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1 — 50 / 347
  1. Londa L. Schiebinger (ed.) (2000). Feminism and the Body. Oxford University Press.
    Feminism and the Body presents classic texts in feminist body studies. Intended for undergraduate and graduate students, the volume touches on the medical history of sexual differences, the political history of the body, the history of clothing and its cultural meanings, symbolic renderings of the body, male bodies, and the body in colonial and cross-cultural contexts.
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  2. John Paul Jones, Heidi J. Nast & Susan M. Roberts (eds.) (1997). Thresholds in Feminist Geography: Difference, Methodology, and Representation. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
  3. Angela R. Miles (1996). Integrative Feminisms: Building Global Visions, 1960s-1990s. Routledge.
    Integrative Feminisms presents a unique discussion of feminist radicalism in North America in the context of feminism's global development since the 1960s. Across divergent agendas, Angela Miles illuminates the transformative power she argues is common to apparently diverse radical, eco-, Black, socialist, lesbian and "third world" feminists. Drawing on interviews with activists, historical and documentary research, and her own participation, she provides powerful analysis of concentric feminisms in a transnational context. The book shows how transformative practices have led these various (...)
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  4. Alison Assiter (1996). Enlightened Women: Modernist Feminism in a Postmodern Age. Routledge.
    This is a bold and controversial feminist, philosophical critique of postmodernism. While providing a brief and accessible introduction to postmodernist feminist thought, Enlightened Women is also a unique defence of realism and enlightenment philosophy. The first half of the book covers an analysis of some of the most influential postmodernist theorists, such as Luce Irigaray and Judith Butler. In the second half Alison Assiter advocates a return to modernism in feminism. She argues, against the current orthodoxy, that there can be (...)
  5. Mica Nava (1992). Changing Cultures: Feminism, Youth and Consumerism. Sage.
    Linked by the connection of feminism, sociology, and cultural studies, Changing Cultures assesses feminist theory, its transformations, and its ability to highlight issues and practices. This controversial yet stimulating volume explores the complex relationship between these three subjects, conceptual approaches, their political implications and their historical context. Nava analyzes utopianism of feminist thought on the family; sexuality and sexual differences in youth service provision; and the symbolic resonance of the urban and domestic education of girls. She also investigates the relationship (...)
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  6. Drucilla Cornell (1993). Transformations: Recollective Imagination and Sexual Difference. Routledge.
    In a unique rethinking of political transformation, Drucilla Cornell argues for the crucial role of psychoanalysis in social theory in voicing connection between our constitution as gendered subjects and social and political change.
  7. Chris Weedon (1999). Feminism, Theory, and the Politics of Difference. Blackwell Publishers.
    "Feminism, Theory and the Politics of Difference" looks at the question of difference across the full spectrum of feminist theory from liberal, radical, lesbian ...
  8. Josefina Figueira-McDonough, Ann Nichols-Casebolt & F. Ellen Netting (eds.) (1998). The Role of Gender in Practice Knowledge: Claiming Half the Human Experience. Garland Pub..
    Feminist critiques of the social sciences are based on the assumption that because the social sciences were developed for the most part by white, middle-class, Western men, the perspectives of women were ignored. This book offers an approach for integrating gender-related content into the social work curriculum. The distinguished contributors discuss the shortcoming of dominant knowledge, address the pressing need for a gender-integrated curriculum, consider the pedagogies consistent with the implementation of an integrate curriculum, address specific areas in social work (...)
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  9. Eric J. Silverman (2009). The Prudence of Love: How Possessing the Virtue of Love Benefits the Lover. Lexington Books.
    The Prudence of Love focuses upon the intersection of philosophical, theological, and psychological issues related to love. Eric Silverman defends an account of love derived from the views of Thomas Aquinas and argues that love provides numerous psychological and relational benefits that increase the lover's happiness. Furthermore, he argues that love is beneficial according to all major contemporary accounts of happiness.
