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1 — 50 / 545
  1. Robert Sherrick Brumbaugh (1964/1981). The Philosophers of Greece. State University of New York Press.
    Illustrations include a reconstruction of the first map.
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  2. John Herman Randall (1970). Plato: Dramatist of the Life of Reason. New York,Columbia University Press.
  3. Richard Harland (1999). Literary Theory From Plato to Barthes: An Introductory History. St. Martin's Press.
    Richard Harland provides a lucid account of all the major movements in literary theory up to the late 1960s. In a lucid and accessible style, he unfolds a comprehensive "story" of literary theory in all its manifestations. Because contemporary literary theory depends heavily upon European thinkers, the book has an international focus, and its coverage extends from philosophers to social theorists to linguists. Harland explains the essential principles of each theoretical position, looking behind particular critical judgments and interpretations in order (...)
  4. David Bolotin (1979). Plato's Dialogue on Friendship: An Interpretation of the Lysis, with a New Translation. Cornell University Press.
  5. Plato (1975/2009). Phaedo. Clarendon Press.
    This new edition is eminently suitable for readers new to Plato, offering a readable translation which is accessible without the aid of a commentary andassumes no prior knowledge of the ancient Greek world or language.
  6. John J. Keaney (1992). The Composition of Aristotle's Athenaion Politeia: Observation and Explanation. Oxford University Press.
    Discovered one hundred years ago, Aristotle's Athenaion Politeia is invaluable to contemporary understanding of Athenian democracy. As a historical record, however, it has been found to be so unreliable that some have questioned its true authorship, and it has remained largely ignored by those studying philosophy and literature. Keaney uses a literary approach to reassert Aristotle's authorship and to present the Athenaion Politeia as a document that defies the constraints of any particular genre--probably never intended to be a piece of (...)
  7. Anthony Kenny (1992). Aristotle on the Perfect Life. Oxford University Press.
    An authoritative exposition of Aristotle's teaching on the subject of happiness, which is of vital importance to the question of the relevance of his ethics today. Kenny helped to set the terms of the debate 25 years ago. In his latest book, he refines his view on the relationship between the Nichomachean Ethics and the Eudemian Ethics.
  8. Rosamond Kent Sprague (1976). Plato's Philosopher-King: A Study of the Theoretical Background. University of South Carolina Press.
  9. Richard D. McKirahan (1978). Plato and Socrates: A Comprehensive Bibliography, 1958-1973. Garland Pub..
    This valuable work of reference provides a comprehensive bibliography on all scholarly work that was published on Plato and Socrates during the years 1958-73. It thus forms an important addition to Harold Cherniss’s bibliography, which covered the years 1950-7. The author has sought to include all materials primarily concerned with Socrates and Plato, together with other works which make a contribution to our understanding of the two philosophers. The bibliography is arranged by topic and there are cross-references at the end (...)
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  10. Plato (1975/2009). Phaedo. Clarendon Press.
    This new edition is eminently suitable for readers new to Plato, offering a readable translation which is accessible without the aid of a commentary andassumes ...
  11. Martha Craven Nussbaum (2001). The Fragility of Goodness: Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a study of ancient views about 'moral luck'. It examines the fundamental ethical problem that many of the valued constituents of a well-lived life are vulnerable to factors outside a person's control, and asks how this affects our appraisal of persons and their lives. The Greeks made a profound contribution to these questions, yet neither the problems nor the Greek views of them have received the attention they deserve. This book thus recovers a central dimension of Greek (...)
  12. J. O. Urmson (1988). Aristotle's Ethics. B. Blackwell.
    Introduces Aristotle's writings on ethics, and discusses character, intelligence, pleasure, and friendship.
  13. Arnold Hermann (2004). The Illustrated to Think Like God: Pythagoras and Parmenides, the Origins of Philosophy. Parmenides Publishing.
    Intended for general readers, The Illustrated To Think Like God explores how philosophy became a speculative science, tracing its origins to the Greek colonies of southern Italy, from the late sixth century to the mid-fifth century BCE. In this lavishly illustrated full-color work, Arnold Hermann tells the story of the sage Pythagoras, the poet Xenophanes, and the lawmaker Parmenides, describing how each in his own way believed that true insight belonged only to the gods. With a sympathetic and critical eye, (...)
