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1 — 50 / 199
  1. Donald E. Washburn & Dennis R. Smith (eds.) (1974). Coping with Increasing Complexity: Implications of General Semantics and General Systems Theory. Gordon and Breach.
  2. Daniel M. Greenberger (ed.) (1986). New Techniques and Ideas in Quantum Measurement Theory. New York Academy of Sciences.
  3. J. D. Bernal (1972). The Extension of Man: A History of Physics Before 1900. London,Weidenfeld and Nicolson.
  4. Leon Brillouin (1970). Relativity Reexamined. New York,Academic Press.
  5. G. Toraldo di Francia (1981). The Investigation of the Physical World. Cambridge University Press.
  6. David Hodgson (1991). The Mind Matters: Consciousness and Choice in a Quantum World. Oxford Unversity Press.
    In this book, Hodgson presents a clear and compelling case against today's orthodox mechanistic view of the brain-mind, and in favor of the view that "the mind matters." In the course of the argument he ranges over such topics as consciousness, informal reasoning, computers, evolution, and quantum indeterminancy and non-locality. Although written from a philosophical viewpoint, the book has important implications for the sciences concerned with the brain-mind problem. At the same time, it is largely non-technical, and thus accessible to (...)
  7. Moshe Carmeli, Stuart I. Fickler & Louis Witten (eds.) (1970). Relativity. New York,Plenum Press.
  8. J. L. Synge (1971). Talking About Relativity. Amsterdam,North-Holland Pub. Co..
  9. James H. Fetzer (ed.) (2000). Science, Explanation, and Rationality: Aspects of the Philosophy of Carl G. Hempel. Oxford University Press.
    Carl G. Hempel exerted greater influence upon philosophers of science than any other figure during the 20th century. In this far-reaching collection, distinguished philosophers contribute valuable studies that illuminate and clarify the central problems to which Hempel was devoted. The essays enhance our understanding of the development of logical empiricism as the major intellectual influence for scientifically-oriented philosophers and philosophically-minded scientists of the 20th century.
  10. Steven M. Rosen (1994). Science, Paradox, and the Moebius Principle: The Evolution of a "Transcultural" Approach to Wholeness. State University of New York Press; Series in Science, Technology, and Society.
    This book confronts basic anomalies in the foundations of contemporary science and philosophy. It deals with paradoxes that call into question our conventional way of thinking about space, time, and the nature of human experience.
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  11. Harvie Ferguson (1990). The Science of Pleasure: Cosmos and Psyche in the Bourgeois World View. Routledge.
    Examines the formation, structure and collapse of the bourgeois world view, exploring the concepts of fun, happiness, pleasure, and excitement.
  12. D. R. Brooks (1988). Evolution as Entropy: Toward a Unified Theory of Biology. University of Chicago Press.
    "By combining recent advances in the physical sciences with some of the novel ideas, techniques, and data of modern biology, this book attempts to achieve a new and different kind of evolutionary synthesis. I found it to be challenging, fascinating, infuriating, and provocative, but certainly not dull."--James H, Brown, University of New Mexico "This book is unquestionably mandatory reading not only for every living biologist but for generations of biologists to come."--Jack P. Hailman, Animal Behaviour , review of the first (...)
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  13. L. Rosenfeld (1979). Selected Papers of Léon Rosenfeld. D. Reidel Pub. Co..
  14. Sunny Y. Auyang (1995). How is Quantum Field Theory Possible? Oxford University Press.
    Quantum field theory (QFT) combines quantum mechanics with Einstein's special theory of relativity and underlies elementary particle physics. This book presents a philosophical analysis of QFT. It is the first treatise in which the philosophies of space-time, quantum phenomena, and particle interactions are encompassed in a unified framework. Describing the physics in nontechnical terms, and schematically illustrating complex ideas, the book also serves as an introduction to fundamental physical theories. The philosophical interpretation both upholds the reality of the quantum world (...)
  15. Sadri Hassani (2010). From Atoms to Galaxies: A Conceptual Physics Approach to Scientific Awareness. Taylor & Francis.
    Written by Sadri Hassani, the author of several mathematical physics textbooks, this work covers the essentials of modern physics, in a way that is as thorough ...
  16. Stephen Gaukroger (1978). Explanatory Structures: A Study of Concepts of Explanation in Early Physics and Philosophy. Humanities Press.