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  10. Kathy Davis, Monique Leijenaar & Jantine Oldersma (eds.) (1991). The Gender of Power. Sage Publications.
    "This book does serve a very useful purpose in returning power to the centre of the feminist stage. . . . This book makes clear the ways in which the machinations of power are more subtle, widespread, and multiform than it sometimes appears. Further, the clarity of presentation means that it is also a text that can usefully be included on student bibliographies." --Women's Philosophy Review "The Gender of Power, which announces itself in the first line of its Preface as (...)
  11. Verena Andermatt Conley (1997). Ecopolitics: The Environment in Poststructuralist Thought. Routledge.
    Ecopolitics is a study of environmental awareness--or non-awareness--in contemporary French theory. Arguing that it is now impossible not to think in an ecological way, Verena Andermatt Conley traces the roots of today's concern for the environment back to the intellectual climate of the late '50s and '60s. Major thinkers of 1968, the author argues, changed the way we think the world; this owes much to an ecological awareness that remains at the heart of issues concerning cultural theory in general. The (...)
  12. Gail Hawkes (1996). A Sociology of Sex and Sexuality. Open University Press.
    A Sociology of Sex and Sexuality offers an historical sociological analysis of ideas about expressions of sexual desire, combining both primary and secondary historical and theoretical material with original research and popular imagery in the contemporary context. While some reference is made to the sexual ideology of Classical Antiquity and of early Christianity, the major focus of the book is on the development of ideas about sex and sexuality in the context of modernity. It questions the widespread assumption that the (...)
  13. Sandra Kemp & Judith Squires (eds.) (1998). Feminisms. Oxford University Press.
    Spanning nearly two decades, from 1980 to 1996, this Reader investigates the debates which have best characterized feminist theory. Including such articles as Pornography and Fantasy, The Body and Cinema, Nature as Female, and A Manifesto for Cyborgs, the extracts examine thoughts on sexualtiy as a domain of exploration, the visual representation of women, what being a feminist means, and why feminists are increasingly involved in political struggles to negotiate the context and meaning of technological development. With writings by bell (...)
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  14. Linda Singer (1992). Erotic Welfare: Sexual Theory and Politics in the Age of Epidemic. Routledge.
    A trenchant critique of sexuality in an age of discipline, where bodies and pleasures have become sites of regulatory power.
  15. Stella Sandford (2000). The Metaphysics of Love: Gender and Transcendence in Levinas. Athlone Press.
    In The Metaphysics of Love, however, Stella Sandford argues that an over-emphasis on ethics in the reception of Levinas's thought has concealed the basis and ...
  16. Linda Alcoff & Elizabeth Potter (eds.) (1993). Feminist Epistemologies. Routledge.
    "First Published in 1992, Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.".
  17. Sally Sheldon & Michael Thomson (eds.) (1998). Feminist Perspectives on Health Care Law. Cavendish Pub..
    This book brings together new work by some of the foremost writers in the health care law arena. It presents exciting new insights,drawing on feminist theory and methodology to further our understanding of health care law. Whilst the book makes a real contribution to both feminist debates and the analysis of this area of law, it is also accessible to the undergraduate student who is approaching this area of legal scholarship and feminist jurisprudence for the first time. Its focus is (...)
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  18. Keith Burgess-Jackson (ed.) (1999). A Most Detestable Crime: New Philosophical Essays on Rape. Oxford University Press.
    This collection of original essays by leading philosophers probes the philosophical aspects of rape in all of its manifestations: act, crime, practice, and institution. Among the issues examined are the nature of rape; the wrongfulness and harmfulness of rape; the relation of rape to racism, sexism, classism, and other forms of oppression; and the legitimacy of various rape-law doctrines. Each contributor advances a novel argument and seeks to disentangle the conceptual, evaluative, and empirical issues that arise in connection with the (...)
  19. Penelope Deutscher (1997). Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction, and the History of Philosophy. Routledge.
