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1 — 50 / 182
  1. Juan Luis Vives (1987). Selected Works of J.L. Vives. E.J. Brill.
    for everyone to handle indiscriminately, since it was something great and holy. 28. They were not wrong, were they? For you are the holy mother who by ...
  2. Richard Swinburne (1996). Is There a God? Oxford University Press.
    At least since Darwin's Origin of Species was published in 1859, it has increasingly become accepted that the existence of God is, intellectually, a lost cause, and that religious faith is an entirely non-rational matter--the province of those who willingly refuse to accept the dramatic advances of modern cosmology. Are belief in God and belief in science really mutually exclusive? Or, as noted philosopher of science and religion Richard Swinburne puts forth, can the very same criteria which scientists use to (...)
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  3. Robert C. Trundle (1999). Medieval Modal Logic & Science: Augustine on Necessary Truth & Thomas on its Impossibility Without a First Cause. University Press of America.
  4. Gabriël Nuchelmans (1996). Studies on the History of Logic and Semantics, 12th-17th Centuries. Variorum.
  5. Armand A. Maurer (1979). St. Thomas and Historicity. Marquette University Press.
  6. Sebastian De Grazia (1989). Machiavelli in Hell. Princeton University Press.
  7. James Hankins (ed.) (2007). The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy provides an introduction to a complex period of change in the subject matter and practice of philosophy. The philosophy of the fourteenth through sixteenth centuries is often seen as transitional between the scholastic philosophy of the Middle Ages and modern philosophy, but the essays collected here, by a distinguished international team of contributors, call these assumptions into question, emphasizing both the continuity with scholastic philosophy and the role of Renaissance philosophy in the emergence of (...)
  8. Augustine Brannigan (1981). The Social Basis of Scientific Discoveries. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, Augustine Brannigan provides a critical examination of the major theories which have been devised to account for discoveries and innovations in ...
  9. Ellis Heywood (1972). Il Moro; Ellis Heywood's Dialogue in Memory of Thomas More. Cambridge, Mass.,Harvard University Press.
    The original Italian text has been reproduced in the back of the volume.
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  10. Benjamin G. Kohl (1985). Renaissance Humanism, 1300-1550: A Bibliography of Materials in English. Garland Pub. Inc..
  11. Burton Z. Cooper (1974). The Idea of God: A Whiteheadian Critique of St. Thomas Aquinas' Concept of God. Nijhoff.
  12. Anthony Grafton (1999). Cardano's Cosmos: The Worlds and Works of a Renaissance Astrologer. Harvard University Press.
    This book traces Cardano's contentious career from his first astrological pamphlet through his rise to high-level consulting and his remarkable autobiographical ...
  13. Peter Abelard (1979). A Dialogue of a Philosopher with a Jew, and a Christian. Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies.
  14. Robert E. Meagher (1978). An Introduction to Augustine. New York University Press.
  15. Gyula Klima (2009). John Buridan. Oxford University Press.
    Buridan's life, works, and influence -- Buridan's logic and the medieval logical tradition -- The primacy of mental language -- The various kinds of concepts and the idea of a mental language -- Natural language and the idea of a formal syntax in Buridan -- Existential import and the square of opposition -- Ontological commitment -- The properties of terms (proprietates terminorum) -- The semantics of propositions -- Logical validity in a token-based, semantically closed logic -- The possibility of scientific (...)
  16. Thomas (2002). The Essential Aquinas: Writings on Philosophy, Religion, and Society. Greenwood Publishing Group.
  17. Andrew B. Schoedinger (ed.) (1996). Readings in Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The most comprehensive collection of its kind, this unique anthology presents fifty-four readings--many of them not widely available--by the most important and influential Christian, Jewish, and Muslim philosophers of the Middle Ages. The text is organized topically, making it easily accessible to students, and the large selection of readings provides instructors with maximum flexiblity in choosing course material. Each thematic section is comprised of six chronologically arranged readings. This organization focuses on the major philosophical issues and allows a smooth introduction (...)
  18. Mark D. Johnston (1996). The Evangelical Rhetoric of Ramon Llull: Lay Learning and Piety in the Christian West Around 1300. Oxford University Press.
    Ramon Llull (1232-1316), born on Majorca, was one of the most remarkable lay intellectuals of the thirteenth century. He devoted much of his life to promoting missions among unbelievers, the reform of Western Christian society, and personal spiritual perfection. He wrote over 200 philosophical and theological works in Catalan, Latin, and Arabic. Many of these expound on his "Great Universal Art of Finding Truth," an idiosyncratic dialectical system that he thought capable of proving Catholic beliefs to non-believers. This study offers (...)
  19. Paul Oskar Kristeller (1979). Renaissance Thought and its Sources. Columbia University Press.
    The U.S. occupation of Japan transformed a brutal war charged with overt racism into an amicable peace in which the issue of race seemed to have disappeared.
