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1 — 50 / 169
  1. Owen J. Flanagan (1996). Self Expressions: Mind, Morals, and the Meaning of Life. Oxford University Press.
    Human beings have the unique ability to consciously reflect on the nature of the self. But reflection has its costs. We can ask what the self is, but as David Hume pointed out, the self, once reflected upon, may be nowhere to be found. The favored view is that we are material beings living in the material world. But if so, a host of destabilizing questions surface. If persons are just a sophisticated sort of animal, then what sense is there (...)
  2. Mark Vernon (2007). Science, Religion, and the Meaning of Life. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Have evolution, science and the trappings of the modern world killed off God irrevocably? And what do we lose if we choose not to believe in him? From Newton and Descartes to Darwin and the discovery of the genome, religion has been pushed back further and further while science has gained ground. But what fills the void that religion leaves behind? This book is an attempt to look at these questions and to suggest a third way between the easy consolations (...)
  3. Richard T. Hull (ed.) (1994). A Quarter Century of Value Inquiry: Presidential Addresses of the American Society for Value Inquiry. Rodopi.
    AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH In the late I wrote some articles defending a kind of Westermarckian view of the sources of moral judgments, and became interested ...
  4. Raymond B. Cattell (1987). Beyondism: Religion From Science. Praeger.
  5. Sven Ove Hansson (2001). The Structure of Values and Norms. Cambridge University Press.
    Formal representations of values and norms are employed in several academic disciplines and specialties, such as economics, jurisprudence, decision theory, and social choice theory. Sven Ove Hansson closely examines such foundational issues as the values of wholes and the values of their parts, the connections between values and norms, how values can be decision-guiding and the structure of normative codes with formal precision. Models of change in both preferences and norms are offered, as well as a new method to base (...)
  6. R. M. Hare (1993). Essays on Bioethics. Oxford University Press.
    R.M. Hare is well known both for his fundamental work in ethical theory and for his applications of it to practical issues. For this volume he has selected the best of his writings on medical ethics and related topics. The book's chief theoretical interest lies in its synthesis between utilitarian and Kantian ethics, which are shown to have the same practical consequences. The main practical thesis in the book is that we can harm possible people by preventing them from becoming (...)
  7. Michele M. Moody-Adams (1997). Fieldwork in Familiar Places: Morality, Culture, and Philosophy. Harvard University Press.
    Fieldwork in Familiar Places challenges the misconceptions about morality, culture, and objectivity that support these skepticisms, to show that we can take ...
  8. Gerard Radnitzky (ed.) (1997). Values and the Social Order. Avebury.
    -- v. 3. Voluntary versus coercive orders.
  9. Steven M. Cahn & Peter J. Markie (eds.) (2009). Ethics: History, Theory, and, Contemporary Issues. Oxford University Press.
    The most comprehensive collection of its kind, Ethics: History, Theory, and Contemporary Issues, Third Edition, is organized into three parts, providing instructors with flexibility in designing and teaching a variety of courses in moral philosophy. The first part, Historical Sources, moves from classical thought (Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, and Epictetus) through medieval views (Augustine and Aquinas) to modern theories (Hobbes, Butler, Hume, Kant, Bentham, and Mill), culminating with leading nineteenth- and twentieth-century thinkers (Nietzsche, James, Dewey, Camus, and Sartre). The second part, (...)
  10. John T. Goldthwait (1985). Value, Language & Life: An Essay in Theory of Value. Prometheus Books.
  11. Walter Lippmann (1929/1982). A Preface to Morals. Transaction Books.
    went their separate ways. While Eliot doubted "whether civilization can endure without religion, and religion without a church,"1 Lippmann doubted that the ...
  12. Charles Birch (1990). A Purpose for Everything: Religion in a Postmodern Worldview. Twenty-Third Publications.
  13. Ivo De Gennaro (ed.) (2012). Value: Sources and Readings on a Key Concept of the Globalized World. Brill.
    This book presents classical philosophical sources on value as well as readings that show how this concept shapes central issues and domains of economics, culture and knowledge, thus shedding a light on a key concept of the globalized work.
