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1 — 50 / 598
  1. M. Ito, Y. Miyashita & Edmund T. Rolls (eds.) (1997). Cognition, Computation, and Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
  2. Masao Itō, Y. Miyashita & Edmund T. Rolls (eds.) (1997). Cognition, Computation, and Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
    Understanding consciousness is a truly multidisciplinary project, attracting intense interest from researchers and theorists from diverse backgrounds. Thus, we now have computational scientists, neuroscientists, and philosophers all engaged in the same effort. This book draws together the work of leading researchers around the world, providing insights from these three general perspectives. The work is highlighted by a rare look at work being conducted by Japanese researchers.
  3. Norman Malcolm (1972). Problems of Mind: Descartes to Wittgenstein. London,Allen and Unwin.
  4. E. B. Goldstein (ed.) (2001). Blackwell Handbook of Perception. Blackwell.
    "The Blackwell Handbook of Perception" is ideal for upper level students looking for succinct overviews and for researchers wanting to know more about current ...
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  5. Christopher D. Green (2003). Early Psychological Thought: Ancient Accounts of Mind and Soul. Praeger.
  6. Maria A. Ron & Trevor W. Robbins (eds.) (2003). Disorders of Brain and Mind 2. Cambridge University Press.
    This authoritative new book details the most recent advances in clinical neuroscience, from neurogenetics to the study of consciousness.
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  7. Jonathan D. Moreno (1982). Discourse in the Social Sciences: Strategies for Translating Models of Mental Illness. Greenwood Press.
  8. Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.) (2000). The New Cognitive Neurosciences: 2nd Edition. MIT Press.
    The majority of the chapters in this edition of The Cognitive Neurosciences are new, and those from the first edition have been completely rewritten and updated ...
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  9. Ralph D. Ellis (1995). Questioning Consciousness: The Interplay of Imagery, Cognition, and Emotion in the Human Brain. John Benjamins.
    ... Geoffrey Underwood (University of Nottingham) Francisco Varela (CREA, Ecole Polytechnique. Paris) Volume 2 Ralph D. Ellis Questioning Consciousness ...
  10. Richard D. Wright (ed.) (1998). Visual Attention. Oxford University Press.
    This book contains a rich, interdisciplinary collection of articles by some of the pioneers of contemporary research on attention.
  11. Rem Blanchard Edwards (ed.) (1982). Psychiatry and Ethics: Insanity, Rational Autonomy, and Mental Health Care. Prometheus Books.
  12. Robert Miller (1981). Meaning and Purpose in the Intact Brain: A Philosophical, Psychological, and Biological Account of Conscious Processes. Oxford University Press.
  13. Colin McGinn (1996). The Character of Mind: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind. New York: Oxford University Press.
    The Character of Mind provides a sweeping and accessible general introduction to the philosophy of mind. Colin McGinn covers all of the main topics--the mind-body problem, the nature of acquaintance, the relation between thought and language, agency, and the self.In particular, McGinn addresses the issue of consciousness, and the difficulty of combining the two very different perspectives on the mind that arise from introspection and from the observation of other people. This second edition has been updated with three new cutting-edge (...)
  14. Peter Carruthers & Peter K. Smith (eds.) (1996). Theories of Theories of Mind. Cambridge University Press.
    Theories of Theories of Mind brings together contributions by a distinguished international team of philosophers, psychologists, and primatologists, who between them address such questions as: what is it to understand the thoughts, feelings, and intentions of other people? How does such an understanding develop in the normal child? Why, unusually, does it fail to develop? And is any such mentalistic understanding shared by members of other species? The volume's four parts together offer a state of the art survey of the (...)
  15. Margaret A. Boden (1988). Computer Models On Mind: Computational Approaches In Theoretical Psychology. Cambridge University Press.
    What is the mind? How does it work? How does it influence behavior? Some psychologists hope to answer such questions in terms of concepts drawn from computer science and artificial intelligence. They test their theories by modeling mental processes in computers. This book shows how computer models are used to study many psychological phenomena--including vision, language, reasoning, and learning. It also shows that computer modeling involves differing theoretical approaches. Computational psychologists disagree about some basic questions. For instance, should the mind (...)
  16. João Branquinho (ed.) (2001). The Foundations of Cognitive Science. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  17. A. G. Cohn & J. R. Thomas (eds.) (1986). Artificial Intelligence and Its Applications. John Wiley and Sons.
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  18. Reuven Bar-On & James D. A. Parker (eds.) (2000). The Handbook of Emotional Intelligence: Theory, Development, Assessment, and Application at Home, School, and in the Workplace. Jossey-Bass.
  19. Kenneth P. Hillner (2000). A Psychological Approach to Ethical Reality. Elsevier.
    The pre-eminent 19th century British ethicist, Henry Sidgwick once said: "All important ethical notions are also psychological, except perhaps the fundamental antitheses of 'good' and 'bad' and 'wrong', with which psychology, as it treats of what is and not of what ought to be, is not directly concerned" (quoted in T.N. Tice and T.P. Slavens, 1983). Sidgwick's statement can be interpreted to mean that psychology is relevant for ethics or that psychological knowledge contributes to the construction of an ethical reality. (...)