  14. Nicholas F. Jones (2008). Politics and Society in Ancient Greece. Praeger.
  15. Plato (1979). Phaedo. Clarendon Press.
    This new edition is eminently suitable for readers new to Plato, offering a readable translation which is accessible without the aid of a commentary andassumes no prior knowledge of the ancient Greek world or language.
  16. David Bostock (1986). Plato's Phaedo. Oxford University Press.
    David Bostock examines the theories and arguments put forward by Plato in his Phaedo, in which he attempts to show that the soul is immortal. This excellent introduction to Plato's often difficult arguments discusses such important philosophical problems as the nature of the mind, the idea of personal identity, the question of how we understand language, and the concept of cause, reason, and explanation.
  17. Lois Peters Agnew (2008). Outward, Visible Propriety: Stoic Philosophy and Eighteenth-Century British Rhetorics. University of South Carolina Press.
    Introduction -- Stoic ethics and rhetoric -- Eighteenth-century common sense and sensus communis -- Taste and sensus communis -- Propriety, sympathy, and style fusing individual and social -- Victorian language theories and the decline of sensus communis.
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  18. Scott Austin (2007). Parmenides and the History of Dialectic: Three Essays. Parmenides Pub..
    Essay one: Parmenidean dialectic -- Essay two: Parmenidean metaphysics -- Essay three: Parmenides and the history of dialectic.
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  19. R. G. Mulgan (1977). Aristotle's Political Theory: An Introduction for Students of Political Theory. Clarendon Press.
    This book aims to provide an introduction to Aristotle's Politics, highlighting the major themes and arguments offered in the scholar's work. It begins with a discussion on what Aristotle perceives as human good, which he had described as the ethical purpose of political science, and how he views the political community, or the polis, as a community of persons formed with a view to some good purpose and a supreme entity in the sense that it is not just one aspect (...)
  20. George Rudebusch (1999). Socrates, Pleasure, and Value. Oxford University Press.
    In this study, George Rudebusch addresses whether Socrates was a hedonist--whether he believed pleasure to be the good. In attempting to locate Socrates' position on hedonism, Rudebusch examines the passages in Plato's early dialogues that are the most disputed on the topic. He maintains that Socrates identifies pleasant activity with virtuous activity, describing Socrates' hedonism as one of activity, not sensation. This analysis allows for Socrates to find both virtue and pleasure to be the good, thus solving the textual puzzle (...)
  21. Albert A. Bell (1991). Resources in Ancient Philosophy: An Annotated Bibliography of Scholarship in English, 1965-1989. Scarecrow Press.
    Covers all philosophers appearing in standard textbooks, from Thales to Augustine . A brief introduction to each thinker or school summarizes their major themes.
  22. Stanley Rosen (ed.) (2000). The Examined Life: Readings From Western Philosophy From Plato to Kant. Random House.
    What did Plato contribute to the philosophy of art? What do Pascal's Pensees really say? Everyone knows the names of these philosophers, but few really understand the ideas at the core of western philosophy. In this treasury of western thought, the primary sources speak for themselves. Over 35 excerpts from important philosophers -- including Aristotle and Hume, as well as contemporary thinkers -- offer a solid introduction to philosophy for the curious reader. Leading scholars have carefully chosen the selections, which (...)
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  23. Sandrine Berges (2009). Plato on Virtue and the Law. Continuum.
  24. Plato (1961). The Collected Dialogues of Plato, Including the Letters. New York]Pantheon Books.
  25. David Bostock (2000). Aristotle's Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    In this fascinating introduction, David Bostock presents a fresh perspective on one of the great classics of moral philosophy: Aristotle's Nicomachaen Ethics. He argues that it is, and deserves to be, Aristotle's most widely studied work, for much of what it has to say is still important for today's debate on the problems of ethics. Here, Bostock guides the reader through explanations and evaluations of all the main themes of the work, exploring questions of interpretation and the differing views of (...)