  14. Ashley Montagu (1956/1973). The Biosocial Nature of Man. Westport, Conn.,Greenwood Press.
  15. May M. Edel (1968/2000). Anthropology & Ethics: The Quest for Moral Understanding. Transaction Publishers.
    This book presents the results of an experiment in interdisciplinary collaboration to clarify theories of morality and anthropology and philosophy, showing how ...
  16. Nils Holtug (2010). Persons, Interests, and Justice. Oxford University Press.
    In our lives, we aim to achieve welfare for ourselves, that is, to live good lives. But we also have another, more impartial perspective, where we aim to balance our concern for our own welfare against a concern for the welfare of others. This is a perspective of justice. Nils Holtug examines these two perspectives and the relations between them. -/- The first part of the book is concerned with prudence; more precisely, with what the necessary and sufficient conditions are (...)
  17. Alan Millar (2004). Understanding People: Normativity and Rationalizing Explanation. Oxford University Press.
    Alan Millar examines our understanding of why people think and act as they do. His key theme is that normative considerations form an indispensable part of the explanatory framework in terms of which we seek to understand each other. Millar defends a conception according to which normativity is linked to reasons. On this basis he examines the structure of certain normative commitments incurred by having propositional attitudes. Controversially, he argues that ascriptions of beliefs and intentions in and of themselves attribute (...)
  18. Roger Crisp (ed.) (1996). How Should One Live?: Essays on the Virtues. Oxford University Press.
    The last few years have seen a remarkable revival of interest in the virtues, which have regained their central role in moral philosophy. This thought-provoking new collection is a much-needed survey of virtue ethics and virtue theory. The specially commissioned articles by an international team of philosophers represent the state of the art in this subject and will set the agenda for future work in the area. The contributors--including Lawrence Blum, John Cottingham, Julia Driver, Rosalind Hursthouse, Terence Irwin, Susan Moller (...)
  19. David Benatar (ed.) (2009). Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc..
    Introduction -- Part I: The meaning of life -- Richard Taylor, The meaning of life -- Thomas Nagel, The absurd -- Richard Hare, Nothing matters -- W.D. Joske, Philosophy and the meaning of life -- Robert Nozick, Philosophy and the meaning of life -- David Schmidtz, The meanings of life -- Part II: Creating people -- Derek Parfit, Whether causing someone to exist can benefit this person -- John Leslie, Why not let life ecome extinct? -- James Lenman, On becoming (...)
  20. David Lyons (1971/1993). Moral Aspects of Legal Theory: Essays on Law, Justice, and Political Responsibility. Cambridge University Press.
    David Lyons is one of the preeminent philosophers of law active in the United States. This volume comprises essays written over a period of twenty years in which Professor Lyons outlines his fundamental views about the nature of law and its relation to morality and justice. The underlying theme of the book is that a system of law has only a tenuous connection with morality and justice. Contrary to those legal theorists who maintain that no matter how bad the law (...)
  21. Noah Marcelino Lemos (1994). Intrinsic Value: Concept and Warrant. Cambridge University Press.
    This book addresses some basic questions about intrinsic value: What is it? What has it? What justifies our beliefs about it? In the first six chapters the author defends the existence of a plurality of intrinsic goods, the thesis of organic unities, the view that some goods are 'higher' than others, and the view that intrinsic value can be explicated in terms of 'fitting' emotional attitudes. The final three chapters explore the justification of our beliefs about intrinsic value, including coherence (...)
  22. Judith Jarvis Thomson (1990). The Realm of Rights. Harvard University Press.
    In The Realm of Rights Judith Thomson provides a full-scale, systematic theory of human and social rights, bringing out what in general makes an attribution of ...