    Yielding Gender explores and reconsiders the tensions that deconstruction poses for feminist philosophy. Emphasizing the important role of deconstruction in revealing the ambiguity and unstable nature of gender, Penelope Deutscher asks the crucial question: does the very instability of gender mean that we can no longer talk of a man or a woman of reason in the history of philosophy? Using the work of Judith Butler, Jacques Derrida and Luce Irigaray, Deutscher explores this question by examining the issue of gender (...)
  20. Pauline Johnson (1994). Feminism as Radical Humanism. Westview Press.
    "Sure to be controversial and of interest to a wide audience in feminist history" (Judith Grant, University of Southern California), this book draws on a wide range of political and intellectual traditions to demonstrate that, only by ...
  21. Claudia Card (2002). The Atrocity Paradigm: A Theory of Evil. Oxford University Press.
    What distinguishes evils from ordinary wrongs? Is hatred a necessarily evil? Are some evils unforgivable? Are there evils we should tolerate? What can make evils hard to recognize? Are evils inevitable? How can we best respond to and live with evils? Claudia Card offers a secular theory of evil that responds to these questions and more. Evils, according to her theory, have two fundamental components. One component is reasonably foreseeable intolerable harm -- harm that makes a life indecent (...)
  22. Hugh J. Silverman (ed.) (1991). Writing the Politics of Difference. State University of New York Press.
    The authors first focus on the diversity of traditions in connection with the texts of Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, Sartre, and De Beauvoir.
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  23. Peta Bowden (1997). Caring: Gender-Sensitive Ethics. Routledge.
    Caring extends and challenges recent debates over feminist ethics by taking issue with accounts of the ethics of care which try to pin down the "principles" of caring, rather than understanding the practice of caring. It explores four main caring practices: mothering, friendship, nursing and citizenship. Bowden's consideration of the differences and similarities in these working practices reveals the complexity of the ethics of caring.
  24. Barbara Hobson, Jane Lewis & Birte Siim (eds.) (2002). Contested Concepts in Gender and Social Politics. E. Elgar Pub..
    This is a major contribution to the theoretical and comparative literature on welfare states, written by some of the most original and challenging feminist ...
  25. Margaret A. Crouch (2001). Thinking About Sexual Harassment: A Guide for the Perplexed. OUP Usa.
    Thinking About Sexual Harassment aims to provide the information necessary for careful, critical thinking about the concept of sexual harassment. Part I traces the construction of the concept of sexual harassment from the first public uses of the term through its definitions in the law, in legal cases, and in empirical research. Part II analyses philosophical definitions of sexual harassment and a number of issues that have arisen in the law, including the reasonable woman standard and whether same-sex harassment should (...)
  26. Kath Weston (1998). Long Slow Burn: Sexuality and Social Science. Routledge.
    The last decade has seen the transformation of the study of sexuality from a marginalized effort to a fully respected discipline at many major universities. There are numerous publications devoted solely to the topic and queer theory, a force to be reckoned with, has its own celebrities. Nonetheless, queer studies is considered to be the brainchild of the humanities, with the social sciences slowly coming around to apply its principles to empirical research. Long, Slow Burn, a powerful collection of essays (...)
  27. Andrew Light & Mechthild Nagel (eds.) (2000). Race, Class, and Community Identity. Humanity Books.
    Despite the intransigent nature of many of the problems discussed, the contributors to this volume demonstrate the possibilities for developing a viable alternative politics.
  28. Jana Sawicki (1991). Disciplining Foucault: Feminism, Power, and the Body. Routledge.
  29. Lynette Hunter (1999). Critiques of Knowing: Situated Textualities in Science, Computing, and the Arts. Routledge.
    Critiques of Knowing explores what happens to science and computing when we think of them as texts. Lynette Hunter elegantly weaves together such vast areas of thought as rhetoric, politics, AI, computing, feminism, science studies, aesthetics and epistemology. This book shows us that what we need is a radical shake-up of approaches to the arts if the critiques of science and computing are to come to any fruition.
