Bargain finder

Use this tool to find book bargains on Amazon Marketplace. It works best on the "my areas of interest" setting, but you need to specify your areas of interest first. You might also want to change your shopping locale (currently the US locale).

Note: the best bargains on this page tend to go fast; the prices shown can be inaccurate because of this.

Settings


 Area(s)

 Offer type

 Sort by
($)
 Max price
% off
 Min discount

 Min year

 Added since

 Pro authors only

 

1 — 50 / 225
  1. Agnes Heller (1981). Renaissance Man. Schocken Books.
    INTRODUCTION Is there a * Renaissance ideal of man'? The consciousness that man is a historical being is a product of bourgeois development ; the condition ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  2. Francisco Sánchez (1988). That Nothing is Known =. Cambridge University Press.
    This is an edition of one of the crucial texts of Renaissance skepticism, Quod nihil scitur, by the Portuguese scholar Franciso Sanches. The treatise, first published in 1581, is a refutation of Aaristotelian dialectics and scientific theory in the search for a true scientific method. This volume provides a critical edition of the original text, an English translation (the first ever published), a substantial introduction, and comprehensive annotation.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. F. C. S. Schiller (1912). Humanism; Philosophical Essays. Westport, Conn.,Greenwood Press.
  4. G. R. Evans (1993). Philosophy and Theology in the Middle Ages. Routledge.
    In the thousand years from the end of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance and Reformation of the Sixteenth century the discussion of the great questions of philosophy and religion was intense. Does God exist? What is he like? What is the purpose of human life and how does God show concern for the future of mankind? This is an introduction to the debates which did more than anything else to transform the ancient into the modern world of thought.
  5. Karl A. Kottman (1972). Law and Apocalypse: The Moral Thought of Luis De León (1527?-1591). The Hague,Nijhoff.
    CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION This study will deal with interpreting the moral, social and spiritual views of the famous Spanish theologian and poet, Luis de Leon. ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Nancy S. Struever (1992). Theory as Practice: Ethical Inquiry in the Renaissance. University of Chicago Press.
    In Theory as Practice, Nancy Struever contests this accepted notion; by focusing on ethical inquiry, she presents the Humanists as engaged in subtle, innovative moral work.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Gordon Leff (1976). The Dissolution of the Medieval Outlook: An Essay on Intellectual and Spiritual Change in the Fourteenth Century. Harper & Row.
  8. David J. Furley (ed.) (1999). From Aristotle to Augustine. Routledge.
    This offering in Routledge's acclaimed History of Philosophy series completes the acclaimed 10-volume collection. This work explores the schools of thought that developed in the wake of Platonism through the time of Augustine. The 11 separately authored in-depth articles include: Aristotle the scientist-- David Furley, Princeton University; Aristotle: logic and metaphysics-- Alan Code, Ohio State University; Aristotle: aesthetics and philosophy of mind -- David Gallop, Trent University, Ontario; Aristotle: ethics and politics-- Stephen White, University of Texas at Austin; The peripatetic (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Gareth B. Matthews (ed.) (1998). The Augustinian Tradition. University of California Press.
    Students and scholars will find that these essays provide impressive evidence of the persisting vitality of Augustine's thought.
  10. Richard Kilvington (1990). The Sophismata of Richard Kilvington: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary. Cambridge University Press.
    Richard Kilvington was an obscure fourteenth-century philosopher whose Sophismata deal with a series of logic-linguistic conundrums of a sort which featured extensively in philosophical discussions of this period. This is the first ever translation or edition of his work. As well as an introduction to Kilvington's work, the editors provide a detailed commentary. This edition will prove of considerable interest to historians of medieval philosophy who will realise from the evidence presented here that Kilvington deserves to be studied just as (...)
