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  1. Alessandro Andretta, Keith Kearnes & Domenico Zambella (eds.) (2008). Logic Colloquium 2004: Proceedings of the Annual European Summer Meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic, Held in Torino, Italy, July 25-31, 2004. [REVIEW] Cambridge University Press.
    Highlights of this volume from the 2004 Annual European Meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic (ASL) include a tutorial survey of the recent highpoints of universal algebra, written by a leading expert; explorations of foundational questions; a quartet of model theory papers giving an excellent reflection of current work in model theory, from the most abstract aspect "abstract elementary classes" to issues around p-adic integration.
  2. Philippe Smets (ed.) (1988). Non-Standard Logics for Automated Reasoning. Academic Press.
  3. Yehoshua Bar-Hillel (ed.) (1970). Mathematical Logic and Foundations of Set Theory. Amsterdam,North-Holland Pub. Co..
    LN , so f lies in the elementary submodel M'. Clearly co 9 M' . It follows that 6 = {f(n): n em} is included in M'. Hence the ordinals of M' form an initial ...
  4. Daniel Steel (2008). Across the Boundaries: Extrapolation in Biology and Social Science. Oxford University Press.
  5. W. S. Anglin (1996). Mathematics, a Concise History and Philosophy. Springer.
    This is a concise introductory textbook for a one semester course in the history and philosophy of mathematics. It is written for mathematics majors, philosophy students, history of science students and secondary school mathematics teachers. The only prerequisite is a solid command of pre-calculus mathematics. It is shorter than the standard textbooks in that area and thus more accessible to students who have trouble coping with vast amounts of reading. Furthermore, there are many detailed explanations of the important mathematical procedures (...)
  6. John Pottage (1983). Geometrical Investigations: Illustrating the Art of Discovery in the Mathematical Field. Addison-Wesley.
  7. Fahiem Bacchus & Toby Walsh (eds.) (2005). Theory and Applications of Satisfiability Testing: 8th International Conference, Sat 2005, St Andrews, Uk, June 19-23, 2005: Proceedings. [REVIEW] Springer.
    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Theory and Applications of Satisfiability Testing, SAT 2005, held in St Andrews, Scotland in June 2005. The 26 revised full papers presented together with 16 revised short papers presented as posters during the technical programme were carefully selected from 73 submissions. The whole spectrum of research in propositional and quantified Boolean formula satisfiability testing is covered including proof systems, search techniques, probabilistic analysis of algorithms and their properties, problem (...)
  8. Jody Azzouni (2004). Deflating Existential Commitment: A Case for Nominalism. OUP USA.
    If we must take mathematical statements to be true, must we also believe in the existence of abstract invisible mathematical objects accessible only by the power of pure thought? Jody Azzouni says no, and he claims that the way to escape such commitments is to accept (as an essential part of scientific doctrine) true statements which are about objects that don't exist in any sense at all. Azzouni illustrates what the metaphysical landscape looks like once we avoid a militant Realism (...)
  9. Nancy Rodgers (2000). Learning to Reason: An Introduction to Logic, Sets and Relations. Wiley.
    Learn how to develop your reasoning skills and how to write well-reasoned proofs Learning to Reason shows you how to use the basic elements of mathematical language to develop highly sophisticated, logical reasoning skills. You'll get clear, concise, easy-to-follow instructions on the process of writing proofs, including the necessary reasoning techniques and syntax for constructing well-written arguments. Through in-depth coverage of logic, sets, and relations, Learning to Reason offers a meaningful, integrated view of modern mathematics, cuts through confusing terms and (...)
  10. Stephen David Ross (1994). Locality and Practical Judgment: Charity and Sacrifice. Fordham University Press.
    This work completes Ross's trilogy examining the inexhaustible complexity of the world and our relation to our surroundings.
