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1 — 50 / 219
  1. Ruth Weissbourd Grant (1997). Hypocrisy and Integrity: Machiavelli, Rousseau, and the Ethics of Politics. University of Chicago Press.
    Questioning the usual judgements of political ethics, Ruth W. Grant argues that hypocrisy can actually be constructive while strictly principled behavior can be destructive. Hypocrisy and Integrity offers a new conceptual framework that clarifies the differences between idealism and fanaticism while it uncovers the moral limits of compromise. "Exciting and provocative. . . . Grant's work is to be highly recommended, offering a fresh reading of Rousseau and Machiavelli as well as presenting a penetrating analysis of hypocrisy and integrity."--Ronald J. (...)
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  2. Harvey Claflin Mansfield (1996). Machiavelli's Virtue. University of Chicago Press.
    Uniting thirty years of authoritative scholarship by a master of textual detail, Machiavelli's Virtue is a comprehensive statement on the founder of modern politics. Harvey Mansfield reveals the role of sects in Machiavelli's politics, his advice on how to rule indirectly, and the ultimately partisan character of his project, and shows him to be the founder of such modern and diverse institutions as the impersonal state and the energetic executive. Accessible and elegant, this groundbreaking interpretation explains the puzzles and reveals (...)
  3. Robert C. Trundle (1999). Medieval Modal Logic & Science: Augustine on Necessary Truth & Thomas on its Impossibility Without a First Cause. University Press of America.
    Medieval Modal Logic & Science uses modal reasoning in a new way to fortify the relationships between science, ethics, and politics. Robert C. Trundle accomplishes this by analyzing the role of modal logic in the work of St. Augustine and St. Thomas Aquinas, then applying these themes to contemporary issues. He incorporates Augustine's ideas involving thought and consciousness, and Aquinas's reasoning to a First Cause. The author also deals with Augustine's ties to Aristotelian modalities of thought regarding science and logic, (...)
  4. Brian P. Copenhaver (1992). Renaissance Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The Renaissance has long been recognized as a brilliant moment in the development of Western civilization. Little attention has been devoted, however, to the distinct contribution of philosophy to Renaissance culture. This volume introduces the reader to the philosophy written, read, taught, and debated during the period traditionally credited with the "revival of learning." Beginning with original sources still largely inaccessible to most readers, and drawing on a wide range of secondary studies, the author examines the relation of Renaissance philosophy (...)
  5. D. E. Luscombe (1997). Medieval Thought. Oxford University Press.
    The Middle Ages span a period of well over a millennium: from the emperor Constantine's Christian conversion in 312 to the early sixteenth century. David Luscombe's clear and accessible history of medieval thought steers a clear path through this long period, beginning with the three greatest influences on medieval philosophy: Augustine, Boethius, and Pseudo-Denis, and focusing on Abelard, Anselm, Aquinas, Ockham, Duns Scotus, and Eckhart among others in the twelfth to fifteenth centuries.
  6. Mark D. Johnston (1987). The Spiritual Logic of Ramon Llull. Oxford University Press.
    This book presents a comprehensive critical survey of all the logical doctrines of the well-known but little understood Catalan philosopher and theologian, Ramon Llull (1232-1316). The highly idiosyncratic character of Llull's writings has long frustrated the efforts of general medieval historians to define his contribution to later scholastic culture, and has resisted attempts by specialists to explain exactly how his methods and procedures worked. This new study--the first book-length treatment in English of Llull's philosophy to appear in over fifty years--seeks (...)
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  7. Richard Swinburne (1996). Is There a God? Oxford University Press.
    At least since Darwin's Origin of Species was published in 1859, it has increasingly become accepted that the existence of God is, intellectually, a lost cause, and that religious faith is an entirely non-rational matter--the province of those who willingly refuse to accept the dramatic advances of modern cosmology. Are belief in God and belief in science really mutually exclusive? Or, as noted philosopher of science and religion Richard Swinburne puts forth, can the very same criteria which scientists use to (...)
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  8. Norman Kretzmann & Eleonore Stump (eds.) (1993). The Cambridge Companion to Aquinas. Cambridge University Press.
    Among the great philosophers of the Middle Ages Aquinas is unique in pursuing two apparently disparate projects. On the one hand he developed a philosophical understanding of Christian doctrine in a fully integrated system encompassing all natural and supernatural reality. On the other hand, he was convinced that Aristotle's philosophy afforded the best available philosophical component of such a system. In a relatively brief career Aquinas developed these projects in great detail and with an astonishing degree of success. In this (...)