  17. Raymond Flood & Michael Lockwood (eds.) (1986). The Nature of Time. B. Blackwell.
  18. Roger B. Angel (1980). Relativity, the Theory and its Philosophy. Pergamon Press.
  19. Anton Z. Capri (2007). From Quanta to Quarks: More Anecdotal History of Physics. World Scientific.
    Chapter Prologue “The scientific theory I like the best is that the rings of Saturn are composed entirely of lost airline baggage.” Max Born Ever since, ...
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  20. W. Gans, Alexander Blumen & A. Amann (eds.) (1991). Large-Scale Molecular Systems: Quantum and Stochastic Aspects--Beyond the Simple Molecular Picture. Plenum Press.
  21. François Penz, Gregory Radick & Robert Howell (eds.) (2004). Space: In Science, Art, and Society. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of essays explores different perceptions of space, taking the reader on a journey from the inner space of the mind to the vacuum beyond Earth. Eight leading researchers span a broad range of fields, from the arts and humanities to the natural sciences. They consider topics ranging from human consciousness to virtual reality, architecture and politics. The essays are written in an accessible style for a general audience.
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  22. Victor J. Stenger (1995). The Unconscious Quantum: Metaphysics in Modern Physics and Cosmology. Prometheus Books.
    In this fascinating and accessible book, physicist Victor J. Stenger guides the lay reader through the key developments of quantum mechanics and the debate over its apparent paradoxes. In the process, he critically appraises recent metaphysical fads. Dr. Stenger's knack for elucidating scientific ideas and controversies in language that the nonspecialist can comprehend opens up to the widest possible audience a wealth of information on the most important findings of contemporary physics.
  23. Hermann Bondi, Wolfgang Yourgrau & Allen duPont Breck (eds.) (1970). Physics, Logic, and History. New York,Plenum Press.
  24. J. T. Fraser (ed.) (1981). The Voices of Time: A Cooperative Survey of Man's Views of Time as Expressed by the Sciences and by the Humanities. University of Massachusetts Press.
  25. K. C. Cole (2001). The Hole in the Universe: How Scientists Peered Over the Edge of Emptiness and Found Everything. Harcourt.
    Welcome to the world of cutting-edge math, physics, and neuroscience, where the search for the ultimate vacuum, the point of nothingness, ground zero of theory, has rendered the universe deep, rich, and juicy. "Modern physics has animated the void," says K. C. Cole in her entrancing journey into the heart of Nothing. Every time scientists and mathematicians think they have reached the ultimate void, new stuff appears: a black hole, an undulating string, an additional dimension of space or time, repulsive (...)
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  26. David Bohm (1985). Unfolding Meaning: A Weekend of Dialogue with David Bohm. Foundation House.
    David Bohm argues that our fragmented, mechanistic notion of order permeates not only modern science and technology today, but also has profound implications ...
  27. David Wick (1995). The Infamous Boundary: Seven Decades of Controversy in Quantum Physics. Birkhauser.
    The author of this book has traced the major lines of argument over those years in a most engaging style with clear descriptions of the concepts and ideas.
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  28. George N. Schlesinger (1994). Timely Topics. St. Martin's Press.
  29. Edward MacKinnon (2011). Interpreting Physics: Language and the Classical/Quantim Divide. Springer.
    This book is the first to offer a systematic account of the role of language in the development and interpretation of physics. An historical-conceptual analysis of the co-evolution of physics and mathematics leads to the classical/quantum interface. Bohr's interpretation is analyzed and extended to the interpretation of the standard model of particle physics.
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  30. Yuri Balashov (2010). Persistence and Spacetime. Oxford University Press.
    Background and assumptions. Persistence and philosophy of time ; Atomism and composition ; Scope ; Some matters of methodology -- Persistence, location, and multilocation in spacetime. Endurance, perdurance, exdurance : some pictures ; More pictures ; Temporal modification and the "problem of temporary intrinsics" ; Persistence, location and multilocation in generic spacetime ; An alternative classification -- Classical and relativistic spacetime. Newtonian spacetime ; Neo-Newtonian (Galilean) spacetime ; Reference frames and coordinate systems ; Galilean transformations in spacetime ; Special relativistic (...)