  23. Robert Rowland Smith (2010). Breakfast with Socrates: An Extraordinary (Philosophical) Journey Through Your Ordinary Day. Free Press.
    Introduction -- Waking up -- Getting ready -- Travelling to work -- Being at work -- Going to the doctor -- Having lunch with your parents -- Bunking off -- Shopping -- Booking a holiday -- Going to the gym -- Taking a bath -- Reading a book -- Watching TV -- Cooking and eating dinner -- Going to a party -- Arguing with your partner -- Having sex -- Falling asleep and dreaming.
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  24. Paul Thagard (2010). The Brain and the Meaning of Life. Princeton University Press.
    The book integrates decades of multidisciplinary research, but its clear explanations and humor make it accessible to the general reader.
  25. Karl Britton (1969). Philosophy and the Meaning of Life. London, Cambridge U.P..
  26. Brenda Almond & Bryan R. Wilson (eds.) (1988). Values: A Symposium. Humanities Press International.
  27. Ben Bradley (2009). Well-Being and Death. Oxford University Press.
  28. Rudolf Haller (ed.) (1981). Science and Ethics. Distributed by Humanities Press.
  29. Zdzisław Najder (1975). Values and Evaluations. Clarendon Press.
  30. Thomas Lynch (2000). Bodies in Motion and at Rest: Essays. W.W. Norton.
  31. Allan Gibbard (2008). Reconciling Our Aims: In Search of Bases for Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    In these three Tanner lectures, distinguished ethical theorist Allan Gibbard explores the nature of normative thought and the bases of ethics. In the first lecture he explores the role of intuitions in moral thinking and offers a way of thinking about the intuitive method of moral inquiry that both places this activity within the natural world and makes sense of it as an indispensable part of our lives as planners. In the second and third lectures he takes up the kind (...)
  32. Paul Smith (2008). Moral and Political Philosophy: Key Issues, Concepts and Theories. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Drug laws -- Justifications of punishment -- Civil disobedience : is there a duty to obey the law? -- Global poverty -- Liberty -- Liberty-limiting principles -- Rights -- Equality and social justice -- Moral relativism -- Utilitarianism -- Kantian moral philosophy -- John Rawls's theory of justice.
  33. Michael Lerner (1997). The Politics of Meaning: Restoring Hope and Possibility in an Age of Cynicism. Addison-Wesley.
    Drawing on ideas presented in the Bible, Jewish teachings, and his experience as a psychotherapist, Lerner examines the roots of the vague discontent felt by so many Americans about our political system and explains how values can be put back into these broken politics.
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  34. David Lyons (1984). Ethics and the Rule of Law. Cambridge University Press.
    An introduction to the philosophy of law, which offers a modern and critical appraisal of all the main issues and problems. This has become a very active area in the last ten years, and one on which philosophers, legal practitioners and theorists and social scientists have tended to converge. The more abstract questions about the nature of law and its relationship to social norms and moral standards are now seen to be directly relevant to more practical and indeed pressing questions (...)
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  35. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1982). Evolution, Morality, and the Meaning of Life. Rowman and Littlefield.
  36. Vishwa Prakash (2009). Who Stole My Soul?: A Dialogue with the Devil on the Meaning of Life. Synergy Books.
    In this fantastical, semi-autobiographical book, Vishwa Prakash addresses these questions.
  37. David Owen Brink (2003). Perfectionism and the Common Good: Themes in the Philosophy of T.H. Green. Oxford University Press.
    David Brink presents a study of T. H. Green's Prolegomena to Ethics (1883), a classic of British idealism. Green develops a perfectionist ethical theory that brings together the best elements in the ancient and modern traditions and that provides the moral foundations for Green's own influential brand of liberalism. Brink's book situates the Prolegomena in its intellectual context, examines its main themes, and explains Green's enduring significance for the history of ethics and contemporary ethical theory.