  9. Ronald Williamson (1989). Jews in the Hellenistic World: Philo. Cambridge University Press.
    An extremely important Jewish writer and thinker of the first century AD, Philo of Alexandria exercised through his ideas and language a lasting influence on the development and growth of Christianity in the New Testament period and later. This book provides an introduction to the major themes and ideas in the religious and philosophical thinking of Philo and outlines the importance of his thought by means of introductory treatments and sections of freshly translated text and commentary. Dr Williamson illustrates in (...)
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  10. G. R. Evans (ed.) (1998). Getting It Wrong: The Mediaeval Epistemology of Error. Brill.
    Deals with the dark side of the medieval theory of knowledge, the pursuit of knowldge in 'wrong' ways, 'common knowledge' and departures from it, wisdom and ...
  11. John Marenbon (1987). Later Medieval Philosophy (1150-1350): An Introduction. Routledge & K. Paul.
    Later Medieval Philosophy (1150-1350) provides an introduction to philosophy in the Latin West between 1150 and 1350. Part I describes the medieval thinker's intellectual and historical context, by examining the structure of courses in the medieval universities, the methods of teaching, the forms of written work, and the translation and availability of ancient Greek, Arab, and Jewish philosophical texts. Part II examines the nature of intellectual knowledge by explaining the arguments given by Aristotle, his antique commentators, and the Arab philosophers, (...)
  12. Boethius (1988). Boethius's in Ciceronis Topica. Cornell University Press.
  13. Andrew B. Schoedinger (ed.) (1996). Readings in Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The most comprehensive collection of its kind, this unique anthology presents fifty-four readings--many of them not widely available--by the most important and influential Christian, Jewish, and Muslim philosophers of the Middle Ages. The text is organized topically, making it easily accessible to students, and the large selection of readings provides instructors with maximum flexiblity in choosing course material. Each thematic section is comprised of six chronologically arranged readings. This organization focuses on the major philosophical issues and allows a smooth introduction (...)
  14. Nicholas (1979). Idiota De Mente =. Abaris Books.
  15. Burton Z. Cooper (1974). The Idea of God: A Whiteheadian Critique of St. Thomas Aquinas' Concept of God. Nijhoff.
  16. Carlos G. Noreña (1975). Studies in Spanish Renaissance Thought. Nijhoff.
  17. Benjamin G. Kohl (1985). Renaissance Humanism, 1300-1550: A Bibliography of Materials in English. Garland Pub. Inc..
  18. Augustine Brannigan (1981). The Social Basis of Scientific Discoveries. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, Augustine Brannigan provides a critical examination of the major theories which have been devised to account for discoveries and innovations in ...
  19. Hanan Yoran (2010). Between Utopia and Dystopia: Erasmus, Thomas More, and the Humanist Republic of Letters. Lexington Books, a Division of Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Humanism as form -- The construction of the Erasmian Republic of Letters -- Erasmian humanism : the reform program of the universal intellectual -- The politics of a disembodied humanist -- More's Richard III : the fragility of humanist discourse -- Utopia and the no-place of the Erasmian republic.
  20. Peter Abelard (1922/1958). The Story of My Misfortunes. Glencoe, Ill.,Free Press.
  21. Paul E. Szarmach (ed.) (1985). Introduction to the Medieval Mystics of Europe. State University of New York Press.
    Though the essays focus on individuals, the cultural and social implications of their lives and work are never ignored, for the mystic way did not exist separately from the rest of medieval life; it functioned as an integral part of the ...
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  22. Julius R. Weinberg (1948/1969). Nicolaus of Autrecourt. New York, Greenwood Press.
  23. Simplicius (1992). Corollaries on Place and Time. Cornell University Press.
  24. Karl A. Kottman (1972). Law and Apocalypse: The Moral Thought of Luis De León (1527?-1591). The Hague,Nijhoff.
    CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION This study will deal with interpreting the moral, social and spiritual views of the famous Spanish theologian and poet, Luis de Leon. ...
  25. Gordon Leff (1976). The Dissolution of the Medieval Outlook: An Essay on Intellectual and Spiritual Change in the Fourteenth Century. Harper & Row.