  31. Roberto Torretti (1990). Creative Understanding: Philosophical Reflections on Physics. University of Chicago Press.
    "A pleasure to read. Gracefully written by a scholar well grounded in the relevant philosophical, historical, and technical background. . . . a helpfully clarifying review and analysis of some issues of importance to recent philosophy of science and a source of some illuminating insights."--Burke Townsend, Philosophy of Science.
  32. Steven Shapin (1995). A Social History of Truth: Civility and Science in Seventeenth-Century England. University of Chicago Press.
    In A Social History of Truth, Shapin engages these universal questions through an elegant recreation of a crucial period in the history of early modern science: ...
  33. Michael Redhead (1995). From Physics to Metaphysics. Cambridge University Press.
    The book is drawn from the Tarner lectures, delivered in Cambridge in 1993. It is concerned with the ultimate nature of reality, and how this is revealed by modern physical theories such as relativity and quantum theory. The objectivity and rationality of science are defended against the views of relativists and social constructionists. It is claimed that modern physics gives us a tentative and fallible, but nevertheless rational, approach to the nature of physical reality. The role of subjectivity in science (...)
  34. Basil Hiley & F. David Peat (eds.) (1991). Quantum Implications: Essays in Honour of David Bohm. Routledge.
    David Bohm is one of the foremost scientific thinkers of today and one of the most distinguished scientists of his generation. His challenge to the conventional understanding of quantum theory has led scientists to reexamine what it is they are going and his ideas have been an inspiration across a wide range of disciplines. Quantum Implications is a collection of original contributions by many of the world' s leading scholars and is dedicated to David Bohm, his work and the issues (...)
  35. Shimon Malin (2001). Nature Loves to Hide: Quantum Physics and Reality, a Western Perspective. Oxford University Press.
    The strangeness of modern physics has sparked several popular books--such as The Tao of Physics--that explore its affinity with Eastern mysticism. But the founders of quantum mechanics were educated in the classical traditions of Western civilization and Western philosophy. In Nature Loves to Hide, physicist Shimon Malin takes readers on a fascinating tour of quantum theory--one that turns to Western philosophical thought to clarify this strange yet inescapable explanation of reality. Malin translates quantum mechanics into plain English, explaining its origins (...)
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  36. Elena Castellani (ed.) (1998). Interpreting Bodies. Princeton University Press.
    Bewildering features of modern physics, such as relativistic space-time structure and the peculiarities of so-called quantum statistics, challenge traditional ways of conceiving of objects in space and time. Interpreting Bodies brings together essays by leading philosophers and scientists to provide a unique overview of the implications of such physical theories for questions about the nature of objects. The collection combines classic articles by Max Born, Werner Heisenberg, Hans Reichenbach, and Erwin Schrodinger with recent contributions, including several papers that have never (...)
  37. Pieter E. Vermaas (1999). A Philosopher's Understanding of Quantum Mechanics: Possibilities and Impossibilities of a Modal Interpretation. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is about how to understand quantum mechanics by means of a modal interpretation. Modal interpretations provide a general framework within which quantum mechanics can be considered as a theory that describes reality in terms of physical systems possessing definite properties. Quantum mechanics is standardly understood to be a theory about probabilities with which measurements have outcomes. Modal interpretations are relatively new attempts to present quantum mechanics as a theory which, like other physical theories, describes an observer-independent reality. In (...)
  38. Arthur Fine (1996). The Shaky Game: Einstein, Realism, and the Quantum Theory. University of Chicago Press.
    In this new edition, Arthur Fine looks at Einstein's philosophy of science and develops his own views on realism. A new Afterword discusses the reaction to Fine's own theory. "What really led Einstein . . . to renounce the new quantum order? For those interested in this question, this book is compulsory reading."--Harvey R. Brown, American Journal of Physics "Fine has successfully combined a historical account of Einstein's philosophical views on quantum mechanics and a discussion of some of the philosophical (...)
  39. Euan J. Squires (1990). Conscious Mind in the Physical World. Adam Hilger.
    The book explores philosophical issues such as idealism and free will and speculates on the relationship of consciousness to quantum mechanics.
  40. Alisa Bokulich (2008). Reexamining the Quantum-Classical Relation: Beyond Reductionism and Pluralism. Cambridge University Press.