  20. Charles P. Nemeth (2001). Aquinas in the Courtroom: Lawyers, Judges, and Judicial Conduct. Greenwood Press.
  21. John Marenbon (1988). Early Medieval Philosophy (480-1150): An Introduction. Routledge.
  22. D. E. Luscombe (1997). Medieval Thought. Oxford University Press.
    The Middle Ages span a period of well over a millennium: from the emperor Constantine's Christian conversion in 312 to the early sixteenth century. David Luscombe's clear and accessible history of medieval thought steers a clear path through this long period, beginning with the three greatest influences on medieval philosophy: Augustine, Boethius, and Pseudo-Denis, and focusing on Abelard, Anselm, Aquinas, Ockham, Duns Scotus, and Eckhart among others in the twelfth to fifteenth centuries.
  23. Nicholas Rescher (2005). Scholastic Meditations. Catholic University of America Press.
    Choice without preference : the problem of "Buridan's ass" -- Nicholas of Cusa on the Koran : a fifteenth-century encounter with Islam -- On learned ignorance and the limits of knowledge -- Unanswerable questions and insolubilia -- Omniscience and our understanding of God's knowledge -- Issues of infinite regress -- Being qua being -- Nonexistents then and now -- Thomism : past, present, and future -- Respect for tradition and the Catholic philosopher today.
  24. Simon Peret͡sovich Markish (1986). Erasmus and the Jews. University of Chicago Press.
    Erasmus of Rotterdam was the greatest Christian humanist scholar of the Northern European Renaissance, a correspondent of Sir Thomas More and many other learned men of his time, known to his contemporaries and to posterity for subtlety of his thought and the depth of his learning. He was also, according to some modern writers, an anti-Semite. In this complete analysis of all of Erasmus' writings on Jews and Judaism, Shimon Markish asserts that the accusation cannot be sustained. For Markish, to (...)
  25. Paul Oskar Kristeller (1964). Eight Philosophers of the Italian Renaissance. Stanford, Calif.,Stanford University Press.
    Petrarch In exactly a hundred years had passed since Jacob Burckhardt published his famous essay The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy, ...
  26. C. Fred Alford (2010). Narrative, Nature, and the Natural Law: From Aquinas to International Human Rights. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Introduction -- Saint Thomas : putting nature into natural law -- Maritain and the love for the natural law -- The new natural law and evolutionary natural law -- International human rights, natural law, and Locke -- Conclusion : evil and the limits of the natural law.
  27. Frederick Charles Copleston (1952/2001). Medieval Philosophy: An Introduction. Dover Publications.
    Classic introduction provides readers with insightful, accessible survey of major philosophical trends and thinkers of the Middle Ages--from the thought of Thomas Aquinas and the Averroists to Duns Scotus and William of Ockham. "A better conspectus of medieval philosophy than this would be difficult to conceive ... a notable achievement." The Tablet (London).
  28. Eugene Rathbone Fairweather (1956). A Scholastic Miscellany: Anselm to Ockham. Philadelphia, Westminster Press.
    This is collection of Christian treatises written prior to the end of the sixteenth century.
  29. Julius R. Weinberg (1948/1969). Nicolaus of Autrecourt. New York, Greenwood Press.
  30. Anthony Goodman & Angus MacKay (eds.) (1990). The Impact of Humanism on Western Europe. Longman.
  31. Thomas (1953/1989). An Introduction to the Metaphysics of St. Thomas Aquinas: Texts. Distributed to the Trade by National Book Network.
  32. M. V. Dougherty (ed.) (2008). Pico Della Mirandola: New Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume provides a comprehensive presentation of the philosophical work of the fifteenth-century Renaissance thinker Giovanni Pico della Mirandola. In essays specially commissioned for this book, a distinguished group of scholars presents the central tropics and texts of Pico’s literary output. Best known as the author of the celebrated “Oration on the Dignity of Man,” a magnificent speech originally intended to introduce a debate of 900 theses to be held in Rome before the Pope, the College of Cardinals, and an (...)
  33. Jacqueline Broad & Karen Green (2009). A History of Women's Political Thought in Europe, 1400-1700. Cambridge University Press.
  34. Mary M. Keys (2006). Aquinas, Aristotle, and the Promise of the Common Good. Cambridge University Press.
    Aquinas, Aristotle, and the Promise of the Common Good claims that contemporary theory and practice have much to gain from engaging Aquinas's normative concept of the common good and his way of reconciling religion, philosophy, and politics. Examining the relationship between personal and common goods, and the relation of virtue and law to both, Mary M. Keys shows why Aquinas should be read in addition to Aristotle on these perennial questions. She focuses on Aquinas's Commentaries as mediating statements between Aristotle's (...)
  35. Thomas (1988). The Philosophy of Thomas Aquinas: Introductory Readings. Other.
  36. Brian Davies (ed.) (2002). Thomas Aquinas: Contemporary Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
    The work of Thomas Aquinas has always enjoyed a privileged position as a pillar of Catholic theology, but for centuries his standing among western philosophers was less sure. Today, Aquinas's work is recognized as a cornerstone of the western philosophical tradition. This book offers a full-scale introduction to Aquinas's philosophy. Brian Davies has collected in one volume the best recent essays on Aquinas by some of the world's foremost scholars of medieval philosophy. Taken together, they illuminate the entire spectrum of (...)
