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1 — 50 / 331
  1. Alison Assiter (1996). Enlightened Women: Modernist Feminism in a Postmodern Age. Routledge.
    This is a bold and controversial feminist, philosophical critique of postmodernism. While providing a brief and accessible introduction to postmodernist feminist thought, Enlightened Women is also a unique defence of realism and enlightenment philosophy. The first half of the book covers an analysis of some of the most influential postmodernist theorists, such as Luce Irigaray and Judith Butler. In the second half Alison Assiter advocates a return to modernism in feminism. She argues, against the current orthodoxy, that there can be (...)
  2. Noretta Koertge (ed.) (1981). The Nature and Causes of Homosexuality: A Philosophic and Scientific Inquiry. Haworth Press.
    For a balanced discussion of the main social, medical, and philosophical aspects of homosexuality, here is the ideal book. Written by philosophers of science, each comprehensive chapter takes a critical look at research on the etiology of homosexuality. Read Philosophy and Homosexuality and examine the evidence for both the sociobiological and hormonal explanations of homosexuality and study the definitions of sexual orientation and how they have affected research.
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  3. Mark Blasius & Shane Phelan (eds.) (1997). We Are Everywhere: A Historical Sourcebook of Gay and Lesbian Politics. Routledge.
    An important and original new contribution to lesbian and gay studies, We Are Everywhere brings together the key primary sources relating to the politics of homosexuality. Presenting political, historical, legal, literary, and psychological documents which trace the evolution of the lesbian and gay movement, it includes documents as diverse as organization pamphlets, essays, polemics, speeches, newspaper and journal articles, and academic papers. We Are Everywhere includes writings from the beginnings of the gay and lesbian movement in the 19th century by (...)
  4. Morwenna Griffiths (1995). Feminisms and the Self: The Web of Identity. Routledge.
    Feminisms and the Self is both a critique and a construction of feminist philosophy, bringing an original contribution to the current debate surrounding identity and subjectivity. This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
  5. Jon Huer (1987). Art, Beauty, and Pornography: A Journey Through American Culture. Prometheus Books.
  6. Lynda I. A. Birke (1994). Feminism, Animals, and Science: The Naming of the Shrew. Open University Press.
  7. Eric J. Silverman (2009). The Prudence of Love: How Possessing the Virtue of Love Benefits the Lover. Lexington Books.
    The Prudence of Love focuses upon the intersection of philosophical, theological, and psychological issues related to love. Eric Silverman defends an account of love derived from the views of Thomas Aquinas and argues that love provides numerous psychological and relational benefits that increase the lover's happiness. Furthermore, he argues that love is beneficial according to all major contemporary accounts of happiness.
  8. William B. Turner (2000). A Genealogy of Queer Theory. Temple University Press.
    As such, the book will interest readers of gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender studies, intellectual history, political theory, and the history of gender/sexuality ...
  9. Philippa Berry & Andrew Wernick (eds.) (1992). Shadow of Spirit: Postmodernism and Religion. Routledge.
    By illuminating the striking affinity between the most innovative aspects of postmodern thought and religious mystical discourse, Shadow of Spirit challenges the long established assumption that western thought is committed to nihilism. This collection of essays by internationally recognized scholars explores the implications of the fascination with the "sacred," "divine" or "infinite" which characterizes much contemporary thought. It shows how these concerns have surfaced in the work of Derrida, Baudrillard, Lyotard, Kristeva, Irigaray and others. Examining the connection between this postmodern (...)
  10. Kathleen A. Staudt (1997). Political Science & Feminisms: Integration or Transformation? Prentice Hall International.
  11. Raia Prokhovnik (2002). Rational Woman: A Feminist Critique of Dichotomy. Distributed Exclusively in the Usa by Palgrave.
    This book is a comprehensive, analytical study of the way the mind/body dichotomy has perpetuated social hierarchy on the basis of gender. It challenges the tradition of dualism and argues that the term “rational woman” is not a contradiction in terms. Having investigated the two major dualisms contained in the term “rational woman”, the author develops an argument for a new relational conception of all the terms involved in “rational woman”, emphasizing the relationship of interdependence of reason and emotion, man (...)