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  30. Larry May & Robert Strikwerda (eds.) (1992). Rethinking Masculinity: Philosophical Explorations in Light of Feminism. Rowman and Littlefield.
    This fascinating collection of articles offers thoughtful reflections on issues of masculinity too often neglected in feminist philosophy.
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  31. Jeremy MacClancy (ed.) (2002). Exotic No More: Anthropology on the Front Lines. University of Chicago Press.
    Since its founding in the nineteenth century, social anthropology has been seen as the study of exotic peoples in faraway places. But today more and more anthropologists are dedicating themselves not just to observing but to understanding and helping solve social problems wherever they occur--in international aid organizations, British TV studios, American hospitals, or racist enclaves in Eastern Europe, for example. In Exotic No More , an initiative of the Royal Anthropological Institute, some of today's most respected anthropologists demonstrate, in (...)
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  32. Brittany Murray & Diane Perpich (eds.) (2011). Taking French Feminism to the Streets. University of Illinois Press.
    "Portions of this work were originally published as La racaille de la Republique by Fadela Amara and Mohammed Abdi, Editions du Seuil, 2006"--T.p. verso.
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  33. Kathleen Lennon & Margaret Whitford (eds.) (1994). Knowing the Difference: Feminist Perspectives in Epistemology. Routledge.
    This collection is one of the first to offer feminist perspectives on epistemology from thinkers outside North America. It presents essays from an international group of contributors, including Rosi Braidotti, Gemma Corradi Fiumara, Anna Yeatman, Sabina Lovibond and Liz Stanley. Using approaches and methods from both analytic and continental philosophy, the contributors engage with questions of traditional epistemology and with issues raised by postmodernist critiques. The essays deal with the central question of difference: the difference which a feminist perspective yields (...)
  34. Paula M. Cooey (1994). Religious Imagination and the Body: A Feminist Analysis. Oxford University Press.
    In recent years feminist scholarship has increasingly focused on the importance of the body and its representations in virtually every social, cultural, and intellectual context. Many have argued that because women are more closely identified with their bodies, they have access to privileged and different kinds of knowledge than men. In this landmark new book, Paula Cooey offers a different perspective on the significance of the body in the context of religious life and practice. Building on the pathbreaking work of (...)
  35. Chris Beasley (1999). What is Feminism?: An Introduction to Feminist Theory. Sage.
    So what is feminism anyway? Why are all the experts so reluctant to give us a clear definition? Is it possible to make sense of the complex and often contradictory debates? In this concise and accessible introduction to feminist theory, Chris Beasley provides clear explanations of the many types of feminism. She outlines the development of liberal, radical and Marxist//socialist feminism, and reviews the more contemporary influences of psychoanalysis, postmodernism, theories of the body, queer theory, and attends to the ongoing (...)
  36. Paul Patton (ed.) (1993). Nietzsche, Feminism, and Political Theory. Routledge.
    "Are you visiting women? Do not forget your whip!" -- Thus Spoke Zarathustra ". . . the democratic movement is . . . a form assumed by man in decay" -- Beyond Good and Evil Nietzsche's views on women and politics have long been the most problematic aspects of his thought. Nietzsche, Feminism and Political Theory is the first book to focus on the interest Nietzsche's work now arouses among feminist theorists and political philosophers. It is unique in its examination (...)
  37. Michael Shalom Kochin (2002). Gender and Rhetoric in Plato's Political Thought. Cambridge University Press.
    Gender and Rhetoric in the Politics of Plato explores the relation between Plato's Republic and Laws on the set of issues that the Laws itself marks out as fundamental to the comparison: the unity of the virtues, the role of women, and the place of the family. Plato aims to persuade men to abandon the view of the good life that Greek cities and their laws inculcate as the only life worth living for those who would be real men and (...)
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  38. Judith Butler & Joan Wallach Scott (eds.) (1992). Feminists Theorize the Political. Routledge.