  26. W. K. C. Guthrie (1969/1971). The Sophists. London,Cambridge University Press.
    The third volume of Professor Guthrie's great history of Greek thought, entitled The Fifth-Century Enlightenment, deals in two parts with the Sophists and Socrates, the key figures in the dramatic and fundamental shift of philosophical interest from the physical universe to man. Each of these parts is now available as a paperback with the text, bibliography and indexes amended where necessary so that each part is self-contained. The Sophists assesses the contribution of individuals like Protagoras, Gorgias and Hippias to the (...)
  27. Steven K. Strange & Jack Zupko (eds.) (2004). Stoicism: Traditions and Transformations. Cambridge University Press.
    Stoicism is now widely recognized as one of the most important philosophical schools of ancient Greece and Rome. But how did it influence Western thought after Greek and Roman antiquity? The contributors recruited for this volume include leading international scholars of Stoicism as well as experts in later periods of philosophy. They trace the impact of Stoicism and Stoic ideas from late antiquity through the medieval and modern periods.
  28. Bernard E. Rollin (ed.) (2006). Harley-Davidson and Philosophy: Full-Throttle Aristotle. Open Court.
    It’s no wonder descriptions of riding often resemble the words of Asian mystics and Jedi knights: The ride causes your senses to open completely. You experience only the present, the now. Readers who prefer revving a Harley to meditating in a Zen garden know that biking is just as contemplative as chanting in the lotus position. Here, philosopher-bikers explore this seeming dichotomy, expounding on intriguing questions such as: Why are the motorcycles the real stars of Easy Rider? What would Marx (...)
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  29. James Adam (1909/1972). The Religious Teachers of Greece. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.
  30. David Boucher & P. J. Kelly (eds.) (2003). Political Thinkers: From Socrates to the Present. Oxford University Press.
    Political Thinkers is an authoritative introduction to the entire history of Western political thought. Carefully edited by two of the leading scholars in the field, it features specially commissioned chapters by an impressive line-up of internationally renowned scholars from around the world. This book provides an overview of the canon of great political theorists--from Socrates and the Sophists to such contemporary thinkers as Habermas and Foucault. Each contributor critically discusses the ideas and significance of each thinker and gives a summary (...)
  31. Nancy Sherman (2005). Stoic Warriors: The Ancient Philosophy Behind the Military Mind. Oxford University Press.
    While few soldiers may have read the works of Epictetus or Marcus Aurelius, it is undoubtedly true that the ancient philosophy known as Stoicism guides the actions of many in the military. Soldiers and seamen learn early in their training "to suck it up," to endure, to put aside their feelings and to get on with the mission. Stoic Warriors is the first book to delve deeply into the ancient legacy of this relationship, exploring what the Stoic philosophy actually is, (...)
  32. W. K. C. Guthrie (1971). Socrates. London,Cambridge University Press.
    The third volume of Professor Guthrie's great history of Greek thought, entitled The Fifth-Century Enlightenment, deals in two parts with the Sophists and Socrates, the key figures in the dramatic and fundamental shift of philosophical interest from the physical universe to man. Each of the two parts is available as a paperback with the text, bibliography and indexes amended where necessary so that each part is self-contained. Socrates dominated the controversies of this period, as he has dominated the subsequent history (...)
  33. Hugh H. Benson (ed.) (1992). Essays on the Philosophy of Socrates. Oxford University Press.
    The last two decades have witnessed a virtual explosion of research in Socratic philosophy. This volume collects essays that represent the range and diversity of that vast literature, including historical and philosophical essays devoted to a single Platonic dialogue, as well as essays devoted to the Socratic method, Socratic epistemology, and Socratic ethics. With lists of suggested further readings, an extensive bibliography on recent Socratic research, and an index locorum, this unique and much-needed anthology makes the study of Socratic philosophy (...)
  34. Michael Cormack (2006). Plato's Stepping Stones: Degrees of Moral Virtue. Continuum.
    Examines the dialogues from Plato's early and middle periods and illustrates the similarities and differences between Plators"s concept of craft knowledge and ...
