Bargain finder

Use this tool to find book bargains on Amazon Marketplace. It works best on the "my areas of interest" setting, but you need to specify your areas of interest first. You might also want to change your shopping locale (currently the US locale).

Note: the best bargains on this page tend to go fast; the prices shown can be inaccurate because of this.



 Offer type

 Sort by
 Max price
% off
 Min discount

 Min year

 Added since

 Pro authors only


1 — 50 / 308
  1. Jacques Ricard (1999). Biological Complexity and the Dynamics of Life Processes. Elsevier.
    The aim of this book is to show how supramolecular complexity of cell organization can dramatically alter the functions of individual macromolecules within a cell. The emergence of new functions which appear as a consequence of supramolecular complexity, is explained in terms of physical chemistry. The book is interdisciplinary, at the border between cell biochemistry, physics and physical chemistry. This interdisciplinarity does not result in the use of physical techniques but from the use of physical concepts to study biological problems. (...)
  2. Richard Spilsbury (1974). Providence Lost: A Critique of Darwinism. Oxford University Press.
  3. P. B. Medawar (1977). The Life Science: Current Ideas of Biology. Wildwood House.
  4. H. James Birx (1972). Pierre Teilhard De Chardin's Philosophy of Evolution. Springfield, Ill.,Thomas.
  5. Andrew Light & Eric Katz (eds.) (1996). Environmental Pragmatism. Routledge.
    Environmental pragmatism is a new strategy in environmental thought: it argues that theoretical debates are hindering the ability of the environmental movement to forge agreement on basic policy imperatives. This new direction in environmental philosophy moves beyond theory, advocating a serious inquiry into the practical merits of moral pluralism. Environmental pragmatism, as a coherent philosophical position, connects the methodology of classical American pragmatist thought to the explanation, solution and discussion of real issues.
  6. Michael Ruse (1989). The Darwinian Paradigm: Essays on its History, Philosophy, and Religious Implications. Routledge.
    INTRODUCTION I first read Charles Darwin's masterpiece, On the Origin of Species , some twenty years ago. At once I fell under its spell - an emotion which ...
  7. Douglas Torgerson (1999). The Promise of Green Politics: Environmentalism and the Public Sphere. Duke University Press.
    InThe Promise of Green PoliticsDouglas Torgerson offers a survey of different schools of ecological thought, discusses their implications for the larger ...
  8. Peter J. Vorzimmer (1970). Charles Darwin: The Years of Controversy. Philadelphia,Temple University Press.
  9. K. S. Shrader-Frechette (1993). Method in Ecology: Strategies for Conservation. Cambridge University Press.
    In this volume, the authors discuss what practical contributions ecology can and can't make in applied science and environmental problem solving. In the first section, they discuss conceptual problems that have often prevented the formulation and evaluation of powerful, precise, general theories, explain why island biogeography is still beset with controversy and examine the ways that science is value laden. In the second section, they describe how ecology can give us specific answers to practical environmental questions posed in individual case (...)
  10. Catherine Roberts (1980). Science, Animals, and Evolution: Reflections on Some Unrealized Potentials of Biology and Medicine. Greenwood Press.
  11. Herbert F. Mataré (1999). Bioethics: The Ethics of Evolution and Genetic Interference. Bergin & Garvey.
    From a scientific approach, this work explores the moral implications of genetic engineering and argues for corrective genetic interference.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Export citation  
    My bibliography  
  12. Mary Maxwell (1984). Human Evolution: A Philosophical Anthropology. Columbia University Press.
    ... Nosce te ipsum -Carolus Linnaeus We, however, want to become those we are — human beings who are new, unique, incomparable, who give themselves laws, ...
  13. Robert T. Francoeur (1970). Evolving World, Converging Man. New York,Holt, Rinehart and Winston.
  14. Jerry L. R. Chandler & Gertrudis van de Vijver (eds.) (2000). Closure: Emergent Organizations and Their Dynamics. New York Academy of Sciences.
  15. Susan James (1984). The Content of Social Explanation. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a study of the central questions of explanation in the social sciences, and a defence of 'holism' against 'individualism'. In the first half of the book Susan James sets out very clearly the philosophical background to this controversy. She locates its source not at the analytical level at which most of the debate is usually conducted but at a more fundamental, moral level, in different conceptions of the human individual. In the second half of the book she examines (...)
  16. Francisco Jose Ayala & Theodosius Grigorievich Dobzhansky (eds.) (1974). Studies in the Philosophy of Biology: Reduction and Related Problems. University of California Press.
    . Introductory Remarks THEODOSIUS DOBZHANSKY The problems of reduction in biology are currently of considerable theoretical interest and practical ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Export citation  
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  17. Lindley Darden (1991). Theory Change in Science: Strategies From Mendelian Genetics. Oxford University Press.
    This innovative book focuses on the development of the gene theory as a case study in scientific creativity.
  18. René J. Dubos (1965). Man Adapting. New Haven, Yale University Press.
    The biological and social problems of human adaptation, including nutrition, the co-evolution of diseases, indigenous microbiota, environmental pollution, and population growth.
  19. Paul F. Boller (1969). American Thought in Transition: The Impact of Evolutionary Naturalism, 1865-1900. Chicago, Rand Mcnally.
