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1 — 50 / 585
  1. Paul Heywood Hirst, Robin Barrow & Patricia White (eds.) (1993). Beyond Liberal Education: Essays in Honour of Paul H. Hirst. Routledge.
    This collection of essays by philosophers and educationalists of international reputation, all published here for the first time, celebrates Paul Hirst's professional career. The introductory essay by Robin Barrow and Patricia White outlines Paul Hirst's career and maps the shifts in his thought about education, showing how his views on teacher education, the curriculum and educational aims are interrelated. Contributions from leading names in British and American philosophy of education cover themes ranging from the nature of good teaching to Wittgensteinian (...)
  2. Pauline Vaillancourt Rosenau (1986). When Marxists Do Research. Greenwood Press.
  3. John White (1997). Education and the End of Work: A New Philosophy of Work and Learning. Cassell.
    This book engages with widespread current anxieties about the future of work and its place in a fulfilled human life.
  4. Max Lewis Rafferty (1968). Max Rafferty on Education. New York, Devin-Adair Co..
  5. Eugénie Angèle Samier & Richard J. Bates (eds.) (2006). Aesthetic Dimensions of Educational Administration & Leadership. Routledge.
    The Aesthetic Dimensions of Educational Administration and Leadership provides an aesthetic critique of educational administration and leadership. It demonstrates the importance of aesthetics on all aspects of the administrative and leadership world: the ways ideas and ideals are created, how their expression is conveyed, the impact they have on interpersonal relationships and the organizational environment that carries and reinforces them, and the moral boundaries or limits that can be established or exceeded. The book is divided into three sections. · Section (...)
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  6. Raymond E. Wanner (1975). Claude Fleury, 1640-1723, as an Educational Historiographer and Thinker. Nijhoff.
    CHAPTER I CLAUDE FLEURY AND HIS CAREER Claude Fleury (-), an educator, historian , jurist, cleric, royal tutor, and immortel of the ...
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  7. Maurice S. Friedman (1978). To Deny Our Nothingness: Contemporary Images of Man. University of Chicago Press.
  8. James Calderhead & Peter Gates (eds.) (1993). Conceptualizing Reflection in Teacher Development. London ;Falmer Press.
  9. Nathan Rotenstreich (1976). Philosophy, History and Politics: Studies in Contemporary English Philosophy of History. Martinus Nijhoff.
  10. Dale A. Blyth (1981). Philosophy, Policies, and Programs for Early Adolescent Education: An Annotated Bibliography. Greenwood Press.
  11. Jonathan Aldred (2009). The Skeptical Economist: Revealing the Ethics Inside Economics. Earthscan.
    Introduction : ethical economics? -- The sovereign consumer -- Two myths about economic growth -- The politics of pay -- Happiness -- Pricing life and nature -- New worlds of money : public services and beyond -- Conclusion.
  12. Stuart C. Brown (ed.) (1975). Philosophers Discuss Education. Macmillan Press.
  13. Andrew Dawson, Jennifer Lorna Hockey & Andrew H. Dawson (eds.) (1997). After Writing Culture: Epistemology and Praxis in Contemporary Anthropology. Routledge.
    Anthropologists now openly acknowledge that social anthropology can no longer fulfill its traditional aim of providing holistic, objective representations of people of "exotic" cultures. After Writing Culture asks what theoretical and practical role contemporary anthropology can play in our increasingly unpredictable and complex world. With fourteen articles written by well-known anthropologists, the work explores some of the directions in which contemporary anthropology is moving, following the questions raised by the "writing culture" debates of the 1980s. Some of the chapters cover: (...)
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  14. Ernest Gellner (1979). Spectacles & Predicaments: Essays in Social Theory. Cambridge University Press.
  15. Eduardo Giannetti Fonsecdaa (1991). Beliefs in Action: Economic Philosophy and Social Change. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is concerned with the role of economic philosophy ("ideas") in the processes of belief-formation and social change. Its aim is to further our understanding of the behavior of the individual economic agent by bringing to light and examining the function of non-rational dispositions and motivations ("passions") in the determination of the agent's beliefs and goals. Drawing on the work of David Hume and Adam Smith, the book spells out the particular ways in which the passions come to affect (...)
