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  1. P. M. Harman (1982). Metaphysics and Natural Philosophy: The Problem of Substance in Classical Physics. Barnes & Noble Books.
  2. Mario Augusto Bunge (1973). Philosophy of Physics. Boston,Reidel.
    PHILOSOPHY: BEACON OR TRAP* There was a time when everyone expected almost everything from philosophy. It was the time when philosophers drew confidently ...
  3. Jennifer Trusted (1991). Physics and Metaphysics: Theories of Space and Time. Routledge.
    The emergence of modern science is a history of disentanglement, as science detached itself first from religion and then from philosophy. Jennifer Trusted in Physics and Metaphysics argues that science -- in its haste to tear itself from its historical links -- has neglected the various roles religious and philosophical ideas have actually played and continue to play in scientific thinking. This book seeks to redress the balance by exploring how metaphysical beliefs have functioned in the history of scientific inquiry (...)
  4. Daniel M. Greenberger (ed.) (1986). New Techniques and Ideas in Quantum Measurement Theory. New York Academy of Sciences.
  5. G. Toraldo di Francia (1981). The Investigation of the Physical World. Cambridge University Press.
  6. W. Gans, Alexander Blumen & A. Amann (eds.) (1991). Large-Scale Molecular Systems: Quantum and Stochastic Aspects--Beyond the Simple Molecular Picture. Plenum Press.
  7. Edward G. Ruestow (1973). Physics at Seventeenth and Eighteenth-Century Leiden: Philosophy and the New Science in the University. The Hague,Nijhoff.
    CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION: A NEW UNIVERSITY AND THE CHALLENGE OF THE NEW SCIENCE Despite the recent and continuing controversy concerning the proper role of ...
  8. David Bohm (1985). Unfolding Meaning: A Weekend of Dialogue with David Bohm. Foundation House.
    David Bohm argues that our fragmented, mechanistic notion of order permeates not only modern science and technology today, but also has profound implications ...
  9. John Earman (1995). Bangs, Crunches, Whimpers, and Shrieks: Singularities and Acausalities in Relativistic Spacetimes. Oxford University Press.
    Indeed, this is the first serious book-length study of the subject by a philosopher of science.
  10. François Penz, Gregory Radick & Robert Howell (eds.) (2004). Space: In Science, Art, and Society. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of essays explores different perceptions of space, taking the reader on a journey from the inner space of the mind to the vacuum beyond Earth. Eight leading researchers span a broad range of fields, from the arts and humanities to the natural sciences. They consider topics ranging from human consciousness to virtual reality, architecture and politics. The essays are written in an accessible style for a general audience.
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  11. David Blythe Foster (1975). The Intelligent Universe. Abelard-Schuman.
  12. David Hodgson (1991). The Mind Matters: Consciousness and Choice in a Quantum World. Oxford Unversity Press.
    In this book, Hodgson presents a clear and compelling case against today's orthodox mechanistic view of the brain-mind, and in favor of the view that "the mind matters." In the course of the argument he ranges over such topics as consciousness, informal reasoning, computers, evolution, and quantum indeterminancy and non-locality. Although written from a philosophical viewpoint, the book has important implications for the sciences concerned with the brain-mind problem. At the same time, it is largely non-technical, and thus accessible to (...)
  13. J. T. Fraser (ed.) (1981). The Voices of Time: A Cooperative Survey of Man's Views of Time as Expressed by the Sciences and by the Humanities. University of Massachusetts Press.
  14. Euan J. Squires (1990). Conscious Mind in the Physical World. Adam Hilger.
    The book explores philosophical issues such as idealism and free will and speculates on the relationship of consciousness to quantum mechanics.
  15. Robert Bruce Lindsay (9999/1957). Foundations of Physics. New York, Dover Publications.
  16. Harvie Ferguson (1990). The Science of Pleasure: Cosmos and Psyche in the Bourgeois World View. Routledge.
    Examines the formation, structure and collapse of the bourgeois world view, exploring the concepts of fun, happiness, pleasure, and excitement.
  17. C. A. Hooker (ed.) (1973). Contemporary Research in the Foundations and Philosophy of Quantum Theory. Boston,D. Reidel.
  18. Basil Hiley & F. David Peat (eds.) (1991). Quantum Implications: Essays in Honour of David Bohm. Routledge.
    David Bohm is one of the foremost scientific thinkers of today and one of the most distinguished scientists of his generation. His challenge to the conventional understanding of quantum theory has led scientists to reexamine what it is they are going and his ideas have been an inspiration across a wide range of disciplines. Quantum Implications is a collection of original contributions by many of the world' s leading scholars and is dedicated to David Bohm, his work and the issues (...)