  12. Sandra Kemp & Judith Squires (eds.) (1998). Feminisms. Oxford University Press.
    Spanning nearly two decades, from 1980 to 1996, this Reader investigates the debates which have best characterized feminist theory. Including such articles as Pornography and Fantasy, The Body and Cinema, Nature as Female, and A Manifesto for Cyborgs, the extracts examine thoughts on sexualtiy as a domain of exploration, the visual representation of women, what being a feminist means, and why feminists are increasingly involved in political struggles to negotiate the context and meaning of technological development. With writings by bell (...)
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  13. David Bindman (2002). Ape to Apollo: Aesthetics and the Idea of Race in the 18th Century. Cornell University Press.
    Ape to Apollo is the first book to follow the development in the eighteenth century of the idea of race as it shaped and was shaped by the idea of aesthetics.
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  14. Steve Pile & N. J. Thrift (eds.) (1995). Mapping the Subject: Geographies of Cultural Transformation. Routledge.
    With no precise boundaries, always on the move and too complex to be defined by space and time, is it possible to map the human subject? This book attempts to do just this, exploring the places of the subject in contemporary culture. The editors approach this subject from four main aspects--its construction, sexuality, limits and politics--using a wide ranging review of literature on subjectivity across the social and human sciences. The first part of the book establishes the idea that the (...)
  15. Margaret A. Crouch (2001). Thinking About Sexual Harassment: A Guide for the Perplexed. Oup Usa.
    Thinking About Sexual Harassment aims to provide the information necessary for careful, critical thinking about the concept of sexual harassment. Part I traces the construction of the concept of sexual harassment from the first public uses of the term through its definitions in the law, in legal cases, and in empirical research. Part II analyses philosophical definitions of sexual harassment and a number of issues that have arisen in the law, including the reasonable woman standard and whether same-sex harassment should (...)
  16. Stacey Young (1997). Changing the Wor(L)D: Discourse, Politics, and the Feminist Movement. Routledge.
    Changing the Wor(l)d draws on feminist publishing, postmodern theory and feminist autobiography to powerfully critique both liberal feminism and scholarship on the women's movement, arguing that both ignore feminism's unique contributions to social analysis and politics. These contributions recognize the power of discourse, the diversity of women's experiences, and the importance of changing the world through changing consciousness. Young critiques social movement theory and five key studies of the women's movement, arguing that gender oppression can be understood only in relation (...)
  17. Mica Nava (1992). Changing Cultures: Feminism, Youth and Consumerism. Sage.
    Linked by the connection of feminism, sociology, and cultural studies, Changing Cultures assesses feminist theory, its transformations, and its ability to highlight issues and practices. This controversial yet stimulating volume explores the complex relationship between these three subjects, conceptual approaches, their political implications and their historical context. Nava analyzes utopianism of feminist thought on the family; sexuality and sexual differences in youth service provision; and the symbolic resonance of the urban and domestic education of girls. She also investigates the relationship (...)
  18. Rosalind Minsky (1996). Psychoanalysis and Gender: An Introductory Reader. Routledge.
    What is object-relations theory and what does it have to do with literary studies? How can Freud's phallocentric theories be applied by feminist critics? In Psychoanalysis and Gender: An Introductory Reader Rosalind Minsky answers these questions and more, offering students a clear, straightforward overview without ever losing them in jargon. In the first section Minsky outlines the fundamentals of the theory, introducing the key thinkers and providing clear commentary. In the second section, the theory is demonstratedn by an anthology of (...)
  19. Gail Hawkes (1996). A Sociology of Sex and Sexuality. Open University Press.
    A Sociology of Sex and Sexuality offers an historical sociological analysis of ideas about expressions of sexual desire, combining both primary and secondary historical and theoretical material with original research and popular imagery in the contemporary context. While some reference is made to the sexual ideology of Classical Antiquity and of early Christianity, the major focus of the book is on the development of ideas about sex and sexuality in the context of modernity. It questions the widespread assumption that the (...)