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  16. Dorothy Mary Emmet (1970). Sociological Theory and Philosophical Analysis: A Collection. London,Macmillan.
    Concept and theory formation in the social sciences, by A. Schutz.--Is it a science? by S. Morgenbesser.--Knowledge and interest, by J. Habermas.--Sociological explanation, by T. Burns.--Methodological individualism reconsidered, by S. Lukes.--The problem of rationality in the social world, by A. Schutz.--Concepts and society, by E. Gellner.--Symbols in Ndembu ritual, by V. Turner.--Telstar and the Aborigines or La pensée sauvage, by E. Leach.--Groote Eylandt totemism and Le totémisme aujourd'hui, by P. Worsley.--Bibliography (p. 225-228).
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  17. Maxine Greene (1973). Teacher as Stranger. Belmont, Calif.,Wadsworth Pub. Co..
  18. Ioannis D. Evrigenis (2008). Fear of Enemies and Collective Action. Cambridge University Press.
    This book explores the way in which the fear of enemies shapes political groups at their founding and helps to preserve them by consolidating them in times of crisis. It develops a theory of “negative association” that examines the dynamics captured by the maxim “The enemy of my enemy is my friend” and then traces its role in the history of political thought, demonstrating that the fear of external threats is an essential element of the formation and preservation of political (...)
  19. John G. Mitchell (1990). Re-Visioning Educational Leadership: A Phenomenological Approach. Garland Pub..
  20. Chris Beckett (2005). Values & Ethics in Social Work: An Introduction. Sage.
    In social work there is seldom an uncontroversial `right way' of doing things. So how will you deal with the value questions and ethical dilemmas that you will be faced with as a professional social worker? This lively and readable introductory text is designed to equip students with a sound understanding of the principles of values and ethics which no social worker should be without. Bridging the gap between theory and practice, this book successfully explores the complexities of ethical issues, (...)
  21. David Williams (1996). Japan and the Enemies of Open Political Science. Routledge.
    Japan and the Enemies of Open Political Science argues that Eurocentric blindness is a scientific failing, not a moral one. In a way true of no other political system, Japan's greatness has the potential to enliven and reform almost all the main branches of Western Political Science. David Williams criticizes Western social science, Anglo-American Philosophy and French Theory and explains why mainstream economists, historians of political thought and postculturalists have ignored Japan's modern achievements. Williams demonstrates why the renewal of social (...)
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  22. Nigel Rapport (ed.) (2010). Human Nature as Capacity: Transcending Discourse and Classification. Berghahn Books.
    This book argues that it is again appropriate to bring "the human" to the fore, to reclaim the singularity of the word as central to the anthropological ...
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  23. Mike Fleetham (2006). Multiple Intelligences in Practice: Enhancing Self-Esteem and Learning in the Classroom. Network Continuum Education.
    This accessible guide gives a clear introduction to MI and provides concrete examples of how you can use it in your teaching.
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  24. James L. Peacock (2001). The Anthropological Lens: Harsh Light, Soft Focus. Cambridge University Press.
    Anthropology is a complex, wide-ranging, and ever-changing field. This clear, coherent, and well-crafted book is a revised version of a very successful text first published in 1986, designed to supplement standard textbooks and monographs. It covers the central concepts, distinctive methodologies, and philosophical as well as practical issues of cultural anthropology, and it is accessible to the anthropological novice, and of value to the professional. The updated version covers current issues in cultural anthropology, and includes topics such as globalization, gender, (...)
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  25. Alan Barnard (2000). History and Theory in Anthropology. Cambridge University Press.
    Anthropology is a discipline very conscious of its history. Alan Barnard has written a clear, detailed overview of anthropological theory that brings out the historical contexts of the great debates, tracing the genealogies of theories and schools of thought. His book covers the precursors of anthropology; evolutionism in all its guises; diffusionism and culture area theories, functionalism and structural-functionalism; action-centered theories; processual and Marxist perspectives; the many faces of relativism, structuralism and poststructuralism; and recent interpretive and postmodernist viewpoints. This is (...)
