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  1. Yehoshua Bar-Hillel (ed.) (1970). Mathematical Logic and Foundations of Set Theory. Amsterdam,North-Holland Pub. Co..
    LN , so f lies in the elementary submodel M'. Clearly co 9 M' . It follows that 6 = {f(n): n em} is included in M'. Hence the ordinals of M' form an initial ...
  2. Dennis Sentilles (1975). A Bridge to Advanced Mathematics. Baltimore,Williams & Wilkins.
  3. Jaakko Hintikka (ed.) (1969). The Philosophy of Mathematics. London, Oxford U.P..
  4. Ian Stewart & David Tall (1977). The Foundations of Mathematics. Oxford University Press.
    The Foundations of Mathematics (Stewart and Tall) is a horse of a different color. The writing is excellent and there is actually some useful mathematics. I definitely like this book."--The Bulletin of Mathematics Books.
  5. Elliott Mendelson (1964). Introduction to Mathematical Logic. Princeton, N.J.,Van Nostrand.
    The Fourth Edition of this long-established text retains all the key features of the previous editions, covering the basic topics of a solid first course in ...
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  6. Paul Ernest (1991). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education. Falmer Press.
  7. Philip J. Davis (1995). The Companion Guide to the Mathematical Experience, Study Edition. Birkhäuser.
  8. O. B. Lupanov (ed.) (2005). Stochastic Algorithms: Foundations and Applications: Third International Symposium, Saga 2005, Moscow, Russia, October 20-22, 2005: Proceedings. [REVIEW] Springer.
    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Stochastic Algorithms: Foundations and Applications, SAGA 2005, held in Moscow, Russia in October 2005. The 14 revised full papers presented together with 5 invited papers were carefully reviewed and selected for inclusion in the book. The contributed papers included in this volume cover both theoretical as well as applied aspects of stochastic computations whith a special focus on new algorithmic ideas involving stochastic decisions and the design and evaluation (...)
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  9. Erwin Engeler (ed.) (1995). The Combinatory Programme. Birkhäuser.
  10. David S. G. Stirling (2009). Mathematical Analysis and Proof. Horwood Pub..
    This fundamental and straightforward text addresses a weakness observed among present-day students, namely a lack of familiarity with formal proof. Beginning with the idea of mathematical proof and the need for it, associated technical and logical skills are developed with care and then brought to bear on the core material of analysis in such a lucid presentation that the development reads naturally and in a straightforward progression. Retaining the core text, the second edition has additional worked examples which users have (...)
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  11. Charles Castonguay (1972). Meaning and Existence in Mathematics. New York,Springer-Verlag.
  12. H. Kirchner & Christophe Ringeissen (eds.) (2000). Frontiers of Combining Systems: Third International Workshop, Frocos 2000, Nancy, France, March 22-24, 2000: Proceedings. [REVIEW] Springer.
    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Third International Workshop on Frontiers of Combining Systems, FroCoS 2000, held in Nancy, France, in March 2000.The 14 revised full papers presented together with four invited papers were carefully reviewed and selected from a total of 31 submissions. Among the topics covered are constraint processing, interval narrowing, rewriting systems, proof planning, sequent calculus, type systems, model checking, theorem proving, declarative programming, logic programming, and equational theories.
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  13. Jody Azzouni (2006). Tracking Reason: Proof, Consequence, and Truth. OUP Usa.
    When ordinary people - mathematicians among them - take something to follow from something else, they are exposing the backbone of our self-ascribed ability to reason. Jody Azzouni investigates the connection between that ordinary notion of consequence and the formal analogues invented by logicians. One claim of the book is that, despite our apparent intuitive grasp of consequence, we do not introspect rules by which we reason, nor do we grasp the scope and range of the domain, as it were, (...)
  14. D. S. Bridges (1987). Varieties of Constructive Mathematics. Cambridge University Press.
    This is an introduction to, and survey of, the constructive approaches to pure mathematics. The authors emphasise the viewpoint of Errett Bishop's school, but intuitionism. Russian constructivism and recursive analysis are also treated, with comparisons between the various approaches included where appropriate. Constructive mathematics is now enjoying a revival, with interest from not only logicans but also category theorists, recursive function theorists and theoretical computer scientists. This account for non-specialists in these and other disciplines.
  15. Stephen David Ross (1994). Locality and Practical Judgment: Charity and Sacrifice. Fordham University Press.
    This work completes Ross 's trilogy examining the inexhaustible complexity of the world and our relation to our surroundings.