  11. Andrew B. Schoedinger (ed.) (1996). Readings in Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The most comprehensive collection of its kind, this unique anthology presents fifty-four readings--many of them not widely available--by the most important and influential Christian, Jewish, and Muslim philosophers of the Middle Ages. The text is organized topically, making it easily accessible to students, and the large selection of readings provides instructors with maximum flexiblity in choosing course material. Each thematic section is comprised of six chronologically arranged readings. This organization focuses on the major philosophical issues and allows a smooth introduction (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Robert C. Trundle (1999). Medieval Modal Logic & Science: Augustine on Necessary Truth & Thomas on its Impossibility Without a First Cause. University Press of America.
    Medieval Modal Logic & Science uses modal reasoning in a new way to fortify the relationships between science, ethics, and politics. Robert C. Trundle accomplishes this by analyzing the role of modal logic in the work of St. Augustine and St. Thomas Aquinas, then applying these themes to contemporary issues. He incorporates Augustine's ideas involving thought and consciousness, and Aquinas's reasoning to a First Cause. The author also deals with Augustine's ties to Aristotelian modalities of thought regarding science and logic, (...)
  13. Niccolò Machiavelli (1988). Machiavelli. Cambridge University Press.
    In his introduction to this new translation by Russell Price, Professor Skinner presents a lucid analysis of Machiavelli's text as a response both to the world of Florentine politics, and as an attack on the advice-books for princes published by a number of his contemporaries. This new edition includes notes on the principal events in Machiavelli's life, and on the vocabulary of The Prince, as well as biographical notes on characters in the text.
  14. Peter Augustine Lawler & Dale D. McConkey (eds.) (1998). Community and Political Thought Today. Praeger.
  15. Oliver Leaman (1990). Moses Maimonides. Routledge.
    Moses Maimonides (1135--1204) is recognized both as a leading Jewish thinker and as one of the most radical philosophers of the Islamic world.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Hanna Fenichel Pitkin (1984). Fortune is a Woman: Gender and Politics in the Thought of Niccolò Machiavelli: With a New Afterword. University of Chicago Press.
    "Fortune is a woman, and if you want to keep her under, you've got to knock her around some."--Niccolò Machiavelli Hanna Pitkin's provocative and enduring study of Machiavelli was the first to systematically place gender at the center of its exploration of his political thought. In this edition, Pitkin adds a new afterword, in which she discusses the book's critical reception and situates the book's arguments in the context of recent interpretations of Machiavelli's thought. "A close and often brilliant exegesis (...)
  17. Moses Maimonides (1996). The Essential Maimonides: Translations of the Rambam. Jason Aronson.
  18. Charles B. Schmitt, Quentin Skinner & Eckhard Kessler (eds.) (1988). The Cambridge History of Renaissance Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge History of Renaissance Philosophy offers a balanced and comprehensive account of philosophical thought from the middle of the fourteenth century to the emergence of modern philosophy at the turn of the seventeenth century. The Renaissance has attracted intense scholarly attention for over a century, but in the beginning the philosophy of the period was relatively neglected and this is the first volume in English to synthesize for a wider readership the substantial and sophisticated research now available. The volume (...)
  19. Richard Swinburne (1996). Is There a God? Oxford University Press.
    At least since Darwin's Origin of Species was published in 1859, it has increasingly become accepted that the existence of God is, intellectually, a lost cause, and that religious faith is an entirely non-rational matter--the province of those who willingly refuse to accept the dramatic advances of modern cosmology. Are belief in God and belief in science really mutually exclusive? Or, as noted philosopher of science and religion Richard Swinburne puts forth, can the very same criteria which scientists use to (...)
  20. Charles P. Nemeth (2001). Aquinas in the Courtroom: Lawyers, Judges, and Judicial Conduct. Greenwood Press.
  21. Gareth B. Matthews (2005). Augustine. Blackwell Pub..
    The first-person point of view -- Augustine's life -- Skepticism -- Language -- The Augustinian cogito -- Mind--body dualism -- The problem of other minds -- Philosophical dream problems -- Time and creation -- Faith and reason -- Foreknowledge and free will -- The problem of evil -- Wanting bad things -- Lying -- Happiness.
  22. Peter Sharratt (ed.) (1976). French Renaissance Studies, 1540-70: Humanism and the Encyclopedia. Edinburgh University Press.