  20. Paul Robbins (2004). Political Ecology: A Critical Introduction. Blackwell Pub..
    The hatchet and the seed -- A tree with deep roots -- The critical tools -- A field crystallizes -- Destruction of nature -- Construction of nature -- Degradation and marginalization -- Conservation and control -- Environmental conflict -- Environmental identity and social movement -- Where to now?
  21. D. R. Brooks (1988). Evolution as Entropy: Toward a Unified Theory of Biology. University of Chicago Press.
    "By combining recent advances in the physical sciences with some of the novel ideas, techniques, and data of modern biology, this book attempts to achieve a new and different kind of evolutionary synthesis. I found it to be challenging, fascinating, infuriating, and provocative, but certainly not dull."--James H, Brown, University of New Mexico "This book is unquestionably mandatory reading not only for every living biologist but for generations of biologists to come."--Jack P. Hailman, Animal Behaviour , review of the first (...)
    Direct download  
    Export citation  
    My bibliography   56 citations  
  22. Jozef Keulartz (1998). Struggle for Nature: A Critique of Radical Ecology. Routledge.
    The Struggle for Nature outlines and examines the main aspects of current environmental philosophy including deep ecology, social and political ecology, eco-feminism and eco-anarchism. It criticizes the dependency on science of these philosophies and the social problems engendered by them. Jozef Keulartz argues for a post-naturalistic turn in environmental philosophy. The Struggle for Nature presents the most up-to-date arguments in environmental philosophy, which will be valuable reading for anyone interested in applied philosophy, environmental studies or geography.
  23. Roger J. Faber (1986). Clockwork Garden: On the Mechanistic Reduction of Living Things. University of Massachusetts Press.
    ONE Wholes and Parts: Introductory Survey COMMON WISDOM ABOUT THE WORLD GUIDES us WELL in daily living, but getting along practically is not enough; ...
  24. G. M. N. Verschuuren (1986). Investigating the Life Sciences: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science. Pergamon Press.
  25. Paul H. Barrett (ed.) (1987). A Concordance to Darwin's the Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex. Cornell University Press.
  26. Verena Andermatt Conley (1997). Ecopolitics: The Environment in Poststructuralist Thought. Routledge.
    Ecopolitics is a study of environmental awareness--or non-awareness--in contemporary French theory. Arguing that it is now impossible not to think in an ecological way, Verena Andermatt Conley traces the roots of today's concern for the environment back to the intellectual climate of the late '50s and '60s. Major thinkers of 1968, the author argues, changed the way we think the world; this owes much to an ecological awareness that remains at the heart of issues concerning cultural theory in general. The (...)
  27. John Alexander Moore (1993). Science as a Way of Knowing: The Foundations of Modern Biology. Harvard University Press.
  28. Paul Thompson (1989). The Structure of Biological Theories. State University of New York Press.
    The central thesis of this book is that the semantic conception is a logical methodologically and heuristically richer and more accurate account of scientific theorizing, and in particular of theorizing in evolutionary biology, than the ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Export citation  
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  29. William S. Cooper (2001). The Evolution of Reason: Logic as a Branch of Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    The formal systems of logic have ordinarily been regarded as independent of biology, but recent developments in evolutionary theory suggest that biology and logic may be intimately interrelated. In this book, Cooper outlines a theory of rationality in which logical law emerges as an intrinsic aspect of evolutionary biology. This biological perspective on logic, though at present unorthodox, could change traditional ideas about the reasoning process. Cooper examines the connections between logic and evolutionary biology and illustrates how logical rules are (...)
  30. Michael Ruse (1988). Philosophy of Biology Today. State University of New York Press.
  31. D. Levine & W. Elsberry (eds.) (1997). Optimality in Biological and Artificial Networks? Lawrence Erlbaum.
    This book is the third in a series based on conferences sponsored by the Metroplex Institute for Neural Dynamics, an interdisciplinary organization of neural ...
      Direct download (2 more)  
    Export citation  
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32. Alan Carter (1999). A Radical Green Political Theory. Routledge.
    This volume analyzes authoritarian, reformist, Marxist and anarchist approaches to the environmental problem, exposing the relationships between environmental crises, economic structures and the role of the state.
  33. Charles Darwin (1978/1972). The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection. Franklin Library.
    ORIGIN OF SPECIES. INTRODUCTION. When on board HMS 'Beagle,' as naturalist, I was ranch struck with certain facts in the distribution of the organic beings ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Export citation  
    My bibliography   83 citations  
  34. Brian Baxter (2000). Ecologism: An Introduction. Georgetown University Press.
  35. Del Ratzsch (2001). Nature, Design, and Science: The Status of Design in Natural Science. State University of New York Press.
    Explores the question of whether or not concepts and principles involving supernatural intelligent design can occupy any legitimate place within science.
  36. Mathew Humphrey (2002). Preservation Versus the People?: Nature, Humanity, and Political Philosophy. OUP Oxford.