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  16. Edward Nelson (1986). Predicative Arithmetic. Princeton University Press.
  17. J. W. Davis (1969). Philosophical Logic. Dordrecht, D. Reidel.
  18. George R. Exner (1997). An Accompaniment to Higher Mathematics. Springer.
    This text prepares undergraduate mathematics students to meet two challenges in the study of mathematics, namely, to read mathematics independently and to understand and write proofs. The book begins by teaching how to read mathematics actively, constructing examples, extreme cases, and non-examples to aid in understanding an unfamiliar theorem or definition (a technique famililar to any mathematician, but rarely taught); it provides practice by indicating explicitly where work with pencil and paper must interrupt reading. The book then turns to proofs, (...)
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  19. Raymond Louis Wilder (1980). Introduction to the Foundations of Mathematics. R. E. Krieger Pub. Co..
  20. Philip Kitcher (1983). The Nature of Mathematical Knowledge. Oxford University Press.
    This book argues against the view that mathematical knowledge is a priori,contending that mathematics is an empirical science and develops historically,just as ...
  21. Imre Lakatos (1978). Mathematics, Science, and Epistemology. Cambridge University Press.
    Imre Lakatos' philosophical and scientific papers are published here in two volumes. Volume I brings together his very influential but scattered papers on the philosophy of the physical sciences, and includes one important unpublished essay on the effect of Newton's scientific achievement. Volume 2 presents his work on the philosophy of mathematics (much of it unpublished), together with some critical essays on contemporary philosophers of science and some famous polemical writings on political and educational issues.
  22. Gary Urton (1997). The Social Life of Numbers: A Quechua Ontology of Numbers and Philosophy of Arithmetic. University of Texas Press.
    Unraveling all the mysteries of the khipu--the knotted string device used by the Inka to record both statistical data and narrative accounts of myths, histories, and genealogies--will require an understanding of how number values and relations may have been used to encode information on social, familial, and political relationships and structures. This is the problem Gary Urton tackles in his pathfinding study of the origin, meaning, and significance of numbers and the philosophical principles underlying the practice of arithmetic among Quechua-speaking (...)
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  23. Chin-Liang Chang (1973/1987). Symbolic Logic and Mechanical Theorem Proving. Academic Press.
    This book contains an introduction to symbolic logic and a thorough discussion of mechanical theorem proving and its applications. The book consists of three major parts. Chapters 2 and 3 constitute an introduction to symbolic logic. Chapters 4–9 introduce several techniques in mechanical theorem proving, and Chapters 10 an 11 show how theorem proving can be applied to various areas such as question answering, problem solving, program analysis, and program synthesis.
  24. A. S. Troelstra (1977). Choice Sequences: A Chapter of Intuitionistic Mathematics. Clarendon Press.
  25. Jody Azzouni (2004). Deflating Existential Commitment: A Case for Nominalism. OUP Usa.
    If we take mathematical statements to be true, then must we also believe in the existence of invisible mathematical objects, accessible only by the power of thought? Jody Azzouni says we do not have to, and claims that the way to escape such a commitment is to accept - as an essential part of scientific doctrine - true statements which are 'about' objects which don't exist in any real sense.
  26. Michał Heller & W. H. Woodin (eds.) (2011). Infinity: New Research Frontiers. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction Rudy Rucker; Part I. Perspectives on Infinity from History: 1. Infinity as a transformative concept in science and theology Wolfgang Achtner; Part II. Perspectives on Infinity from Mathematics: 2. The mathematical infinity Enrico Bombieri; 3. Warning signs of a possible collapse of contemporary mathematics Edward Nelson; Part III. Technical Perspectives on Infinity from Advanced Mathematics: 4. The realm of the infinite W. Hugh Woodin; 5. A potential subtlety concerning the distinction between determinism and nondeterminism W. (...)
  27. Francesco Berto (2009). There's Something About Gödel: The Complete Guide to the Incompleteness Theorem. Wiley-Blackwell.
    The Gödelian symphony -- Foundations and paradoxes -- This sentence is false -- The liar and Gödel -- Language and metalanguage -- The axiomatic method or how to get the non-obvious out of the obvious -- Peano's axioms -- And the unsatisfied logicists, Frege and Russell -- Bits of set theory -- The abstraction principle -- Bytes of set theory -- Properties, relations, functions, that is, sets again -- Calculating, computing, enumerating, that is, the notion of algorithm -- Taking numbers (...)