  20. Sylvia Junko Yanagisako & Carol Lowery Delaney (eds.) (1995). Naturalizing Power: Essays in Feminist Cultural Analysis. Routledge.
    This collection of essays analyzes relations of social inequality that appear to be logical extensions of a "natural order," and in the process demonstrates that a revitalized feminist anthropology of the 1990s has much to offer the field of feminist theory. Fashioned as a response to the lack of cultural analysis in feminist scholarship, the contributors question the category of gender within the inclusive context of the structural dynamics of inequality. They also examine how cultural identities, domains and institutions affect (...)
  21. Kate Campbell (ed.) (1992). Critical Feminism: Argument in the Disciplines. Open University Press.
  22. Barbara Hobson, Jane Lewis & Birte Siim (eds.) (2002). Contested Concepts in Gender and Social Politics. E. Elgar Pub..
    This is a major contribution to the theoretical and comparative literature on welfare states, written by some of the most original and challenging feminist ...
  23. Bernard Boxill (ed.) (1996). Race and Racism (Oxford Readings in Philosophy). Oxford UP.
    Investigating the meaning of race and racism, the eighteen superb essays in this book not only explore the nature of these controversial ideas but also promote ...
  24. George Yancy (ed.) (2004). What White Looks Like: African-American Philosophers on the Whiteness Question. Routledge.
    In the burgeoning field of whiteness studies, What White Looks Like takes a unique approach to the subject by collecting the ideas of African-American philosophers. George Yancy has brought together a group of thinkers who address the problematic issues of whiteness as a category requiring serious analysis. What does white look like when viewed through philosophical training and African-American experience? In this volume, Robert Birt asks if whites can "live whiteness authentically." Janine Jones examines what it means to be a (...)
  25. Verena Andermatt Conley (1997). Ecopolitics: The Environment in Poststructuralist Thought. Routledge.
    Ecopolitics is a study of environmental awareness--or non-awareness--in contemporary French theory. Arguing that it is now impossible not to think in an ecological way, Verena Andermatt Conley traces the roots of today's concern for the environment back to the intellectual climate of the late '50s and '60s. Major thinkers of 1968, the author argues, changed the way we think the world; this owes much to an ecological awareness that remains at the heart of issues concerning cultural theory in general. The (...)
  26. Claire Colebrook (2004). Gender. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book offers a clear introductory overview of the concept of gender. It places gender in its historical contexts and traces its development from the Enlightenment to the present, before moving on to the evolution of the concept of gender from within the various stances of feminist criticism, and recent developments in queer theory and post-feminism. Close analysis of key literary texts, including Frankenstein , Paradise Lost and A Midsummer Night's Dream , shows how specific styles of literature enable reflection (...)
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  27. Bernard Boxill (1984). Blacks and Social Justice. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    From Bernard Boxill, professor of philosophy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and editor of Race and Racism, comes a tightly-argued, very illuminating book that will be essential reading for anyone interested in ...
  28. Herta Nagl-Docekal (2004). Feminist Philosophy. Westview Press.
    Are we in a post-feminist era? Has the term, feminist, grown out of its resisted stance? What from today's standpoint is an appropriate concept of feminist philosophy? And is it not the case that all people thinking democratically must share its central concern? In Feminist Philosophy , internationally acclaimed philosopher Herta Nagl-Docekal discusses and critiques the theories of today. Her study ranges across philosophical anthropology, aesthetics, philosophy of science, the critique of reason, political theory, and philosophy of law. Feminist Philosophy (...)
  29. Naomi Zack (ed.) (2000). Women of Color and Philosophy: A Critical Reader. Blackwell Publishers.
  30. Kelly Oliver & Lisa Walsh (eds.) (2004). Contemporary French Feminism. Oup Oxford.
    Have we entered a historical moment of 'post-feminism'? This volume presents a timely and convincing 'no'. These essays demonstrate that there is a new generation of French women who take up questions of equality and difference from a position distinct from either first or second wave feminism, a position that often attempts to move beyond the binary of equality and/or difference to a new form of the individual.