  11. Alfred North Whitehead & Bertrand Russell (1962/1997). Principia Mathematica, to *56. Cambridge University Press.
    The great three-volume Principia Mathematica is deservedly the most famous work ever written on the foundations of mathematics. Its aim is to deduce all the fundamental propositions of logic and mathematics from a small number of logical premisses and primitive ideas, and so to prove that mathematics is a development of logic. This abridged text of Volume I contains the material that is most relevant to an introductory study of logic and the philosophy of mathematics (more advanced students will wish (...)
  12. Ian Stewart & David Tall (1977). The Foundations of Mathematics. Oxford University Press.
    The Foundations of Mathematics (Stewart and Tall) is a horse of a different color. The writing is excellent and there is actually some useful mathematics. I definitely like this book."--The Bulletin of Mathematics Books.
  13. Jaakko Hintikka (1996). The Principles of Mathematics Revisited. Cambridge University Press.
    This book, written by one of philosophy's pre-eminent logicians, argues that many of the basic assumptions common to logic, philosophy of mathematics and metaphysics are in need of change. It is therefore a book of critical importance to logical theory. Jaakko Hintikka proposes a new basic first-order logic and uses it to explore the foundations of mathematics. This new logic enables logicians to express on the first-order level such concepts as equicardinality, infinity, and truth in the same language. The famous (...)
  14. Philip Kitcher (1983). The Nature of Mathematical Knowledge. Oxford University Press.
    This book argues against the view that mathematical knowledge is a priori,contending that mathematics is an empirical science and develops historically,just as ...
  15. Hilary Putnam (1979). Mathematics, Matter, and Method. Cambridge University Press.
    Professor Hilary Putnam has been one of the most influential and sharply original of recent American philosophers in a whole range of fields. His most important published work is collected here, together with several new and substantial studies, in two volumes. The first deals with the philosophy of mathematics and of science and the nature of philosophical and scientific enquiry; the second deals with the philosophy of language and mind. Volume one is now issued in a new edition, including an (...)
  16. Charles Castonguay (1972). Meaning and Existence in Mathematics. New York,Springer-Verlag.
  17. Jody Azzouni (2010). Talking About Nothing: Numbers, Hallucinations, and Fictions. Oxford University Press.
    Numbers -- Hallucinations -- Fictions -- Scientific languages, ontology, and truth -- Truth conditions and semantics.
  18. H. Kirchner & Christophe Ringeissen (eds.) (2000). Frontiers of Combining Systems: Third International Workshop, Frocos 2000, Nancy, France, March 22-24, 2000: Proceedings. [REVIEW] Springer.
    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Third International Workshop on Frontiers of Combining Systems, FroCoS 2000, held in Nancy, France, in March 2000.The 14 revised full papers presented together with four invited papers were carefully reviewed and selected from a total of 31 submissions. Among the topics covered are constraint processing, interval narrowing, rewriting systems, proof planning, sequent calculus, type systems, model checking, theorem proving, declarative programming, logic programming, and equational theories.
  19. Geoffrey Hellman (1989). Mathematics Without Numbers: Towards a Modal-Structural Interpretation. Oxford University Press.
    Develops a structuralist understanding of mathematics, as an alternative to set- or type-theoretic foundations, that respects classical mathematical truth while ...
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  20. Clare Boucher (2000). The Six Blind Men and the Elephant: A Traditional Indian Story. Candlewick Press.
  21. Eli Maor (1987/1991). To Infinity and Beyond: A Cultural History of the Infinite. Princeton University Press.
    Eli Maor examines the role of infinity in mathematics and geometry and its cultural impact on the arts and sciences. He evokes the profound intellectual impact the infinite has exercised on the human mind--from the "horror infiniti" of the Greeks to the works of M. C. Escher from the ornamental designs of the Moslems, to the sage Giordano Bruno, whose belief in an infinite universe led to his death at the hands of the Inquisition. But above all, the book describes (...)
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  22. Gila Sher & Richard L. Tieszen (eds.) (2000). Between Logic and Intuition: Essays in Honor of Charles Parsons. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of new essays offers a 'state-of-the-art' conspectus of major trends in the philosophy of logic and philosophy of mathematics. A distinguished group of philosophers addresses issues at the centre of contemporary debate: semantic and set-theoretic paradoxes, the set/class distinction, foundations of set theory, mathematical intuition and many others. The volume includes Hilary Putnam's 1995 Alfred Tarski lectures, published here for the first time.