  23. Frances Amelia Yates (1964). Giordano Bruno and the Hermetic Tradition. Routledge.
    Placing Bruno—both advanced philosopher and magician burned at the stake—in the Hermetic tradition, Yates's acclaimed study gives an overview not only of Renaissance humanism but of its interplay—and conflict—with magic and occult practices. "Among those who have explored the intellectual world of the sixteenth century no one in England can rival Miss Yates. Wherever she looks, she illuminates. Now she has looked on Bruno. This brilliant book takes time to digest, but it is an intellectual adventure to read it. Historians (...)
  24. Burton Z. Cooper (1974). The Idea of God: A Whiteheadian Critique of St. Thomas Aquinas' Concept of God. Nijhoff.
  25. Benjamin G. Kohl (1985). Renaissance Humanism, 1300-1550: A Bibliography of Materials in English. Garland Pub. Inc..
  26. Sebastian De Grazia (1989). Machiavelli in Hell. Princeton University Press.
  27. Umberto Eco (1988). The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas. Harvard University Press.
    As the only book-length treatment of Aquinas's aesthetics available in English, this volume should interest philosophers, medievalists, historians, critics, and ...
  28. Paul Weiss (1986). Toward a Perfected State. State University of New York Press.
    Paul Weiss is Heffer Professor of Philosophy at the Catholic University of America. He founded the Metaphysical Society of America and The Review of Metaphysics.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Raymond L. Weiss (1991). Maimonides' Ethics: The Encounter of Philosophic and Religious Morality. University of Chicago Press.
    In this book Raymond L. Weiss examines how a seminal Jewish thinker negotiates the philosophical conflict between Athens and Jerusalem in the crucial area of ethics. Maimonides, a master of both the classical and the biblical-rabbinic traditions, reconciled their differing views of morality primarily in the context of Jewish jurisprudence. Taking into consideration the entire corpus of Maimonides' writings, Weiss focuses on the ethical sections of the Commentary on the Mishnah and the Mishneh Torah , but also discusses the Guide (...)
  30. Niels Jørgen Green-Pedersen (1984). The Tradition of the Topics in the Middle Ages: The Commentaries on Aristotle's and Boethius' Topics. Philosophia Verlag.
  31. Harvey Claflin Mansfield (1996). Machiavelli's Virtue. University of Chicago Press.
    Uniting thirty years of authoritative scholarship by a master of textual detail, Machiavelli's Virtue is a comprehensive statement on the founder of modern politics. Harvey Mansfield reveals the role of sects in Machiavelli's politics, his advice on how to rule indirectly, and the ultimately partisan character of his project, and shows him to be the founder of such modern and diverse institutions as the impersonal state and the energetic executive. Accessible and elegant, this groundbreaking interpretation explains the puzzles and reveals (...)
  32. M. V. Dougherty (ed.) (2007). Pico Della Mirandola: New Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume provides a comprehensive presentation of the philosophical work of the fifteenth-century Renaissance thinker Giovanni Pico della Mirandola. In essays specially commissioned for this book, a distinguished group of scholars presents the central tropics and texts of Pico’s literary output. Best known as the author of the celebrated “Oration on the Dignity of Man,” a magnificent speech originally intended to introduce a debate of 900 theses to be held in Rome before the Pope, the College of Cardinals, and an (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Thomas (2002). The Essential Aquinas: Writings on Philosophy, Religion, and Society. Greenwood Publishing Group.
  34. Louis Althusser (1999). Machiavelli and Us. Verso.
    Among his own posthumously released drafts, one, at least, is incontestably neither mistake nor out-take: the text of his lecture course on Machiavelli, ...
  35. David E. Cooper (2002). The Measure of Things: Humanism, Humility, and Mystery. Oxford University Press.
    David Cooper explores and defends the view that a reality independent of human perspectives is necessarily indescribable, a "mystery." Other views are shown to be hubristic. Humanists, for whom "man is the measure" of reality, exaggerate our capacity to live without the sense of an independent measure. Absolutists, who proclaim our capacity to know an independent reality, exaggerate our cognitive powers. In this highly original book Cooper restores to philosophy a proper appreciation of mystery-that is what provides a measure of (...)
  36. Mark D. Johnston (1996). The Evangelical Rhetoric of Ramon Llull: Lay Learning and Piety in the Christian West Around 1300. Oxford University Press.