  31. John G. Taylor (2001). The Race for Consciousness. MIT Press.
  32. Iwao Hoshii (1987). Sex in Ethics and Law. Paul Norbury Publications.
  33. Kathleen Lennon & Margaret Whitford (eds.) (1994). Knowing the Difference: Feminist Perspectives in Epistemology. Routledge.
    This collection is one of the first to offer feminist perspectives on epistemology from thinkers outside North America. It presents essays from an international group of contributors, including Rosi Braidotti, Gemma Corradi Fiumara, Anna Yeatman, Sabina Lovibond and Liz Stanley. Using approaches and methods from both analytic and continental philosophy, the contributors engage with questions of traditional epistemology and with issues raised by postmodernist critiques. The essays deal with the central question of difference: the difference which a feminist perspective yields (...)
  34. Marilyn Friedman (ed.) (2005). Women and Citizenship. Oup Usa.
    This highly interdisciplinary volume explores the political and cultural dimensions of citizenship and their relevance to women and gender. Containing essays by leading scholars such as Iris Marion Young, Alison Jaggar, Martha Nussbaum, and Sandra Bartky, it examines the conceptual issues and strategies at play in the feminist quest to give women full citizenship status. The contributors take a fresh look at issues, going beyond conventional critiques, and examining problems in the political and social arrangements, practices, and conditions that diminish (...)
  35. Chris Weedon (1999). Feminism, Theory, and the Politics of Difference. Blackwell Publishers.
    "Feminism, Theory and the Politics of Difference" looks at the question of difference across the full spectrum of feminist theory from liberal, radical, lesbian ...
  36. Stella Sandford (2000). The Metaphysics of Love: Gender and Transcendence in Levinas. Athlone Press.
    In The Metaphysics of Love, however, Stella Sandford argues that an over-emphasis on ethics in the reception of Levinas's thought has concealed the basis and ...
  37. Marguerite la Caze (2002). The Analytic Imaginary. Cornell University Press.
    lntroduction Imaginary and Images M philosophical imaginary refers to both the capacity to imagine and the stock of images philosophers use. ...
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  38. Alcuin Blamires (2006/2008). Chaucer, Ethics, and Gender. Oxford University Press.
    This book makes a vigorous reassessment of the moral dimension in Chaucer's writings. For the Middle Ages, the study of human behavior generally signified the study of the morality of attitudes, choices, and actions. Moreover, moral analysis was not gender neutral: it presupposed that certain virtues and certain failings were largely gender-specific. Alcuin Blamires, mainly concentrating on The Canterbury Tales, discloses how Chaucer adapts the composite inherited traditions of moral literature to shape the significance and the gender implications of his (...)
  39. Charlotte Greig (2007/2009). A Girl's Guide to Modern European Philosophy: A Novel. Other Press.
    With her older, successful boyfriend, Susannah has the perfect life for a philosophy student, but things become complicated when she begins having an affair with her tutorial partner and becomes pregnant.
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  40. Stevi Jackson (ed.) (1993). Women's Studies: Essential Readings. New York University Press.
    "...No mere collection, but a wonderful synthesis of some of the best and most representative works of modern feminist scholarship, reflecting the richness and diversity of contemporary women's studies. It provides an informative and empowering perspective on feminist scholarly achievements of the last decades." -Dale Spender, Founding member of WITS (Women, Information, Technology, and Scholarship), is author of more than 30 books, including Feminist Theorists: Three Centuries of Key Women Thinkers and For The Record: the Making and Meaning of Feminist (...)
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  41. Diana T. Meyers (ed.) (1997). Feminists Rethink the Self. Westview Press.
    How is women’s conception of self affected by the caregiving responsibilities traditionally assigned to them and by the personal vulnerabilities imposed on them? If institutions of male dominance profoundly influence women’s lives and minds, how can women form judgments about their own best interests and overcome oppression? Can feminist politics survive in face of the diversity of women’s experience, which is shaped by race, class, ethnicity, and sexual orientation, as well as by gender? Exploring such questions, leading feminist thinkers have (...)
