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Use this tool to find book bargains on Amazon Marketplace. It works best on the "my areas of interest" setting, but you need to specify your areas of interest first. You might also want to change your shopping locale (currently the US locale).

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  1. Keith Devlin (1991). Logic and Information. Cambridge University Press.
    Classical logic, beginning with the work of Aristotle, has developed into a powerful and rigorous mathematical theory with many applications in mathematics and ...
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  2. John Budd (2008). Self-Examination: The Present and Future of Librarianship. Libraries Unlimited.
    Genealogy of the profession -- Place and identity -- Being informed about informing -- What's the right thing to do? -- In a democracy -- The information society -- Optimistic synthesis.
  3. Arto Salomaa (1985). Computation and Automata. Cambridge University Press.
    This introduction to certain mathematical topics central to theoretical computer science treats computability and recursive functions, formal languages and automata, computational complexity, and cruptography. The presentation is essentially self-contained with detailed proofs of all statements provided. Although it begins with the basics, it proceeds to some of the most important recent developments in theoretical computer science.
  4. Melvin Fitting (1987). Computability Theory, Semantics, and Logic Programming. Clarendon Press.
    This book describes computability theory and provides an extensive treatment of data structures and program correctness. It makes accessible some of the author's work on generalized recursion theory, particularly the material on the logic programming language PROLOG, which is currently of great interest. Fitting considers the relation of PROLOG logic programming to the LISP type of language.
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  5. Ralph Gregory Taylor (1998). Models of Computation and Formal Languages. Oxford University Press.
    This unique book presents a comprehensive and rigorous treatment of the theory of computability which is introductory yet self-contained. It takes a novel approach by looking at the subject using computation models rather than a limitation orientation, and is the first book of its kind to include software. Accompanying software simulations of almost all computational models are available for use in conjunction with the text, and numerous examples are provided on disk in a user-friendly format. Its applications to computer science (...)
  6. Benjamin Woolley (1992). Virtual Worlds: A Journey in Hype and Hyperreality. Blackwell.
    In Virtual Worlds, Benjamin Woolley examines the reality of virtual reality.
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  7. Nigel Cutland (1980). Computability, an Introduction to Recursive Function Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    What can computers do in principle? What are their inherent theoretical limitations? These are questions to which computer scientists must address themselves. The theoretical framework which enables such questions to be answered has been developed over the last fifty years from the idea of a computable function: intuitively a function whose values can be calculated in an effective or automatic way. This book is an introduction to computability theory (or recursion theory as it is traditionally known to mathematicians). Dr Cutland (...)
  8. M. Lerman (2010). A Framework for Priority Arguments. Cambridge University Press.
    This book presents a unifying framework for using priority arguments to prove theorems in computability.
  9. L. Floridi (ed.) (2004). The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Computing and Information. Blackwell.
    This Guide provides an ambitious state-of-the-art survey of the fundamental themes, problems, arguments and theories constituting the philosophy of computing.
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  10. C. Foster (1990). Algorithms, Abstraction and Implementation. Academic Press.
  11. Nelson Goodman (1968). Languages of Art. Bobbs-Merrill.
    . . . Unlike Dewey, he has provided detailed incisive argumentation, and has shown just where the dogmas and dualisms break down." -- Richard Rorty, The Yale Review.
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  12. Martin Davis (1958/1982). Computability & Unsolvability. Dover.
    Classic text considersgeneral theory of computability, computable functions, operations on computable functions, Turing machines self-applied, unsolvable decision problems, applications of general theory, mathematical logic, Kleene hierarchy, computable functionals, classification of unsolvable decision problems and more.
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  13. H. Rogers (1987). Theory of Recursive Functions and Effective Computability. Mit Press.
  14. A. P. Ershov & Donald Ervin Knuth (eds.) (1981). Algorithms in Modern Mathematics and Computer Science: Proceedings, Urgench, Uzbek Ssr, September 16-22, 1979. Springer-Verlag.
  15. Aleksandr I͡Akovlevich Khinchin (1957). Mathematical Foundations of Information Theory. New York, Dover Publications.
    Comprehensive, rigorous introduction to work of Shannon, McMillan, Feinstein and Khinchin. Translated by R. A. Silverman and M. D. Friedman.
  16. Robert Anton Wilson (1990). Quantum Psychology: How Brain Software Programs You and Your World. New Falcon.
  17. Amit Hagar (2011). The Complexity of Noise: A Philosophical Outlook on Quantum Error Correction. Morgan & Claypool Publishers.
    In quantum computing, where algorithms exist that can solve computational problems more efficiently than any known classical algorithms, the elimination of errors that result from external disturbances or from imperfect gates has become the ...
  18. Jan Westerhoff (2011). Reality: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.
    Is matter real? Are persons real? Is time real? This Very Short Introduction discusses what, if anything, is "real" by looking at a variety of arguments from philosophy, physics, and cognitive science. The book shows that the question "what is real?" is not some esoteric puzzle that only philosophers ponder. Scientists also ask this question when they investigate whether candidates for the fundamental constituents of matter are actually "out there" or just a mere abstraction from a successful theory and cognitive (...)