  28. Alfred North Whitehead & Bertrand Russell (1962/1997). Principia Mathematica, to *56. Cambridge University Press.
    The great three-volume Principia Mathematica is deservedly the most famous work ever written on the foundations of mathematics. Its aim is to deduce all the fundamental propositions of logic and mathematics from a small number of logical premisses and primitive ideas, and so to prove that mathematics is a development of logic. This abridged text of Volume I contains the material that is most relevant to an introductory study of logic and the philosophy of mathematics (more advanced students will wish (...)
  29. Frederic B. Fitch (1974). Elements of Combinatory Logic. New Haven,Yale University Press.
  30. Paul C. Rosenbloom (1950/2005). The Elements of Mathematical Logic. New York]Dover Publications.
    An excellent introduction to mathematical logic, this book provides readers with a sound knowledge of the most important approaches to the subject, stressing the use of logical methods in attacking nontrivial problems. It covers the logic of classes, of propositions, of propositional functions, and the general syntax of language, with a brief introduction that also illustrates applications to so-called undecidability and incompleteness theorems. Other topics include the simple proof of the completeness of the theory of combinations, Church's theorem on the (...)
  31. P. T. Johnstone (1987). Notes on Logic and Set Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    A succinct introduction to mathematical logic and set theory, which together form the foundations for the rigorous development of mathematics. Suitable for all introductory mathematics undergraduates, Notes on Logic and Set Theory covers the basic concepts of logic: first-order logic, consistency, and the completeness theorem, before introducing the reader to the fundamentals of axiomatic set theory. Successive chapters examine the recursive functions, the axiom of choice, ordinal and cardinal arithmetic, and the incompleteness theorems. Dr. Johnstone has included numerous exercises designed (...)
  32. Roland Omnès (2004). Converging Realities: Toward a Common Philosophy of Physics and Mathematics. Princeton University Press.
    The philosophical relationship between mathematics and the natural sciences is the subject of Converging Realities, the latest work by one of the leading thinkers on the subject.
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  33. Hilary Putnam (1979). Mathematics, Matter, and Method. Cambridge University Press.
    Professor Hilary Putnam has been one of the most influential and sharply original of recent American philosophers in a whole range of fields. His most important published work is collected here, together with several new and substantial studies, in two volumes. The first deals with the philosophy of mathematics and of science and the nature of philosophical and scientific enquiry; the second deals with the philosophy of language and mind. Volume one is now issued in a new edition, including an (...)
  34. V. Di Gesù, F. Masulli & Alfredo Petrosino (eds.) (2006). Fuzzy Logic and Applications: 5th International Workshop, Wilf 2003, Naples, Italy, October 9-11, 2003: Revised Selected Papers. [REVIEW] Springer.
    This volume constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-workshop proceedings of the 5th International Workshop on Fuzzy Logic and Applications held in Naples, Italy, in October 2003. The 40 revised full papers presented have gone through two rounds of reviewing and revision. All current issues of theoretical, experimental and applied fuzzy logic and related techniques are addressed with special attention to rough set theory, neural networks, genetic algorithms and soft computing. The papers are organized in topical section on fuzzy sets and systems, (...)
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  35. Shaughan Lavine (1994). Understanding the Infinite. Harvard University Press.
    An engaging account of the origins of the modern mathematical theory of the infinite, his book is also a spirited defense against the attacks and misconceptions ...
  36. Alessandro Andretta, Keith Kearnes & Domenico Zambella (eds.) (2008). Logic Colloquium 2004: Proceedings of the Annual European Summer Meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic, Held in Torino, Italy, July 25-31, 2004. [REVIEW] Cambridge University Press.
    Highlights of this volume from the 2004 Annual European Meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic (ASL) include a tutorial survey of the recent highpoints of universal algebra, written by a leading expert; explorations of foundational questions; a quartet of model theory papers giving an excellent reflection of current work in model theory, from the most abstract aspect "abstract elementary classes" to issues around p-adic integration.
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  37. Thomas Tymoczko (ed.) (1998). New Directions in the Philosophy of Mathematics: An Anthology. Princeton University Press.
    This expanded edition now contains essays by Penelope Maddy, Michael D. Resnik, and William P. Thurston that address the nature of mathematical proofs. The editor has provided a new afterword and a supplemental bibliography of recent work.
