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1 — 50 / 219
  1. Carlos G. Noreña (1975). Studies in Spanish Renaissance Thought. Nijhoff.
  2. William (1983). Predestination, God's Foreknowledge, and Future Contingents. Hackett Pub Co Inc.
  3. M. S. Kempshall (1999). The Common Good in Late Medieval Political Thought. Oxford University Press.
    This book offers a major reinterpretation of the `secularization' of medieval ideas by examining scholastic discussions on the nature of the common good. It challenges the view that the rediscovery of Aristotle was the primary catalyst for the emergence of a secular theory of the state. A detailed exposition of the content and the context of late scholastic political and ethical thought reveals that the roots of medieval 'secularization' were profoundly theological.
  4. John Marenbon (1987). Later Medieval Philosophy (1150-1350): An Introduction. Routledge & K. Paul.
    Later Medieval Philosophy (1150-1350) provides an introduction to philosophy in the Latin West between 1150 and 1350. Part I describes the medieval thinker's intellectual and historical context, by examining the structure of courses in the medieval universities, the methods of teaching, the forms of written work, and the translation and availability of ancient Greek, Arab, and Jewish philosophical texts. Part II examines the nature of intellectual knowledge by explaining the arguments given by Aristotle, his antique commentators, and the Arab philosophers, (...)
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  5. Paul Oskar Kristeller (1979). Renaissance Thought and its Sources. Columbia University Press.
    The U.S. occupation of Japan transformed a brutal war charged with overt racism into an amicable peace in which the issue of race seemed to have disappeared.
  6. Gordon Leff (1976). The Dissolution of the Medieval Outlook: An Essay on Intellectual and Spiritual Change in the Fourteenth Century. Harper & Row.
  7. György Faludy (1970). Erasmus. New York,Stein and Day.
  8. Dorothy Koenigsberger (1979). Renaissance Man and Creative Thinking: A History of Concepts of Harmony, 1400-1700. Humanities Press.
  9. Anthony Goodman & Angus MacKay (eds.) (1990). The Impact of Humanism on Western Europe. Longman.
  10. Karl A. Kottman (1972). Law and Apocalypse: The Moral Thought of Luis De León (1527?-1591). The Hague,Nijhoff.
    CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION This study will deal with interpreting the moral, social and spiritual views of the famous Spanish theologian and poet, Luis de Leon. ...
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  11. Gyula Klima (2009). John Buridan. Oxford University Press.
    Buridan's life, works, and influence -- Buridan's logic and the medieval logical tradition -- The primacy of mental language -- The various kinds of concepts and the idea of a mental language -- Natural language and the idea of a formal syntax in Buridan -- Existential import and the square of opposition -- Ontological commitment -- The properties of terms (proprietates terminorum) -- The semantics of propositions -- Logical validity in a token-based, semantically closed logic -- The possibility of scientific (...)
  12. Brian P. Copenhaver (1992). Renaissance Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The Renaissance has long been recognized as a brilliant moment in the development of Western civilization. Little attention has been devoted, however, to the distinct contribution of philosophy to Renaissance culture. This volume introduces the reader to the philosophy written, read, taught, and debated during the period traditionally credited with the "revival of learning." Beginning with original sources still largely inaccessible to most readers, and drawing on a wide range of secondary studies, the author examines the relation of Renaissance philosophy (...)
  13. D. J. O'Connor (1968). Aquinas and Natural Law. Melbourne [Etc.]Macmillan.
  14. Frances Amelia Yates (1964/1999). Giordano Bruno and the Hermetic Tradition. Routledge.
  15. Richard Swinburne (1996). Is There a God? Oxford University Press.
    At least since Darwin's Origin of Species was published in 1859, it has increasingly become accepted that the existence of God is, intellectually, a lost cause, and that religious faith is an entirely non-rational matter--the province of those who willingly refuse to accept the dramatic advances of modern cosmology. Are belief in God and belief in science really mutually exclusive? Or, as noted philosopher of science and religion Richard Swinburne puts forth, can the very same criteria which scientists use to (...)
  16. Burton Z. Cooper (1974). The Idea of God: A Whiteheadian Critique of St. Thomas Aquinas' Concept of God. Nijhoff.
  17. Benjamin G. Kohl (1985). Renaissance Humanism, 1300-1550: A Bibliography of Materials in English. Garland Pub. Inc..
  18. Ehud Benor (1995). Worship of the Heart: A Study of Maimonides' Philosophy of Religion. State University of N.Y. Press.
    Introduction The purpose of this study is to characterize a conception of prayer that plays an important role in the religious thought of the medieval ...