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  26. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2008). The Politics of Agency: Toward a Pragmatic Philosophical Anthropology. Ashgate.
    This book argues that the traditional emphasis on the accuracy of a given theory of human agency has systematically obscured the normative dimension in these theories and that recognizing this normative dimension allows us to see that a ...
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  27. Irene van Staveren (2001). The Values of Economics: An Aristotelian Perspective. Routledge.
    With an aim to bring caring back into economic theory, this work draws upon the work of Aristotle and Amartya Sen's notions of capability and commitment, to propose an alternative methodology to utilitarianism that is not normative.
  28. Alison Blunt (2000). Dissident Geographies: An Introduction to Radical Ideas and Practice. Prentice Hall.
    The perspectives examined in the book reveal and resist certain power relations that have constituted geographical knowledge. The book has two main aims.
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  29. Peter Charles Hoffer (2008). The Historians' Paradox: The Study of History in Our Time. New York University Press.
    To reconcile this paradox — that history is impossible but necessary — Peter Charles Hoffer proposes a practical, workable philosophy of history for our ...
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  30. Anne Edwards (2002). Rethinking Teacher Education: Collaborative Responses to Uncertainty. Routledgefalmer.
    In an era of political, economic and epistemological uncertainty, this book provides an accessible, critical and thorough analysis of the difficulties that beset teacher education. The authors draw on philosophical, psychological and sociological perspectives and illustrate their points with a detailed mix of international examples.
  31. Matthew Lipman & Ann Margaret Sharp (eds.) (1978). Growing Up with Philosophy. Temple University Press.
  32. Paul Radin (1966). The Method and Theory of Ethnology. New York, Basic Books.
  33. Raimondo Cubeddu (1993). The Philosophy of the Austrian School. Routledge.
    In recent years, the Austrian School has been an influential contributor to the social sciences. Yet most of the attempts to understand this vital school of thought have remained locked into a polemical frame. The Philosophy of the Austrian School challenges this approach through a philosophically grounded account of the School's methodological, political, and economic ideas. Raimondo Cubeddu acknowledges important differences between the key figures in the School--Menger, Mises and Hayek-- but also finds important parallels between these thinkers. The theory (...)
  34. Roger P. Mourad (1997). Postmodern Philosophical Critique and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Higher Education. Bergin & Garvey.
    What is the significance of postmodern philosophy for the pursuit of knowledge generally?
  35. Matthew Johnson (1999). Archaeological Theory: An Introduction. Blackwell Publishers.
    Common sense is not enough -- The "new archaeology" -- Archaeology as a science -- Middle-range theory, ethnoarchaeology, and material culture studies -- Culture and process -- Thoughts and ideologies -- Postprocessual and interpretative archaeologies -- Archaeology, gender, and identity -- Archaeology and cultural evolution -- Archaeology and Darwinian evolution -- Archaeology and history -- Archaeology, politics and culture -- Conclusion : the future of theory.
  36. Eleonora Montuschi (2003). The Objects of Social Science. Continuum.
    Using a range of examples from specific social sciences, the book both identifies the practical and theoretical procedures involved in the identification of the ...
  37. Ursula Rao, John Hutnyk & Klaus-Peter Köpping (eds.) (2005). Celebrating Transgression: Method and Politics in Anthropological Studies of Culture: A Book in Honour of Klaus Peter Köpping. Berghahn Books.
    This book brings key authors in anthropology together to debate and transgress anthropological expectations.
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  38. Irving Velody & Robin Williams (eds.) (1998). The Politics of Constructionism. Sage Publications.
    The Politics of Constructionism presents a broadranging and critical overview of the many themes of social constructionism and its relevance to contemporary social and political issues. Clearly structured and bringing together leading international contributors from across the social sciences, it offers an invaluable may through this rich body of literature. Major questions and topics explored in its critique and application of constructionist ideas include the theory and practice of scientific method, the development of social and political policy, the use of (...)