  20. Serge P. Shohov (ed.) (2002). Advances in Psychology Research. Nova Science Publishers.
    "Advances in Psychology Research" presents original research results on the leading edge of psychology.
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  21. Paul Marcus (2003). Ancient Religious Wisdom, Spirituality, and Psychoanalysis. Praeger.
    Unlike most books on psychoanalysis and religion, where psychoanalysis is regarded as a superior mode of understanding, this work explains how psychoanalysis ...
  22. Roland Case (ed.) (1991). The Mind's Staircase: Exploring the Conceptual Underpinnings of Children's Thought and Knowledge. Lawrence Erlbaum.
    This volume describes the current "main contenders," including neo-Piagetian, neo-connectionist, neo-innatist and sociocultural models.
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  23. Alvin I. Goldman (1993). Philosophical Applications of Cognitive Science. Westview Press.
    One of the most fruitful interdisciplinary boundaries in contemporary scholarship is that between philosophy and cognitive science. Now that solid empirical results about the activities of the human mind are available, it is no longer necessary for philosophers to practice armchair psychology.In this short, accessible, and entertaining book, Alvin Goldman presents a masterly survey of recent work in cognitive science that has particular relevance to philosophy. Besides providing a valuable review of the most suggestive work in cognitive and social psychology, (...)
  24. Nivedita Gangopadhyay, Michael Madary & Finn Spicer (eds.) (2010). Perception, Action, and Consciousness: Sensorimotor Dynamics and Two Visual Systems. Oxford University Press, Usa.
    Machine generated contents note: -- 1. Introduction -- Consciousness and Sensorimotor Dynamics: Methodological Issues -- 2. Computational consciousness, D. Ballard -- 3. Explaining what people say about sensory qualia, J. Kevin O'Regan -- 4. Perception, action, and experience: unraveling the golden braid, A. Clark -- The Two-Visual Systems Hypothesis -- 5. Cortical visual systems for perception and action, A.D. Milner and M.A. Goodale -- 6. Hermann Lotze's Theory of 'Local Sign': evidence from pointing responses in an illusory figure, (...)
  25. Edward M. Hundert (1989). Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Neuroscience: Three Approaches to the Mind: A Synthetic Analysis of the Varieties of Human Experience. Oxford University Press.
    In this book Hundert proposes a new, unified view of the mind, one that integrates the insights of philosophers, psychologists, and neuroscientists. Through a detailed discussion of major theories from these and related disciplines, he gradually reveals links between what were previously unconnected approaches to human thought and experience.
  26. Bernard J. Baars (1997). In the Theater of Consciousness: The Workspace of the Mind. Oxford University Press.
    The study of conscious experience has seen remarkable strides in the last ten years, reflecting important technological breakthroughs and the enormous efforts of researchers in disciplines as varied as neuroscience, cognitive science, and philosophy. Although still embroiled in debate, scientists are now beginning to find common ground in their understanding of consciousness, which may pave the way for a unified explanation of how and why we experience and understand the world around us. Written by eminent psychologist Bernard J. Baars, Inside (...)
  27. Mario Bunge & Ruben Ardila (1987). Philosophy Of Psychology. Springer.
  28. H. Jasper, L. Descarries, V. Castellucci & S. Rossignol (eds.) (1998). Consciousness: At the Frontiers of Neuroscience. Lippincott-Raven.
  29. Alan Millar (2004). Understanding People: Normativity and Rationalizing Explanation. Oxford University Press.
    Alan Millar examines our understanding of why people think and act as they do. His key theme is that normative considerations form an indispensable part of the explanatory framework in terms of which we seek to understand each other. Millar defends a conception according to which normativity is linked to reasons. On this basis he examines the structure of certain normative commitments incurred by having propositional attitudes. Controversially, he argues that ascriptions of beliefs and intentions in and of themselves attribute (...)
  30. Andrew Ortony, Jon Slack & Oliviero Stock (eds.) (1992). Communication From an Artificial Intelligence Perspective: Theoretical and Applied Issues. Springer.
    Theoretical and Applied Issues Edited by Andrew Ortony Jon Slack Oliviero Stock NATO ASI Series Series F: Computer and Systems Sciences, Vol. 100 Communication from an Artificial Intelligence Perspective NATO ASI Series Advanced ...
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  31. Radu J. Bogdan (ed.) (1991). Mind and Common Sense: Philosophical Essays on Commonsense Psychology. Cambridge University Press.
    The contributors to this volume examine current controversies about the importance of common sense psychology for our understanding of the human mind. Common sense provides a familiar and friendly psychological scheme by which to talk about the mind. Its categories (belief, desire, intention, consciousness, emotion, and so on) tend to portray the mind as quite different from the rest of nature, and thus irreducible to physical matters and its laws. In this volume a variety of positions on common sense psychology (...)