  19. David Wick (1995). The Infamous Boundary: Seven Decades of Controversy in Quantum Physics. Birkhauser.
    The author of this book has traced the major lines of argument over those years in a most engaging style with clear descriptions of the concepts and ideas.
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  20. Stephen Gaukroger (1978). Explanatory Structures: A Study of Concepts of Explanation in Early Physics and Philosophy. Humanities Press.
  21. Robert E. Schofield (1969/1970). Mechanism and Materialism. Princeton, N.J.,Princeton University Press.
  22. David Bohm (1993). The Undivided Universe: An Ontological Interpretation of Quantum Theory. Routledge.
    In the The Undivided Universe, David Bohn and Basil Hiley present a radically different approach to quantum theory.
  23. Sunny Y. Auyang (1995). How is Quantum Field Theory Possible? Oxford University Press.
    Quantum field theory (QFT) combines quantum mechanics with Einstein's special theory of relativity and underlies elementary particle physics. This book presents a philosophical analysis of QFT. It is the first treatise in which the philosophies of space-time, quantum phenomena, and particle interactions are encompassed in a unified framework. Describing the physics in nontechnical terms, and schematically illustrating complex ideas, the book also serves as an introduction to fundamental physical theories. The philosophical interpretation both upholds the reality of the quantum world (...)
  24. D. Farnsworth (ed.) (1972). Methods of Local and Global Differential Geometry in General Relativity. New York,Springer-Verlag.
  25. F. Rohrlich (1987). From Paradox to Reality: Our New Concepts of the Physical World. Cambridge University Press.
    Using a clear, non-technical style, Professor Rohrlich discusses the two major theories of twentieth-century physics: relativity and quantum mechanics. Discussed conceptually and philosophically, rather than using mathematics, the philosophical issues raised show how new discoveries forced physicists to accept often strange and unconventional notions. He aims to remove the mystery and misrepresentation that often surround the ideas of modern physics and to show how modern scientists construct theories, so that the reader can appreciate their successes and failures and understand problems (...)
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  26. Elena Castellani (ed.) (1998). Interpreting Bodies. Princeton University Press.
    Bewildering features of modern physics, such as relativistic space-time structure and the peculiarities of so-called quantum statistics, challenge traditional ways of conceiving of objects in space and time. Interpreting Bodies brings together essays by leading philosophers and scientists to provide a unique overview of the implications of such physical theories for questions about the nature of objects. The collection combines classic articles by Max Born, Werner Heisenberg, Hans Reichenbach, and Erwin Schrodinger with recent contributions, including several papers that have never (...)
  27. Michael Redhead (1995). From Physics to Metaphysics. Cambridge University Press.
    The book is drawn from the Tarner lectures, delivered in Cambridge in 1993. It is concerned with the ultimate nature of reality, and how this is revealed by modern physical theories such as relativity and quantum theory. The objectivity and rationality of science are defended against the views of relativists and social constructionists. It is claimed that modern physics gives us a tentative and fallible, but nevertheless rational, approach to the nature of physical reality. The role of subjectivity in science (...)
  28. Lawrence Sklar (1992). Philosophy of Physics. Westview Press.
    The study of the physical world had its origins in philosophy, and, two-and-one-half millennia later, the scientific advances of the twentieth century are bringing the two fields closer together again. So argues Lawrence Sklar in this brilliant new text on the philosophy of physics.Aimed at students of both disciplines, Philosophy of Physics is a broad overview of the problems of contemporary philosophy of physics that readers of all levels of sophistication should find accessible and engaging. Professor Sklar’s talent for clarity (...)
  29. Michael Frayn (2006/2007). The Human Touch: Our Part in the Creation of a Universe. Metropolitan Books.
    What do we really know? What are we in relation to the world around us? Here, the acclaimed playwright and novelist takes on the great questions of his career—and of our lives Humankind, scientists agree, is an insignificant speck in the impersonal vastness of the universe. But what would that universe be like if we were not here to say something about it? Would there be numbers if there were no one to count them? Would the universe even be vast, (...)
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  30. James H. Fetzer (ed.) (2000). Science, Explanation, and Rationality: Aspects of the Philosophy of Carl G. Hempel. Oxford University Press.
    Carl G. Hempel exerted greater influence upon philosophers of science than any other figure during the 20th century. In this far-reaching collection, distinguished philosophers contribute valuable studies that illuminate and clarify the central problems to which Hempel was devoted. The essays enhance our understanding of the development of logical empiricism as the major intellectual influence for scientifically-oriented philosophers and philosophically-minded scientists of the 20th century.