  23. W. D. Hart (ed.) (1996). The Philosophy of Mathematics. Oxford University Press.
    This volume offers a selection of the most interesting and important work from recent years in the philosophy of mathematics, which has always been closely linked to, and has exerted a significant influence upon, the main stream of analytical philosophy. The issues discussed are of interest throughout philosophy, and no mathematical expertise is required of the reader. Contributors include W.V. Quine, W.D. Hart, Michael Dummett, Charles Parsons, Paul Benacerraf, Penelope Maddy, W.W. Tait, Hilary Putnam, George Boolos, Daniel Isaacson, Stewart Shapiro, (...)
  24. Paolo Mancosu (1996). Philosophy of Mathematics and Mathematical Practice in the Seventeenth Century. Oxford University Press.
    The seventeenth century saw dramatic advances in mathematical theory and practice. With the recovery of many of the classical Greek mathematical texts, new techniques were introduced, and within 100 years, the rules of analytic geometry, geometry of indivisibles, arithmatic of infinites, and calculus were developed. Although many technical studies have been devoted to these innovations, Mancosu provides the first comprehensive account of the relationship between mathematical advances of the seventeenth century and the philosophy of mathematics of the period. Starting with (...)
  25. V. Di Gesù, F. Masulli & Alfredo Petrosino (eds.) (2006). Fuzzy Logic and Applications: 5th International Workshop, Wilf 2003, Naples, Italy, October 9-11, 2003: Revised Selected Papers. [REVIEW] Springer.
    This volume constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-workshop proceedings of the 5th International Workshop on Fuzzy Logic and Applications held in Naples, Italy, in October 2003. The 40 revised full papers presented have gone through two rounds of reviewing and revision. All current issues of theoretical, experimental and applied fuzzy logic and related techniques are addressed with special attention to rough set theory, neural networks, genetic algorithms and soft computing. The papers are organized in topical section on fuzzy sets and systems, (...)
  26. P. T. Johnstone (1987). Notes on Logic and Set Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    A succinct introduction to mathematical logic and set theory, which together form the foundations for the rigorous development of mathematics. Suitable for all introductory mathematics undergraduates, Notes on Logic and Set Theory covers the basic concepts of logic: first-order logic, consistency, and the completeness theorem, before introducing the reader to the fundamentals of axiomatic set theory. Successive chapters examine the recursive functions, the axiom of choice, ordinal and cardinal arithmetic, and the incompleteness theorems. Dr. Johnstone has included numerous exercises designed (...)
  27. Bryan H. Bunch (1982/1997). Mathematical Fallacies and Paradoxes. Dover Publications.
    Stimulating, thought-provoking analysis of a number of the most interesting intellectual inconsistencies in mathematics, physics and language. Delightful elucidations of methods for misunderstanding the real world of experiment (Aristotle’s Circle paradox), being led astray by algebra (De Morgan’s paradox) and other mind-benders. Some high school algebra and geometry is assumed; any other math needed is developed in text. Reprint of 1982 ed.
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  28. Paul Thagard (1992). Conceptual Revolutions. Princeton University Press.
    In this path-breaking work, Paul Thagard draws on history and philosophy of science, cognitive psychology, and the field of artificial intelligence to develop a ...
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  29. Charles S. Chihara (1990). Constructibility and Mathematical Existence. Oxford University Press.
    Chihara here develops a mathematical system in which there are no existence assertions but only assertions of the constructibility of certain sorts of things. He utilizes this system in the analysis of the nature of mathematics, and discusses many recent works in the philosophy of mathematics from the viewpoint of the constructibility theory developed. This innovative analysis will appeal to mathematicians and philosophers of logic, mathematics, and science.
  30. Rudy vB Rucker (1982/1995). Infinity and the Mind: The Science and Philosophy of the Infinite. Princeton University Press.