  19. Niccolò Machiavelli (1988). Machiavelli. Cambridge University Press.
    In his introduction to this new translation by Russell Price, Professor Skinner presents a lucid analysis of Machiavelli's text as a response both to the world of Florentine politics, and as an attack on the advice-books for princes published by a number of his contemporaries. This new edition includes notes on the principal events in Machiavelli's life, and on the vocabulary of The Prince, as well as biographical notes on characters in the text.
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  20. John Jeffries Martin (2004). Myths of Renaissance Individualism. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The idea that the Renaissance witnessed the emergence of the modern individual remains a powerful myth. In this important new book Martin examines the Renaissance self with attention to both social history and literary theory and offers a new typology of Renaissance selfhood which was at once collective, performative and porous. At the same time, he stresses the layered qualities of the Renaissance self and the salient role of interiority and notions of inwardness in the shaping of identity.
  21. Ellis Heywood (1972). Il Moro; Ellis Heywood's Dialogue in Memory of Thomas More. Cambridge, Mass.,Harvard University Press.
    The original Italian text has been reproduced in the back of the volume.
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  22. Agnes Heller (1981). Renaissance Man. Schocken Books.
    INTRODUCTION Is there a * Renaissance ideal of man'? The consciousness that man is a historical being is a product of bourgeois development ; the condition ...
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  23. J. David Hoeveler (1977). The New Humanism: A Critique of Modern America, 1900-1940. University Press of Virginia.
  24. David Goicoechea, John C. Luik & Tim Madigan (eds.) (1991). The Question of Humanism: Challenges and Possibilities. Prometheus Books.
  25. Gabriël Nuchelmans (1996). Studies on the History of Logic and Semantics, 12th-17th Centuries. Variorum.
  26. Julius R. Weinberg (1948/1969). Nicolaus of Autrecourt. New York, Greenwood Press.
  27. James Hankins (ed.) (2007). The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy provides an introduction to a complex period of change in the subject matter and practice of philosophy. The philosophy of the fourteenth through sixteenth centuries is often seen as transitional between the scholastic philosophy of the Middle Ages and modern philosophy, but the essays collected here, by a distinguished international team of contributors, call these assumptions into question, emphasizing both the continuity with scholastic philosophy and the role of Renaissance philosophy in the emergence of (...)
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  28. John Marenbon (1988). Early Medieval Philosophy (480-1150): An Introduction. Routledge.
  29. G. R. Evans (1993). Philosophy and Theology in the Middle Ages. Routledge.
    In the thousand years from the end of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance and Reformation of the Sixteenth century the discussion of the great questions of philosophy and religion was intense. Does God exist? What is he like? What is the purpose of human life and how does God show concern for the future of mankind? This is an introduction to the debates which did more than anything else to transform the ancient into the modern world of thought.
  30. Peter Sharratt (ed.) (1976). French Renaissance Studies, 1540-70: Humanism and the Encyclopedia. Edinburgh University Press.
  31. Peter Abelard (1971). Peter Abelard's Ethics. Oxford,Clarendon Press.
  32. Niccolò Machiavelli (1640/1969). The Prince. Menston, Eng.,Scolar Press.
    The first modern treatise of political philosophy, The Prince remains one of the world’s most influential and widely read books. Machiavelli, whose name has become synonymous with expedient exercises of will, reveals nothing less than the secrets of power: how to gain it, how to wield it, and how to keep it. But curiously, this work of outspoken clarity has, for centuries, inspired myriad interpretations as to its author’s true message. The Introduction by noted Italian Renaissance scholar Albert Russell Ascoli (...)
  33. Julius R. Weinberg (1977). Ockham, Descartes, and Hume: Self-Knowledge, Substance, and Causality. University of Wisconsin Press.
  34. Andrew B. Schoedinger (ed.) (1996). Readings in Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The most comprehensive collection of its kind, this unique anthology presents fifty-four readings--many of them not widely available--by the most important and influential Christian, Jewish, and Muslim philosophers of the Middle Ages. The text is organized topically, making it easily accessible to students, and the large selection of readings provides instructors with maximum flexiblity in choosing course material. Each thematic section is comprised of six chronologically arranged readings. This organization focuses on the major philosophical issues and allows a smooth introduction (...)
  35. Mary T. Clark (1958). Augustine. New York, Desclée Co..
    Augustine of Hippo is a giant in the history of Christian thought, commended by St Jerome for having virtually 're-founded the old faith'.
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  36. Simon Peret͡sovich Markish (1986). Erasmus and the Jews. University of Chicago Press.
    Erasmus of Rotterdam was the greatest Christian humanist scholar of the Northern European Renaissance, a correspondent of Sir Thomas More and many other learned men of his time, known to his contemporaries and to posterity for subtlety of his thought and the depth of his learning. He was also, according to some modern writers, an anti-Semite. In this complete analysis of all of Erasmus' writings on Jews and Judaism, Shimon Markish asserts that the accusation cannot be sustained. For Markish, to (...)