  31. Pieter E. Vermaas (1999). A Philosopher's Understanding of Quantum Mechanics: Possibilities and Impossibilities of a Modal Interpretation. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is about how to understand quantum mechanics by means of a modal interpretation. Modal interpretations provide a general framework within which quantum mechanics can be considered as a theory that describes reality in terms of physical systems possessing definite properties. Quantum mechanics is standardly understood to be a theory about probabilities with which measurements have outcomes. Modal interpretations are relatively new attempts to present quantum mechanics as a theory which, like other physical theories, describes an observer-independent reality. In (...)
  32. Stephen G. Brush (1983). The History of Modern Physics: An International Bibliography. Garland.
  33. Peter Kosso (1998). Appearance and Reality: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Physics. Oxford University Press.
    Appearance and Reality: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Physics addresses quantum mechanics and relativity and their philosophical implications, focusing on whether these theories of modern physics can help us know nature as it really is, or only as it appears to us. The author clearly explains the foundational concepts and principles of both quantum mechanics and relativity and then uses them to argue that we can know more than mere appearances, and that we can know to some extent the (...)
  34. Ken Wilber (2000). Sex, Ecology, Spirituality: The Spirit of Evolution. Shambhala.
    In a tour de force of scholarship and vision, Ken Wilber traces the course of evolution from matter to life to mind. In each case evolution has a "direction," a tendency to produce more highly organized patterns. The "spirit of evolution" lies in its directionality: order out of chaos. After arriving at the emergence of mind, Wilber traces the evolution of human consciousness through its major stages of development, pointing out that at each stage there is the "dialectic of progress"--every (...)
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  35. Roger Penrose & C. J. Isham (eds.) (1986). Quantum Concepts in Space and Time. New York ;Oxford University Press.
    Recent developments in quantum theory have focused attention on fundamental questions, in particular on whether it might be necessary to modify quantum mechanics to reconcile quantum gravity and general relativity. This book is based on a conference held in Oxford in the spring of 1984 to discuss quantum gravity. It brings together contributors who examine different aspects of the problem, including the experimental support for quantum mechanics, its strange and apparently paradoxical features, its underlying philosophy, and possible modifications to the (...)
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  36. Yuri Balashov (2010). Persistence and Spacetime. Oxford University Press.
    Background and assumptions. Persistence and philosophy of time ; Atomism and composition ; Scope ; Some matters of methodology -- Persistence, location, and multilocation in spacetime. Endurance, perdurance, exdurance : some pictures ; More pictures ; Temporal modification and the "problem of temporary intrinsics" ; Persistence, location and multilocation in generic spacetime ; An alternative classification -- Classical and relativistic spacetime. Newtonian spacetime ; Neo-Newtonian (Galilean) spacetime ; Reference frames and coordinate systems ; Galilean transformations in spacetime ; (...)
  37. Abraham Pais (1986). Inward Bound: Of Matter and Forces in the Physical World. Oxford University Press.
    Abraham Pais's Subtle Is the Lord was a publishing phenomenon: a mathematically sophisticated exposition of the science and the life of Albert Einstein that reached a huge audience and won an American Book Award. Reviewers hailed the book as "a monument to sound scholarship and graceful style" (The New York Times Book Review), "an extraordinary biography of an extraordinary man" (Christian Science Monitor), and "a fine book" (Scientific American). In this groundbreaking new volume, Pais undertakes a history of the physics (...)
  38. Huw Price (1996). Time's Arrow & Archimedes' Point: New Directions for the Physics of Time. Oxford University Press.
    Why is the future so different from the past? Why does the past affect the future and not the other way around? What does quantum mechanics really tell us about the world? In this important and accessible book, Huw Price throws fascinating new light on some of the great mysteries of modern physics, and connects them in a wholly original way. Price begins with the mystery of the arrow of time. Why, for example, does disorder always increase, as required by (...)
  39. David Bohm (1965). The Special Theory of Relativity. New York, W.A. Benjamin.
    With clarity and grace, he also reveals the limited truth of some of the "common sense" assumptions which make it difficult for us to appreciate its full ...
  40. M. Dardo (2004). Nobel Laureates and Twentieth-Century Physics. Cambridge University Press.
    Using an original approach, Mauro Dardo recounts the major achievements of twentieth-century physics--including relativity, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, the invention of the transistor and the laser, superconductivity, binary pulsars, and the Bose-Einstein condensate--as each emerged. His year-by-year chronicle, biographies and revealing personal anecdotes help bring to life the main events since the first Nobel Prize was awarded in 1901. The work of the most famous physicists of the twentieth century--including the Curies, Bohr, Heisenberg, Einstein, Fermi, Feynman, Gell-Mann, Rutherford, (...)