    In Infinity and the Mind, Rudy Rucker leads an excursion to that stretch of the universe he calls the "Mindscape," where he explores infinity in all its forms: potential and actual, mathematical and physical, theological and mundane. Here Rucker acquaints us with Gödel's rotating universe, in which it is theoretically possible to travel into the past, and explains an interpretation of quantum mechanics in which billions of parallel worlds are produced every microsecond. It is in the realm of infinity, he (...)
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  31. Donald C. Benson (1999). The Moment of Proof: Mathematical Epiphanies. Oxford University Press.
    When Archimedes, while bathing, suddenly hit upon the principle of buoyancy, he ran wildly through the streets of Syracuse, stark naked, crying "eureka!" In The Moment of Proof, Donald Benson attempts to convey to general readers the feeling of eureka--the joy of discovery--that mathematicians feel when they first encounter an elegant proof. This is not an introduction to mathematics so much as an introduction to the pleasures of mathematical thinking. And indeed the delights of this book are many and varied. (...)
  32. Chin-Liang Chang (1973/1987). Symbolic Logic and Mechanical Theorem Proving. Academic Press.
    This book contains an introduction to symbolic logic and a thorough discussion of mechanical theorem proving and its applications. The book consists of three major parts. Chapters 2 and 3 constitute an introduction to symbolic logic. Chapters 4–9 introduce several techniques in mechanical theorem proving, and Chapters 10 an 11 show how theorem proving can be applied to various areas such as question answering, problem solving, program analysis, and program synthesis.
  33. Kit Fine (2002). The Limits of Abstraction. Oxford University Press.
    Kit Fine develops a Fregean theory of abstraction, and suggests that it may yield a new philosophical foundation for mathematics, one that can account for both our reference to various mathematical objects and our knowledge of various mathematical truths. The Limits of Abstraction breaks new ground both technically and philosophically.
  34. Thomas J. McKay (2006). Plural Predication. Oxford University Press.
    Plural predication is a pervasive part of ordinary language. We can say that some people are fifty in number, are surrounding a building, come from many countries, and are classmates. These predicates can be true of some people without being true of any one of them; they are non-distributive predications. However, the apparatus of modern logic does not allow a place for them. Thomas McKay here explores the enrichment of logic with non-distributive plural predication and quantification. His book will be (...)
  35. Philip J. Davis (1995/1982). The Mathematical Experience. Birkhäuser.
    Presents general information about meteorology, weather, and climate and includes more than thirty activities to help study these topics, including making a ...
  36. Charles Chihara (2004). A Structural Account of Mathematics. Clarendon Press.
    A Structural Account of Mathematics will be required reading for anyone working in this field.
  37. D. S. Bridges (1987). Varieties of Constructive Mathematics. Cambridge University Press.
    This is an introduction to, and survey of, the constructive approaches to pure mathematics. The authors emphasise the viewpoint of Errett Bishop's school, but intuitionism. Russian constructivism and recursive analysis are also treated, with comparisons between the various approaches included where appropriate. Constructive mathematics is now enjoying a revival, with interest from not only logicans but also category theorists, recursive function theorists and theoretical computer scientists. This account for non-specialists in these and other disciplines.
  38. Paul Benacerraf (1964). Philosophy of Mathematics. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.,Prentice-Hall.
    The present collection brings together in a convenient form the seminal articles in the philosophy of mathematics by these and other major thinkers.
  39. Paul Benacerraf & Hilary Putnam (eds.) (1983). Philosophy of Mathematics: Selected Readings. Cambridge University Press.
    The twentieth century has witnessed an unprecedented 'crisis in the foundations of mathematics', featuring a world-famous paradox (Russell's Paradox), a challenge to 'classical' mathematics from a world-famous mathematician (the 'mathematical intuitionism' of Brouwer), a new foundational school (Hilbert's Formalism), and the profound incompleteness results of Kurt Gödel. In the same period, the cross-fertilization of mathematics and philosophy resulted in a new sort of 'mathematical philosophy', associated most notably (but in different ways) with Bertrand Russell, W. V. Quine, and Gödel himself, (...)
