philosophy. The Struggle for Nature presents the most up-to-date arguments in environmental philosophy, which will be valuable reading for anyone interested in applied philosophy, environmental studies or geography.
  30. Herbert F. Mataré (1999). Bioethics: The Ethics of Evolution and Genetic Interference. Bergin & Garvey.
    From a scientific approach, this work explores the moral implications of genetic engineering and argues for corrective genetic interference.
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  31. Francisco Jose Ayala & Theodosius Grigorievich Dobzhansky (eds.) (1974). Studies in the Philosophy of Biology: Reduction and Related Problems. University of California Press.
    . Introductory Remarks THEODOSIUS DOBZHANSKY The problems of reduction in biology are currently of considerable theoretical interest and practical ...
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  32. Stephen R. L. Clark (1994). How to Think About the Earth. Mowbray.
  33. Roger J. Faber (1986). Clockwork Garden: On the Mechanistic Reduction of Living Things. University of Massachusetts Press.
    ONE Wholes and Parts: Introductory Survey COMMON WISDOM ABOUT THE WORLD GUIDES us WELL in daily living, but getting along practically is not enough; ...
  34. Sean Esbjörn-Hargens (2009). Integral Ecology: Uniting Multiple Perspectives on the Natural World. Integral Books.
    In response to this pressing need, Integral Ecology unites valuable insights from multiple perspectives into a comprehensive theoretical framework-one that can ...
  35. Frederic L. Bender (2003). The Culture of Extinction: Toward a Philosophy of Deep Ecology. Humanity Books.
  36. H. Carel & D. Gamez (eds.) (2004). What Philosophy Is. Ccontinuum.
    This book addresses the question "What is Philosophy?" by gathering together responses from philosophers working in a variety of areas.
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  37. Robert E. Massy (1976). Hills' Theory of Consciousness: An Interpretation of Nuclear Evolution. University of the Trees Press.
  38. William S. Cooper (2001). The Evolution of Reason: Logic as a Branch of Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    The formal systems of logic have ordinarily been regarded as independent of biology, but recent developments in evolutionary theory suggest that biology and logic may be intimately interrelated. In this book, Cooper outlines a theory of rationality in which logical law emerges as an intrinsic aspect of evolutionary biology. This biological perspective on logic, though at present unorthodox, could change traditional ideas about the reasoning process. Cooper examines the connections between logic and evolutionary biology and illustrates how logical rules are (...)
  39. Margaret A. Boden (ed.) (1996). The Philosophy of Artificial Life. Oxford University Press.
    This new volume in the acclaimed Oxford Readings in Philosophy sereis offers a selection of the most important philosophical work being done in the new and fast-growing interdisciplinary area of artificial life. Artificial life research seeks to synthesize the characteristics of life by artificial means, particularly employing computer technology. The essays here explore such fascinating themes as the nature of life, the relation between life and mind, and the limits of technology.
  40. René J. Dubos (1965). Man Adapting. New Haven, Yale University Press.
    The biological and social problems of human adaptation, including nutrition, the co-evolution of diseases, indigenous microbiota, environmental pollution, and population growth.
  41. Mathew Humphrey (2002). Preservation Versus the People?: Nature, Humanity, and Political Philosophy. OUP Oxford.
    This book looks anew at the question of nature preservation as public policy. The philosophy of nature preservation has to date focused on whether arguments for nature preservation should be centred on the value of nature itself or derived human benefits . This book argues that this way of thinking about the problem of preservation has been counter-productive for environmental ethics. Instead we need to unite both views around a concern for the irreplaceability of natural objects.
  42. Kirkpatrick Sale (1985/2000). Dwellers in the Land: The Bioregional Vision. University of Georgia Press.
    Dwellers in the Land focuses on the realistic development of these bioregionally focused communities and the places where they are established to create a ...
  43. Warwick Fox (1990). Toward a Transpersonal Ecology: Developing New Foundations for Environmentalism. Distributed in the U.S. By Random House.
  44. Ellery Eells & James H. Fetzer (eds.) (2010). The Place of Probability in Science. Springer.
  45. Richard Swinburne (1996). Is There a God? Oxford University Press.
    At least since Darwin's Origin of Species was published in 1859, it has increasingly become accepted that the existence of God is, intellectually, a lost cause, and that religious faith is an entirely non-rational matter--the province of those who willingly refuse to accept the dramatic advances of modern cosmology. Are belief in God and belief in science really mutually exclusive? Or, as noted philosopher of science and religion Richard Swinburne puts forth, can the very same criteria which scientists use to (...)
  46. Robert A. Wilson (2012). Genes and the Agents of Life: The Individual in the Fragile Sciences Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    Genes and the Agents of Life undertakes to rethink the place of the individual in the biological sciences, drawing parallels with the cognitive and social sciences. Genes, organisms, and species are all agents of life but how are each of these conceptualized within genetics, developmental biology, evolutionary biology, and systematics? The book includes highly accessible discussions of genetic encoding, species and natural kinds, and pluralism above the levels of selection, drawing on work from across the biological sciences. The book is (...)
  47. Marcello Barbieri (2003). The Organic Codes: An Introduction to Semantic Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    The genetic code appeared on Earth with the first cells. The codes of cultural evolution arrived almost four billion years later. These are the only codes that are recognized by modern biology. In this book, however, Marcello Barbieri explains that there are many more organic codes in nature, and their appearance not only took place throughout the history of life but marked the major steps of that history. A code establishes a correspondence between two independent 'worlds', and the codemaker is (...)
  48. Bryan G. Norton (2003). Searching for Sustainability: Interdisciplinary Essays in the Philosophy of Conservation Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    This book examines from a multidisciplinary viewpoint the question of what we mean - what we should mean - by setting sustainability as a goal for environmental management. The author, trained as a philosopher of science and language, explores ways to break down the disciplinary barriers to communication and deliberation about environment policy, and to integrate science and evaluations into a more comprehensive environmental policy. Choosing sustainability as the keystone concept of environmental policy, the author explores what we can learn (...)
  49. Robert T. Pennock (ed.) (2001). Intelligent Design Creationism and Its Critics: Philosophical, Theological, and Scientifc Perspectives. MIT Press.
    An anthology of writings by proponents and critics of intelligent design creationism.
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  50. der Steen & J. Wim (2000). Evolution as Natural History: A Philosophical Analysis. Praeger.
  51. 1 — 50 / 301