  38. Alexander George (ed.) (1994). Mathematics and Mind. Oxford University Press.
    Those inquiring into the nature of mind have long been interested in the foundations of mathematics, and conversely this branch of knowledge is distinctive in that our access to it is purely through thought. A better understanding of mathematical thought should clarify the conceptual foundations of mathematics, and a deeper grasp of the latter should in turn illuminate the powers of mind through which mathematics is made available to us. The link between conceptions of mind and of mathematics has been (...)
  39. Charles S. Chihara (1973). Ontology and the Vicious-Circle Principle. Ithaca [N.Y.]Cornell University Press.
  40. Ludwig Wittgenstein (1978). Remarks on the Foundations of Mathematics. B. Blackwell.
  41. Eli Maor (1987/1991). To Infinity and Beyond: A Cultural History of the Infinite. Princeton University Press.
    Eli Maor examines the role of infinity in mathematics and geometry and its cultural impact on the arts and sciences. He evokes the profound intellectual impact the infinite has exercised on the human mind--from the "horror infiniti" of the Greeks to the works of M. C. Escher from the ornamental designs of the Moslems, to the sage Giordano Bruno, whose belief in an infinite universe led to his death at the hands of the Inquisition. But above all, the (...)
  42. Penelope Maddy (1990). Realism in Mathematics. Oxford University Prress.
    Mathematicians tend to think of themselves as scientists investigating the features of real mathematical things, and the wildly successful application of mathematics in the physical sciences reinforces this picture of mathematics as an objective study. For philosophers, however, this realism about mathematics raises serious questions: What are mathematical things? Where are they? How do we know about them? Offering a scrupulously fair treatment of both mathematical and philosophical concerns, Penelope Maddy here delineates and defends a novel version of mathematical realism. (...)
  43. Amir D. Aczel (2000). The Mystery of the Aleph: Mathematics, the Kabbalah, and the Search for Infinity. Four Walls Eight Windows.
    From the end of the 19th century until his death, one of history's most brilliant mathematicians languished in an asylum. The Mystery of the Aleph tells the story of Georg Cantor (1845-1918), a Russian-born German who created set theory, the concept of infinite numbers, and the "continuum hypothesis," which challenged the very foundations of mathematics. His ideas brought expected denunciation from established corners - he was called a "corruptor of youth" not only for his work in mathematics, but for his (...)
  44. Robert S. Tragesser (1984). Husserl and Realism in Logic and Mathematics. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book Robert Tragesser sets out to determine the conditions under which a realist ontology of mathematics and logic might be justified, taking as his starting point Husserl's treatment of these metaphysical problems. He does not aim primarily at an exposition of Husserl's phenomenology, although many of the central claims of phenomenology are clarified here. Rather he exploits its ideas and methods to show how they can contribute to answering Michael Dummet's question 'Realism or Anti-Realism?'. In doing so he (...)
  45. Thomas J. Jech (1971). Lectures in Set Theory. New York,Springer-Verlag.
  46. W. S. Anglin (1996). Mathematics, a Concise History and Philosophy. Springer.
    This is a concise introductory textbook for a one semester course in the history and philosophy of mathematics. It is written for mathematics majors, philosophy students, history of science students and secondary school mathematics teachers. The only prerequisite is a solid command of pre-calculus mathematics. It is shorter than the standard textbooks in that area and thus more accessible to students who have trouble coping with vast amounts of reading. Furthermore, there are many detailed explanations of the important mathematical procedures (...)
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  47. C. S. Jenkins (2008). Grounding Concepts: An Empirical Basis for Arithmetical Knowledge. OUP Oxford.
    Carrie Jenkins presents a new account of arithmetical knowledge, which manages to respect three key intuitions: a priorism, mind-independence realism, and empiricism. Jenkins argues that arithmetic can be known through the examination of empirically grounded concepts, non-accidentally accurate representations of the mind-independent world.
  48. Jody Azzouni (2010). Talking About Nothing: Numbers, Hallucinations, and Fictions. Oxford University Press.
    Numbers -- Hallucinations -- Fictions -- Scientific languages, ontology, and truth -- Truth conditions and semantics.
  49. Alonzo Church (1956). Introduction to Mathematical Logic. Princeton, Princeton University Press.
    This book is intended to be used as a textbook by students of mathematics, and also within limitations as a reference work.
  50. Philip J. Davis (1995/1982). The Mathematical Experience. Birkhäuser.
    Presents general information about meteorology, weather, and climate and includes more than thirty activities to help study these topics, including making a ...
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