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  39. David Nyberg (1981). Power Over Power: What Power Means in Ordinary Life, How It is Related to Acting Freely, and What It Can Contribute to a Renovated Ethics of Education. Cornell University Press.
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  40. Paddy Walsh (1993). Education and Meaning: Philosophy in Practice. Cassell.
  41. Philip Pomper, Richard Elphick & Richard T. Vann (eds.) (1998). World History: Ideologies, Structures, and Identities. Blackwell Publishers.
  42. Chris Shilling (2001). The Sociological Ambition: Elementary Forms of Social and Moral Life. Sage.
    In a comprehensive and innovative reassessment of the discipline, this book argues that classical and contemporary social theories must be studied in relation to the ambition that shaped and established sociology: the ambition to comprehend the relationship between social and moral life. Surveying a range of sociological analyses from Comte to feminism, postmodernism and rational choice theory, this book examines the various attempts that have been made to reconstruct the discipline over the last century, and the challenges facing it today. (...)
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  43. George L. Henderson & Marvin Waterstone (eds.) (2009). Geographic Thought : A Praxis Perspective. Routledge.
    For researchers and students interested in the connections between theoretically informed work and the possibilities for bettering people's everyday lives, this ...
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  44. Leonard Krieger (1989). Time's Reasons: Philosophies of History Old and New. University of Chicago Press.
    This original work caps years of thought by Leonard Krieger about the crisis of the discipline of history. His mission is to restore history's autonomy while attacking the sources of its erosion in various "new histories," which borrow their principles and methods from disciplines outside of history. Krieger justifies the discipline through an analysis of the foundations on which various generations of historians have tried to establish the coherence of their subject matter and of the convergence of historical patterns. The (...)
  45. Steven M. Cahn (ed.) (1990). Morality, Responsibility, and the University: Studies in Academic Ethics. Temple University Press.
    Author note: Steven M. Cahn is Provost and Professor of Philosophy at the Graduate School of the City University of New York.
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  46. Keith Graham (2002). Practical Reasoning in a Social World: How We Act Together. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book Keith Graham examines the philosophical assumptions behind the ideas of group membership and loyalty. Drawing out the significance of social context, he challenges individualist views by placing collectivities such as committees, classes or nations within the moral realm. He offers a new understanding of the multiplicity of sources which vie for the attention of human beings as they decide how to act, and challenges the conventional division between self-interest and altruism. He also offers a systematic account of (...)
  47. Hayward R. Alker (1996). Rediscoveries and Reformulations: Humanistic Methodologies for International Studies. Cambridge University Press.
    This book provides a distinctive and rich conception of methodology within international studies. From a rereading of the works of leading Western thinkers about international studies, Hayward Alker rediscovers a 'neo-Classical' conception of international relations which is both humanistic and scientific. He draws on the work of classical authors such as Aristotle and Thucydides; modern writers like Machiavelli, Vico, Marx, Weber, Deutsch and Bull; and post-modern writers like Havel, Connolly and Toulmin. The central challenge addressed is how to integrate 'positivist' (...)
  48. Theodore R. Sarbin & John I. Kitsuse (eds.) (1994). Constructing the Social. Sage.
    If you are looking for a clear, concrete overview on social constructionist research and analysis, look no further than Constructing the Social. This timely volume pools the talents of many leading psychologists and sociologists, who in each case ground theory into practical examples. Contributors demonstrate that human beings are principally social agents rather than passive reactors that process information. Each contributor analyzes the historical and cultural contexts implicit in a wide range of key issues including anxiety, the family, intelligence, aging, (...)
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  49. Malcolm Williams (2000). Science and Social Science: An Introduction. Routledge.
    Is social science really a science at all, and if so in what sense? This is the first real question that any course on the philosophy of the social sciences must tackle. In this brief introduction, Malcolm Williams gives the students the grounding that will enable them to discuss the issues involved with confidence.
  50. John Law (1984). Science for Social Scientists. Macmillan Press.
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