  37. G. R. Evans (1993). Philosophy and Theology in the Middle Ages. Routledge.
    In the thousand years from the end of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance and Reformation of the Sixteenth century the discussion of the great questions of philosophy and religion was intense. Does God exist? What is he like? What is the purpose of human life and how does God show concern for the future of mankind? This is an introduction to the debates which did more than anything else to transform the ancient into the modern world of thought.
  38. Peter Sharratt (ed.) (1976). French Renaissance Studies, 1540-70: Humanism and the Encyclopedia. Edinburgh University Press.
  39. Thomas (1951/1982). Philosophical Texts. Labyrinth Press.
  40. Aryeh Botwinick (1997). Skepticism, Belief, and the Modern: Maimonides to Nietzsche. Cornell University Press.
  41. Niccolò Machiavelli (1640/1969). The Prince. Menston, Eng.,Scolar Press.
    The first modern treatise of political philosophy, The Prince remains one of the world’s most influential and widely read books. Machiavelli, whose name has become synonymous with expedient exercises of will, reveals nothing less than the secrets of power: how to gain it, how to wield it, and how to keep it. But curiously, this work of outspoken clarity has, for centuries, inspired myriad interpretations as to its author’s true message. The Introduction by noted Italian Renaissance scholar Albert Russell Ascoli (...)
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  42. Philo (2004). Selected Writings. Dover Publications.
    A contemporary of Jesus Christ, Philo of Alexandria ranks among the greatest of Jewish and Greek thinkers.
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  43. James McEvoy (2000). Robert Grosseteste. OUP USA.
    In this book, James McEvoy provides a brief, accessible introduction to the thought of Robert Grosseteste (c.1168-1253). Grosseteste was the initiator of the English scientific tradition, one of the first chancellors of Oxford University, and a famous teacher and commentator on the newly discovered works of Aristotle. Despite his importance, very little of his work is available in English. McEvoy translates into English brief passages from Grosseteste's own writings which are of central importance to his thought and builds around them (...)
  44. Arthur Stephen McGrade (1974). The Political Thought of William of Ockham. New York]Cambridge University Press.
    The English Franciscan, William of Ockham (c. 1285-1349), was one of the most important thinkers of the later middle ages. Summoned to Avignon in 1324 to answer charges of heresy, Ockham became convinced that Pope John XXII was himself a heretic in denying the complete poverty of Christ and the apostles and a tyrant in claiming supremacy over the Roman empire. Ockham's political writings were a result of these personal convictions, but also include systematic discourses on the basis and functions (...)
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  45. Thomas Buckingham (1987). Thomas Buckingham and the Contingency of Futures: The Possibility of Human Freedom: A Study and Edition of Thomas Buckingham, "De Contingentia Futurorum Et Arbitrii Libertate": Question 1 of Ostensio Meriti Liberae Actionis. University of Notre Dame Press.
  46. Peter Samuel Donaldson (1988). Machiavelli and Mystery of State. Cambridge University Press.
    This book studies the intersection of sacred and secular conceptions of kingship in the Renaissance. The book documents in detail six instances of the attempt to connect Machiavelli's thought to an ancient and secret tradition of political counsel, the arcana imperii, or mysteries of state. The ways in which Renaissance writers attempted such a connection varied widely. In addition to carefully analyzing these arguments, the book documents patterns in their dissemination. Through his connection with mysteries of state, Machiavelli influenced not (...)
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  47. Lenn Evan Goodman (2006). Avicenna. Cornell University.
    the philosophers in the West, none, perhaps, is better known by name and less familiar in actual content of his ideas than the medieval Muslim philosopher, physician, minister and naturalist Abu Ali Ibn Sina, known since the days of the scholastics as Avicenna. In this book the author, himself a philosopher, and long known for his studies of Arabic thought, presents a factual account of Avicenna's philosophy. Setting the thinker in the context of his often turbulent times and tracing the (...)
  48. H. F. Stewart (1891/1974). Boethius: An Essay. B. Franklin.
    BOETHIUS. CHAPTER I. A GLANCE AT THE CONTROVERSY ON BOETHIUS. Authorities. — The volumes of Nitzsch and Hildebrand mentioned in this chapter have been of ...
  49. Aidan Nichols (2002/2003). Discovering Aquinas: An Introduction to His Life, Work, and Influence. William B. Eerdmans Pub. Co..
  50. Herbert A. Davidson (2005). Moses Maimonides: The Man and His Works. OUP USA.
    Moses Maimonides, rabbinist, philosopher, and physician, had a greater impact on Jewish history than any other medieval figure. Born in Cordova, Spain, in 1137 or 1138, he spent a few years in Morocco, visited Palestine, and settled in Egypt by 1167. He died there in 1204. Maimonides was a man of superlatives. He wrote the first commentary to cover the entire Mishna corpus; composed what quickly became the dominant work on the 613 commandments believed to have been given by God (...)
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