  32. Dianne C. Berry (1997). How Implicit is Implicit Learning? Oxford University Press.
  33. John Haugeland (1985). Artificial Intelligence: The Very Idea. Cambridge: Mit Press.
    The idea that human thinking and machine computing are "radically the same" provides the central theme for this marvelously lucid and witty book on...
  34. Robert Borger (ed.) (1970). Explanation In The Behavioural Sciences. Cambridge University Press.
    A confrontation of views written by distinguished figures concerned with the behavioural and social sciences.
  35. Melvyn A. Goodale & A. David Milner (2004/2005). Sight Unseen: An Exploration of Conscious and Unconscious Vision. Oxford University Press.
    Vision, more than any other sense, dominates our mental life. Our visual experience is just so rich, so detailed, that we can hardly distinguish that experience from the world itself. Even when we just think about the world and don't look at it directly, we can't help but 'imagine' what it looks like. We think of 'seeing' as being a conscious activity--we direct our eyes, we choose what we look at, we register what we are seeing. The series of events (...)
  36. Paula M. Niedenthal & S. Kitayama (eds.) (1994). The Heart's Eye: Emotional Influences in Perception and Attention. Academic Press.
  37. L. Poon, David C. Rubin & B. Wilson (eds.) (1989). Everyday Cognition in Adulthood and Late Life. Cambridge University Press.
    Provides a firm theoretical grounding for the increasing movement of cognitive psychologists, neuropsychologists and their students beyond the laboratory, in an ...
  38. Owen J. Flanagan (1996). Self Expressions: Mind, Morals, and the Meaning of Life. Oxford University Press.
    Human beings have the unique ability to consciously reflect on the nature of the self. But reflection has its costs. We can ask what the self is, but as David Hume pointed out, the self, once reflected upon, may be nowhere to be found. The favored view is that we are material beings living in the material world. But if so, a host of destabilizing questions surface. If persons are just a sophisticated sort of animal, then what sense is there (...)
  39. Alvin Goldman (ed.) (1993). Readings in Philosophy and Cognitive Science. Cambridge: MIT Press.
    This collection of readings shows how cognitive science can influence most of the primary branches of philosophy, as well as how philosophy critically examines...
  40. L. Jonathan Cohen (1986). The Dialogue of Reason. Cambridge University Press.
    Johnathan Cohen's book provides a lucid and penetrating treatment of the fundamental issues of contemporary analytical philosophy. This field now spans a greater variety of topics and divergence of opinion than fifty years ago, and Cohen's book addresses the presuppositions implicit to it and the patterns of reasoning on which it relies.
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  41. A. G. Cairns-Smith (1996). Evolving the Mind: On the Nature of Matter and the Origin of Consciousness. Cambridge University Press.
    Evolving the Mind has two main themes: how ideas about the mind evolved in science; and how the mind itself evolved in nature. The mind came into physical science when it was realised, first, that it is the activity of a physical object, a brain, which makes a mind; and secondly, that our theories of nature are largely mental constructions, artificial extensions of an inner model of the world which we inherited from our distant ancestors. From both of these perspectives, (...)
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  42. Melvin E. Miller & Alan N. West (eds.) (2000). Spirituality, Ethics, and Relationship in Adulthood: Clinical and Theoretical Explorations. Psychosocial Press.
  43. Ray S. Jackendoff (1987). Consciousness and the Computational Mind. MIT Press.
  44. R. A. Sharpe (ed.) (1990). Making the Human Mind. Routledge.
    Making the Human Mind is an attack on the widespread assumption that the mind has parts, that the interaction between these parts accounts for some of the most characteristic human behavior, the sorts of irrational behavior displayed in self-deception and weakness of will. The implications of this attack are considerable: Sharpe contests a realism about the mind, the belief that there is an inventory which an all-seeing deity could compile containing answers to all the questions we ask about people, whether (...)
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  45. Talis Bachmann, Bruno Breitmeyer & Haluk Ögmen (2007/2011). Experimental Phenomena of Consciousness: A Brief Dictionary. Oxford University Press.
    Experimental Phenomena of Consciousness is the definitive collection of consciousness phenomena in which awareness emerges as an experimental variable.
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  46. Michael A. Arbib (ed.) (1995). Handbook of Brain Theory and Neural Networks. MIT Press.
  47. Fiona Cowie (1998). What's Within? Oxford University Press.
    This powerfully iconoclastic book reconsiders the influential nativist position toward the mind.
  48. V. Bruce (ed.) (1997). Unsolved Mysteries of the Mind: Tutorial Essays in Cognition. Taylor and Francis.
    The book complements standard course texts in cognition by providing a series of articles which emphasize particularly what we do not understand, rather than ...
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  49. Susana Nuccetelli (ed.) (2003). New Essays on Semantic Externalism and Self-Knowledge. MIT Press.
  50. Martha J. Farah (1990). Visual Agnosia: Disorders of Object Recognition and What They Tell Us About Normal Vision. MIT Press.
  51. 1 — 50 / 598