  38. Joel Kupperman (1999). Value-- And What Follows. Oxford University Press.
    This fresh and engaging work by noted philosopher Joel Kupperman centers on "value"--in the sense of what is worth having or worthy being in life. Kupperman looks first at how judgments of values manifest themselves, whether there can be evidence for them, and whether a realistic account is appropriate. Kupperman then goes on to examine the relations between judgments of value and those of what it is best to do, and whether value has any proper role in social policy. Kupperman (...)
  39. Ralph Wedgwood (2007). The Nature of Normativity. Oxford University Press.
    This is a book about normativity -- where the central normative terms are words like 'ought' and 'should' and their equivalents in other languages. It has three parts: The first part is about the semantics of normative discourse: what it means to talk about what ought to be the case. The second part is about the metaphysics of normative properties and relations: what is the nature of those properties and relations (if any) whose pattern of instantiation makes propositions about what (...)
  40. Marcel Dol (ed.) (1999). Recognizing the Intrinsic Value of Animals: Beyond Animal Welfare. Van Gorcum.
    Introduction Moral concern for animals is commonly formulated in terms of concern for their welfare. Yet, besides the welfare issue, although highly ...
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  41. Peter Heinegg (ed.) (2003). Mortalism: Readings on the Meaning of Life. Prometheus Books.
  42. Christopher Belshaw (2005). 10 Good Questions About Life and Death. Blackwell Pub..
    Where can I find answers? -- Is life sacred? -- Is it bad to die? -- Which deaths are worse? -- Might I live on? -- Should I take the elixir of life? -- Who's who? -- Is it all meaningless? -- Should there be more, and better, people? -- Does reality matter?
  43. Wolfgang Köhler (1976). The Place of Value in a World of Facts. Liveright.
  44. Craig L. Carr (2010). Liberalism and Pluralism: The Politics of E Pluribus Unum. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Table of Contents: Politics, morality, and pluralism -- Liberal morality and political legitimacy -- Political legitimacy and social justice -- Williams's concept of the political -- Legitimacy, stability, and morality -- The politics of morality -- A moral point of view -- Manners and morality -- Morality and conflict -- Moral conflict and political theory -- The morality of politics -- Feminism and multiculturalism -- A defense of culture -- Politics and normative conflict -- The political as moral viewpoint -- (...)
  45. Anthony O'Hear (ed.) (2002). Logic, Thought, and Language. Cambridge University Press.
    Original essays by leading philosophers on topics of logic, thought and language.
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  46. Lance Kinseth (1989). River Eternal. Viking.
  47. John Martin Fischer (2009). Our Stories: Essays on Life, Death, and Free Will. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction: "meaning in life and death : our stories" -- John Martin Fischer and Anthony B rueckner, "Why is death bad?", Philosophical studies, vol. 50, no. 2 (September 1986) -- "Death, badness, and the impossibility of experience," Journal of ethics -- John Martin Fischer and Daniel Speak, "Death and the psychological conception of personal identity," Midwest studies in philosophy, vol. 24 -- "Earlier birth and later death : symmetry through thick and thin," Richard Feldman, Kris McDaniel, Jason R. Raibley, eds., (...)
  48. Tsunetomo Yamamoto (1979). Hagakure: The Book of the Samurai. Distributed in the United States by Harper & Row.
  49. Denise Linn (1999). Sacred Legacies: Healing Your Past and Creating a Positive Future. Ballantine Wellspring.
    "Healing the past helps restructure the present, which then becomes the hope for the future." As we approach a new millennium, many of us are fearing for the future while hungering for a vision of our place in a sacred whole. The immense changes of the last hundred years have severed our sense of connection to a spiritual lineage that gave past generations the strength to meet life's challenges and bequeath wisdom to their descendants. In this inspirational yet down-to-earth book, (...)
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  50. Anne-Marie E. Cantwell, Eva Friedlander & Madeleine Lorch Tramm (eds.) (2000). Ethics and Anthropology: Facing Future Issues in Human Biology, Globalism, and Cultural Property. New York Academy of Sciences.
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