  26. J. P. van Praag (1982). The Foundations of Humanism. Prometheus Books.
  27. Ralph M. McInerny (1977/1982). St. Thomas Aquinas. University of Notre Dame Press.
  28. Simon Peret͡sovich Markish (1986). Erasmus and the Jews. University of Chicago Press.
    Erasmus of Rotterdam was the greatest Christian humanist scholar of the Northern European Renaissance, a correspondent of Sir Thomas More and many other learned men of his time, known to his contemporaries and to posterity for subtlety of his thought and the depth of his learning. He was also, according to some modern writers, an anti-Semite. In this complete analysis of all of Erasmus' writings on Jews and Judaism, Shimon Markish asserts that the accusation cannot be sustained. For Markish, to (...)
  29. Gyula Klima, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.) (2007). Medieval Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary. Blackwell Pub..
  30. Gabriël Nuchelmans (1996). Studies on the History of Logic and Semantics, 12th-17th Centuries. Variorum.
  31. Gisela Bock, Quentin Skinner & Maurizio Viroli (eds.) (1990). Machiavelli and Republicanism. Cambridge University Press.
    This highly acclaimed volume brings together some of the world's foremost historians of ideas to consider Machiavelli's political thought in the larger context of the European republican tradition, and the image of Machiavelli held by other republicans. An international team of scholars from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds (notably law, philosophy, history and the history of political thought) explore both the immediate Florentine context in which Machiavelli wrote, and the republican legacy to which he contributed.
  32. James McEvoy (2000). Robert Grosseteste. OUP Usa.
    Robert Grosseteste was the initiator of the English scientific tradition, one of the first chancellors of Oxford University, and a famous teacher and commentator on the newly discovered works of Aristotle. In this book, James McEvoy provides the first general, inclusive overview of the entire range of Grosseteste's massive intellectual achievement.
  33. Paul Oskar Kristeller, Thomas A. Brady & Heiko Augustinus Oberman (eds.) (1975). Itinerarium Italicum: The Profile of the Italian Renaissance in the Mirror of its European Transformations: Dedicated to Paul Oskar Kristeller on the Occasion of His 70th Birthday. Brill.
    Oberman, H. A. Quoscunque tulit foecunda vetustas.--Bouwsma, W. J. The two faces of humanism.--Gilmore, M. P. Italian reactions to Erasmian humanism.--Dresden, S. The profile of the reception of the Italian Renaissance in France.--IJsewijn, J. The coming of humanism to the Low Countries.--Hay, D. England and the humanities in the fifteenth century.--Spitz, L. W. The course of German humanism.
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  34. Francisco Sánchez (1988). That Nothing is Known =. Cambridge University Press.
    This is an edition of one of the crucial texts of Renaissance skepticism, Quod nihil scitur, by the Portuguese scholar Franciso Sanches. The treatise, first published in 1581, is a refutation of Aaristotelian dialectics and scientific theory in the search for a true scientific method. This volume provides a critical edition of the original text, an English translation (the first ever published), a substantial introduction, and comprehensive annotation.
  35. Mark D. Johnston (1996). The Evangelical Rhetoric of Ramon Llull: Lay Learning and Piety in the Christian West Around 1300. Oxford University Press.
    Ramon Llull (1232-1316), born on Majorca, was one of the most remarkable lay intellectuals of the thirteenth century. He devoted much of his life to promoting missions among unbelievers, the reform of Western Christian society, and personal spiritual perfection. He wrote over 200 philosophical and theological works in Catalan, Latin, and Arabic. Many of these expound on his "Great Universal Art of Finding Truth," an idiosyncratic dialectical system that he thought capable of proving Catholic beliefs to non-believers. This study offers (...)
  36. Peter Sharratt (ed.) (1976). French Renaissance Studies, 1540-70: Humanism and the Encyclopedia. Edinburgh University Press.
  37. Howard B. Radest (1990). The Devil and Secular Humanism: The Children of the Enlightenment. Praeger.
    This volume clarifies the nature of humanism by exploring historical and current thought.
  38. Liz Sonneborn (2006). Averroes (Ibn Rushd): Muslim Scholar, Philosopher, and Physician of the Twelfth Century. Rosen Central/Rosen Pub. Group.
    A reluctant philosopher -- The world of Cordoba -- A philosopher's education -- Reason and faith -- A judge and a physician -- The legacy of Averroës.
  39. Thomas (1988). The Philosophy of Thomas Aquinas: Introductory Readings. Other.
  40. Frances Amelia Yates (1964/1999). Giordano Bruno and the Hermetic Tradition. Routledge.
  41. Peter Godman (2009). Paradoxes of Conscience in the High Middle Ages: Abelard, Heloise, and the Archpoet. Cambridge University Press.
    Moral moments -- The neurotic and the penitent -- True, false, and feigned penance -- Fame without conscience -- Cain and conscience -- Feminine paradoxes -- Sincere hypocrisy -- The poetical consience -- Envoi : spiritual sophistry.