  40. Friedrich Waismann (1951/2003). Introduction to Mathematical Thinking: The Formation of Concepts in Modern Mathematics. Dover Publications.
    "With exceptional clarity, but with no evasion of essential ideas, the author outlines the fundamental structure of mathematics."--Carl B. Boyer, Brooklyn College. This enlightening survey of mathematical concept formation holds a natural appeal to philosophically minded readers, and no formal training in mathematics is necessary to appreciate its clear exposition. Contents include examinations of arithmetic and geometry; the rigorous construction of the theory of integers; the rational numbers and their foundation in arithmetic; and the rigorous construction of elementary arithmetic. Advanced (...)
  41. Alison Gopnik (1997). Words, Thoughts, and Theories. Mit Press.
  42. Joseph Mazur (2005). Euclid in the Rainforest: Discovering Universal Truth in Logic and Math. Pi Press.
  43. Steven M. Rosen (2006). Topologies of the Flesh: A Multidimensional Exploration of the Lifeworld. Ohio University Press, Series in Continental Thought.
    Topologies of the Flesh is an original blend of continental thought and mathematical imagination.
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  44. Paolo Mancosu (ed.) (1998). From Brouwer to Hilbert: The Debate on the Foundations of Mathematics in the 1920s. Oxford University Press.
    From Brouwer To Hilbert: The Debate on the Foundations of Mathematics in the 1920s offers the first comprehensive introduction to the most exciting period in the foundation of mathematics in the twentieth century. The 1920s witnessed the seminal foundational work of Hilbert and Bernays in proof theory, Brouwer's refinement of intuitionistic mathematics, and Weyl's predicativist approach to the foundations of analysis. This impressive collection makes available the first English translations of twenty-five central articles by these important contributors and many others. (...)
  45. Douglas M. Jesseph (1993). Berkeley's Philosophy of Mathematics. University of Chicago Press.
    In this first modern, critical assessment of the place of mathematics in Berkeley's philosophy and Berkeley's place in the history of mathematics, Douglas M. Jesseph provides a bold reinterpretation of Berkeley's work.
  46. Hao Wang (1962/1970). Logic, Computers, and Sets. New York,Chelsea Pub. Co..
  47. A. S. Troelstra (1973). Metamathematical Investigation of Intuitionistic Arithmetic and Analysis. New York,Springer.
  48. Amir D. Aczel (2000). The Mystery of the Aleph: Mathematics, the Kabbalah, and the Search for Infinity. Four Walls Eight Windows.
    From the end of the 19th century until his death, one of history's most brilliant mathematicians languished in an asylum. The Mystery of the Aleph tells the story of Georg Cantor (1845-1918), a Russian-born German who created set theory, the concept of infinite numbers, and the "continuum hypothesis," which challenged the very foundations of mathematics. His ideas brought expected denunciation from established corners - he was called a "corruptor of youth" not only for his work in mathematics, but for his (...)
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  49. Penelope Maddy (2007). Second Philosophy: A Naturalistic Method. Oxford University Press.
    Many philosophers these days consider themselves naturalists, but it's doubtful any two of them intend the same position by the term. In Second Philosophy, Penelope Maddy describes and practices a particularly austere form of naturalism called "Second Philosophy". Without a definitive criterion for what counts as "science" and what doesn't, Second Philosophy can't be specified directly ("trust only the methods of science" for example), so Maddy proceeds instead by illustrating the behaviors of an idealized inquirer she calls the "Second Philosopher". (...)
  50. Steven M. Rosen (1994). Science, Paradox, and the Moebius Principle: The Evolution of a "Transcultural" Approach to Wholeness. State University of New York Press; Series in Science, Technology, and Society.
    PART I. The Moebius Principle in Science and Philosophy INTRODUCTION The papers in part span a seventeen year period (-). The section begins and ends with ...
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