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  37. Simplicius (1992). Corollaries on Place and Time. Cornell University Press.
  38. Nicholas (1979). Idiota De Mente =. Abaris Books.
  39. John Peckham (1993). Questions Concerning the Eternity of the World. Fordham University Press.
    This dual-language book is a translation of John Pecham’s De aeternitate mundi, written probably in 1270. Pecham was born in England around 1230. He pursued studies in Paris, where he may have been a student of Roger Bacon’s, and at Oxford. He returned to Paris some time between 1257 and 1259 to study theology and in 1269-1270 became magister theologiae. It was at this time that he presumably wrote the essay translated here, and presented it as part of his inception, (...)
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  40. John Inglis (1998). Spheres of Philosophical Inquiry and the Historiography of Medieval Philosophy. Brill.
    This volume continues this discussion with particular reference to medieval philosophy.Inglis shows that the modern historiography of medieval philosophy had ...
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  41. Peter Augustine Lawler & Dale D. McConkey (eds.) (1998). Community and Political Thought Today. Praeger.
  42. James McEvoy (2000). Robert Grosseteste. OUP Usa.
    Robert Grosseteste was the initiator of the English scientific tradition, one of the first chancellors of Oxford University, and a famous teacher and commentator on the newly discovered works of Aristotle. In this book, James McEvoy provides the first general, inclusive overview of the entire range of Grosseteste's massive intellectual achievement.
  43. M. V. Dougherty (ed.) (2008). Pico Della Mirandola: New Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume provides a comprehensive presentation of the philosophical work of the fifteenth-century Renaissance thinker Giovanni Pico della Mirandola. In essays specially commissioned for this book, a distinguished group of scholars presents the central tropics and texts of Pico’s literary output. Best known as the author of the celebrated “Oration on the Dignity of Man,” a magnificent speech originally intended to introduce a debate of 900 theses to be held in Rome before the Pope, the College of Cardinals, and an (...)
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  44. Mark D. Johnston (1996). The Evangelical Rhetoric of Ramon Llull: Lay Learning and Piety in the Christian West Around 1300. Oxford University Press.
    Ramon Llull (1232-1316), born on Majorca, was one of the most remarkable lay intellectuals of the thirteenth century. He devoted much of his life to promoting missions among unbelievers, the reform of Western Christian society, and personal spiritual perfection. He wrote over 200 philosophical and theological works in Catalan, Latin, and Arabic. Many of these expound on his "Great Universal Art of Finding Truth," an idiosyncratic dialectical system that he thought capable of proving Catholic beliefs to non-believers. This study offers (...)
  45. Anthony Kenny (1993). Aquinas on Mind. Routledge.
  46. John C. Olin (1994). Erasmus, Utopia, and the Jesuits: Essays on the Outreach of Humanism. Fordham University Press.
    Olin’s focus in this collection of essays is the historical period of the early sixteenth century, the juncture of the Renaissance and the Reformation. Providing an in-depth alternative to the standard treatment – so often limited to the classical revival – this work concerns itself with the unique link between humanism and the great literary works of the period, and, in particular, the patristic scholarship inherent in Erasmus’ ideals of reform. Olin specifically take into account the movements of New Learning (...)
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  47. Howard B. Radest (1990). The Devil and Secular Humanism: The Children of the Enlightenment. Praeger.
    This volume clarifies the nature of humanism by exploring historical and current thought.
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  48. Robert J. O'Connell (1978). Art and the Christian Intelligence in St. Augustine. Harvard University Press.
  49. Raymond L. Weiss (1991). Maimonides' Ethics: The Encounter of Philosophic and Religious Morality. University of Chicago Press.
    In this book Raymond L. Weiss examines how a seminal Jewish thinker negotiates the philosophical conflict between Athens and Jerusalem in the crucial area of ethics. Maimonides, a master of both the classical and the biblical-rabbinic traditions, reconciled their differing views of morality primarily in the context of Jewish jurisprudence. Taking into consideration the entire corpus of Maimonides' writings, Weiss focuses on the ethical sections of the Commentary on the Mishnah and the Mishneh Torah , but also (...)
  50. Peter Godman (2009). Paradoxes of Conscience in the High Middle Ages: Abelard, Heloise, and the Archpoet. Cambridge University Press.
    Moral moments -- The neurotic and the penitent -- True, false, and feigned penance -- Fame without conscience -- Cain and conscience -- Feminine paradoxes -- Sincere hypocrisy -- The poetical consience -- Envoi : spiritual sophistry.
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  51. 1 — 50 / 219