    This book looks anew at the question of nature preservation as public policy. The philosophy of nature preservation has to date focused on whether arguments for nature preservation should be centred on the value of nature itself or derived human benefits . This book argues that this way of thinking about the problem of preservation has been counter-productive for environmental ethics. Instead we need to unite both views around a concern for the irreplaceability of natural objects.
  37. Richard Swinburne (1996). Is There a God? Oxford University Press.
    At least since Darwin's Origin of Species was published in 1859, it has increasingly become accepted that the existence of God is, intellectually, a lost cause, and that religious faith is an entirely non-rational matter--the province of those who willingly refuse to accept the dramatic advances of modern cosmology. Are belief in God and belief in science really mutually exclusive? Or, as noted philosopher of science and religion Richard Swinburne puts forth, can the very same criteria which scientists use to (...)
  38. Koula Mellos (1988). Perspectives on Ecology: A Critical Essay. St. Martin's Press.
  39. Bryson Brown (2007). Evolution: A Historical Perspective. Greenwood Press.
  40. Joseph Needham (1936/1968). Order and Life. Cambridge, M.I.T. Press.
    The nature of biological order.--The deployment of biological order.--The hierarchical continuity of biological order.--Bibliography (p. xvi-xvii).
    Direct download  
    Export citation  
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  41. Rebecca Stott (2012). Darwin's Ghosts: The Secret History of Evolution. Spiegel & Grau.
    Citing an 1859 letter that accused Charles Darwin of failing to acknowledge his scientific predecessors, a chronicle of the collective history of evolution dedicates each chapter to an evolutionary thinker, from Aristotle and da Vinci to ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Export citation  
    My bibliography  
  42. David Holbrook (1987). Evolution and the Humanities. St. Martin's Press.
  43. Marc Bekoff & Dale W. Jamieson (eds.) (1996). Readings in Animal Cognition. MIT Press.
    This collection of 24 readings is the first comprehensive treatment of important topics by leading figures in the rapidly growing interdisciplinary field of...
  44. Robert A. Wilson (2005). Genes and the Agents of Life: The Individual in the Fragile Sciences, Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    What are the agents of life? Central to our conception of the biological world is the idea that it contains various kinds of individuals, including genes, organisms, and species. How we conceive of these agents of life is central to our understanding of the relationship between life and mind, the place of hierarchical thinking in the biological sciences, and pluralistic views of biological agency. Genes and the Agents of Life rethinks the place of the individual in the biological sciences, drawing (...)
  45. Peter Munz (1993). Philosophical Darwinism: On the Origin of Knowledge by Means of Natural Selection. Routledge.
    Philosophers have not taken the evolution of human beings seriously enough. If they did, argues Peter Munz, many long-standing philosophical problems would be resolved. One of the philosophical consequences of biology is that all the knowledge produced in evolution is a priori established hypothetically by chance mutation and selective retention rather than by observation and intelligent induction. For organisms as embodied theories, selection is natural. For theories as disembodied organisms, it is artificial. Following Karl Popper, the growth of knowledge is (...)
  46. Elliott Sober (2000). Philosophy of Biology. Westview Press.
    Perhaps because of it implications for our understanding of human nature, recent philosophy of biology has seen what might be the most dramatic work in the philosophies of the ”special” sciences. This drama has centered on evolutionary theory, and in the second edition of this textbook, Elliott Sober introduces the reader to the most important issues of these developments. With a rare combination of technical sophistication and clarity of expression, Sober engages both the higher level of theory and the direct (...)
  47. Lindley Darden (2006). Reasoning in Biological Discoveries: Essays on Mechanisms, Interfield Relations, and Anomaly Resolution. Cambridge University Press.
    Reasoning in Biological Discoveries brings together a series of essays which focus on one of the most heavily debated topics of scientific discovery today. Collected together and richly illustrated for the first time in this edition, Darden's essays represent a ground-breaking foray into one of the major problems facing scientists and philosophers of science. Divided into three sections, the essays focus on broad themes, notably historical and philosophical issues at play in discussions of biological mechanism; and the problem of developing (...)
  48. Lisa Sideris (2003). Environmental Ethics, Ecological Theology, and Natural Selection: Suffering and Responsibility. Columbia University Press.
    Lisa Sideris proposes a new way of thinking about the natural world, an environmental ethic that incorporates the ideas of natural selection and values the processes rather than the products of nature.
  49. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1982). Evolution, Morality, and the Meaning of Life. Rowman and Littlefield.
  50. David J. Wellman (2004). Sustainable Diplomacy: Ecology, Religion, and Ethics in Muslim-Christian Relations. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Drawing on the disciplines of Islamic and Christian Ethics, International Affairs, Environmental Science, History and Anthropology, Sustainable Diplomacy: Ecology, Religion and Ethics in Muslim-Christian Relations is a highly constructive work. Set in the context of modern Moroccan-Spanish relations, this text is a direct critique of realism as it is practiced in modern diplomacy. Proposing a new eco-centric approach to relations between nation-states and bioregions, Wellman presents the case for Ecological Realism, an undergirding philosophy for conducting a diplomacy that values the (...)
    Direct download  
    Export citation  
    My bibliography  
  51. 1 — 50 / 308