  42. John Marenbon (ed.) (1998). Medieval Philosophy. Routledge.
    Combining the latest scholarship with fresh perspectives on this complex and rapidly changing area of research, this work considers the rich traditions of medieval Arab, Jewish and Latin philosophy. Experts in the field provide comprehensive analyses of the key areas of medieval philosophy and its most influential figures, including: Avicenna, Averroes, Maimonides, Eriugena, Anselm, Abelard, Grosseteste, Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, Duns Scotus, Peter Aureoli, William of Ockham, Wyclif, Suarez, and the enormous and enduring influence of Boethius on the medieval Latin (...)
  43. Richard Kilvington (1990). The Sophismata of Richard Kilvington: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary. Cambridge University Press.
    Richard Kilvington was an obscure fourteenth-century philosopher whose Sophismata deal with a series of logic-linguistic conundrums of a sort which featured extensively in philosophical discussions of this period. This is the first ever translation or edition of his work. As well as an introduction to Kilvington's work, the editors provide a detailed commentary. This edition will prove of considerable interest to historians of medieval philosophy who will realise from the evidence presented here that Kilvington deserves to be studied just as (...)
  44. John Duns Scotus (2006). Quaestiones Super Secundum Et Tertiam de Anima. Franciscan Institute of St. Bonaventure University.
  45. M. V. Dougherty (ed.) (2008). Pico Della Mirandola: New Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume provides a comprehensive presentation of the philosophical work of the fifteenth-century Renaissance thinker Giovanni Pico della Mirandola. In essays specially commissioned for this book, a distinguished group of scholars presents the central tropics and texts of Pico’s literary output. Best known as the author of the celebrated “Oration on the Dignity of Man,” a magnificent speech originally intended to introduce a debate of 900 theses to be held in Rome before the Pope, the College of Cardinals, and an (...)
  46. Timothy F. Bellamah (2011). The Biblical Interpretation of William of Alton. OUP Usa.
    Timothy Bellamah explores the exegesis of William of Alton, a Dominican regent master at Paris during the thirteenth-century. A near contemporary of Bonaventure, Albert the Great, and Thomas Aquinas, William was an important representative of university exegesis at a time of rapidly changing methods and remarkable intellectual development.
  47. John Peckham (1993). Questions Concerning the Eternity of the World. Fordham University Press.
    This dual-language book is a translation of John Pecham’s De aeternitate mundi (On the Eternity of the World), written probably in 1270. Pecham was born in England around 1230. He pursued studies in Paris, where he may have been a student of Roger Bacon’s, and at Oxford. He returned to Paris some time between 1257 and 1259 to study theology and in 1269-1270 became magister theologiae. It was at this time that he presumably wrote the essay translated here, and presented (...)
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  48. Philipp Rosemann (1999). Understanding Scholastic Thought with Foucault. St. Martin's Press.
    In Understanding Scholastic Thought with Foucault, Philipp Rosemann provides a new introduction to Scholastic thought written from a contemporary and, notably, Foucauldian perspective. In taking inspiration from the methodology of historical research developed by Foucault, the book places the intellectual achievements of the thirteenth century, especially Thomas Aquinas, in a larger cultural and institutional framework. Rosemann’s analysis sees the Scholastic tradition as the process of the gradual reinscription of the Greek intellectual heritage into the center of Christian culture. This process (...)
  49. Gyula Klima (2009). John Buridan. Oxford University Press.
    Buridan's life, works, and influence -- Buridan's logic and the medieval logical tradition -- The primacy of mental language -- The various kinds of concepts and the idea of a mental language -- Natural language and the idea of a formal syntax in Buridan -- Existential import and the square of opposition -- Ontological commitment -- The properties of terms (proprietates terminorum) -- The semantics of propositions -- Logical validity in a token-based, semantically closed logic -- The possibility of scientific (...)
  50. Herbert A. Davidson (2005). Moses Maimonides: The Man and His Works. OUP Usa.
    Moses Maimonides , scholar, physician, and philosopher, was the most influential Jewish thinker of the Middle Ages. In this magisterial new biography, the work of many years, Herbert Davidson provides an exhaustive guide to Maimonides' life and works. After considering Maimonides' upbringing and education, Davidson expounds all of his voluminous writings in exhaustive detail, with separate chapters on rabbinic, philosophical, and medical texts. This long-awaited volume is destined to become the standard work on this towering figure of Western intellectual history.
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