    Classical mechanics and quantum mechanics are two of the most successful scientific theories ever discovered, and yet how they can describe the same world is far from clear: one theory is deterministic, the other indeterministic; one theory describes a world in which chaos is pervasive, the other a world in which chaos is absent. Focusing on the exciting field of 'quantum chaos', this book reveals that there is a subtle and complex relation between classical and quantum mechanics. It challenges the (...)
  41. John Earman (1995). Bangs, Crunches, Whimpers, and Shrieks: Singularities and Acausalities in Relativistic Spacetimes. Oxford University Press.
    Indeed, this is the first serious book-length study of the subject by a philosopher of science.
  42. Bas C. Van Fraassen (1991). Quantum Mechanics: An Empiricist View. Oxford University Press.
    After introducing the empiricist point of view in philosophy of science, and the concepts and methods of the semantic approach to scientific theories, van Fraassen discusses quantum theory in three stages. He first examines the question of whether and how empirical phenomena require a non-classical theory, and what sort of theory they require. He then discusses the mathematical foundations of quantum theory with special reference to developments in the modelling of interaction, composite systems, and measurement. Finally, the author broaches the (...)
  43. Richard Olson (1975). Scottish Philosophy and British Physics, 1750-1880: A Study in the Foundations of the Victorian Scientific Style. Princeton University Press.
  44. J. R. Lucas (1990). Spacetime and Electromagnetism: An Essay on the Philosophy of the Special Theory of Relativity. Oxford University Press.
    That space and time should be integrated into a single entity, spacetime, is the great insight of Einstein's special theory of relativity, and leads us to regard spacetime as a fundamental context in which to make sense of the world around us. But it is not the only one. Causality is equally important and at least as far as the special theory goes, it cannot be subsumed under a fundamentally geometrical form of explanation. In fact, the agent of propagation of (...)
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  45. Huw Price (1996). Time's Arrow & Archimedes' Point: New Directions for the Physics of Time. Oxford University Press.
    Why is the future so different from the past? Why does the past affect the future and not the other way around? What does quantum mechanics really tell us about the world? In this important and accessible book, Huw Price throws fascinating new light on some of the great mysteries of modern physics, and connects them in a wholly original way. Price begins with the mystery of the arrow of time. Why, for example, does disorder always increase, as required by (...)
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  46. David Bohm (1993). The Undivided Universe: An Ontological Interpretation of Quantum Theory. Routledge.
    In the The Undivided Universe, David Bohn and Basil Hiley present a radically different approach to quantum theory.
  47. Pierre Maurice Marie Duhem (1954). The Aim and Structure of Physical Theory. Princeton, Princeton University Press.
    This classic work in the philosophy of physical science is an incisive and readable account of the scientific method. Pierre Duhem was one of the great figures in French science, a devoted teacher, and a distinguished scholar of the history and philosophy of science. This book represents his most mature thought on a wide range of topics.
  48. Emilio Segrè (1984). From Falling Bodies to Radio Waves: Classical Physicists and Their Discoveries. Dover Publications.
    Hailed by the Journal of the History of Astronomy as "charming and witty," this chronicle by a renowned physicist traces the development of scientific thought from the works of the "founding fathers" — Galileo, Huygens, and Newton — to the more recent discoveries of Maxwell, Boltzmann, and Gibbs. 1984 edition.
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  49. Peter Coles (2006). From Cosmos to Chaos: The Science of Unpredictability. Oxford University Press.
    Cosmology has undergone a revolution in recent years. The exciting interplay between astronomy and fundamental physics has led to dramatic revelations, including the existence of the dark matter and the dark energy that appear to dominate our cosmos. But these discoveries only reveal themselves through small effects in noisy experimental data. Dealing with such observations requires the careful application of probability and statistics. But it is not only in the arcane world of fundamental physics that probability theory plays such an (...)
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  50. M. Dardo (2004). Nobel Laureates and Twentieth-Century Physics. Cambridge University Press.
    Using an original approach, Mauro Dardo recounts the major achievements of twentieth-century physics--including relativity, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, the invention of the transistor and the laser, superconductivity, binary pulsars, and the Bose-Einstein condensate--as each emerged. His year-by-year chronicle, biographies and revealing personal anecdotes help bring to life the main events since the first Nobel Prize was awarded in 1901. The work of the most famous physicists of the twentieth century--including the Curies, Bohr, Heisenberg, Einstein, Fermi, Feynman, Gell-Mann, Rutherford, (...)
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