  42. Kathy Davis, Monique Leijenaar & Jantine Oldersma (eds.) (1991). The Gender of Power. Sage Publications.
    "This book does serve a very useful purpose in returning power to the centre of the feminist stage. . . . This book makes clear the ways in which the machinations of power are more subtle, widespread, and multiform than it sometimes appears. Further, the clarity of presentation means that it is also a text that can usefully be included on student bibliographies." --Women's Philosophy Review "The Gender of Power, which announces itself in the first line of its Preface as (...)
  43. Allison Weir (1996). Sacrificial Logics: Feminist Theory and the Critique of Identity. Routledge.
    Contemporary feminist theory is at an impasse: the project of reformulating concepts of self and social identity is thwarted by an association between identity and oppression and victimhood. In Sacrificial Logics, Allison Weir proposes a way out of this impasse through a concept of identity which depends on accepting difference. Weir argues that the equation of identity with repression and domination links "relational" feminists like Nancy Chodorow, who equate self-identity with the repression of connection to others, and poststructuralist feminists like (...)
  44. Linda M. G. Zerilli (1994). Signifying Woman: Culture and Chaos in Rousseau, Burke, and Mill. Cornell University Press.
    CHAPTER ONE Political Theory as a Signifying Practice Political theory has been a heroic business, snatching us from the abyss a vocation worthy of giants. ...
  45. Louise J. Kaplan (2006). Cultures of Fetishism. Palgrave Macmillan.
    In her latest book, Dr. Louise Kaplan, author of the groundbreaking Female Perversions, explores the fetishism strategy, a psychological defense that aims to tame, subdue, and if necessary, murder human vitalities. Through an exploration of such cultural phenomena as footbinding, reality television, and the construction of robots, Kaplan demonstrates how, in a technology-driven world, an understanding of the fetishism strategy can help to preserve the human dialogue that is the basis of all human relationships. Kaplan writes from the heart as (...)
  46. Patricia Ann Lather (1991). Getting Smart: Feminist Research and Pedagogy with/in the Postmodern. Routledge.
    The ways in which knowledge relates to power have been much discussed in radical education theory. New emphasis on the role of gender and the growing debate about subjectivity have deepened the discussion, while making it more complex. In Getting Smart , Patti Lather makes use of her unique integration of feminism and postmodernism into critical education theory to address some of the most vital questions facing education researchers and teachers.
  47. Evelyn Fox Keller (1992). Secrets of Life, Secrets of Death: Essays on Language, Gender, and Science. Routledge.
    The essays included here represent Fox Keller's attempts to integrate the insights of feminist theory with those of her contemporaries in the history and philosophy of science.
  48. Carolyn McLeod (2002). Self-Trust and Reproductive Autonomy. MIT Press.
    The power of new medical technologies, the cultural authority of physicians, and the gendered power dynamics of many patient-physician relationships can all inhibit women's reproductive freedom. Often these factors interfere with women's ability to trust themselves to choose and act in ways that are consistent with their own goals and values. In this book Carolyn McLeod introduces to the reproductive ethics literature the idea that in reproductive health care women's self-trust can be undermined in ways that threaten their autonomy. Understanding (...)
  49. Nicholas Bamforth (2008). Patriarchal Religion, Sexuality, and Gender: A Critique of New Natural Law. Cambridge University Press.
    Fundamentalist forms of religion today claim authority everywhere, including the debates over the politics and constitutional law of liberal democracies. This book examines this general question through its critical evaluation of a recent school of thought: that of the new natural lawyers. The new natural lawyers are the lawyers of the current Vatical hierarchy, polemically concerned to defend its retrograde views on matters of sexuality and gender in terms of arguments that, in fact, notably lack the philosophical rigor of the (...)
  50. Alison Stone (2006). Luce Irigaray and the Philosophy of Sexual Difference. Cambridge University Press.
    Alison Stone offers a feminist defence of the idea that sexual difference is natural, providing a new interpretation of the later philosophy of Luce Irigaray. She defends Irigaray's unique form of essentialism and her rethinking of the relationship between nature and culture, showing how Irigaray's ideas can be reconciled with Judith Butler's performative conception of gender, through rethinking sexual difference in relation to German Romantic philosophies of nature. This is the first sustained attempt to connect feminist conceptions of embodiment to (...)
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