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  41. Steven Shapin (1995). A Social History of Truth: Civility and Science in Seventeenth-Century England. University of Chicago Press.
    In A Social History of Truth, Shapin engages these universal questions through an elegant recreation of a crucial period in the history of early modern science: ...
  42. J. L. Heilbron (ed.) (2005). The Oxford Guide to the History of Physics and Astronomy. Oxford University Press.
    With over 150 alphabetically arranged entries about key scientists, concepts, discoveries, technological innovations, and learned institutions, the Oxford Guide to Physics and Astronomy traces the history of physics and astronomy from the Renaissance to the present. For students, teachers, historians, scientists, and readers of popular science books such as Galileo's Daughter, this guide deciphers the methods and philosophies of physics and astronomy as well as the historical periods from which they emerged. Meant to serve the lay reader and the professional (...)
  43. Hans Reichenbach (1956/1999). The Direction of Time. Dover.
    The final work of a distinguished physicist, this remarkable volume examines the emotive significance of time, the time order of mechanics, the time direction of thermodynamics and microstatistics, the time direction of macrostatistics, and the time of quantum physics. Coherent discussions include accounts of analytic methods of scientific philosophy in the investigation of probability, quantum mechanics, the theory of relativity, and causality. "[Reichenbach’s] best by a good deal."—Physics Today. 1971 ed.
  44. K. C. Cole (2001). The Hole in the Universe: How Scientists Peered Over the Edge of Emptiness and Found Everything. Harcourt.
    Welcome to the world of cutting-edge math, physics, and neuroscience, where the search for the ultimate vacuum, the point of nothingness, ground zero of theory, has rendered the universe deep, rich, and juicy. "Modern physics has animated the void," says K. C. Cole in her entrancing journey into the heart of Nothing. Every time scientists and mathematicians think they have reached the ultimate void, new stuff appears: a black hole, an undulating string, an additional dimension of space or time, repulsive (...)
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  45. Arthur Fine (1996). The Shaky Game: Einstein, Realism, and the Quantum Theory. University of Chicago Press.
    In this new edition, Arthur Fine looks at Einstein's philosophy of science and develops his own views on realism. A new Afterword discusses the reaction to Fine's own theory. "What really led Einstein . . . to renounce the new quantum order? For those interested in this question, this book is compulsory reading."--Harvey R. Brown, American Journal of Physics "Fine has successfully combined a historical account of Einstein's philosophical views on quantum mechanics and a discussion of some of the philosophical (...)
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  46. Gerhard Ernst & Andreas Hüttemann (eds.) (2010). Time, Chance and Reduction: Philosophical Aspects of Statistical Mechanics. Cambridge University Press.
    Statistical mechanics attempts to explain the behaviour of macroscopic physical systems in terms of the mechanical properties of their constituents. Although it is one of the fundamental theories of physics, it has received little attention from philosophers of science. Nevertheless, it raises philosophical questions of fundamental importance on the nature of time, chance and reduction. Most philosophical issues in this domain relate to the question of the reduction of thermodynamics to statistical mechanics. This book addresses issues inherent in this reduction: (...)
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  47. Errol E. Harris (1988). The Reality of Time. State University of New York Press.
  48. Alisa Bokulich (2008). Reexamining the Quantum-Classical Relation: Beyond Reductionism and Pluralism. Cambridge University Press.
    Classical mechanics and quantum mechanics are two of the most successful scientific theories ever discovered, and yet how they can describe the same world is far from clear: one theory is deterministic, the other indeterministic; one theory describes a world in which chaos is pervasive, the other a world in which chaos is absent. Focusing on the exciting field of 'quantum chaos', this book reveals that there is a subtle and complex relation between classical and quantum mechanics. It challenges the (...)
  49. Dugald Murdoch (1987). Niels Bohr's Philosophy of Physics. Cambridge University Press.
    Murdoch describes the historical background of the physics from which Bohr's ideas grew; he traces the origins of his idea of complementarity and discusses its meaning and significance. Special emphasis is placed on the contrasting views of Einstein, and the great debate between Bohr and Einstein is thoroughly examined. Bohr's philosophy is revealed as being much more subtle, and more interesting than is generally acknowledged.
  50. Lawrence W. Fagg (1995/2003). The Becoming of Time: Integrating Physical and Religious Time. Duke University Press.
    Now available in an updated addition: ""Integrating concepts of time derived from the physical sciences and world religions, "The Becoming of Time" examines ...
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