    Ramon Llull (1232-1316), born on Majorca, was one of the most remarkable lay intellectuals of the thirteenth century. He devoted much of his life to promoting missions among unbelievers, the reform of Western Christian society, and personal spiritual perfection. He wrote over 200 philosophical and theological works in Catalan, Latin, and Arabic. Many of these expound on his "Great Universal Art of Finding Truth," an idiosyncratic dialectical system that he thought capable of proving Catholic beliefs to non-believers. This study offers (...)
  37. Paul Richard Blum (2010). Philosophy of Religion in the Renaissance. Ashgate.
    Contents: Preface; From faith to reason for fideism: Raymond Lull, Raimundus Sabundus and Michel de Montaigne; Nicholas of Cusa and Pythagorean theology; Giordano Bruno's philosophy of religion; Coluccio Salutati: hermeneutics of humanity; Humanism applied to language, logic and religion: Lorenzo Valla; Georgios Gemistos Plethon: from paganism to Christianity and back; Marsilio Ficino's philosophical theology; Giovanni Pico against popular Platonism; Tommaso Campanella: God makes sense in the world; Francisco Suárez – scholastic and Platonic ideas of God; Epilogue: conflicting truth claims; Bibliography; (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Efrem Bettoni (1964). Saint Bonaventure. Greenwood Press.
  39. Simon Peret͡sovich Markish (1986). Erasmus and the Jews. University of Chicago Press.
    Erasmus of Rotterdam was the greatest Christian humanist scholar of the Northern European Renaissance, a correspondent of Sir Thomas More and many other learned men of his time, known to his contemporaries and to posterity for subtlety of his thought and the depth of his learning. He was also, according to some modern writers, an anti-Semite. In this complete analysis of all of Erasmus' writings on Jews and Judaism, Shimon Markish asserts that the accusation cannot be sustained. For Markish, to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Gyula Klima, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.) (2007). Medieval Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary. Blackwell Pub..
  41. Jaroslav Pelikan (1986). The Mystery of Continuity: Time and History, Memory and Eternity in the Thought of Saint Augustine. University Press of Virginia.
  42. Dominic Keech (2012). The Anti-Pelagian Christology of Augustine of Hippo, 396-430. OUP Oxford.
    A new study which engages with some of the most controversial questions in recent scholarship on Augustine of Hippo, the Origenist controversy and the development of Christology through the history of the ecumenical councils.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. James McEvoy (2000). Robert Grosseteste. OUP Usa.
    Robert Grosseteste was the initiator of the English scientific tradition, one of the first chancellors of Oxford University, and a famous teacher and commentator on the newly discovered works of Aristotle. In this book, James McEvoy provides the first general, inclusive overview of the entire range of Grosseteste's massive intellectual achievement.
  44. P. Osmund Lewry (ed.) (1983). The Rise of British Logic: Acts of the Sixth European Symposium on Medieval Logic and Semantics, Balliol College, Oxford, 19-24 June 1983. [REVIEW] Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies.
  45. Mary T. Clark (1958). Augustine. New York, Desclée Co..
    Augustine of Hippo is a giant in the history of Christian thought, commended by St Jerome for having virtually 're-founded the old faith'.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Julius R. Weinberg (1977). Ockham, Descartes, and Hume: Self-Knowledge, Substance, and Causality. University of Wisconsin Press.
  47. G. R. Evans (ed.) (1998). Getting It Wrong: The Mediaeval Epistemology of Error. Brill.
    Deals with the dark side of the medieval theory of knowledge, the pursuit of knowldge in 'wrong' ways, 'common knowledge' and departures from it, wisdom and ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Anne Jackson Fremantle (1970). The Age of Belief. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.
  49. Howard B. Radest (1990). The Devil and Secular Humanism: The Children of the Enlightenment. Praeger.
    This volume clarifies the nature of humanism by exploring historical and current thought.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Silvia Ruffo-Fiore (1990). Niccolò Machiavelli: An Annotated Bibliography of Modern Criticism and Scholarship. Greenwood Press.
    The volume will implement the research efforts of both Machiavelli scholars and those in related general and specific fields.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  51. 1 — 50 / 225