  35. Kevin K. J. Durand (2004). Virtue: Essays in Ancient Philosophy. Upa.
    Virtue is an examination of central topics in ancient Greek explorations of "virtue," particularly the elusive notion of "Sophrosune," alternatively translated as "moderation" or "temperance". The book investigates central works of Plato and Aristotle to develop an understanding of the role this virtue plays in the broader ethical commitments of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle.
  36. Louis Dudek (1994). The Birth of Reason. Dc Books.
  37. Sarah Broadie (1991). Ethics with Aristotle. Oxford University Press.
    In this incisive study Sarah Broadie gives an argued account of the main topics of Aristotle's ethics: eudaimonia, virtue, voluntary agency, practical reason, akrasia, pleasure, and the ethical status of theoria. She explores the sense of "eudaimonia," probes Aristotle's division of the soul and its virtues, and traces the ambiguities in "voluntary." Fresh light is shed on his comparison of practical wisdom with other kinds of knowledge, and a realistic account is developed of Aristototelian deliberation. The concept of pleasure as (...)
  38. John Philoponus & Catherine Osborne (2006). On Aristotle's "Physics 1.1-3". Cornell University Press.
  39. John B. Morrall (1977). Aristotle. G. Allen & Unwin.
    This volume is the only account published in English in the 20th century to be exclusively devoted to an interpretation of Aristotle's political thought (as ...
  40. Michael C. Stokes (1986). Plato's Socratic Conversations: Drama and Dialectic in Three Dialogues. Johns Hopkins University Press.
  41. Plato (1945/1972). Plato's Philebus. London,Cambridge University Press.
  42. Kathleen Freeman (1952/1970). God, Man, and State: Greek Concepts. Westport, Conn.,Greenwood Press.
  43. Michael Shalom Kochin (2002). Gender and Rhetoric in Plato's Political Thought. Cambridge University Press.
    Gender and Rhetoric in the Politics of Plato explores the relation between Plato's Republic and Laws on the set of issues that the Laws itself marks out as fundamental to the comparison: the unity of the virtues, the role of women, and the place of the family. Plato aims to persuade men to abandon the view of the good life that Greek cities and their laws inculcate as the only life worth living for those who would be real men and (...)
  44. Alexander of Aphrodisias (1992). Quaestiones 1.1--2.15. Cornell University Press.
    trans. R. W. Sharples. Alexander addresses a number of questions drawn from a range of topics in Aristotle's works.
  45. Brian Duignan (ed.) (2010). Ancient Philosophy: From 600 Bce to 500 Ce. Britannica Educational Pub. In Association with Rosen Educational Services.
    Presents an introduction to philosophy in the ancient world, discussing the writings of the Pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, as well as the teachings of Stoicism, Epicureanism, and the early Jewish and Christian authors.
  46. Daniel Kolak (ed.) (1994). From Plato to Wittgenstein: The Historical Foundations of Mind. Wadsworth Pub. Co..
  47. Lynne Spellman (1995). Substance and Separation in Aristotle. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a study of Aristotle's metaphysics in which the central argument is that Aristotle's views on substance are a direct response to Plato's Theory of Forms. The claim is that Aristotle believes that many of Plato's views are tenable once one has rejected Plato's notion of separation. There have been many recent books on Aristotle's theory of substance. This one is distinct from previous books in several ways: firstly, it offers a completely new, coherent interpretation of Aristotle's claim (...)
  48. Alan C. Bowen (2012). Simplicius on the Planets and Their Motions: In Defense of a Heresy. Brill.
    The book contends that the digression ending Simplicius’ In de caelo 2.12 is not a proper history of early Greek planetary theory, but a creative atempt to show that to accept Ptolemy’s planetary hypotheses one need not repudiate Aristotle’s argument that the cosmos is eternal.
  49. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (1996). Plato's Socrates. OUP Usa.
    This book develops novel accounts of many of the most controversial topics in the philosophy of Socrates. The authors first develop Socrates' methodological, epistemological, and psychological views before examining his ethical, political, and religious convictions. The results reveals both the richness and the remarkable coherence of the philosophy of Plato's Socrates.
  50. Antony Flew (1989). An Introduction to Western Philosophy: Ideas and Argument From Plato to Popper. Thames and Hudson.
  51. 1 — 50 / 545