  39. Luce Irigaray (1985). This Sex Which Is Not One. Cornell University Press.
    In eleven acute and widely ranging essays, Irigaray reconsiders the question of female sexuality in a variety of contexts that are relevant to current discussion of feminist theory and practice.
  40. Linda McDowell & Joanne P. Sharp (eds.) (1997). Space, Gender, Knowledge: Feminist Readings. J. Wiley.
    Space Gender Knowledge is an innovative and comprehensive introduction to the geographies of gender and the gendered nature of spatial relations. It examines the major issues raised by women's movements and academic feminism, and outlines the main shifts in feminist geographical work, from the geography of women to the impact of post-structuralism. In making their selection, the editors have drawn on a wide range of interdisciplinary material, ranging across spatial scales from the body to the globe. The book presents influential (...)
  41. Alcuin Blamires (2006/2008). Chaucer, Ethics, and Gender. Oxford University Press.
    This book makes a vigorous reassessment of the moral dimension in Chaucer's writings. For the Middle Ages, the study of human behavior generally signified the study of the morality of attitudes, choices, and actions. Moreover, moral analysis was not gender neutral: it presupposed that certain virtues and certain failings were largely gender-specific. Alcuin Blamires, mainly concentrating on The Canterbury Tales, discloses how Chaucer adapts the composite inherited traditions of moral literature to shape the significance and the gender implications of his (...)
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  42. Daniel Price (1997). Without a Woman to Read: Toward the Daughter in Postmodernism. State University of New York Press.
    A philosophical questioning of reading and writing that focuses on metaphors of women and women's roles in our cultural and intellectual heritage.
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  43. Kelly Oliver & Lisa Walsh (eds.) (2004). Contemporary French Feminism. OUP Oxford.
    Have we entered a historical moment of 'post-feminism'? This volume presents a timely and convincing 'no'. These essays demonstrate that there is a new generation of French women who take up questions of equality and difference from a position distinct from either first or second wave feminism, a position that often attempts to move beyond the binary of equality and/or difference to a new form of the individual.
  44. Naomi Zack (ed.) (2000). Women of Color and Philosophy: A Critical Reader. Blackwell Publishers.
    Philosophy is in its fourth millennium but this collection is the first of its kind. Twelve contemporary women of color who are American academic philosophers consider the methods and subjects of the discipline from perspectives partly informed by their experiences as African American, Asian American, Latina, Mixed Race and Native American.
  45. Paul C. Taylor (2004). Race: A Philosophical Introduction. Distributed in the Usa by Blackwell Pub..
    The book unfolds in a sequence of five chapters, each devoted to one of the following questions: What is race-thinking?
  46. İlham Dilman (1987). Love and Human Separateness. B. Blackwell.
  47. Marilyn Friedman (ed.) (2005). Women and Citizenship. OUP Usa.
    This highly interdisciplinary volume explores the political and cultural dimensions of citizenship and their relevance to women and gender. Containing essays by leading scholars such as Iris Marion Young, Alison Jaggar, Martha Nussbaum, and Sandra Bartky, it examines the conceptual issues and strategies at play in the feminist quest to give women full citizenship status. The contributors take a fresh look at issues, going beyond conventional critiques, and examining problems in the political and social arrangements, practices, and conditions that diminish (...)
  48. Iwao Hoshii (1987). Sex in Ethics and Law. Paul Norbury Publications.
  49. Kate Campbell (ed.) (1992). Critical Feminism: Argument in the Disciplines. Open University Press.
  50. Beverley Clack (ed.) (1999). Misogyny in the Western Philosophical Tradition: A Reader. Routledge.
    From some of the great philosophers of the Western tradition: "The Devils gateway" --Tertullian "A misbegotten male" --Aquinas "Big children their whole life long" --Schopenhauer The roots of philosophical misogyny in the writings of thinkers from the ancient Greeks through the modern age are exposed and explored in this collection. Beverley Clack questions whether the wisdom of these philosophers can be separated from the misogyny, and whether feminists should seek an alternative to the Western philosophical canon. This collection offers chronological (...)
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